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San Ildefonso Pueblo English Pronunciation: "San Ill-day-fon-so" Traditional Name: Po-woh-ge-oweenge "Where the water cuts through" San Ildefonso Pueblo pottery is one of the best known art forms of the New Mexico Pueblos because of the famous black-on-black pottery which originated there and which was revived in the nineteen-twenties. At that time San Ildefonso Pueblo, like many other Pueblos, was suffering a severe economic depression. Long standing internal conflicts, encroachment upon tribal lands by squatters and illegal cutting of timber all contributed to the low subsistence level to which the Pueblo had fallen. When American Indian crafts began to be popular with collectors, it was fortunate for the San Ildefonso people, because although the Pueblo population was small, there were a number of skilled artisans, makers of pottery and painters, who set to work to improve the economic condition of the Pueblo. Before long, the outstanding quality of San Ildefonso Pueblo pottery became known. It was then that the famous black pots were revived, primarily because of Maria Martinez. Today, they command the respect of world-wide collectors of fine art. Other artists, potters and watercolor painters came to the attention of the public and although the Pueblo is one of the smallest in population, it is among the best known. The San Ildefonso people have lived in the present site since before thirteen hundred A.D. They have a strong sense of identity and retain ancient ceremonies and rituals tenaciously, as well as tribal dances. A particularly important festival is the Buffalo Deer Dance, performed in San Ildefonso’s feast day.

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Martinez, Maria – Gunmetal Water Jar “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

It’s not often that you see “The Perfect” gunmetal piece by Maria Martinez.  This jar is one of those pieces.  The water jar has a fluted rim and a wide shoulder.  There is a slight indention for the shoulder of the jar. However, what makes it so “perfect” is the firing.  It is so perfectly gunmetal in firing that the surface has a silvery appearance. It even appears more gunmetal in low light! The jar is quite extraordinary as the gunmetal color is created from the heat of the firing.   It is signed on the bottom in the clay,  “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

 

$ 7,200.00
Martinez, Maria – “Skunk” Plate (Maria + Popovi,1956-9)

This is a charming black plate by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the plate while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The plate is highly polished and is one of his few pieces which has an animal motif.  This plate has a skunk with a plant design.  Popovi Da was an accomplished painter in the San Ildefonso two-dimensional style and this plate captures that style of his art.  The skunk is painted much in the way it was on his polychrome pottery.  It was only from 1956-9  that Popovi painted these pieces, which are among the most sought after and best of his career!   It is  signed on the back in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was made around 1956-9.   The plate is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 6,500.00
Martinez, Maria – “Prancing Deer” Plate (Maria + Popovi,1956-9)

This is a charming black plate by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the plate while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The plate is highly polished and is one of his few pieces which has an animal motif.  This plate has a prancing deer with a plant design below.  Popovi Da was an accomplished painter in the San Ildefonso two-dimensional style and this plate captures that style of his art.  The deer is beautifully painted in motion.  It was only from 1956-9  that Popovi painted these pieces, which are among the most sought after and best of his career!   It is  signed on the back in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was made around 1956-9.   The plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 5,800.00
Martinez, Maria – “Pueblo Deer” Plate (Maria + Popovi,1956-9), Published

This is a charming gunmetal fired plate by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the plate while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The plate is highly polished and is one of his few pieces which has an animal motif.  This plate has a pueblo style deer painted on the surface.  Below the deer is a plant design.  Popovi Da was an accomplished painter in the San Ildefonso two-dimensional style and this plate captures that style of his art.  The deer is beautifully painted in motion.  It was only from 1956-9  that Popovi painted these pieces, which are among the most sought after and best of his career!   It is  signed on the back in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was made around 1956-9.    The plate is also published in the book, “The Legacy of Maria Poveka Martinez” by Richard Spivey, on page 89.  It is always a plus to have a piece which has been published in a significant book for both future authenticity and value.  The plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 6,500.00
Martinez, Maria – Gunmetal Long Neck Jar “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

In the 1950's Maria Martinez created a series of pieces which were simply stone polished with no design.  As she primarily made the pottery and polished it this was fitting with the other pieces of her career.  This small bowl is fired with a near gunmetal appearance.  It is possible as the bowl is turned to see how the gunmetal color (which comes from the firing) give the bowl a lustrous appearance.  It is signed in the clay, “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one tiny blister on the piece which can be seen in the photos.

Maria Martinez Signatures

 

$ 5,300.00
Martinez, Maria – Avanyu Plate (Maria + Popovi 570)

This is classic plate by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the plate while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The plate is highly polished and has a near gunmetal shine.  The avanyu is painted with the traditional horn and clouds around the body. There is a slight curve to the surface and the rim.   It is  signed on the back in the clay, “Maria Popovi 570“. The signature indicates that it was fired in May, 1970.   The plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,500.00
Blue Corn – Bowl with Feather Pattern

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she also made exquisite black-on-black pottery. Her learned to make pottery from Maria Martinez at San Ildefonso. This jar is very highly polished and painted with a feather pattern. There is a striking contrast of the painted areas with the highly polished surface. The shape of the jar is one of her classic shape with the low shoulder. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  The bowl is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a few light surface scratches seen in the photos.

$ 775.00
Blue Corn –  Tall Jar with Feather Design (1970’s)

Blue Corn is certainly one of the most creative potters of her time with a varied used of clays and firing techniques to create her distinctive pottery.  This is one of her distinctive red pieces. The jar is fully polished red and has a feather pattern painted along the body of the piece.  Around the neck is a triangular mountain design. The jar is painted in a buff-on-red style. The highly polished red is in contrast to the matte painted surface.  The jar was traditionally fired to create the coloration.  The jar is signed in the clay on the bottom, “Blue Corn”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,000.00
Blue Corn – Jar with Feather Pattern (1970’s)

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she also made exquisite black-on-black pottery. Her learned to make pottery from Maria Martinez at San Ildefonso. This jar is very highly polished and painted with a feather and mountain pattern. There is a striking contrast of the painted areas with the highly polished surface. The shape of the jar is one of her classic shape with the low shoulder. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one small rub area shown in the photos.

$ 675.00
Martinez, Maria  – Jar with Prayer Feather Designs (Marie + Santana, 1954-6)

This jar by Maria Martinez is one of her classic pieces.  It was made by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana Martinez (the wife of Adam Martinez).  It is very highly polished and has a glassy surface.  The design is a prayer feather pattern which is at an angle and then a cloud and rain design. The painting is very crisp and stands out against the highly polished surface.  There are some small areas which are nearly gunmetal in appearance.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie + Santana”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic!

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 1,800.00
Blue Corn – Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1960’s)

While Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she began her career making black pottery. This is one of her earlier pieces from the 1960’s and it is deeply carved with an avanyu.  The style of the carving is much like that seen in other early San Ildefonso potters, with a “cameo style”.  The avanyu encircles the shoulder of the bowl.  The piece is highly polished and fired a deep black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  The bowl is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 575.00
Roybal, Tonita – Carved Jar with Avanyu (late 1930’s)

This is one of the few carved pieces we have ever seen by Tonita Roybal.  She is one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This jar is carved with an avanyu around the body of the piece.  The avanyu is polished while the red of the jar is matte red.  What makes this piece so exceptional is the bottom, which has one of the Santa Fe Indian Market stickers, which they began using in 1936!  It is also signed, “Tonita” in the clay on the bottom.  It is overall in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair and certainly one of the most unique pieces of her pottery we have seen.  It’s exciting to see that she excelled in both carved and painted pottery!

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 2,800.00
Pena, Juanita – Red Carved Bowl with Avanyu (1930’s)

This wide shoulder bowl by Juanita Pena is from the 1930’s and it is carved with an avanyu as the design.  Juanita and Tony Pena had a particular style to their avanyu with the triangular eye.  As well, the carving was more in the “cameo” style, as note that the avanyu is in raised relief. It is the small details which are so striking on their work, such as the polished rim and the polish at the base of the bowl.  It is signed, “Juanita, San Ildefonso” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 850.00
Gonzales, Ramona Sanchez – Red Jar with Carved Avanyu (1930’s)

This is a certainly a later jar by Ramona Gonzales.  Ramona was known for her delicately painted pottery.  This is one of the only carved pieces of her pottery we have seen. The avanyu is carved in a cameo style, much like that of Rose Gonzales.  Note how the clouds extend down from the neck and the complexity of the head of the avanyu.  It is an exceptional piece by Ramona.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ramona”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some wear on the surface. This is definitely a significant and rare piece of her pottery.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 1,800.00
Sanchez, Desideria – Large Jar with Cloud and Wind Patterns (1920’s)

Desideria Montoya Sanchez was a sister of noted potter Maria Martinez.  She was known for her traditional pottery and use of both classic and innovative designs. This tall jar is a shape that was used by both her and Maria during the 1920’s.  It is a tall shaped jar with a high shoulder.  The jar here is highly polished and has a cloud design painted around the neck and then additional rain and wind designs around the shoulder.  The painted designs here are so bold that they give a very modernistic appearance to the jar. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Desideria”.

