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Sunday, February 17, 2019   

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Saturday, February 16, 2019

Curran, Dolores – Mini Square Neck Jar with Avanyu

This is an intricately painted miniature jar by Dolores Curran.  Before she began making her carved pieces, she was well known for her delicately painted buff-on-red pottery.  This piece is unusual as it is fired black.  It is fully polished and the jar has a square neck.  The neck has a cloud and rain design and the shoulder has a water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece.  Much like her buff-on-red pieces, they design has to be painted over several times.  Note the precision of the lines!  The jar is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 125.00

Crank, Susie – Water Jar with Round Shoulder

Susie Crank is a daughter of Rose Williams and a sister of Alice Cling.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and amazingly, she says he may burnish a piece over and over as many as 15 times to get a high shine!  This water jar has a round body and an elongated neck.  The jar is then traditionally fired to create the fire-clouds on the surface.  The colorations on this jar range from black to a deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  Today, the pine pitch seals the vessel and gives it the shine.  This jar has a stunning shine and a great feel to the surface!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Susie Crank”.

$ 350.00

Tafoya, Ray  – Mimbres Big Horn Sheep Seedpot (1987)

This is a very intricate miniature seedpot by Ray Tafoya.  The design has a Mimbres Big Horn Sheep as the main design.  It is surrounded by additional prayer feather, lightning and mountain designs.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  The seedpot is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay with his hallmark.

$ 300.00

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Friday, February 15, 2019

Garcia, Jason – Four Corn Maidens Box

Jason Garcia is known for his tiles, he also creates a few boxes and jars each year.  This box is one that has four Corn Maidens painted, with one on each side.  They are painted in the old “two-dimensional” style of Santa Clara art and each of the Corn Maidens represents a different direction (North, South, East, West) based on the color (Blue, Red, White, Yellow).  In one hand she is holding corn and the other a basket of cornmeal.  On the ground are stylized corn plants and there is a corn design on each of the dresses.  The detail in this box is fantastic, with even small detailed created with the clay. The box is made of native clay and he uses native clay slips for the colors.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay “Okuu Pin” which is Jason’s name in Tewa (which means Turtle Mountain).  The piece is certainly inspired by the work of San Ildefonso painter Gilbert Atencio and his Blue Corn Maiden (see last photo).

$ 900.00

Natseway, Charmae – Lidded Jar with Plant & Bird Designs

Charmae Natseway is known for her exceptional painted pottery and use of distinctive forms. This wonderful seedpot has flat sides and an unusual pyramid form.  The sides are each painted with different plant designs near the base.  Above the plants is a band of leaf patterns and then two larger stylized birds.  Note the very delicate lines painted for the plants and birds!  All the various colors are from natural clay slips.  The piece is signed on the bottom, “Charmae Natseway”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is a striking balance of traditional and historic imagery on a very modern form.

$ 450.00

Natseway, Charmae – Large Seedpot with Katsina Figure

Charmae Natseway is known for her exceptional painted pottery and use of distinctive forms. This large seedpot is painted on the top with an intricate design.  There is a katsina figure in the center and it is surrounded with additional Acoma designs.  All the fine-line patterns are delicately painted on this piece.  All the various colors are from natural clay slips.  The piece is signed on the bottom, “Charmae Natseway”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is a striking balance of traditional and historic imagery on a very modern form.

$ 350.00

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Thursday, February 14, 2019

Pino-Martinez, Dominguita – Black-on-Red Jar (ca 1915)

This is a fascinating jar by Dominguita Pino Martinez.  She was the mother of Cresencia Martinez and Tonita Roybal and the grandmother of Alfonso Roybal (Awa Tsireh), Tomasita Montoya Sanchez, JD Robyal and Margaret Lou Gutierrez.  She was well known by the early 1900’s for her black-on-red pottery.  This jar is a classic example of her work and although it was not signed (she did not sign any of her work), it has a great provenance.  The piece was acquired from Dick Howard, who had shown the jar to Maria Martinez in 1965.  Maria identified it as the work of Dominguita Pino from around 1915.  Dick was one of the great early resources for getting pottery identified by Maria.  Dick had written this out on the receipt for the piece when it was acquired in 1999 (see last photo). However, it is not just the identification from Dick Howard, but the jar itself is one of her classic styles. The shape with the straight style of neck and the high shoulder are certainly associated with her work. The painting style of the open designs are also in her manner.  Some of her later pieces are more detailed and probably painted by Tonita.  The jar was slipped red and then painted with the black to create the coloration.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There is a slight lean to one side.

In “Spoken Though Clay” Dick Howard had an interesting quote (he had originally said to Richard Spivey) when talking about identifying historic San Ildefonso pottery.

“Because Maria—and I’ve found this to be true of other potters—considers the potter to be the one who does the potting. The painting is aside from that. Only rarely did she even comment on the painting. Once in a while she’d say, ‘Oh, that’s a nice design.’ But almost always she was really examining the potting, and she’d feel the pot or feel the inside. So unless I asked, as a follow-up, if the potter had also decorated it, she usually didn’t tell me one way or another, which I thought was interesting. Because to my eye what I often see first when I look at the decorated pot is the design, but that wasn’t what she saw. She always just sort of looked through the design.” —Richard Howard, 2000

 

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 5,800.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Polychrome Bowl with Sun Designs

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This bowl is one of his first incorporating a polished white clay slip!  The white is the same white clay used on historic San Ildefonso polychrome pottery when it was stone polished.  This piece has a culturally inspired design with two different old style Sun Faces.  Each sun is different and they are meant to represent the Summer people and the Winter people at the Pueblo.  Each sun is etched into the white clay and they are highlighted with red and black clay.  The rim has a rain design while the base has mountains with the sun rising.  There is a striking degree of complexity in the etched imagery on this piece!  As well, it is a true polychrome with polished deep red, white, black, light red and matte tan, red and black clay colorations.  There are three inset bands of hematite hei-shi beads which encircle the bowl.  As Russell continues to innovate from historic designs, he says, “Tradition means moving forward and adding to it. You keep moving forward.  If we stayed stagnant we would no longer exist.”  The bottom of the bowl is indented, which reflects the historic San Ildefonso pottery with the indented base which would be worn on the head.   The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  The second to the last photo is of the bowl before it was fired. The last photo is of a similar Sun design from a San Ildefonso plate from the 1920s.  It is exciting to see how this imagery is not new but Russell’s reinterpretation of it both modernizes and revives.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 6,800.00

Roybal, Tonita – Jar with Reverse Feather Design (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This jar reflects the exceptional nature of her pottery designs, shapes, and firing.  The jar has a round shoulder and then and a slight indention before extending up to the neck.  The jar itself is very highly polished and beautifully painted.  The design is interesting with a reverse feather pattern which extends up from the base.  What is interesting is the design leaves more open space and draws the eye to the shoulder.  The jar is fired to a gunmetal appearance with areas which even have a gold-tone coloration.  This “goldtone” is a rarity in her work and one which was achieved in the firing. The jar has a very metallic appearance with just the touch of yellow or gold in the light.  The jar is from the 1920’s and it has its original sticker on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Tonita” in the clay on the bottom.  As a provenance, the jar was de-acquisitioned from the American Indian Culture Research Center in Marvin, South Dakota.  It still has the tag for its catalog number of 00251.

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

$ 1,600.00

Gutierrez, Margaret Lou – Mini Bowl with Cloud and Rain Designs (1990’s)

Margaret Lou Gutierrez was the only daughter of noted potters Tonita & Juan Roybal.  She began making pottery in the 1970’s and this is one of her pieces from the 1990’s.  It is a mini bowl which is fully polished and painted with a cloud and rain design.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Lou Gutierrez”. 

$ 75.00

Gutierrez, Margaret Lou – Small Jar with Feather Pattern (1990’s)

Margaret Lou Gutierrez was the only daughter of noted potters Tonita & Juan Roybal.  She began making pottery in the 1970’s and this is one of her pieces from the 1990’s. The jar has a long neck and a high shoulder.  It is painted with her sharp, elongated feathers and it is very highly polished.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Lou Gutierrez”. 

