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Pojoaque Pueblo. English Pronunciation: "Po-wock-ee or Po-hock-ee" Traditional Name: PO-SUWAE-GEH Pojoaque Pueblo is one of the six Northern Tewa speaking Rio Grande Pueblos. Archeological studies of the area have dated inhabitation of the historic Pojoaque Pueblo area as early as 500 AD with a large prehistoric population in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. Pojoaque has always maintained a strong cultural identity and was known by its Tewa speaking neighbors as “Po-suwae-geh” the water drinking or gathering place. In the early 1600’s the first Spanish mission San Francisco de Pojoaque was founded. During the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 and pre-Reconquest period the Pueblo of Pojoaque was ravaged by external pressures and scattered to neighboring tribes. At the time of the Re-Conquest of New Mexico by Don Diego de Vargas, the Pueblo of Pojoaque was completely deserted. In 1706 Pojoaque Pueblo was resettled by 5 families. By 1712 the population reached 79. By the 1800’s the land base was being encroached upon by non-Indians and an official land grant was patented by Abraham Lincoln with the presentation of a silver cane of authority to the Governor of Pojoaque. The Pueblo was further devasted by a smallpox epidemic, lack of water, encroaching non-Indians, and a lack of arable land base for agriculture. Circa 1900 the las Cacique died and Governor Jose Antonio Tapia left the reservation for outside employment. The Pueblo of Pojoaque was once again abandoned, its people migrating to other villages in the region. In 1934, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs issued a call for all Tribal members to return to the area. Under the Indian Re-organization Act, 14 members of the Tapia, Villarial, Romero, and later the Gutierez/Montoya families were awarded land grants in the Pueblo land base. In 1936 the Pueblo of Pojoque became a federally recognized Tribal Reservation wutg 11m963 acres and current Tribal enrollment at 263 members. In 1973, Pojoaque Pueblo’s progressive approach led to the election of the first woman governor in the Rio Grande villages, Thelma Talachy. At present the Poeh Cultural Center is responsible for undertaking a vocational/educational approach to teaching Native Studio art to Indian students as part of a process of cultural regeneration. Annual traditional dances open to the public are Pojoaque’s Feast Day December 12 and Reyes Day dances on January 12 on the plaza.

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Year Flower, Lucy – Carved Seedpot with Avanyu & Sun

Lucy Year Flower was known for her distinctive carved pottery.  This seedpot is very deeply carved and highly polished.  The design is a water serpent (avanyu) which is carved encircling the piece. It starts at the top and spirals around the sides.  There is wonderful intricacy in the carving and note the sun face figure as well.  Typical of her work, the background areas are also fully incised with deep lines.  On the top there are also two small inset pieces of turquoise.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Lucy Year Flower” on the bottom.

$ 225.00
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Tafoya, Shawn – Tile with Hunter and Dog (1988)

Shawn Tafoya is a son of Lucy YearFlower Tafoya, a grandson of Camilio Tafoya and a great-grandson of SaraFina Tafoya.  He began making art at the age of five. Although Shawn is a traditionalist in terms of material and technique, his pottery and Pueblo embroidery work is strikingly innovative, and he is well known for it. He has won numerous awards for his work, and has participated in many shows and exhibitions. Interestingly, Shawn is also one of the most gifted Pueblo textile embroiderers working today and teaches this traditional art throughout the northern villages. His pottery is often a unique balance of traditional and contemporary.  This round tile is inspired by the ancient Mimbres pottery of the 1100’s.  Here, he has painted a hunter with an antelope and a small dog at his feet.  The small dog is really a charming part of this piece!  The rim has fineline patterns painted with clay.  The piece is signed on the back in the clay.

$ 200.00 $ 100.00
Browning, Ashley – “NDN-opoly” Digital Photograph

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment or life in contemporary Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called “NDN-opoly”.  Ashley writes of this piece, “It is a hand drawn illustration of a Native American Monopoly. It represents Pueblos (the Man on the top and the Pueblo homes), Navajos (the man in the middle holding the sheep and fry bread), and Plains Indian (the tee pees). I think this is such a cool idea they should make an actual game!”.  The first in this series won a Second Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2015. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “NDN iPhone” Digital Photograph

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment or life in contemporary Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called, “NDN iPhone”.  The hand model is Shaandiin Tome.  Ashley says of this piece, “It has hand drawn icons that are a Native version of iPhone apps, it is placed that are set on top of Montana Tee Pees.  So cool, it should be made into an actual apps.”  Take a closer look a few of the apps, as they certain capture the life of many Native artists.  Ashley certainly has an extraordinary sense of cultural critique in her artwork.  The first in this series won a Second Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2015. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “Generation Hands” Digital Photograph

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment or life in contemporary Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called, “Generation Hands”.  It is certainly one of the most powerful of her digital photos.  Ashley says, “The models are  (Top to bottom) Samantha Whitegeese, Mindy Little Yellow Bird, Tina Whitegeese, Michele Tapia Browning and Lu Ann Tafoya.  It is a portrait of four generations of strong women, a Student, a disabled woodworker, a corporate person, an artist and a potter. On their arms is the tewa words that represents their relations to me. So it goes from top to bottom: younger relation (no real tewa word for cousin), relation (no real tewa word for sister), aunt, mother and grandma.”  The original photo was taken and then overlayed with the words in Tewa.   The first in this series won a FirstSecond Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2014. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “Paper Doll” Digital Photo

Ashley Browning uses her photographic and innovative graphic skills to create her unique digital photo compositions. This piece is entitled, “Paper Doll” and utilized Leslie Browning Tafoya as the model.  Ashley says of this piece, “After playing with paper dolls as a child, I always wanted to play with a pueblo paper doll, especially a paper doll from my pueblo of Santa Clara. I inspired it from the summer side, where there is a mix of different style and colors.”  The piece is creative with the various traditional clothes from Santa Clara. She ended up dressing the model three different times for the clothing ‘options’.  Native People’s Magazine wrote about Ashely and this piece,

 “I like to make people feel, to remember something—experience something meaningful,” says Ashley Browning, 21, of Pojoaque and Santa Clara pueblos in New Mexico. In 2013 she won first prize at Indian Market for best computer-generated graphics with her “real-life” paper doll, which featured a digitally altered photo of her model with interchangeable traditional and contemporary attire. With it, Browning used the digital present to evoke memories of the previous generation’s analog world.”

The first piece in this series won first place ribbon at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2013.  It is an edition of 10 and framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “Juxtaposition” Digital Photo

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment in Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called, “Juxaposition”.  The model is Samatha Whitegeese (a daughter of Daryl Whitegeese).  Ashley says of this piece, “This photo is about young woman who is balancing her contemporary lifestyle and her traditional pueblo life. It is an everyday challenge that almost every young person deals with while going to school and participating in traditions.”  She took multiple photos of Samantha and combined them together to create this image.  The first in this series won a First Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2013. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
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