$ 2,000.00
Pena, Isabel – Red & Tan Carved Plate with Avanyu (1930’s)

Isabel Pena was one of the early San Ildefonso potters. This is one of her few carved pieces. It is most likely that she made the plate and then it was carved by her daughter, Terasita.  The style of carving is similar to that of her daughter.  The front of the plate is polished red and carved with an avanyu.  The interior carved area is filled in with the a cream colored clay. The back of the plate is also fully polished and it is tan.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Isabel”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Isabel Pena was a granddaughter of Cipriana Pena and a daughter of Tonita Pena (ca 1847-1910) who was known for making large storage vessels. Isabel was the wife of Pasqual Martinez. She was also the mother of noted potters Terasita Martinez and Petronella Martinez. Her great-grandson, Elvis Torres continues to make pottery today.

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 650.00
Pena, Juanita – Black Carved Bowl with Avanyu (1930’s)

This wide shoulder bowl by Juanita Pena is from the 1930’s and it is carved with an avanyu as the design.  Juanita and Tony Pena had a particular style to their avanyu with the triangular eye.  As well, the carving was more in the “cameo” style, as note that the avanyu is in raised relief. It is the small details which are so striking on their work, such as the polished rim and the polish at the base of the bowl.  It is signed, “Tony + Juanita, San Ildefonso” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 950.00
Gonzales, Juanita – Red Bowl with Mountain and Rainbow Design (1930’s)

This bowl is one of the very few red pieces we have seen by Juanita Gonzales.  It is carved with the cameo style which Juanita learned from Rose Gonzales.  It has a mountain carved with a step design and the arch above is the rainbow. The bowl is highly polished and the red is a deep coloration.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.    The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Juanita”.   It is great to find one of their red pieces in such wonderful condition!

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 600.00
Martinez, Terasita & Juan – Large Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1930’s)

This is a fascinating bowl by Terasita Martinez.  She was a daughter of noted potter Isabel Pena. She married Juan Martinez in 1933 and they often worked together on pottery. She also helped her mother with the carving on her pottery.  Terasita’s pottery is very distinctive with the reverse carved style of avanyu.  As well, she had such a short lifespan that she did not make that much pottery, and even less of it seems to have survived over time.  Interestingly, we see have come across pieces of her pottery mis-attributed to “Terasita Naranjo”.  However, the carving style  and designs are completely different. This jar is signed, “Terasita & Juan”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 900.00
Roybal, Tonita – Water Jar with Avanyu Design (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal is one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This is a classic shape for Tonita, with the low, round shoulder and the turned out rim.  What is unusual is the use of the avanyu or water serpent, as the design.  She painted a variety of designs, but very rarely depicted the water serpent on her pottery. The jar here is fired to a near gunmetal finish and  it is delicately painted and beautifully polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita”  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 2,400.00
Roybal, Tonita – Terraced Bowl with Cloud Designs (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal is one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This is an extraordinary piece of her pottery.  It is one of her few terraced bowls.  They step shape in the form is representative of mountains. Both the inside and the outside are painted with very fine cloud and rain patterns.  The painting is simply exquisite!  The bowl is fully polished on the inside and outside.  It is in exceptional condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  On the bottom is the original sticker with her name and you can just see a bit of her signature.  I didn’t want to remove the sticker (which has probably been there for 90 years!) and risk damaging the signature or bottom.  However, it is one of her most unique and special forms.  Outstanding!

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

 

$ 2,200.00
Pena, Isabel – Jar with Step Pattern and Lid

Isabel Pena was one of the early San Ildefonso potters. This is an exceptional jar by Isabel Pena.  It is one of the only lidded pieces of hers we have come across.  The jar is painted with a mountain step pattern and the lid is also painted.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Isabel”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Isabel Pena was a granddaughter of Cipriana Pena and a daughter of Tonita Pena (ca 1847-1910) who was known for making large storage vessels. Isabel was the wife of Pasqual Martinez. She was also the mother of noted potters Teresita Martinez and Petronella Martinez. Her great-grandson, Elvis Torres continues to make pottery today.

 

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 800.00
Gonzales, Rayita – Carved Jar with Avanyu (1930’s)

Rayita Gonzales was a sister of Louis  “Wo-Peen” Gonzales and Raymoncita Gonzales.  She did not make much pottery but it was mostly during the 1930’s. This carved jar is an excellent example of her pottery with a carved water serpent encircling the jar. The style of her carving is very distinctive and especially on the neck with the carving of the lightning and clouds into the negative space.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rayita”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

 

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 850.00
Martinez, Maxamiliana “Anna” – Large Bowl with Water Designs (1930’s)

This is a large bowl by Maximiliana “Anna” Martinez, who was a sister of Maria Martinez.   It is fully polished and painted with water designs around the shoulder. The bowl itself has great coloration with areas which are nearly gunmetal.  The painting is fluid around the entire piece.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Anna”.

Click here for more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 1,500.00
Aguilar, Susana -Bowl with Avanyu (1920’s)

This is a very distinctive bowl by Susana Aguilar.  The piece is from the 1920’s and it is fully polished and fired to a near gunmetal appearance.  The style of her avanyu is very distinctive with the shape of the horn and the way she painted the mouth. The avanyu of her son, Joe Aguilar, is in very much the same style.  The shape of the bowl is also very classic for her work, with thin walls and a very flat top after the curve of the shoulder.  The bottom of the bowl is also fully polished.  It is signed on the bottom  in the clay, “Susana”. The bowl is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It has some scratches on the rim.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 875.00
Roybal, Tonita – Bowl with Fineline Mountain and Plant Designs (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal is one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This has long been one of my favorite bowls by Tonita.  The shape is perfect with the sharp shoulder and sloping angle.  The design is boldly painted with a mountain pattern which has lines painted in the center.  There are additional small plant designs.  Like much of her work, it is the gunmetal coloration, achieve during the heat of the firing, which gives the bowl its dynamic appearance.  The silver surface above the shoulder accentuate the design and give it a dynamic appearance. The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

 

 

$ 1,800.00
Roybal, Tonita -Tall Red Jar with Feather Designs (Late 1930’s)

Tonita Roybal is one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This is simply a classic long neck jar by Tonita.  The jar is a shape which is visually associated with her pottery. The high shoulder, the elongated neck define the elegance of the shape. The entire piece is fully polished red. The designs are red-on-red with a striking feather pattern separated by a bird tail design. The painting was done by Juan Cruz Roybal, her husband. There are white clay slip areas along with his signature “dots” and the hatchmarks.  The jar is from the late 1930’s and has the sticker of “approval” used at the Santa Fe Indian Market after 1936.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita + Juan”.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

$ 5,500.00
Martinez, Maxamiliana “Anna” – Red Bowl with Rain Designs (1926)

This is an exceptional bowl by Maximiliana “Anna” Martinez, who was a sister of Maria Martinez.  What makes it exceptional is that is one of her few red pieces.  It is also very early for redware. The bowl was deacessioned from the Denver Art Museum, and it was originally acquired there in 1926.  The original catalog number and date are on the bottom!  Consider that Carl Guthe writes that it was only in 1925 that San Ildefonso potters began making redware and one realizes how significant this piece is as a historical marker!  The bowl is painted red-on-red with a rain and cloud design.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Anna”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 900.00
Roybal, Tonita – Jar with Handles and Lightning Designs (1930’s)