$ 200.00

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019

Gutierrez, Lois  – Jar with Koshari Clown and Fish (1992)

This is a charming jar by Lois Gutierrez.  She is one of the few potters who continues to create polychrome pottery at Santa Clara.  Polychrome, or more than three different colors of clay slips, are all painted onto the surface of the vessel before it is fired. This jar has a kive step design on one side, giving it a taller appearance.  On the top there are also step designs representing the four directions.  On the jar itself, it is fully designed with a Koshari Clown who is fishing.  He is sitting by the water with a fishing pole and melons and a soda.  The fishing pole has the line into the water and as the jar is turned you can see the fish below the water surface and follow the line.  It is wrapped around his foot!  All the colors are derived from natural clay slips.   This jar has over five different natural clay colors utilized.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Lois”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks restoration or repair.   This is certainly a classic piece of Lois’s pottery which combines a cultural legacy in design with one in clay.

 

ois Gutierrez is one of the few potters who continues to create polychrome pottery at Santa Clara.  Polychrome, or more than three different colors of clay slips, are all painted onto the surface of the vessel before it is fired. This water jar has a wonderful shape with very round body and elongated neck.  The design around the neck is a feather pattern.  Note the use of the three different colors of clay for the tip of the feather in contrast to the white feathers.  The body of the jar has two intertwined water serpents. Note the use of classic rain and seed patterns in the bodies of each avanyu.  Above them is a rain cloud design. What makes them the “old style” avanyu?  Check out the shape of the horn and the shape of the tongue.  They each have the three prong style, and this is similar to the very early historic style of avany painted on the pottery!   The base of the jar is indented, which is reminiscent of the historic Santa Clara water jars which were carried on the head.  This jar has over five different natural clay colors utilized.  This is certainly a classic piece of Lois’s pottery which combines a cultural legacy in design with one in clay.

 

$ 500.00

Cling, Alice – Round Jar with Corn Husk Design

This jar by Alice Cling has a deep coloration from the firing.  Alice Cling is one of the great names in the revival of Navajo pottery in the 1980s. This jar is coil built, stone polished around the neck and striated corn husk designs down the size.  This jar is a very traditional Navajo shape with a round body and a short neck.  The design is very subtle but is the coloration of the firing which is so dynamic!  The colors on this jar swirl and range from black to a deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when the pitch was used to make the pottery utilitarian.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alice Cling”.  Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 175.00

Daubs, Dennis – Jar with Avanyu and Feathers

Dennis Daubs is known for his intricately incised pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and the imagery is etched into the surface of the clay.  This jar has a water serpent in one section of the design.  The remainder of the jar has etched feathers, rain and cloud patterns.  The designs are very intricately etched and note the precision of the lines. The piece is signed, “Dennis Daubs”.

$ 200.00

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Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Curran, Dolores – Round Box with Avanyu Lid

Dolores Curran creates intricately incised and painted pottery.  She was inspired to create these red polychrome incised and painted by her husband, Alvin Curran.  He was known for his incised San Juan style pottery in the 1990’s.  This piece is one of her lidded boxes. The box is oval and the sides are fully painted with geometric designs.  There are feather, cloud and sun designs.  Did you know that when she paints the designs, she goes over each area at least four times so that the white clay will be dark enough to show against the polished red surface!  The lid has a water serpent incised into the clay in a San Juan style.  The area is matte and there are red, white and brown clay slips.  It is surrounded by a painted cloud design.  Note on the lid there are red dots on one side and white dots on the other, to let you know which way to place the lid!  The piece is wonderfully intricate in painting and complex in form.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dolores Curran”.

$ 1,600.00

Toya, Dominique – Red Bowl with Melon Swirl Design

Dominique Toya is known for her intricately carved pottery with sharp ridged melon swirls.  This is an earlier piece of her pottery which is carved with six swirling melon ribs.  The entire piece is fully stone polished to a high shine.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Damian Toya”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00

Duwyenie, Debra & Preston – Seedpot with Eight Turtles

Debra Duwyenie is well known for her wonderful miniatures and incised designs. Each piece is stone polished and then it is etched before it is fired! This seedpot has eight turtles as the design.  Each of the turtles has a different design on the back.  Note the one with the wavy lines, that one is meant to represent Preston Duwyenie, her husband, who is known for his “shifting sand” pottery.  There are additional dragonflies and a water serpent at the base of the design.  Note that the lighter red matte areas are where Debra has only etched away the polished surface but not down as far as the tan color of the clay. Debra also pays close attention to the little details like the tan background area and how evenly she etches the vertical lines. The seedpot is traditionally fired.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay with Preston’s hallmark and “Debra”.

$ 450.00

Naranjo, Jody –  Seed Jar with Eight Flute Players (1990)

This is an early jar by Jody Naranjo is from 1990.  It is highly polished to the shoulder and matte below.  The top part is etched with eight flute players as the design.  The background matte area is also designed with linear patterns.  The jar is outdoor fired to create the coloration in the clay.   The jar is signed, “Jody Naranjo” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 450.00

Sahmie, Ida – “Four Sacred Plants” Jar

This is a very traditionally inspired jar by Ida Sahmie.  It is “The Four Sacred Plants”, which is a design often seen in sandpaintings.  Here, Ida has painted it on a stone polished jar using natural clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  The four sacred plants are corn, beans, squash, and tobacco.  There are both painted and matte areas along with incised designs.   The tile was traditionally fired and it is signed on the back, “Ida Sahmie”.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.   The story of the Four Sacred Plants and the Dine people is as follows:

“Four Sacred Plants are assigned to the cardinal points, and amongst the Navajos Maize is the plant of the North, Beans of the east. This means that both are male and as both are grown for edible seeds, recognition of the physiological function of the male was probably involved in the selection. This is entirely possible since the convention could have been established only very late, after settlement in America. Squash, for the Navajos, is the plant of the South, which is fitting since its fruit is called “eight-sided” and the eight-sided earth (an alternative to the square earth, taking account of the diagonal directions) is female. Also the stalk is angled in sections, a feature deliberately exaggerated when the plant is depicted in sand paintings, and crooked things are female. Tobacco, which the Navajos put on the west, is female because it is used to make smoke which is blown out with the breath, and that is female. Below the Plants are white roots, the significance being that these plants still have their roots in the lower world.”

$ 325.00

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Monday, February 11, 2019

Quotskuyva, Dextra – Jar with Nampeyo Style Eagle Tail Design (1980’s)

This is a very traditionally inspired jar by Dextra Quotskuyva.  She is certainly one of the great innovators among Hopi-Tewa potters.  Her work began with more classic imagery and then has evolved over the years to more unique and stylized designs. This piece is from the mid-1980’s.  It is inspired by the work of Nampeyo of Hano and the early style of painted red on the pottery.  In the early 1930’s Mary Colton at the Museum of Northern Arizona introduced a new clay slip to Hopi.  Previously the red had a more ‘painterly” appearance (see last photo of a jar by Nampeyo of Hano), which allowed the clay to show through. The new red is the one we see used today which more completely covers the painted area.  This jar looks back at the earlier style of Nampeyo and the red which has a more “painterly” appearance.  This jar is painted with red around the neck and the remainder has a classic eagle tail design.  However, note the very thin lines for the checkerboard pattern on the bird tail. The style of the painting is certainly Dextra’s but there is a wonderful homage to the work of her great-grandmother as well!   The bowl is traditionally fired so that there are blushes and color variations around the surface.  It is signed on the bottom with bee-weed, “Dextra” with an ear of corn representing the Corn Clan.   The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. The piece comes to us from the collection of Georgia Loloma, the wife not noted Hopi jeweler Charles Loloma and it is a piece the acquired directly from Dextra.  Dextra has been the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture called, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 6,500.00

Duwyenie, Preston – Black Mica Jar with Silver Inset

This is a wide jar by Preston Duwyenie.  The shape is one which Preston calls a “shoulder jar” as it is inspired by the historic Sikyaki pottery with the wide shoulders. Preston’s modernist version has a wide shoulder and a small neck.  The piece is made from micaceous clay and slipped with a micaceous clay slip.  It is fired black and the mica gives the piece a somewhat metallic appearance.  There is a single inset piece of silver on the top shoulder of the jar.  The silver has the appearance of “shifting sands”, much in a similar style to the pottery where he has carved a shifting sand pattern.  It is cast by Preston against cuttlefish bone, to create the distinctive texture.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay with Preston’s hallmark, which means “carried in beauty”.  There is certainly something both modern and ancient about this striking piece!   Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.  He is married to pottery Debra Duwyenie and now resides in Santa Clara Pueblo.  Preston has won numerous awards for pottery, including “Best of Show” at the Heard Indian Market.