Tonita Roybal is one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This amazing long neck jar is simply one of the most unique we have had of her pieces.  The jar has a long neck and two handles on the side.  The neck of the jar is painted by Juan and has a angular lightning pattern. There is also his signature hatchmark designs on the jar.  The handles are also painted with design! However, what makes the jar so dynamic is the gunmetal coloration to the firing.  It is seems to have a glow from within with the overall metallic appearance.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita + Juan”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

 

$ 3,000.00
Aguilar, Susana – Large Plate with Butterfly Design (1920’s)

It is not often that we see such a large plate by Susana Aguilar.  This is a striking piece of her pottery from the 1920’s.  It is as much an open bowl as a large plate. The front is slipped and highly polished while the back is wet polished.  The design is very intricately painted with a butterfly or moth as the design.  Interestingly, the word for both “moth” and “butterfly” is the same in Tewa (Thanks for the info Russell!!).  The design combines geometric and fine line elements. The butterfly shape can be seen with antennae at the top, the wings at the side.  I took a variety of different angles for the photos to show off both the polish and the design. The plate is signed on the back in clay slip, “Susanna”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 2,400.00
Pena, Isabel – Large Jar with Snow Patterns

Isabel Pena was one of the early San Ildefonso potters. This is one of the largest of her black-on-black bowls we have seen. It  has a snow pattern as the design.  It is a complex pattern that encompasses the surface of the jar.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Isabel Pena”.  It is in good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a few little rubs and a small chip on the inside of the rim.  Isabel Pena was a granddaughter of Cipriana Pena and a daughter of Tonita Pena (ca 1847-1910) who was known for making large storage vessels. Isabel was the wife of Pasqual Martinez. She was also the mother of noted potters Teresita Martinez and Petronella Martinez. Her great-grandson, Elvis Torres continues to make pottery today.

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 600.00
Gonzales, Juanita – Large Bowl with Carved Rain Designs (1930’s)

This bowl is one of the larger bowls we have had  by Juanita and Wo-Peen Gonzales.  It is carved with the cameo style which Juanita learned from Rose Gonzales.  It has a flowing design on the shoulder with rain and lightning designs separated by mountains.  The carving is deep and perfectly fits the shape of the bowl.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.    The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Juanita”.   It is great to find one of their pieces in such wonderful condition!

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 1,200.00
Martinez, Maria – Polychrome Plate with Butterfly Design (1920’s)

This small plate by Maria Martinez is one of the few polychrome pieces by Maria Martinez and her husband, Julian. The plate is from the early 1920’s and it is painted with a butterfly design on the front. The center of the butterfly has a lightning bolt painted.  It is perfectly painted and fired. The plate is signed on the back on the rim “Marie”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,300.00
Gonzales, Ramona Sanchez – Red Bowl with Rain Patterns (late 1920’s)

This is an early red-on-red painted bowl by Ramona Gonzales.  Ramona was known for her delicately painted pottery.  It was only after 1925 that red pottery appeared at San Ildefonso Pueblo. This bowl is a classic shape and beautifully painted. There are such delicate fine lines to the rain and cloud pattern.  The bowl is signed, “Ramona” on the bottom in the clay.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some wear on the surface. However, still a fascinating historic piece.

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 800.00
Gonzales, Ramona Sanchez – Red Jar with Snake Handles (1930’s)

This is an extraordinary jar by Ramona Gonzales.  Ramona was known for her delicately painted pottery.   Not only is this jar red, but it also has handles in the shape of snakes!  It is an exceptional jar with beautifully painted cloud and rain designs. The imagery is outlined in white and then slipped with a red clay slip.  Each of the snakes has just a small bit of design on their backs.  It is fascinating to see such an early San Ildefonso jar with figurative aspects!  Ramona was amazingly innovative for the time!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ramona”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks.  There was restoration on one of the snake heads.  There is some light wear on the surface. This is definitely a significant and rare piece of her pottery.

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 2,000.00
Martinez, Maria – Red Carved Bowl with Avanyu (1930’s), Maria/Julian

This is an exceptional carved bowl by Maria Martinez and her husband, Julian.  Maria would make the pottery and Julian would paint, or in this case, carve, the design.  While he did a variety of carved pieces, this is one of the only ones we have seen with a water serpent (avanyu) as the design! The avanyu encircles the shoulder of the bowl.  Note how it is carved into the negative space, while most other potters carved away around the avanyu, leaving it the polished relief section.  The bowl is from the 1930’s and it is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie + Julian”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 4,800.00
Pena, Juanita – Polychrome Plate with Bird (1938)

This is a very unusual plate by Juanita Pena is from the 1930’s. It is polished and polychrome with a bird as the design.  The bird is a combination of black mineral slip and a red slip.  The back of the plate is signed, “Juanita P.”. While it should be an easy piece to attribute to Juanita Pena, Russell Sanchez told me that Juanita Pena never made polychrome pottery and he thinks the “P” after the name is not a letter.  So, if not then the plate would be by Juanita Gonzales.  I does strike me a bit more like Juanita Pena’s style of design.  Either way, there are very few polychrome pieces in general by this time. The piece was deacquisitioned by a museum and its original acquisition date was 1938.  Either Gonzales or Pena, it is a charming piece!

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 400.00
Martinez, Maxamiliana “Anna” – Black-on-Red Bowl with Sun and Rainbow (1920’s)

This is a striking wide bowl by Maximiliana “Anna” Martinez, who was a sister of Maria Martinez.  It is one of her few black-on-red pieces.  The jar has a sun design (the center checkerboard) with a rainbow pattern above and an overall tablita appearance.  The shape is a classic one for Anna with a wide sharp shoulder.  The red is a very deep coloration on this bowl and the painting creative in style   It is unsigned but easy to attribute to Anna.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 3,800.00
Roybal, Tonita – Black-on-Red Bowl with Mountain & Cloud Designs (1932)

It is very rare that we come across a black-on-red piece by Tonita Roybal.  This bowl is an early piece from the 1920’s.  Tonita and her mother, Dominguita Pino, were both very well known for their black-on-red pottery before the advent of the black-on-black pottery in 1920.  This bowl has beautifully painted designs in the band around the shoulder.  There are mountain, cloud and rain patterns.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. This bowl has exceptional provenance.  It was part of the original collection of Dick Howard and featured in the booklet published on her pottery.  It also has the original Indian Market sticker for 1932!  Amazing!  This is definitely a piece of history, as much as piece of art!

$ 5,500.00
Montoya, Florentino & Martina – Large Fineline Jar (1905-10)

This is an extraordinary large jar by Florentino & Martina Montoya from around 1910.  Johnathan Batkin wrote about them, “The pottery of this husband and wife team is that of artist and innovators who introduced new materials and techniques to other potters. Martina’s experimentation with shapes and slips, and Florintino’s distinctive painting style facilitate the identification of many of their pots. [They] were active during a period of change in San Ildefonso pottery.”  I have included them in our “Early San Ildefonso Innovators” Show as they are the precursors to the changes and innovations in the 1920’s.  Looking at this jar, is is inspiring in the size, shape and designs.  The jar is thin walled and perfectly formed.  However, as with much of the San Ildefonso pottery, it is the shape which is so extraordinary.  The varied designs as the jar is turned is a hallmark of Florentino. The fineline hatchmark patterns along with the delicate plant swirls are almost unexpected on this large jar.  There is so little repetition that each quarter turn seems to evoke a new jar.  It was pottery like this jar which inspired these Early San Ildefonso Innovators.  Maria and other noted that Florentino was one of the finest painters they knew. His early passing during the influenza epidemic, along with so many others, changed the world of San Ildefonso.  This jar is unsigned but easily attributed to Florentino and Martina by shape and design.  I’ve been pleased that numerous other experts, beyond myself (I won’t claim extensive expertise here) all agree that this is one of their classic and more refined vessels.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair.  There are few small rim chips, but nothing unexpected with its age or size.  Simply said, historically important and a classic!

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 15,000.00
Gonzales, Ramona Sanchez – Plate with Bird Design (1920’s)

This is a striking painted bowl by Ramona Gonzales.  Ramona was known for her delicately painted pottery.  This plate is almost more like an open bowl.  It is fully polished on the front and back. The design has a bird which fills up the entire surface of the plate.  The polished background and matte painted designs work perfectly on this piece.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Ramona”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some wear on the surface. This is definitely an important piece of her pottery.

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 1,400.00
Martinez, Maxamiliana “Anna” – Black-on-Red Jar with Tablita Design Figure (1920’s)

This is a striking wide bowl by Maximiliana “Anna” Martinez, who was a sister of Maria Martinez.  It is one of her few black-on-red pieces.  The jar has a sun design (the center checkerboard) with a rainbow pattern above and an overall tablita appearance.  The shape is a classic one for Anna with a wide sharp shoulder.  The red is a very deep coloration on this bowl and the painting creative in style   It is unsigned but easy to attribute to Anna.  But more to the point on the attribution I looked at several signed pieces I had in the past by Anna and compared the angle of the base (when it is in the puki) and the angle of the sides.  The puki used and shapes are typically individual to each artist.  Note the last photo with this jar by Anna on one side and a black-on-black signed piece by her on the right.  It is then easier to see how this is one of the shapes she created for her pottery.  This wide bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Special Thanks to Russell Sanchez for his identification of designs and also working on the attribution for this bowl with me.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 3,600.00
Aguilar, Rosalie & Joe – Plate with Bird Designs (1920’s)

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional pottery during brief career working together.  It is often their plates which are the most visually striking and complex of their work.  This plate is a complicated and fascinating design. There are two avanyu heads on either side where the circle is the eye and each has an elongated tongue. They are connected with a water design and the step pattern is the mountain. The “x” design in the center is the turkey track.  The fineline checkerboard areas area exceptionally well painted.  The piece has a very modern appearance with the placement of the imagery yet it is one from the 1920’s.  This plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or  repair.  There are a few light surface scratches.  It is signed on the back, “Rosalie + Joe”.

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 1,200.00
Atencio, GIlbert – Red Jar with Feather & Rain Pattern

Gilbert Atencio is a name synonymous with classic two-dimensional style paintings at San Ildefonso Pueblo.  He is undoubtedly one of the most famous of the painters yet he also made a few pieces of pottery throughout his career.  Gilbert was a son of Isabel Montoya Atencio and a nephew of Maria Martinez.  His sister Helen Gutierrez was a well known potter.  This jar has a classic feel to the shape and it is highly polished red.  The design around the neck is a feather pattern with a stylized mountain steppe design separating the sections.  Around the shoulder are checkerboard painted panels and rain designs.  The style and placement of the imagery has a very planned appearance and works perfectly with the shape of the jar.  It is painted with the traditional cream colored clay on the red polished surface. The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a dramatic piece and exciting to see one of the few pieces he made during his career

$ 1,200.00
Naranjo, Florence Aguilar – Polychrome Jar with Cloud, Rain and Snow Designs (1950s’)

Florence Naranjo is a daughter of noted potters Rosalie & Joe Aguilar and a granddaughter of Susana Aguilar.  This is one of her few polychrome pieces of pottery. The jar is fully painted with black and red rain, cloud and snow patterns on a cream background.  The jar is a classic San Ildefonso water jar shape.  It is signed on the bottom, “Florence Naranjo”.  It is good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 400.00
Roybal, Juan Cruz – Bowl with Lightning Designs (1940’s)

Juan Cruz Roybal is one of the great painters in San Ildefonso pottery.  He worked on pottery with his wife, Tonita, and often painted for other potters after her death in 1945.  Juan was known for his very distinctive style of painting using fine lines and flowing designs.  This is an unusual bowl which is just signed, “Juan”.  It has his very distinctive style of painting a lightning design.  It may be that he painted on a series of pieces which remained unfinished after the passing of Tonita.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 275.00
Roybal, Juan Cruz – Bowl with Bird Wing Designs (1940’s)

Juan Cruz Roybal is one of the great painters in San Ildefonso pottery.  He worked on pottery with his wife, Tonita, and often painted for other potters after her death in 1945.  Juan was known for his very distinctive style of painting using fine lines and flowing designs.  This is an unusual bowl which is just signed, “Juan”.  It has his very distinctive style of painting with a bird wing pattern.  It may be that he painted on a series of pieces which remained unfinished after the passing of Tonita. It is in good condition with some surface wear but no no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 150.00
Aguilar, Joe – Polychrome Plate with Cloud and Rain Designs (1950’s)

Joe Aguilar began his career painting pottery for his mother, Susana Aguilar,  He also made pottery with his wife, Rosalie, through the 1940’s.  In the 1950’s he created a fascinating group of polychrome pottery including both plates and vessels.  He was one of the few potters at the time still using traditional techniques and designs for his work. This plate is painted in a polychrome style.  The design has cloud patterns in the center and there are asymmetric divisions of the design.  Joe would use uneven patterning with lines to create the overall imagery for his plates. This plate has a “From the Pueblo of San Ildefonso” sticker on the back, which were used in the 1940’s and 50’s.  The plate is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair.  It is unsigned but easily attributable to Joe Aguilar by style of painting.  The plate is accompanied by a letter of attribution..

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 300.00
Montoya, Simona Pena – Wide Bowl with Rain Designs (1920’s)

This is one of the only pieces we have ever seen by Simona Pena Montoya Naranjo (1902-82).  She was a daughter of Juan and Isabelita Pena.  She did not make much pottery and this bowl is from the 1920’s.  The bowl is signed, “Simona M.” and that was during the 1920’s when she was first married.  Her second marriage made her a Naranjo.  The bowl has painted triangular designed around the shoulder.  It is fully polished if a bit heavy to one side.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a unique piece!

 

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 175.00
Aguilar, Joe – Polychrome Plate with Eagle (1950’s)

Joe Aguilar began his career painting pottery for his mother, Susana Aguilar,  He also made pottery with his wife, Rosalie, through the 1940’s.  In the 1950’s he created a fascinating group of polychrome pottery including both plates and vessels.  He was one of the few potters at the time still using traditional techniques and designs for his work. This plate is painted in a polychrome style.  The design is an eagle. Note the use of the hatchwork on the body of the bird.  The plate is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair.  It is unsigned but easily attributable to Joe Aguilar by style of painting.  The plate is accompanied by a letter of attribution.

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 300.00
Gonzales, Rose – Red Canteen with Cloud & Rain Design (1930’s)

This canteen is an unusual piece by San Ildefono potter Rose Gonzales.  She is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This is one of the few canteens we have had of her work and one of her earlier pieces.  It is fully polished red and painted with a red clay slip.  The design is a cloud pattern near the top and a rain and prayer feather pattern below. There is still the original leather cord connected to the stopper!  The piece is signed on the bottom, “Rose” over a red matte clay slip.  This was typical of a lot of potters in the 1930’s and helps to date this piece.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,300.00
Atencio, Isabel – Plainware Black Water Jar

Isabel Atencio was a daughter of Nicolasa Montoya (the aunt who taught Maria Martinez to make pottery) and a sister of Rayita Montoya, Santana Montoya and Alfredo Montoya (the first husband of Tonita Roybal). Among her children Gilbert Atencio is known primarily for is paintings. Her daughters Helen Gutierrez and Angelita Sanchez are both well-known potters.  This is one of her classic water jars, which has been fired black.  It is fully polished to a beautiful shine.  This jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Belle Atencio”.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 475.00
Aguilar, Joe – Polychrome Plate with Feather Designs (1950’s)

Joe Aguilar began his career painting pottery for his mother, Susana Aguilar,  He also made pottery with his wife, Rosalie, through the 1940’s.  In the 1950’s he created a fascinating group of polychrome pottery including both plates and vessels.  He was one of the few potters at the time still using traditional techniques and designs for his work. This plate is painted in a polychrome style.  The composition is classic for the Aguilars with fineline patterns breaking up various sections of design.  The designs include rain and eagle tail patterns.  The plate is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair. There are two small areas where the white slip has flaked away.  It is unsigned but easily attributable to Joe Aguilar.  The plate is accompanied by a letter of attribution.

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 350.00
Aguilar, Joe – Whirling Water Design Polychrome Plate (1950’s)

Joe Aguilar began his career painting pottery for his mother, Susana Aguilar,  He also made pottery with his wife, Rosalie, through the 1940’s.  In the 1950’s he created a fascinating group of polychrome pottery including both plates and vessels.  He was one of the few potters at the time still using traditional techniques and designs for his work. This is an exceptional plate painted with polychrome designs. The center is a fineline pattern, which was often seen in the earlier black-on-black pottery. The central medallion then becomes a whirling circle of water with the extensions of the plant designs.  The plate is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair. There are two small areas where the white slip has flaked away.  It is signed on the back, “Joe Aguilar”.