$ 900.00

Namingha, Les – Jar with Rain and Cloud Designs

This jar by Les Namingha is a more traditional Hopi-Tewa designed piece.  The jar has a wide shoulder and a short neck.  The designs are a series of cloud and rain designs.  There are two different colors of clay slips which are polished to create the different red and tan color.  The various colors on the surface are the blushes from the firing.  It is signed, “Les Namingha” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,800.00

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Sunday, February 10, 2019

Lonewolf, Joseph – “Quail” Etching, 18/60 (1981)

Joseph Lonewolf created a series of original etchings based on designs from his pottery.  This piece has quail and butterflies as the design.  It is very intricately designed with many of the same motifs he used in his pottery.   It is dated 1981 and signed and numbered 18/60.  It is in excellent condition.

$ 200.00

Tafoya, Camilio -“Frogs and Mice” Original Etching (1981)  23/60

This is an original etching by Camilio Tafoya.  It uses similar designs to those in his pottery.  Here it depicts a charming combination of frogs and mice playing in the sun.  There are additional colors added to the etching.  This piece is 23/60 and it was printed by El Cerro Graphics, who printed all of Camilio and Jospeh’s etchings.  It is dated 1981 and signed, “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”.   It is in excellent condition.

$ 150.00

Lonewolf, Rosemary –  “Corn Spirit’s Fertile Form” Original Etching (1985) 4/60

This is an original etching by Rosemary Lonewolf.  The figure is a Corn Spirit holding an ear of corn and surrounded by a corn stalk and pollen.  It is 4/60 and titled, “Corn Spirit’s Fertile Form”.   It is signed, “Rosemary Apple Blossom Lonewolf”.   It is in excellent condition.

$ 125.00

Natseway, Charmae – Canteen with Birds and Lizards (1981)

Charmae Natseway is known for her exceptionally painted pottery and use of distinctive forms. This piece is from 1981 and it is one of her classic canteen shapes.  On the front are a Mimbres style bird and two lizards.  They are very detailed in design.  The mouth of the canteen and the handles are slipped with a red clay.  On the back is a red flower with black petals.  It is signed on the bottom, “Charmae  Shields Natseway”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00

Pacheco, Paulita – Large Water Jar with Birds and Plants

Paulita Pacheco (b. 1943) is a sister of noted potter Robert Tenorio.  She is married to Gilbert Pacheco and her daughter, Rose Pacheco continues to make traditional style Kewa pottery.  Paulita learned to make pottery from her mother Juanita C. Tenorio and grandmother Andrea Ortiz. This jar is coil built, painted with bee-weed (black) and red clay slips and traditionally fired.  The jar has a classic style Kewa bird as the design along with flowers which encircle the jar.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Paulita Pacheco”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00

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Saturday, February 9, 2019

Tafoya, Jennifer – Mini Jar with Trout

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and also her amazing animal figures!  This jar is fully polished and has a water jar shape. The shoulder of the jar is etched with a series of trout.  There are five fish encircling the piece.  Check out how detailed they are for the size!  The inside of the neck is a mica clay slip.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 500.00

Tafoya, Jennifer – Jar with Eight Horned Lizards

Jennifer Tafoya is known for her clay vessels and exceptional realistic animals. This jar is coil built and fully polished.  It has a round body and an elongated neck. One side of the jar has three different large horned lizards as the design.  Check out the amazing detail in the faces and the scales!  The background behind them is a micaceous clay slip to have the appearance of sand.  The opposite side has five horned lizards.  There are three different types.  The level of realism on each of the lizards is amazing.  It is almost as if you could pick them up!  Surrounding these areas are cloud and rain designs.  There is also a single band of inset turquoise hei-shi beads.  All the colors are all from natural clay slips..  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 3,000.00

Tafoya, Jennifer – Jar with Fish, Turtles, Frogs and Frog Lid

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and also her amazing animal figures!  This jar is fully polished and fully designed.  There is a water serpent (avanyu) encircling the around the top of the piece.  Below are fish, frogs, turtles, and even a snake!  Each is very intricately etched and detailed.  The lid is fully polished and has a frog in relief.  It is surrounded by water designs.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 800.00

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Friday, February 8, 2019

Curran, Dolores – Mini Seedpot with Feather and Avanyu Designs

This is an intricately painted miniature seedpot by Dolores Curran.  Before she began making her carved pieces, she was well known for her delicately painted buff-on-red pottery.  The bowl is highly polished red and painted with a buff clay for the design.  Amazingly, she would paint each piece up to five times to get the color of the matte painted areas deep and consistent enough!  This piece has a feather pattern which encircles the piece.  Below are cloud and rain designs.  Around the top is a water serpent.  Note the precision of the lines!  So why doesn’t Dolores make this style anymore? She ran out of the cream-colored clay slip for the painting, and so only uses it as an accent on her new work!  As well, this is a larger sized piece of her painted pottery, as she mostly made miniatures due to the time-consuming nature of the painting. The bowl is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 150.00

Youngblood, Nancy – Miniature Kiva Bowl (1975)

While Nancy Youngblood is known for her swirl melon bowls and carved pottery, she started out her career making miniatures.  This miniature is from 1975 which makes it a very early piece of her pottery!  It is a miniature kiva bowl and it is fully polished on the inside and the outside.  The edges of the kiva steps are matte in contrast to the highly polished surface.  Note as well the little holes in the sides of the kiva steps.  On larger pieces the holes would be placed in the kiva bowls so that eagle feathers could be attached.  It is amazing that she was able to replicate this concept in miniature!  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nancy Yellow Aspen ’75”.

$ 900.00

Haungooah, Art Cody- Seedpot with Sun, Lizard and Frog (1981)

This seedpot by Art Cody Haungooah is from 1981.  It is fully polished and has etched designs. There is a sunface in one medallion.  The other medallion ahs a lizard and frog. This medallion is “two-toned” to make it black-and sienna.  The contrast of the highly polished surfaces and the color from the sienna is striking.  Art was Kiowa and married to Martha Suazo from Santa Clara and that is where he began to make pottery. The bowl is signed, “Haungooah” and a flute player.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 250.00

Haungooah, Art Cody- Seedpot with Mosquite Man (1977)

This seedpot by Art Cody Haungooah is from 1977.  It is fully polished and has a single etched medallion. The design is the “Mosquito Man”.  It is a design which is found on the kiva murals at Pottery Mound, NM.  The last photo is the Mosquito Man from the actual murals.  On this piece, Art depicted the figure with a striking similarity to the actual mural figure.  The remainder of the piece is highly polished.  It is signed, “Haungooah” and a flute player.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 200.00

Naranjo, Veronica – Carved Plate with Avanyu Design

Veronica Naranjo is a daughter of Barbarita Naranjo and a granddaughter of Pasqualita Tafoya. This is one of her few plates but carved in her very deep style.  The design is an avanyu which encircles the plate.  It is stone polished and traditionally fired.  The carving is deep for the size of the piece.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Veronica”

$ 120.00

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Thursday, February 7, 2019

Tafoya, SaraFina – Bowl with Lightning Designs (1933)

SaraFina Tafoya was the matriarch of a family of renowned potters,  including her children Margaret Tafoya, Camilio Tafoya, and Christina Naranjo. While she is known for her large vessels, in the 1930’s she created a series of smaller painted and plainware vessels which were signed.  They are unusual and scarce pieces, yet a fascinating part of the history of Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is a classic piece of painted pottery and has a fascinating provenance.  The bowl was originally acquired in 1933 by the Denver Art Museum.  It was included in the book “Margaret Tafoya” by Mary Ellen and Lawrence Blair on p. 53 (fig. 2-19).  The bowl was later deaccessioned by the DAM and ended up in a private collection.  The bowl is fully polished and painted red-on-red with a lightning design.  The designs are highlighted with a white clay slip.  It is a complex and varied design which relies as much on the matte painted areas as the negative polished space.  The bowl is signed in the clay on the bottom, “Sarafina Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Interestingly, it still has the original catalog number for the museum as well as the museum card.  Definitely a great piece of history!

 

Signed, “Serafina”: The Signed Pottery of SaraFina Tafoya

To learn more about the SaraFina’s signatures, check out the new article by Charles S. King, “Signed SaraFina”.

$ 1,800.00

Tafoya, SaraFina – Plate with Avanyu and Wild Boar (1930’s)

SaraFina Tafoya was the matriarch of a family of renowned potters,  including her children Margaret Tafoya, Camilio Tafoya, and Christina Naranjo. While she is known for her large vessels, in the 1930’s she created a series of smaller painted and plainware vessels which were signed.  They are unusual and scarce pieces, yet a fascinating part of the history of Santa Clara pottery.  This is an exceptional polychrome plate.  The design in the center is a boar and it is surrounded by an avanu (water serpent).  They are both painted with a red clay slip and accented with white and gray.  The design of the boar is unusual in Santa Clara designs from this period.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Serafina Santa Clara Pueblo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Signed, “Serafina”: The Signed Pottery of SaraFina Tafoya

To learn more about the SaraFina’s signatures, check out the new article by Charles S. King, “Signed SaraFina”.

$ 4,000.00

Martinez, Maxamiliana “Anna” – Plate with Avanyu and Flower Designs (1920’s)

This is a creatively designed plate by Maximiliana “Anna” Martinez, who was a sister of Maria Martinez.   It is fully polished on the front and matte on the back.  The plate has a checkerboard pattern in the center and a triangular design emanating out to the rim.  The charming part of the plate is the very thinly painted water serpent which encircles the central checkerboard medallion.  The plate is fired a deep black in coloration.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Anna”.   Why is the work of Anna Martinez important? Interestingly, Maria would often say she was the best painter in the family.  She was married to Cresencio Martinez, who was known for his paintings and was also a brother to Tonita Roybal.  One can begin to see how her talent was easily fostered by those around her making a plate such as this one a creative classic!

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 1,400.00

Montoya, Tomasita – Large Terraced Cloud Bowl (1950’s)

Tomasita Montoya is one of the early revivalists in San Juan pottery.  She was one of the original seven San Juan potters who revived the art form in the 1930’s.  The Pueblo was renown for their pottery but by about 1890 there were no potters left. In 1930 Regina Cata organized a pottery study group at San Juan Pueblo with the intent of revitalizing pottery production. The group studied ancient potsherds of wares made at San Juan in earlier times and selected Potsuwi‘i Incised Ware (1450-1500) as a basis for a contemporary pottery type.  This is a large open bowl with kiva steps or cloud designs.  The rim of the bowl has a step pattern which has incised mountain designs.  The center of the bowl is deeply carved and then slipped with additional clays for the coloration.  The fascinating part about this piece is that it combines both the Potsuw’i’i incised designs on the terraced edges and the San Juan carved designs.  The back is fully polished.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tomasita Montoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tomasita Montoya”.

$ 875.00

Tapia, Tom – Bowl with Katsina and Corn Designs

This is a smaller bowl by Tom Tapia.  It is highly polished and designed with a series of designs. There is a Tewa Dancer with a drum along with a sun and Pueblo scene.  There is another katsina figure and finally a corn plant.  The bowl was fired black and then the reddish clay coloration is added after the firing.  It is this color combination for which Tom achieved recognition.  The bowl is signed, “Tom Tapia”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 200.00

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Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Quotskuyva, Dextra – Bowl with Blackbird Migration (1985), Painted Perfection p. 25

This is a classic open bowl by Dextra Quotskuyva.  She is certainly one of the great innovators among Hopi-Tewa potters.  Her work began with more classic imagery and then has evolved over the years to more unique and stylized designs. This piece is from about 1985 and it is featured in the book, “Painted Perfection” on p. 25.  The design is classic Nampeyo pattern of the Blackbird Migration.  The design is very intricately painted and swirls around the inside of the bowl. The bowl itself has a carved rim, which is almost mesa-like in shape.  From certain angles, it is as if the one is looking over the edge of the mesa and seeing the birds flying in the sky!  The bowl was traditionally fired to create the various fire clouds on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom with bee-weed, “Dextra” with an ear of corn representing the Corn Clan.   The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The bowl comes to us from the collection of Georgia Loloma, the wife of noted Hopi silversmith Charles Loloma.  It’s great to have a piece with such exceptional provenance!  Dextra has been the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture called, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 7,000.00

Swentzell, Roxanne – “Indian On the Edge” Original Clay Figure

This is an exceptional original clay piece by Roxanne Swentzell.  It is entitled “Indian On the Edge”.  The figure is one of the few males she has made during her career.  There is a look of uncertainty in the eyes of the eyes of the figure as he is looking over the edge. The piece sits almost flat but when placed on the edge it balances out.  Roxanne had said of this piece, that, its quizzical look and inability to sit evenly on a flat surface is about the feeling of being stranded between two cultures and unable to be comfortable in either one.  It is definitely a powerful piece of her work and a great statement on the lives of many native artists. The hair is sculpted with clay hair ties which extend to the back and the side.  The parrot feathers are tied in bundles and added to the piece. The sculptural quality of the hands and feet is striking on this figure.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is from early 2000 and signed in the clay, “ROX”.

$ 11,000.00

Tafoya, Ray  – Jar with Buffalo, Buffalo Dancers and Buffalo Lid (1982)

This is an exceptional lidded jar by Ray Tafoya.  The jar has a realistic buffalo etched around the neck.  Below is a stylized Buffalo Dancer.  On either side of the medallion are a male and female Buffalo Dancer.  Around the neck are etched feathers and separating the two dancers are prayer feather desigsn.  The lid of the piece has a buffalo on the top.  There are coral and turquoise additions on the buffalo lid.  Ray used an additional red clay color to accentuate the designs. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay along with his hallmark, “White Mountain”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Note how many of the geometric designs are similar to ones used today by his daughter, Jennifer Tafoya.  

$ 700.00

Nampeyo, Camille “Hisi” – Jar with Carved Designs (1990’s)

Camille “Hisi” Quotskuyva learned to make pottery from her mother, Dextra Quotskuyva.  She is a sister of noted painter Dan Namingha and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano, Annie Healing and Rachel Nampeyo.  She is known for her use of traditional imagery and the delicate painting of her designs.  This is one of her more contemporary style of pieces.  The bowl is matte and has carved abstract designs on the surface.  The rim is also asymmetric and with a crackled appearance.  The piece was traditionally fired with slight blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The piece comes to us from the collection of Georgia Loloma, the wife of noted Hopi jeweler Charles Loloma.

$ 800.00

Sahmie, Ida – Mini “Night Chant” Bowl

This is an exceptional miniature by Ida Sahmie.  For the size, it has incredible detail, as one might expect from a great miniature in pottery!   It is the Night Chant Dance with eight male Yei-bi-chi dancers encircling the jar.  The background area is fully painted with bee-weed (a plant) to make it black.  In the background, there are the mesas, moon, and stars.  Ida also incises into the clay for the faces and the bodies, leather, and masks.  The detail here is quite exceptional!  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ida Sahmie”.

“Yei bichei (Yébîchai), or “maternal grandfather of the yei”, is another name of Talking God who often speaks on behalf of the other Holy People. (He, along with Growling God, Black God, and Water Sprinkler, were the first four Holy People encountered by the Navajo.) He is invoked (along with eight other male yei) in the “Night Chant” or “Nightway” sometimes simply called “Yei bichei,” a nine-night ceremony in which masked dancers personify the gods.”

$ 275.00

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Tuesday, February 5, 2019

Swentzell, Roxanne – “The Seduction” Original Clay Figure

This is a classic original clay piece by Roxanne Swentzell.  It is entitled “The Seduction”.  The figure is made from clay and she is in a reclining position.  Her one hand is holding up her head while the other is extending outward with the finger extended.   She is beckoning the viewer forward.  There is a gentleness to the figure and the face.  The continuous coloration of the figure accentuates the form.  Note the detail in the hands and the feet as well.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is from early 2000s and signed in the clay, “ROX”.