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 1,000.00
Aguilar, Joe – Polychrome Plate with Birds (1950’s)

Joe Aguilar began his career painting pottery for his mother, Susana Aguilar,  He also made pottery with his wife, Rosalie, through the 1940’s.  In the 1950’s he created a fascinating group of polychrome pottery including both plates and vessels.  He was one of the few potters at the time still using traditional techniques and designs for his work. This plate is a very stylized birds as the design.  The style of painting, with the central square and the spiraling designs is very similar to his earlier black-on-black painted pottery. The plate is signed on the back, “Joe Aguilar + Katherine”.  Katherine was his daughter.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 850.00
Atencio, Isabel – Plainware Red Bowl

Isabel Atencio was a daughter of Nicolasa Montoya (the aunt who taught Maria Martinez to make pottery) and a sister of Rayita Montoya, Santana Montoya and Alfredo Montoya (the first husband of Tonita Roybal). Among her children Gilbert Atencio is known primarily for is paintings. Her daughters Helen Gutierrez and Angelita Sanchez are both well-known potters.  This is one of her later plainware vessels. The bowl is highly polished and fired red.  It is a simple piece, but beautifully polished.  Note the bottom has a classic indention and signed, “Isabel” in the clay.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 275.00
Atencio, Isabel & Gilbert Atencio- Buff-on-Red Bowl with Rain Designs

Isabel Atencio was a daughter of Nicolasa Montoya (the aunt who taught Maria Martinez to make pottery) and a sister of Rayita Montoya, Santana Montoya and Alfredo Montoya (the first husband of Tonita Roybal). Among her children Gilbert Atencio is known primarily for is paintings. Her daughters Helen Gutierrez and Angelita Sanchez are both well-known potters.  This is one of her few collaborative pieces with her son, Gilbert. The bowl was made and polished by Isabel and painted by Gilbert.   The design is a plant, rain and mountain pattern.  It is signed, “Belle + Gilbert”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00
Atencio, Isabel – Red Turtle

Isabel Atencio was a daughter of Nicolasa Montoya (the aunt who taught Maria Martinez to make pottery) and a sister of Rayita Montoya, Santana Montoya and Alfredo Montoya (the first husband of Tonita Roybal). Among her children Gilbert Atencio is known primarily for is paintings. Her daughters Helen Gutierrez and Angelita Sanchez are both well-known potters.  This is one of her charming turtle figures.  The back is polished while the remainder of the piece is matte.  It is signed on the bottom, “Belle”.  She signed her work both Isabel and “Belle”.  This piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 125.00
Martinez, Maria – Plainware Bowl “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

In the 1950’s Maria Martinez created a series of pieces which were simply stone polished with no design.  As she primarily made the pottery and polished it this was fitting with the other pieces of her career.  This small bowl is fired with a near gunmetal appearance.  It is possible as the bowl is turned to see how the gunmetal color (which comes from the firing) give the bowl a lustrous appearance.  It is signed in the clay, “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one tiny blister on the piece which can be seen in the photos.

$ 950.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Red & Black Bear with Checkerboard and Sun Design

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This bear is one of his classic shapes.  This bear is polished with a deep red clay slip.  The front has a sun pattern with a black mica clay line design in the center. The sun pattern is one that is inspired by the early pottery of Tonita Roybal.  The black of the bear has a black matte section along with a traditional San Ildefonso rain design.  The bear has a heartline which is etched into the clay.  The heartline which extends out from the mouth of the bear. The bear is a symbol of strength and the heartline is a traditional image used to symbolize the heart as the center of power in the animal.  The bear is hollow as the piece is coil built.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 3,800.00
Sanchez, Russell & Arthur Lopez – San Isidro the Farmer Saint Box

Russell Sanchez (San Ildefonso) and Arthur Lopez (Hispanic), have created unique collaborative works for the first time this year.  The vessel was made by Russell and stone polished with a black clay. The wood sections were carved by Arthur.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and water color pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.  Russell uses traditional clay from San Ildefonso, which is then coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  These are the time involved and historic foundations for this collaboration.

“San Isidro” is a charming piece which is both modern and historic in style.  The box was made by Russell Sanchez and the wood lid by Arthur Lopez.  The box is polished with a red clay slip and painted with black mica in the checkerboard near the base.  The lid depicts San Isidro, known as the Farmer Saint and for his piety to the poor and animals.  Here Arthur has depicted him surrounded by the bounty of his farm and a modernized version of the figure kneeling in prayer.  Around the sides are scenes depicting the farmland with an angel plowing the field in on scene and the crops sprouting in another.  Separating them are polished sections where Russell has etched Pueblo plants in bloom.

Russell and Arthur say about this piece:

The story of San Isidro told in New Mexico is that Isidro was always working in the fields and didn’t have time to go to church. God sent an angel to plow the fields so he would have time to pray.  The figure of San Isidro on the top of the box is him praying after a bountiful harvest.  The checkerboard at the bottom represents the heaven and earth, the two worlds.  The plants on the side are sprouting with the rain.  The brown hei-shi represents he earth and soil while the green hei-shi represents the crops.

 

$ 7,400.00
Sanchez, Russell & Arthur Lopez – Virgin of Guadalupe & San Ildefonso Roses

Russell Sanchez (San Ildefonso) and Arthur Lopez (Hispanic), have created unique collaborative works for the first time this year.  The vessel was made by Russell and stone polished with a black clay. The wood sections were carved by Arthur.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and water color pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.  Russell uses traditional clay from San Ildefonso, which is then coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  These are the time involved and historic foundations for this collaboration.

This oval clay vessel is the foundation for the “Virgin of Guadalupe” wood bultos added to one side.  The back is etched with roses and inset with Lone Mountain Turquoise.  The sides of the jar are inlaid with multi-color heishi beads.

Arthur and Russell say of this piece:

The Virgil of Guadalupe is the patron saint of Mexico.  She is depicted with brown skin, an angel and moon at her feet and rays of sunlight that encircle her.   According to tradition, the Virgin Mary appeared to an indigenous man named Juan Diego on Dec. 9, 1531.  Juan was told to take a message to the local bishop to build a church.  When he was ignored, he returned and the inside of his robe was filled with roses in the middle of winter.  When he opened his robe the roses fell to the ground and the Virgin’s image appeared on his cloak.  The Virgin of Guadalupe is therefore associated with Roses.  The back of the jar has San Idlefonso style roses.  The multicolor hei-shi is for the rainbow and also all the colors of the world.  The colors of the world represent light and all the people of the world.

$ 7,000.00
Sanchez, Russell & Arthur Lopez – Mother of Sorrows/Sacred Heart

Russell Sanchez (San Ildefonso) and Arthur Lopez (Hispanic), have created unique collaborative works for the first time this year.  The vessel was made by Russell and stone polished with a black clay. The wood sections were carved by Arthur.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and water color pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.  Russell uses traditional clay from San Ildefonso, which is then coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  These are the time involved and historic foundations for this collaboration.

The jar is polished with a black clay slip.  The rim is polished a deep red.  Russell has included two bands of copper leaf and inset hei-shi beads.  The sgraffito design is meant to complement the carved figurative work.

The clay vessel made by Russell Sanchez in a stylized form of the Sacred Heart. The wood panel on the front, and the wood sword, were carved by Arthur Lopez. The figure represents the Mother of Sorrows and the sword is symbolic of how Mary’s heart was broken seven times during the Passion.   Asymmetrical heart shape also has the ‘blood’ coming from the wound, represents the pain a mother is always feeling for their children.

$ 7,800.00
Sanchez, Russell & Arthur Lopez – Immaculate Conception & Avanyu Jar

Russell Sanchez (San Ildefonso) and Arthur Lopez (Spanish), have created unique collaborative works for the first time this year.  The vessel was made by Russell and stone polished with a black clay. The wood sections were carved by Arthur.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and water color pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.  Russell uses traditional clay from San Ildefonso, which is then coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  These are the time involved and historic foundations for this collaboration.

The jar has a black and red polished surface. The neck and base are polished black and there are very classic San Ildefonso style handles.  The central band is polished with a deep red clay. There are inset bands of turquoise hei-shi beads.  The coloration of the firing of the black is deep and a striking complement to the deep red.