$ 11,000.00

Ebelacker, Jason – Wide Shoulder Water Jar

This water jar by Jason Ebelacker is a striking vessel, which finds its reference in a very historical form. The jar has a very wide shoulder which then curves downward before extending up to the neck.  There is just a slight turn out of the rim. The jar is highly polished and fired a deep black.  The various curves on the jar create beautiful angles for the reflection of light.. Jason is a son of noted potter Richard Ebelacker and grandson of Virginia Ebelacker.

$ 3,000.00

Koopee, Jacob -19″ Wide Bowl with Migration Pattern & Hopi Cradle Doll Designs

This is an amazing large open bowl by Jacob Koopee.  Jake was known for his large pieces and his variations on traditional Hopi-Tewa designs.  This large open bowl is coil built and it is painted on the outside and the inside. On the outside there is the classic migration pattern.  Jake had an ability to paint the fine lines of the pattern thin and even. The inside of the bowl is also fully painted with hand prints and cradle dolls.  Each of the cradle dolls is a different katsina, including a Qooqule, Grandmother, Runner and other figures.  The small hand prints were meant to represent the children given the cradle dolls as gifts.  The bowl is signed on the bottom with a flute player, which was one of Jake’s signatures.  This immense bowl is a striking example of his skill as both potter and painter.  It is traditionally fired and painted with bee weed (black) and natural clay slips. Jake won numerous awards during his career including “Best of Show” in 2005 at both Santa Fe Indian Market and the Heard Museum Market.  I was lucky to have been a pottery judge both years at both events, and it was exciting to see an artist create such dynamic work.  Our consignor has asked us to lower the price, which makes this large bowl an exceptional value.

$ 9,200.00

Sahmie, Ida – “Yei-bi-Chi” Double Sided Tile

This is an unusual tile by Ida Sahmie.  The tile is fully polished and painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.    The front side has the Yei-bi-Chi figure, often also called the “Talking God”, who is the first in a series of eight during the Night Chant.  The opposite side has the last figure.  The figures are etched into the clay and then slipped with clay to create the colorations.  Ida is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.  It is signed on the side in the clay, “Ida Sahmie”.

$ 250.00

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Monday, February 4, 2019

Martinez, Maria – Jar with Cloud Designs (Maria Popovi 769)

This is a short neck jar by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the jar while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The jar is highly polished and has the classic cloud, wind and rain pattern which is painted around the shoulder.  The shape is iconic for Maria with the high shoulder and short neck.  While the painting and shape are beautiful, it is the firing which is striking.  The jar has a very gunmetal in coloration to the surface with a very high shine.  The jar is signed on thhttps://kinggalleries.com/maria-martinez-pottery-signatures/e bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi 769“. The signature indicates that it was made around in July 1969.  The jar is in excellent shape with no condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

 

$ 4,000.00

Martinez, Maria – Jar with Rain and Lightning Designs (1930’s)

This is a classic round jar by Maria Martinez and her husband, Julian.  Maria would make the pottery and Julian would paint the design.  This jar has a very round shape and a slight neck.  The design painted on the shoulder is a cloud, rain, and lightning pattern.  It has a striking stylistic pattern using extended lines, half-circles and open space imagery.  The jar has a highly polished surface and a slight gunmetal appearance.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie + Julian”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   It’s always great to see early work by Maria and Julian in such good condition.

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 3,500.00

Stevens, Jacquie – Red Clay Bowl with Woven Rim (1995)

Jacquie Stevens is best known for simple use of forms on her pottery.  Over the years she brought an unexpected dimension to Native pottery with her immense, undulating vessels. Her Winnebago ancestry inspired her to add basket weaving and other materials as embellishments to her undecorated forms. Her aesthetic of the organic challenges the symmetry of Pueblo pottery and provides a provocative glimpse into the future of Native pottery.  This bowl is a red clay with a matte surface.  The simplicity of the bowl is enhanced by the complexity of the rim, which is a very tightly woven basket pattern.  The holes in the side of the bowl are used to hold the stitching of the basketry.  The  basket perfectly matches the slope of the bowl.  The piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  The piece is from 1995.

“The ceramics of Jacquie Stevens are to the casual observer beautiful, lyrical ware, but on a more subtle level, they are often subliminal statements about sensuous shapes, and the texture and volume of the human body—in an age when television advertising (not figurative painting or sculpture) has capitalized most powerfully on people’s love of and need for the truly human in their lives. Stevens’s work is also intellectual, playing on the ceramic traditions of potters from all over the world. Even when she is not working metaphorically, the artist’s involvement with texture, whether it be of scored clay, embellishments of beads, or the smoothness of hides, is her hallmark.”  Spoken Through Clay

$ 2,400.00

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Sunday, February 3, 2019

Borts-Medlock, Autumn  – Lidded Canteen with Circle Designs (2001)

This is an intricately carved canteen by Autumn Borts-Medlock.  She is known for her often fanciful carved pottery and use of unique shapes.  The canteen is built with two handles.  It is fully carved with a series of circles which flow around the piece.  They are either polished or slipped with mica.  There is also a micaceous lid which fits onto the top of the piece as well.  The piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Autumn Borts”.

$ 1,400.00

Naranjo, Jody – Jar with Bighorn Sheep (2005)

This jar by Jody Naranjo is from 2005.  It is highly polished and fully designed.  The neck and base of the jar are fully polished and etched with her signature “kiva step” design.  The center band is matte and the design is a series of bighorn sheep.  They are each etched into the clay and they have large round horns, which add to the overall visual strength of the piece.  The variations in color are from the firing.  Note as well the etched linear designs in the background of the piece.  The jar is signed, “Jody Naranjo” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Jody said of her designing:

“As for the design on the top and the bottom, it was the kiva step in the beginning. My family used them but just parts of them, the top half of the design. I started making them just around the top of the pot in one row. Then it became two rows and three rows, and then I started filling in between them.  Now it looks more like a textile, and it’s a signature pattern that I do on everything.” Jody Naranjo, Spoken Through Clay

$ 1,400.00

Youngblood, Nancy – Bowl with 20 Carved Feathers (1977)

This is an early carved bowl by Nancy Youngblood.  The bowl is from 1977 when Nancy was just 22 years old!  The shape is a classic bowl and the feathers are carved into the clay.  Note the depth of the carving!  Each feather is symmetric and precise.  The entire piece is very highly polished and fired a deep black.  It is easy to see looking at this bowl the level of talent evident in her early work and how that same precision in carving and polishing is still part of her work today.  In the area below the shoulder, there is also a carved bear paw.  It is a charming addition to the overall design.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nancy Yellow Aspen Youngblood, Dec. 1977”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It comes to us from the collection of Georgia Loloma, the wife of noted jeweler Charles Loloma.

$ 2,300.00

Lewis, Carmel  – Bowl with Rain & Lightning Design (2016)

Carmel Lewis was the youngest daughter of noted potter Lucy Lewis.  This bowl is coil built and painted with bee-weed and a red clay slip.  The design is a classic Acoma pattern with rain, lightning and cloud designs.  The pattern encircles the entire bowl.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Carmel Lewis”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00

Sarracino, Myron – Lightning Design Jar

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin-walled and tightly painted. This jar has a high shoulder and a more classic “olla” shape. Around the top and bottom of the jar are classic lightning designs in black and white.  ARound the center is a larger lightning pattern in red with additional rain and cloud motifs.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece and it is also a tribute to the potters who came before.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 375.00

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Saturday, February 2, 2019

Sanchez, Russell  – Red & Black Seed Bowl with Avanyu

This seed bowl by Russell Sanchez incorporates two different colors of clay.  The top and bottom are slipped with a deep red clay.  The center has two bands of black clay which has been stone polished. The design on the top of the piece is a water serpent (avanyu) which encircles the bowl.  Note the additional designs with the avanyu including the dots along the back and the bear paw.  There is a single inset piece of turquoise for the eye.  Below the avanyu are two bands of checkerboard corn patterns. They alternate from polished black to matte with an incised dot of red.  The bowl is beautifully polished and fired.  There are three bands of shell hei-shi beads inset into the piece.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.   Once again Russell deftly revives historic San Idlefonso designs and stories and uses them for his own contemporary work.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 3,400.00

Blue Corn – Polychrome Bowl with Blue Corn Design (1980’s)

This is a striking large bowl by Blue Corn.  The bowl is a very round shape and it is fully polished with the white clay.  It is painted with a red clay for the designs.  Around the rim are rain and cloud designs.  Around the side of the bowl are corn patterns which are highlighted with a black clay.  However, the black clay has an almost-blusih tint in some light, which gives the piece a very striking appearance.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. Certainly a classic by this important San Ildefonso potter.

$ 2,300.00

Gonzales, John – Bowl with Avanyu (1995)

This bowl by John Gonzales is from 1995.  It is one of his few piece which is polished as opposed to matte clay slips.  The bowl is fully polished and has an avanyu etched into the clay.  The avanyu encircles the bowl and there is a single inset piece of turquoise for the eye.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 800.00

Aguilar, Rosalie & Joe – Carved Plate with Ram Dancer (1930’s)

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional pottery throughout their time working together.  In the 1930’s they began to make carved pottery.  This plate is one of their most complex designs.  The design is a Ram Dancer, which is seen at San Ildefonso Pueblo during Feast Day in January.  The Ram Dancer is carved into the clay and there are incised designs on the kilt and legs along with painted designs on the neck and ram’s horn.  Surrounding the figure are cloud, rain and lightning designs.  The background area is matte against the polished surfaces of the design.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Rosalie & Joe”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a few light scratches on the rim and back and a bit of wear along the back of the dancer.  However, nothing unexpected which is not age-related.  This is certainly a unique piece both culturally and artistically. 

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

$ 1,400.00

Sanchez, Desideria – Large Jar with Bird Wing Designs (1920’s)

Desideria Montoya Sanchez was a sister of noted potter Maria Martinez.  She was known for her traditional pottery and use of both classic and innovative designs. This jar is from the 1920’s and has a wide shoulder and sloping sides.  There are three sections of design, each with a stylized bird wing pattern.  There are cloud patterns above the wings and below is a checkerboard design.  Separating each of the sections are a series of small dots.  The jar is highly polished and fired a slivery black coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Desideria”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It’s great to see a piece of her pottery with such complex designs.

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

$ 1,600.00

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Friday, February 1, 2019

Sanchez, Russell  – Polychrome Wedding Vase with Sun Design

This is wedding vase by Russell Sanchez incorporates three different colors of clay.  The top half is a lighter red clay, while the center band has a black clay slip.  The bottom of the vase is a deep red.  The wedding vase is etched with a sun designs extending down towards the base.  Note that one side has a checkerboard pattern etched into the clay while the opposite has dots.  Russell has been taking inspiration from the work of early San Ildefonso potters Tonita Roybal and Florentino Montoya for his designs.  They are not copied but his own interpretation and revival of these creative designs.  The shape of the wedding vase is elegant with a strong proportion between the shoulder and the spouts.  Wedding vases are considered difficult to polish as the handles and spouts create unusual angles and directions in which the piece must be turned.  It was traditionally fired and after the firing Russell inset two bands of jet hei-shi beads.  The vase is signed on the bottom in the clay.   Once again Russell deftly revives historic San Idlefonso designs and stories and uses them for his own contemporary work.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 3,800.00

Naranjo, Jody – Square Neck Jar with Crazy Horse Rider

This jar by Jody Naranjo is from 2005.  It is highly polished and of her few pieces which is fired a deep black!  The jar is designed after the firing.  The top and base of the jar are fully etched with her signature “kiva step” design.  The center band is also fully polished.  Here she has her iconic “Crazy Horse” girl on a horse.  There is additional etching for the handprint on the rear of the horse and the girl’s hair.  The jar itself has square sides which, being flat, add a striking appearance to both the jar and the burnished surfaces.  The jar is signed, “Jody Naranjo” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Jody said of her designing:

“As for the design on the top and the bottom, it was the kiva step in the beginning. My family used them but just parts of them, the top half of the design. I started making them just around the top of the pot in one row. Then it became two rows and three rows, and then I started filling in between them.  Now it looks more like a textile, and it’s a signature pattern that I do on everything.” Jody Naranjo, Spoken Through Clay

$ 1,200.00

Komalestewa, Alton –  Melon Jar with 21 Ribs (1980’s)

Alton Komalestewa learned to make pottery from his mother-in-law, Helen Shupla.  She was famous for her traditional melon bowls and over the years Alton has taken and refined this form.  This large melon jar is an earlier piece of his pottery from the 1980’s and it is made with Santa Clara clay.  The jar has 21 melon ribs which each pushed out from the inside so that there is an undulation of the ribs.  Typical of Alton’s work, there is also a symmetry to each rib!  Of course, it is technically difficult to stretch the clay and create even ribs. The jar is highly polished and fired a brown coloration. Again, much like Helen, Alton has continually experimented with various colors of clay throughout his career to create distinctive vessels.  The jar has been traditionally fired and it is signed on the bottom by Alton and he also uses a katsina face as part of the hallmark of his name.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,400.00

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Thursday, January 31, 2019

Navasie, Joy “Frogwoman” – Jar with Birds (1980’s)

This smaller jar by Joy “Frog Woman” Navasie is one of her classic shapes.  The jar has straight sides and it is polished on the inside and the outside.  The jar is slipped with the white clay and then painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black).   The sides of the jar are very tightly painted in four panels.  It’s nice to see a smaller piece with such precision to the lines!  Two panels are birds and the other two are bird tail designs. The black painted with bee-weed (a plant) and the red is a deeper red clay she began to use in the 1980’s.  It has been traditionally fired so there are some variations in the coloration from white to almost a pinkish color.   The jar is signed on the bottom with her Frog Hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 1,100.00

Quotskuyva, Dextra – Bowl with Red Tail Hawk Design (1980’s)

This is a traditional bowl by Dextra Quotskuyva.  She is certainly one of the great innovators among Hopi-Tewa potters.  Her work began with more classic imagery and then has evolved over the years to more unique and stylized designs. This piece is from the mid-1980’s, which can be seen in the color of the red clay, as well as her signature.  The bowl has a series of Red Tail hawk tail feathers painted in four sections.  Separating each of them is a triangular design, which represents the back and wings of the birds.  The red areas are stone polished and the black is painted with bee-weed (a plant). The bowl is traditionally fired so that there are blushes and color variations around the surface.  It is signed on the bottom with bee-weed, “Dextra” with an ear of corn representing the Corn Clan.   The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Dextra has been the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture called, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 3,800.00

Lucas, Steve – Jar with Sun and Lightning Designs (1993)

This jar by Steve Lucas is from 1993.  It is very intricately painted with a sun and lightning pattern. The designs encircle the shoulder of the jar.  Note the very finely painted lines!  There are polished red areas while the black is painted with bee-weed.  The inside of the neck is also stone polished.  The jar was traditionally fired and has slight color variations from the firing.  It is signed on the bottom with his name and an ear of corn (Corn Clan) and a Mudhead Katsina (Koyemsi).  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 1,100.00

Estevan, Paula – Jar with Basket Weave Design

Paula Estevan is known for thin-walled and tightly painted pottery.  This jar has a wide shape which accentuates the “op-art” basket pattern. The weave lines are in black and white and spiral around the surface of the jar.  The imagery goes from small at the rim to larger at the shoulder and then small again at the base.  Paula has a wonderful ability to match the shape and designs of her work perfectly!  The jar is signed on the bottom, “P. Estevan”.

$ 575.00

Estevan, Paula – Wide Jar with Star Pattern

Paula Estevan is known for her jar is thin-walled coil-built pottery.  This jar is very tightly painted with an “op-art” star pattern.  Each of the stars is inter-connected in a lattice-like style.  They spiral out around the jar from the neck to the base.  It is a visually stunning design!   Note how the imagery goes from small at the rim to larger at the shoulder and then small again at the base. The jar has a wide shoulder and just a slight neck.  Paula has a wonderful ability to match the shape and designs of her work perfectly!  The jar is signed on the bottom, “P. Estevan”.