Arthur and Russell said of this jar:

This jar combines to similar concepts, the Immaculate Conception and the pueblo Avanyu.  The vessel is a classic San Ildefonso water jar.  The black, red and tan are representative of the San Ildefonso polychrome pottery.  The jar is a “pot within a pot”, where the outer pot represents the acceptance of the pueblos of Catholicism.  People looked at the religion and not how it was forced on the pueblo people.  The avanyu (water serpent) encircling the back of the jar is representative of the avanyu as a symbol of cleansing.  In a similar manner the wood lid is a representation of the Immaculate Conception.  The painted section is painted in a Spanish style and has baby Jesus and a lamb, representing ‘the Lamb of God’.  So, much as the, “lamb of God washes away the sins of the world”, the avanyu is a cleansing force in the Pueblo world.

$ 11,500.00
Roybal, Tonita – Oval Shallow Bowl with Lightning Designs (1920’s)

This is a charming open bowl by Tonita Roybal, from the 1920’s.  It is either a small plate or a small dish.  It is oval and has a slight rim.  The bowl is painted on the inside with a lightning and cloud pattern.  The piece is polished which creates a strong contrast for the design.  The bowl is signed on the back in the clay, “Tonita”.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair. There are few tiny dings on the rim.  Amazingly, the center of the piece is in excellent condition!

 

$ 675.00
Gonzales, Cavan  – Polychrome Bowl Rainbow Band Design

This bowl by Cavan Gonzales is classic design in polychrome pottery.  Cavan is a descendant of Maria Martinez and a son of Barbara Gonzales.  He is one of the few potters at San Ildefonso who continue to paint traditional polychrome pottery. This bowl has a rainbow pattern painted around the shoulder.  There are four inset pieces of turquoise near the neck. At the shoulder he has painted a scalloped cloud pattern. T he use of the red, black and cream color is striking.  The bowl is signed on the bottom.

 

$ 1,000.00
Gonzales, Cavan  – Black Clay Big Horn Sheep

This large clay Big Horn Sheep is made out of clay by Cavan Gonzales.  Cavan is a descendant of Maria Martinez and the son of Barbara Gonzales.  This piece is polished on the front and then mica slipped on the back.  It has been fired black.  The use of the Big Horn Sheep is a symbolic representation of one’s own self worth.  There are inset bands of hei-shi in turquoise and shell.  It is a striking contrast of matte and polished surfaces.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 850.00
Gonzales, Cavan  – Polychrome Plate with Old Style Avanyu

This plate by Cavan Gonzales is a beautiful example of both his clay and painting skill.  As a form, many Pueblo potters dislike to create plates, as they break frequently while drying and firing.  Cavan is one of the few who has been making this form most of his career.  This plate is polychrome with the very oldest style of Avanyu design known.  In the center is a single inset piece of turquoise and 6 inset pieces of coral.  The pattern is a series of interlocking avanyu “tongues” which circle around the plate.  It is signed on the back in the clay.

 

$ 325.00
Gonzales, Cavan  – Red Clay Big Horn Sheep

This large clay Big Horn Sheep is made out of clay by Cavan Gonzales.  Cavan is a descendant of Maria Martinez and the son of Barbara Gonzales.  This piece is polished on the front and then mica slipped on the back.  It has been fired red.  The use of the Big Horn Sheep is a symbolic representation of one’s own self worth.  There are inset bands of hei-shi in turquoise, coral and shell.  there is also an additional inset piece of turquoise near the neck of the Big Horn Sheep.  It is a striking contrast of matte and polished surfaces.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 800.00
Gonzales, Cavan  – Polychrome Bowl with Corn and Plant Designs

This open by Cavan Gonzales is classic design in polychrome pottery.  Cavan is a descendant of Maria Martinez and a son of Barbara Gonzales.  This open bowl has a corn and plant design painted in the center.  The black and red are clay slips which are used to create the coloration. The bowl is signed on the back.

 

$ 400.00
Martinez, Maria   – Gunmetal Fired Bowl “Maria + Popovi 869”

This bowl is a simple but stunning piece by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the bowl while it was fired by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). Popovi focused on both the painted surfaces of the pottery as well as the firings.  This bowl is a true gunmetal with a metallic appearance across most of the surface.   The glassy shine is nearly perfect!   It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria / Popovi 869”.  The firing date is when the pottery was made, so this bowl was from August, 1969. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Great gunmetal fired pieces by Maria and Popovi with such high polished surface are always stunning and a great addition to any collection!

$ 2,200.00
Martinez, Maria –  Gunmetal Bowl with Water and Wind Design (late 1920’s)

This is a stunning gunmetal fired bowl by Maria Martinez.  It was made and polished by Maria and then painted by her husband, Julian Martinez (1897-1943).  The design is unusual with the cloud and water designs.  It is very simple but linear.  The bowl is very highly polished and nearly a full gunmetal appearance from the firing.  Even the bottom of the bowl is fully polished, making it an earlier piece.  It is signed, “Marie + Julian” on the bottom in the clay.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,000.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Black-and-Red Bowl with Corn Designs & Lid

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This bowl is a classic shape and the body is fully polished black.  The design is a corn pattern (note the dot in the center) etched as a checkerboard pattern.  Surrounding the corn is a sun design.  This “flower” like pattern is one that was originated by Tonita Roybal and found on her work from the early 1920’s.  Separating each of the sections is a matte red cloud pattern.  The designs fits perfectly to the shape of the bowl and elegant flow of design.  The neck of the bowl is fully polished a very deep red.  The lid is inspired by the dome lids of early San Ildefonso pottery.  The combination of the black, red, buff and matte red make this a true-polychrome vessel.  There is additional black hei-shi beads inset into the jar.  Russell has brought back the deep red clay slip which was used at San Ildefonso in the 1920’s and 30’s.  It is an extraordinary coloration!  For the polished black mica, Russell said that he was inspired by the use of the micaceous clay on utilitarian vessels and how he could use it to better match his highly polished surfaces.  The result is a black stone polished micaceous surface which has a high shine and a color that somehow ranges from gray to black to almost a blue, depending on the light!  It is quite exceptional!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 7,400.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Black-and-Red Water Jar with Raindrop Rim

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This is a classic double shoulder water jar. At the shoulder the jar reaches a sharp edge and drops down before it rises up to the double shoulder and the neck.  The body of the piece is polished with a black clay while there is a single band of deep red polished area.  The rim of the jar is polished a deep red and it is fluted or has a “raindrop rim”, as it is traditionally called.  Separating the various carved and clay colored areas are shell and turquoise hei-shi beads.  The three strands of white add a striking complement to the red and black areas.  Russell said that he was inspired by the use of the black  mica clay on utilitarian vessels and how he could use it to better match his highly polished surfaces.  The result is a black stone polished surface which has a high shine and a color that somehow ranges from gray to black to almost a blue, depending on the light!  It is quite exceptional!  The red is a recent addition to his pottery, and again, harkens to the early San Ildefonso pottery.   The bottom of the jar is indented, which reflects the historic San Ildefonso pottery with the indented base which would be worn on the head.   The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 6,400.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Rain Drop Rim and Double Shoulder Water Jar

This is a classic water jar by Russell Sanchez.  The shape is a very traditional form with a round shoulder and fluted neck.  The shoulder of the jar has been carved with 16 melon ribs.  The interesting aspect of his jar is where the shoulder meets the neck. It comes to a very sharp point, dips down and the begins to go up to the neck.  It is the small area where it dips down which is always difficult to create.  However, the interesting result is how the light hits the shoulder and the indention!  The top down photos really shows off the edges! Beautiful!  The rim is fluted with 16 undulations, which again, are difficult as they often crack during polishing or firing. The jar is fired a dark black coloration, with some almost gunmetal areas.  The neck has two bands of black mica separating three bands of shell hei-shi beads.  The overall polishing on this jar is extraordinary as polishing all the different angles at one time is what creates the challenge.  It is fascinating how Russell has gone back to revive old style and create their modern versions.  Russell continues to creatively revive historic San Ildefonso designs with his innovative style of pottery.  The bottom of the jar has the classic indention of traditional San Ildefonso water jars.  It’s exciting how Russell uses these historic elements to keep them alive on his contemporary pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 7,200.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Black-and-Red Bowl with Bear Lid

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  The bowl is polished with a black clay and there is a single band of deep red.  Separating the black and red stone polished areas are two bands of turquoise hei-shi beads.  The lid to the bowl is a bear which is also polished black. Note how inside the bear legs it is the red clay slip. The proportionality of the bear and the bowl work perfectly!  Russell said that he was inspired by the use of the black  mica clay on utilitarian vessels and how he could use it to better match his highly polished surfaces.  The result is a black stone polished surface which has a high shine and a color that somehow ranges from gray to black to almost a blue, depending on the light!  It is quite exceptional!  The red is a recent addition to his pottery, and again, harkens to the early San Ildefonso pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 4,200.00
Martinez, Maria – Gunmetal Long Neck Avanyu Design Jar Double Signed “Maria Popovi” (1956-8)

This large long neck water jar is stunning piece by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the jar while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The jar is highly polished and has a water serpent (avanyu) as the design.  The neck has a high shine between gunmetal and deep black.  This is an early piece by Maria and Popovi, when he was just beginning to sign the pottery with Maria.  It is also a larger piece of their pottery with the classic elongated neck.  Finding larger pieces in such great condition is always an exciting testament to their creativity and skill as potters!  What is definitely unique about this jar is the double signature!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi“.  However, it is also signed on the side in the clay and polished over!  I have to admit I didn’t even see it until I was photographing the jar and it showed up in the bright light.  That is definitely something that I have not seen often!  The signature indicates that it was made between 1956 and 1959.   The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one small rub on the side.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

 

$ 15,000.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Black-and-Red Mini Jar with Avanyu

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This bear is one of his classic shapes.  The is one of his miniature vessels.  It has a wide shoulder and a long neck, much in the style of his great-aunt, Rose Gonzales.  The neck and base are polished black while the center area is polished a deep red.  There are two bands of turquoise hei-shi beads. The color contrast is visually striking.  Russell said that he was inspired by the use of the black  mica clay on utilitarian vessels and how he could use it to better match his highly polished surfaces.  The result is a black stone polished surface which has a high shine and a color that somehow ranges from gray to black to almost a blue, depending on the light!  It is quite exceptional!  The red is a recent addition to his pottery, and again, harkens to the early San Ildefonso pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 2,250.00
Vigil, Albert & Josephine – Red Bowl with Rain and Cloud Patterns (1980’s)

Albert and Josephine Vigil worked together on their pottery. Albert Vigil (1927-2009) was a nephew of Maria Martinez. He was the son of painter Romando Vigil, one of the members of the San Ildefonso School of watercolor artists. Josephine Cordova Vigil (1927-2001) was from Taos Pueblo. She moved to San Ildefonso when she married Albert. Josephine learned pottery making by watching her aunts-in-law Maria Martinez and Clara Montoya. Maria taught her how to shape the clay and Clara taught her how to polish.  They began making pottery in 1945.  This bowl is polished red and has a red painted cloud and rain design. Their later work was typically buff-on-red while this bowl is red-on-red.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Albert + Josephine”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

$ 550.00
Blue Corn – Red Bowl with Feather Pattern

Blue Corn is certainly one of the most creative potters of her time with a varied used of clays and firing techniques to create her distinctive pottery.  This is one of her few red pieces. The bowl is fully polished red and has a feather pattern painted on the shoulder. The feathers are tightly painted in a matte clay to contrast with the highly polished surface. The round body gives it a larger feel. The bowl is signed on the  bottom, “Blue Corn”.   The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,800.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Black-and-Red Water Jar with Melon Swirl Base

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This bowl is one of his classic shapes.  This water jar is exceptional in form and design.  In many ways, the use of the polished black mica surface along with the deep red and tan is like a revival of this historic polychrome pottery (black, red, tan).  This jar is polished the deep red on the rim. The up and down undulation in the rim is historically called a “rainbow rim”.  Note as well how far down the neck of the jar it is polished!   The neck of the jar is polished with the black mica. The sun design is one that was made famous by Tonita Roybal in the 1920’s. Around the shoulder, the jar is polished deep red and black mica.  The black mica area has a checkerboard pattern while the red areas are designs from old San Ildefonso pottery.  Each design is different.  What is really the unexpected aspect of this jar is the base, which is carved with a swirl melon rib pattern and polished with the black mica.  Not only is it an amazing color, but the feel is extraordinary!  The sharp edge of the swirl and the high polish really create a surprise when holding the piece.  Russell has brought back the deep red clay slip which was used at San Ildefonso in the 1920’s and 30’s.  It is an extraordinary coloration!  For the polished black mica, Russell said that he was inspired by the use of the micaceous clay on utilitarian vessels and how he could use it to better match his highly polished surfaces.  The result is a black stone polished micaceous surface which has a high shine and a color that somehow ranges from gray to black to almost a blue, depending on the light!  It is quite exceptional!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 10,600.00
Pena, Isabel – Water Jar with Rain & Mountain Designs (1930’s)

Isabel Pena was one of the early San Ildefonso potters. This bowl is one of her black-on-black pieces.  It is painted with a stylized rain and mountain pattern.  The jar is highly polished and fired to near gunmetal on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Isabel”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It has a slight lean to the shape, which might have happened in the firing if it got too so hot that it created the gunmetal surface. Isabel Pena was a granddaughter of Cipriana Pena and a daughter of Tonita Pena (ca 1847-1910) who was known for making large storage vessels. Isabel was the wife of Pasqual Martinez. She was also the mother of noted potters Teresita Martinez and Petronella Martinez. Her great-grandson, Elvis Torres continues to make pottery today.

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 175.00
Pena, Isabel – Bowl with Mountain Designs (1930’s)

Isabel Pena was one of the early San Ildefonso potters. This bowl is one of her black-on-black pieces.  It is painted with a angular mountain pattern.  The bowl is highly polished and boldly painted.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Isabel”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is slightly off center. Isabel Pena was a granddaughter of Cipriana Pena and a daughter of Tonita Pena (ca 1847-1910) who was known for making large storage vessels. Isabel was the wife of Pasqual Martinez. She was also the mother of noted potters Teresita Martinez and Petronella Martinez. Her great-grandson, Elvis Torres continues to make pottery today.

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 100.00
Martinez, Anita – Lidded Plainware Jar

Anita Martinez was a granddaughter of Maria Martinez and a daughter of Santana & Adam Martinez.  This is a classic jar with the indented shoulder and a lid.  There is an elegant balance of the shape of the jar with the shape of the lid.  The entire piece is fully polished and fired a deep black, but there are very light gunmetal areas on the surface.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Anita Martinez”.

$ 850.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Black-and-Red Bear with Medallions

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This bear is one of his classic shapes.  The bear is fully polished with a deep red clay slip for the two medallions.  Russell has brought back the deep red clay slip which was used at San Ildefonso in the 1920’s and 30’s.  It is an extraordinary coloration!  One medallion has a cougar and the other an elk.  However, it the overall color of the piece, which is polished with a black mica clay, which is extraordinary.  Russell said that he was inspired by the use of the micaceous clay on utilitarian vessels and how he could use it to better match his highly polished surfaces.  The result is a black stone polished micaceous surface which has a high shine and a color that somehow ranges from gray to black to almost a blue, depending on the light!  It is quite exceptional!  The bear also has a heartline, which is symbolic of the bears and their symbolism for good luck.  The black jet inlay around each medallion was made by the Calabasa family of Santo Domingo.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Stunning!