$ 600.00

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Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Martinez, Maria – Fully Polished Open Bowl, “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

During the 1950’s Maria Martinez made and polished pottery and signed using her Tewa name, “Maria Poveka”.  Poveka means “Water Lilly”.  This is one of her classic open bowls, which are polished on both the inside and outside. Interestingly, today, few potters will attempt to fully polish the inside and outside of a piece, as it adds the possibility of it cracking.  The bowl is very highly polished and there are small areas of gunmetal and coloration in the black from the heat of the firing.  The bowl is signed in the clay on the bottom, “Maria Pove’ka”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

 

$ 1,100.00

Roybal, Tonita – Large Plate with Feather Design (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This is a very early plate by Tonita.  The entire piece is fully polished, including the front and back.  On the front, it is painted with a feather pattern in the center.  The feathers are the early style, as now how the rectangular matte area is at the center of each feather.  Later, they potters would move the rectangular section off to the side.  This earlier style is more reflective of the Mimbres pottery feather patterns.  Around the rim of the plate is a cloud and rain design.  The circular design with three lines on the rim of the plate was described as a “tassel on a man’s dance belt” by Maria Martinez in 1925.  The plate is fired a deep black.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration, or repair.  There are some surface scratched, one of which is in the center plainware area.  However, considering it’s age and the size, they are not exceptionally unusual or distracting.   The plate is signed on the back “Tonita”.  It is her earliest signature which is very tight and compact.  Definitely a striking piece for its size!

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

 

$ 1,500.00

Martinez, Maria  – Plate with Cloud Designs “Marie + Santana”, 1940’s

This plate by Maria Martinez is one of her classic designs.  It was made and polished by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana. It is painted around the rim with a cloud design.  It is a style which Santana often used for her larger plates.  It’s nice to see it on a smaller piece!  The plate is signed on the back, “Marie + Santana”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair but some minor surface scratches.  Definitely a classic!  

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 1,200.00

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Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Patricio, Robert – Water Jar with Lightning Designs

Robert Patricio is known for his classic forms and use of both traditional and pre-historic imagery.  This jar is coil built and thin walled. It has a classic water jar shape with the high shoulder and the sloping neck.  The jar is painted with a classic stylized lightning design.  Here the designs appear to swirl around the jar and are contrasted in black, white and with fine-lines.  The jar has both an ancient and very modern appearance.  Robert is certainly one of the leading traditional Acoma potters working today which is evidenced by his stunning forms and complementary designs.

$ 975.00

Sarracino, Myron – Jar with Heartline Deer and Plant Patterns

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin-walled and tightly painted. This is a larger jar with a wide shoulder and short neck.  The neck is painted with a mountain motif.  The central band of the jar has four heartline deer as the design.  This imagery is a classic to both Acoma pottery with the heartline signifying the center or “heart” of the animal.  Myron has complemented it with plants which separate each of the deer.  The plant motif is one which is easily recognizable as Laguna.  Near the base of the jar there is another band of triangular patterns.   The jar is a nice balance of form and design.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece and it is also a tribute to the potters who came before.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 425.00

Laate, Jennie – Kiva Bowl (1970’s)

Jennie Laate was among the most important revival potters at Zuni in the 1970’s.  This is a very traditional style Zuni Kiva bowl. The bowl is shaped with terraced “kiva” steps or cloud shapes.  In the center is a frog with a head in relief. Surrounding the frog are tadpoles.  On the outside are dragonflies with the wings painted with either red or black lines.  The purpose of the kiva bowls was often ceremonial and the inclusion of frogs, tadpoles, and dragonflies are representative of prayers.  The kiva bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 550.00

Victorino, Sandra  – Seed Jar with Snow and Rain Designs

Sandra Victorino is a niece of noted potter Dorothy Torivio.    Sandra has her own unique style of “op-art”, where the patterns start small, then get larger and then smaller again on the vessel.  These pieces reflect the variety and intricacy of her pottery designs. This jar has the white clay painted with the black bee-weed (a plant).  The jar has a checkerboard snow pattern swirling down from the rim on one half of the jar.  The other half is a fine-line rain pattern.  Separating the two halves is an eternity pattern.  The intricacy of the designs and the use of the op-art imagery adds to the sophistication of the jar!   The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Sandra creates a beautiful sense of balance between the form and design.

$ 200.00

Victorino, Sandra  – Seed Jar with Swirling Rain and Snow Designs

Sandra Victorino is a niece of noted potter Dorothy Torivio.    Sandra has her own unique style of “op-art”, where the patterns start small, then get larger and then smaller again on the vessel.  These pieces reflect the variety and intricacy of her pottery designs. This jar has the white clay painted with the black bee-weed (a plant).  The jar has a checkerboard snow pattern and a fine-line rain pattern.  They are alternating around the jar as they swirl down from the rim to the base.  The intricacy of the designs and the use of the op-art imagery adds to the sophistication of the jar!   The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 175.00

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Monday, January 28, 2019

Tafoya, Severa – Jar with Polychrome Birds (1930’s)

Severa Tafoya was a sister of Van Gutierrez and her children included Angela Baca, Tonita Tafoya and, Lydia Tafoya.  Other direct descendants include Paul Speckled Rock, Ray Tafoya, Tina Garcia, Greg Garcia, Robert Cleto Nichols, Jennifer Tafoya, and Jason Garcia. She was known for her polychrome and carved pottery along with her more traditional shapes and designs.  This is one of the few polychrome pieces we have seen of work.  However, as her brother was Van Gutierrez, it’s not unexpected to see such beautifully painted pottery. This jar is polished at the top and the base.  The center band is painted with two birds. Each bird is highlighted with additional clay slips to create the coloration.  The design is charming with the use of classic Santa Clara imagery to create the head and feathers.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Severa”. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 225.00

Tafoya, Severa – Plate with Carved Avanyu (1960’s)

Severa Tafoya was a sister of Van Gutierrez and her children included Angela Baca, Tonita Tafoya and, Lydia Tafoya.  Other direct descendants include Paul Speckled Rock, Ray Tafoya, Tina Garcia, Greg Garcia, Robert Cleto Nichols, Jennifer Moquino and Jason Garcia. She was known for her polychrome and carved pottery along with her more traditional shapes and designs.  This plate is one of her iconic designs, with a carved avanyu encircling the piece.  Her style of avanyu is immediately recognizable with the elongated head and horn.  The piece is fully polished on the front and back. On the back note the area where it has almost a metallic appearance from the firing.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Severa”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are some light surface scratches.

$ 675.00

Lewis, Lucy – Large Seedpot with Star Design (1970’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the past century. This large seedpot is coil built and painted with bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  The design is painted on the top of the piece.  It is a star pattern in black-and white and extends out from the opening.  This seedpot is from the 1970s.   It has been native fired and has a beautiful coloration to the white clay slip.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00

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Sunday, January 27, 2019

Sahmie, Ida – “Father Sky” Tile

This is a very traditionally inspired tile by Ida Sahmie.  It is “Father Sky”, which is a design often seen in sandpaintings.  Here, Ida has painted it on a stone polished tile using natural clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  Father Sky is in the center with the cosmos painted on the body.  Surrounding the figure is a rainbow design.  Note how areas are etched into the clay, as well as painted!  The tile was traditionally fired and it is signed on the back, “Ida Sahmie”.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.   The story of Father Sky and Mother Earth, and the Dine people is as follows:

“The Navajo people, the Diné, passed through three different worlds before emerging into this world, The Fourth World, or Glittering World. The Diné believe there are two classes of beings: the Earth People and the Holy People. The Holy People are believed to have the power to aid or harm the Earth People. Since Earth People of the Diné are an integral part of the universe, they must do everything they can to maintain harmony or balance on Mother Earth.  It is believed that centuries ago the Holy People taught the Diné how to live the right way and to conduct their many acts of everyday life. They were taught to live in harmony with Mother Earth, Father Sky and the many other elements such as man, animals, plants, and insects.”