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 5,800.00
Martinez, Maria – Fully Polished Open Bowl, “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

During the 1950’s Maria Martinez made and polished pottery and signed using her Tewa name, “Maria Poveka”.  Poveka means “Water Lilly”.  This is one of her classic open bowls, which are polished on both the inside and outside. Interestingly, today, few potters will attempt to fully polish the inside and outside of a piece, as it adds the possibility of it cracking.  The bowl is very highly polished and there are small areas of gunmetal and coloration in the black from the heat of the firing.  The bowl is signed in the clay on the bottom, “Maria Pove’ka”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,000.00
Martinez, Maria – Small Feather Jar “Maria Popovi 467”

This is a classic jar by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the jar while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The jar is highly polished and has a feather pattern around the shoulder.  It is the firing which has given it the striking surface.  It has a black to gunmetal firing.  It is  signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi 467“. The signature indicates that it was made around in April, 1967.   The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,800.00
Sale!
Gutierrez, Rose – Red Bowl with Spider & Flower

Rose Gutierrez is a daughter of noted potter Helen Gutierrez and a sister of Geraldine Gutierrez and Kathy Gutierrez.  This is a simple bowl with a flower motif around the rim painted with cream colored clay.   The side of bowl has a painted spider as well as one on the inside. The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 75.00 $ 55.00
Gonzales, Rose – Wedding Vase with Mountain Designs

Rose Gonzales is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery. This wedding vase is from the 1960’s. It is painted with a plant design on two sides and a very intricate mountain design on the sides.  Note the use of the linear lines for the mountain!  The wedding vase is fully polished it is not often that we see a wedding vase by Rose.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay “Rose”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are some scratches near the base of the piece.   Rose’s legacy an certainly be seen in the work of Tse-Pe, Dora Tse-Pe and Russell Sanchez.

$ 750.00
Appleleaf, Martha Fender – Green-on-Black Water Jar

Martha Appleleaf learned to make pottery from her mother, Carmelita Vigil Dunlap. Today she continues to create distinctive pottery with traditional designs.  This is a classic shaped water jar with a sharp shoulder and a micaceous clay rim. The jar has been painted with a green clay slip, which has a very subtle green coloration after the firing. The design is a feather pattern around the shoulder and a prayer feather design around the neck.  Below the shoulder are tadpoles. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 850.00
Martinez, Maria – Feather Plate “Maria + Popovi”

This is a classic plate by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the plate while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The plate is highly polished and has a feather pattern as the main design.  The surface of the plate beautifully reflects the light.  The feathers are very tightly painted, which is typical of the early pieces from the late 1950’s.   It is  signed on the back in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was made around 1956-9.   The plate is in very good  condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,300.00
Da, Tony – Gunmetal & Sienna Jar with Seed Design (1970-1)

While the pottery of Tony Da has been well documented, it is still exciting to have a piece with such an exceptional provenance.  This gunmetal fired jar is an early piece of his pottery from 1970-71.  It is featured in the book, “The Art and Life of Tony Da” on page 57.  The jar is perfectly polished and fired to a gunmetal appearance. The rim has been “two-toned” sienna.  Note how on the black and sienna pieces there is a the sienna color (where the black has been burned back off) and then a “halo” of black and then the gunmetal. The jar is designed around the shoulder and has a seed and a prayer feather pattern.  This is a design that he did not often do in his pottery, which makes it distinctive.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Over the course of a career that spanned from 1967-82, Tony helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.  While he started out as a painter, he made his first pottery in 1967 and his first public showing was at Gallup Ceremonials of that year.

Da, Tony – Gunmetal Jar with Avanyu & Lid (1969)

While the pottery of Tony Da has been well documented, it is still exciting to have a piece with such an exceptional provenance.  This gunmetal fired jar is an early piece of his pottery from 1969, just two years after he began making pottery!   The jar is first featured in the book, “Maria” by Richard Spivey as a full plate (the correct caption is figure 6.25).  It captures the elegance of the shape and the lid.  The second time it is published is in the book, “The Art and Life of Tony Da”.  The shape of the jar reflects Tony having  learned to make pottery from Maria.  It has a round should and an elongated neck.  It is around the shoulder that the water serpent (avanyu) is etched into the clay before the firing. The lid has a long handle and it is formed on the inside so that it fits perfectly on the jar.  The jar was fired by Popovi Da (who fired most of Tony’s gunmetal pottery) and it has a stunning gunmetal appearance.  It is only near the base of the piece that there is more of a black coloration.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Over the course of a career that spanned from 1967-82, Tony helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.  While he started out as a painter, he made his first pottery in 1967 and it’s first public showing was at Gallup Ceremonials of that year.

Da, Tony – “Corn Dancer” Original Casein Painting (1975)

Tony Da is famous for his intricately etched and stylized pottery.  However, throughout his career he always wanted to be known as a painter.  His early work was all painted in casein and then after 1977 he also began to paint with acrylic.  This painting is from 1975 and one of his few later figurative pieces. The detail in the corn dancer is extraordinary, with little details on the branches in his hands.  As well, the very angular nature of the figure harkens back to some of his earliest paintings from the 1960’s, with elongated and angular figures.  The coloration and movements is  exceptional, as is the subject matter.  The painting is signed in the lower right corner “DA”.  It is in its original frame and the painting was originally purchased from Tony in 1975.   Paintings of his in this style and quality are certainly among the most visionary of his career.

$ 6,500.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Red Bear with Sun Designs and Hei-Shi Band

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This bear is one of his classic shapes.  The bear is fully polished with a deep red clay slip.  Russell has brought back the deep red clay slip which was used at San Ildefonso in the 1920’s and 30’s.  It is an extraordinary coloration!  This piece reflects on a very significant design, which is associated with Tonita Roybal.  It is the “sun” pattern which is on the back of the bear.  This design, which is painted with a black mica, is a very tight hatchwork pattern. The sun pattern is one that Tonita was inspired to use from some Acoma pottery, which speaks to the potters looking at a variety of designs and styles in the 1920’s.  Tonita modified it and it was identified in Guthe’s “San Ildefonso Pueblo Pottery Making” in 1925 by Tonita as one of her designs. The last photo is a close up of the “sun” design on a black-on-red jar by Tonita Roybal.  Here, Russell has strikingly painted and then etched the design into the clay.  There is also a heartline from the mouth of the bear.  The back has a series of five horizontal rows of hei-shi beads.  The eyes are also turquoise.  Note as well the use of the black micaceous clay for the legs of the bear!  The bears are symbolic of good luck and in many of the pueblos are carved from stone.  The bear is hollow as the piece is coil built.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Stunning!

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 6,800.00
Gonzales, John – Large Plate with Feather & Avanyu Designs (2003)

This plate by John Gonzales is from 2003.  John was well known for his plate and their intricate etched designs.  This plate is matte tan and the feather design is etched into the clay. The central medallion has a water serpent and in the very center is an inset piece of turquoise. The eye of the avanyu also has a piece of turquoise.  The background area which has been etched away has a micaceous clay slip.  There is also a band of shell hei-shi beads inlaid into the clay near the rim. The plate is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the back.

$ 1,200.00
Sale!
Martinez, Lucy – Jar with Feather Pattern (1980’s)

Lucy Martinez is known for her traditional style San Ildefonso pottery.  This jar is highly polished and painted with a feather pattern around the neck. Around the shoulder is a cloud pattern.  Typically she would make the pottery and it would be polished by her husband, Richard. The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Lucy M.”.

$ 125.00 $ 75.00
Tse-Pe, Dora – Red Jar with Avanyu (1990)

This is a classic jar by Dora Tse-Pe.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law Rose Gonzales and continued her work in a similar style of cameo carving. This jar has a water serpent (avanyu) carved around the top of the shoulder.  The avanyu is slipped in a micaceous clay.  There is a single inset piece of turquoise for the eye.  The neck and base of the jar are both fully polished to a very high shine. The contrast of the matte and polished surfaces work perfectly on this jar.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dora of San Ildefonso”.

$ 1,400.00
Roybal, Tonita – Gunmetal Fired Jar with Cloud Designs

This is a visually striking jar by Tonita Roybal, from the 1920’s.  The jar was made and painted by Tonita.  It has a wide, round shoulder, and a slight neck. The jar is painted with a series of cloud patterns separated by rain and wind designs.  Note the strength of the painting on the piece and the wide lines, which enhance the design.  While beautifully painted, it is the firing, which gave this jar a very metallic gunmetal appearance.  It is a beautiful surface and great designs. The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Tonita”.

$ 800.00
Fender, Erik – Open Bowl with Avanyu & Feather Pattern

Erik Fender is the son of Martha Appleleaf and the grandson of noted potter Carmelita Dunlap. Erik combines classic San Ildefonso imagery with his own creative style. His pottery is signed, with his Tewa name, “Than Tsideh”.  This open bowl is carved on the outside with an avanyu and has a micaceous clay slip. The inside of the bowl is very fully painted with a feather, rain and cloud pattern.  It is a striking contrast between the polished interior and the mica exterior.  However, it is the complexity of a fully designed piece which makes this bowl so extraordinary.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 900.00
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