$ 220.00

Sahmie, Ida – “Four Sacred Plants” Tile

This is a very traditionally inspired tile by Ida Sahmie.  It is “The Four Sacred Plants”, which is a design often seen in sandpaintings.  Here, Ida has painted it on a stone polished tile using natural clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  The four sacred plants are corn, beans, squash, and tobacco.  There are both painted and matte areas along with incised designs.   The tile was traditionally fired and it is signed on the back, “Ida Sahmie”.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.   The story of the Four Sacred Plants and the Dine people is as follows:

“Four Sacred Plants are assigned to the cardinal points, and amongst the Navajos Maize is the plant of the North, Beans of the east. This means that both are male and as both are grown for edible seeds, recognition of the physiological function of the male was probably involved in the selection. This is entirely possible since the convention could have been established only very late, after settlement in America. Squash, for the Navajos, is the plant of the South, which is fitting since its fruit is called “eight-sided” and the eight-sided earth (an alternative to the square earth, taking account of the diagonal directions) is female. Also the stalk is angled in sections, a feature deliberately exaggerated when the plant is depicted in sand paintings, and crooked things are female. Tobacco, which the Navajos put on the west, is female because it is used to make smoke which is blown out with the breath, and that is female. Below the Plants are white roots, the significance being that these plants still have their roots in the lower world.”

$ 250.00

Cling, Alice – Jar with Corn Husk Design

This a striking jar by Alice Cling.  Alice Cling is one of the great names in the revival of Navajo pottery in the 1980s. This jar is coil built, stone polished around the neck and striated corn husk designs down the size.  The jar has a polished rim and the etched area has strong variations in color which range from deep black to brown.  The design is very subtle but is the coloration of the firing which is so dynamic!  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when the pitch was used to make the pottery utilitarian.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alice Cling”.  Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 250.00

Crank, Susie – Round Jar with Short Neck

Susie Crank is a daughter of Rose Williams and a sister of Alice Cling.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and amazingly, she says he may burnish a piece over and over as many as 15 times to get a high shine!  This water jar has a round body and a short neck.  The jar is then traditionally fired to create the fire-clouds on the surface.  The colorations on this jar range from black to a deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  Today, the pine pitch seals the vessel and gives it the shine.  This jar has a stunning shine and a great feel to the surface!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Susie Crank”.

$ 325.00

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Saturday, January 26, 2019

Lewis, Eric & Sharon Lewis – Dragonfly and Hummingbird Fineline Jar

This is a creative jar by Eric Lewis and his mother, Sharon Lewis.  Eric made the jar and painted the outlines of the dragonfly and the hummingbird. They are surrounded by the bold Acoma style lines which Eric paints.  Sharon, his mother, is known for her detailed painting on miniatures. She painted the very fine lines on the dragonfly and hummingbird.  Check out the precision of the painting of the lines and how they create another dimension to the jar!  They work well together!  The jar is signed on the bottom by both Eric and Sharon.   Eric remains one of the young Pueblo potters to watch!

$ 400.00

Naranjo, Geri  – Jar with Avanyu and Cloud Designs

This miniature jar by Geri Naranjo is a striking shape.  It has a round shoulder and a short neck.  Geri is known for her miniature pottery and intricately etched designs.  Here the entire piece is fully polished and around the shoulder is an avanyu and below are cloud, rain and lightning designs.  The designs are all etched into the clay with precision.  The remainder of the jar is very highly polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 375.00

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Friday, January 25, 2019

Candelario, Hubert – Seedpot with 44 Holes (2019)

Hubert Candelario is one of the few potters working at San Felipe Pueblo.  He has been known for his micaceous pottery for over thirty years.  This piece has 44 holes cut into the clay before the piece is fired.  The holes all vary in size and add to both the complexity and intricacy of the piece.  It is always interesting with such an open lattice style or clay work that his pieces always feel so structurally sound.  The piece is slipped 3 to 4 times with a micaceous clay before it is fired. This gives the piece such a deep coloration.  It is signed on the bottom, “Hubert Candelario”. 

$ 950.00

Honyumptewa, Aaron – Picuris Tall Micaceous Cloud Jar

Aaron Honyumptewa is both Hopi and Picuris. He is known for his very intricately carved katinsa dolls.  In the last year, he moved back to Picuris Pueblo in New Mexico, the home of his mother and family and has begun to learn to make pottery from his mother.  The pottery is the traditional style of Picuris Pueblo and Aaron says he is hoping to help revive the art form!  This larger bowl is made from Picuris micaceous clay.  It has the “cloud” terraced rim and the “hobnail” additions to the side. These are often seen on historic Picuris pottery and it’s nice to see their revival.  The clay itself is a beautiful coloration as it was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  If Aaron works with the clay with the same creativity in which he carved katsinas, he has a bright future!

$ 175.00

Manymules, Samuel   Large Wide Swirl Jar

This is a very wide jar by Samuel Manymules.  It is coil built and slipped with red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar has a stone polished neck and the ribs extend from the shoulder swirling down to the base.  Each rib is pushed out by hand and they come to a sharp point.  There are 10 ribs which extend across the surface of the jar.  However, it is not the size or the ribs which make this jar so remarkable, but the coloration.  Did you know Samuel fires his pottery on its side?!?!  This helps create more dynamic colorations. This jar goes from a deep reddish-purple to dark black and brown.  Interestingly, the brown areas are the more intensely fired sections of his pottery.  After the piece is fired, the jar is covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  The piece is signed on the bottom.   It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 2,800.00

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Thursday, January 24, 2019

Nampeyo, Fannie – Large Migration Pattern Jar (1970’s)

This is a spectacular large jar by Fannie Nampeyo. She was the youngest daughter of noted potter Nampeyo of Hano and also the mother of noted potters Iris Nampeyo, Leah Nampeyo, and Thomas Polacca.  She was certainly among the most skilled of her generation for painting designs pottery.  While her mother revived the “migration” or bird wing design, Fannie made is a signature design of her pottery and of the Nampeyo family.  This larger jar is very wide in shape with a round shoulder and a short neck. The neck is slightly turned out on the rim.  However, it is the migration pattern which dominates the surface of this piece.  The migration pattern, or bird wings, extend around the entire jar in 10 sections.  The jar was traditionally fired so that it has some visually striking blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom, “Fannie Nampeyo” and a corn plant representing the corn clan.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo said of  the migration pattern:

“This is the one design that was really stressed for us to use, the migration pattern. Nothing but lines, representing the migration of all the people to all the places, including down below and up above. It has seven points at the top and bottom. All the x’s represent life from the bottom and top, telling you the universe is one. The thin lines, I just wanted to paint them real fast and real close to try and include everyone.”  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo, Spoken Through Clay

$ 2,800.00

Lucas, Steve – Red Tail Hawk Jar

Steve Lucas is known for his intricately painted designs and thin-walled pottery.  This jar has a red tail hawk as the design.  On two sides the tail feathers of the hawk extend down from the neck and are slipped with red clay.  The head of the bird is also slipped with a polished red clay.  Separating the two birds is a wing design.  Note how thin the lines are on the jar!  The shape of the jar also starts narrow they widens at the shoulder and comes to a small neck.  Perfect to show off the design!  The jar is traditionally fired and has slight color variations from the firing.  It is signed on the bottom with his name and an ear of corn (Corn Clan) and a Mudhead Katsina (Koyemsi).  

$ 1,400.00

Namingha, Les – “Mimbres Man” Acrylic Painting (2002)

This painting by Les Namingha is titled, “Mimbres Man”.  The reference is to the Mimbres pottery of the 1100’s.  There are figurative elements in many pieces of Mimbres pottery.  Note the very last photo and it shows a piece of Mimbres pottery with featuring two men. Les has taken this idea and painted a single Mimbres man as the design.  In the background are the mountains surrounding the Mimbres area in Southen New Mexico.  Much of the coloration is also reflective of the colors seen in Mimbres pottery.  However, take a closer look at the face of the man and how the left has a more stylized eye while on the right it is the eye of a katsina.  The painting quickly becomes not just a commentary on the past but on “man” and his culture.  The painting is certainly a dynamic one by Les Namingha!  It was featured in the book “NDN Art” on p. 64.   It is acrylic on board and it is framed in a wood frame.  It is in excellent condition and signed 0n the lower right, “LN”.   Always nice to have the provenance of a painting which has been published and captures the creativity of the painter!

$ 2,200.00

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All Contemporary   All Signed Historic

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