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Gallery Awards

 King Galleries gets recognized over the years!

award 2015

King Galleries Receives 2015 Best Business of Scottsdale Award: Art Galleries

U.S. Commerce Association’s Award

King Galleries of Scottsdale has been selected as the 2015 Best Business of Scottsdale in the category of Art Galleries.

The Scottsdale Best Businesses Program is an annual program honoring the achievements and accomplishments of local businesses throughout the Scottsdale area. Recognition is given to those companies that have shown the ability to use their best practices and implemented programs to generate competitive advantages and long-term value.

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from Facebook 2014….

Congratulations on 18 years of operating the “Finest Native American Pottery Gallery” in the world. Bold words but I think I can say that. (I admit I have not seen them all). When I think of the attributes that make you successful they are: 1.) Deep knowledge of the art and willingness to share and teach what you know. 2.) Close relationship with so many of the finest artists which gives you a pipeline to the best available work. 3.) An impressive selection representing a broad cross section of the craft at price points for both entry level collectors and those with unlimited resources. 4.) And most important, a deep sense of commitment to something larger than running a gallery business. You are in it for love of the art and the people you interact with.

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yelp_logofrom Yelp 2013….

“Charles has the most incredible pieces of Native American pottery available to both collectors and beginners alike. King Galleries is a must-do stop if you are in the Old Town Scottsdale area. You can always count on both a pleasant chat and an incredible learning experience when stopping in the gallery.

The owner Charles King has a seemingly endless knowledge of Native American pottery. His personal relationship with many of the artists adds an extra depth that is evident in his selections and exhibits. If you can’t stop by the gallery be sure to check out the gallery website. It’s almost as good as visiting the gallery in person. Either way you’ll be sure to find the perfect piece to add to or begin your collection.”

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from Yelp 2013….

One of our favorite galleries to visit in Scottsdale!!   The selection is always fresh and the gallery owner carries only authentically made Native American pottery.  Don’t miss it if you are near Main Street in Scottsdale!!

 

 

 

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from Yelp 2013….

This is truly a great gallery, with top notch selections backed by expert service. Their selections range from cutting edge contemporary work by the best Native American artists to museum-quality pieces from the past. Owner Charles King, a noted authority on Native pottery, has many scholarly publications to his credit. He also curates shows for museums and regularly serves as a judge for the most prestigious Indian markets in the Southwest. Most highly recommended.

 

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from Yelp 2013….

I was so impressed with the knowledge, honesty, and professionalism of Charles the owner. I bought a small Acoma pottery on a recent trip to Scottsdale. Charles’ love of pottery is infectious!! This is a gem of a gallery if you are into Native American pottery. I will be visiting anytime I am near Scottsdale.

 

 

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from Yelp 2013….

I’ve had the pleasure of buying pottery from the King Galleries for the last five years. The pieces have ranged in size & cost from small to medium. The gallery owner, Charles King, always spends time with me explaining in detail each piece & identifying those I had overlooked. Mr. King has a wealth of knowledge related to Native American art including the well-known, and yet to be known, artists. There is nothing typical about a visit to the King Galleries. The time spent there is a valuable learning experience. One that gives an appreciation of an art form not  only to people unfamiliar with it, but to those well versed in the subject. Mr. King has spent his life involved with Native American art & history, and his love of them both comes through in the various aspects of his work & interaction with everyone fortunate enough to spend time with him. If you know Native American art visit the gallery to increase your knowledge. If the art is unknown to you visit the gallery to become aware of an art form as American as it gets.

 

 

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King Galleries Receives 2013 Best of Scottsdale Award

U.S. Commerce Association’s Award Plaque Honors the Achievement

NEW YORK, NY, August 20, 2013 — For the sixth consecutive year, King Galleries has been selected for the 2013 Best of Scottsdale Award in the Art Galleries & Dealers category by the U.S. Commerce Association (USCA).

The USCA “Best of Local Business” Award Program recognizes outstanding local businesses throughout the country. Each year, the USCA identifies companies that they believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and community.

This is the first year that a business has qualified as a Six-Time Award Winner. Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2013 USCA Award Program focuses on quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the USCA and data provided by third parties.

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Born of Fire ASU

Pueblo Pottery of Tafoya, Descendants at ASU

January 9, 2013

The Republic/AzCentral.com

by Kevin Downey

…Although Tafoya’s pottery, including water jars and plates, was functional, it also was decorative. Many of her pieces had highly polished finishes with images of animals, people and clouds pressed or cut into them.  “A lot of the designs are decorative but also embedded in the history of the Santa Clara Pueblo people,” Held said. “The work has a timeless beauty. People who are not familiar with pueblo pottery can still appreciate the technical skills involved.”

ASU’s exhibit, “Born of Fire: The Pottery of Margaret Tafoya” has 30 of her pieces of on display. Pottery from 18 of her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren also are in the exhibit. Tafoya died in 2001.  “There is a similarity in their work, but a number of them have developed their own styles and designs,” Held said. “But they all work in the tradition of Santa Clara Pueblo pottery, which has evolved over time.”

On Feb. 8, the ASU Art Museum will host a book signing of “Born of Fire: The Life and Pottery of Margaret Tafoya,” by Charles King, who owns King Galleries of Scottsdale.  “She was really a pivotal figure in transforming the pottery from utilitarian to folk art to this period where it is fine art,” King said. “Her life transcended that entire period.”  He said Tafoya made enough money from her artwork to provide for her 12 children, some of whom graduated from college. She also passed on the traditions of Santa Clara Pueblo pottery.  “It is about utilizing the resources available to you,” King said. “It’s about the connection to nature. So, all the clay they’re using is from near the pueblo.  “It’s the same with the designs, like bear claws. There’s a legend that a bear led them to water during a drought. These are stories that teach you about who you are.”

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Top 10 Galleries in Scottsdale by Scottsdale.org!

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King Galleries Receives 2012 Best of Scottsdale Award

NEW YORK, NY, May 3, 2012 — For the fifth consecutive year, King Galleries has been selected for the 2012 Best of Scottsdale Award in the Art Galleries & Dealers category by the U.S. Commerce Association (USCA).

The USCA “Best of Local Business” Award Program recognizes outstanding local businesses throughout the country. Each year, the USCA identifies companies that they believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and community.

This is the first year that a business has qualified as a Five-Time Award Winner. Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2012 USCA Award Program focuses on quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the USCA and data provided by third parties.

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Where Magazine – Phoenix + Scottsdale

November, 2010

30 Things we Love about Phoenix + Scottsdale

“25 – Versatile Visual Artist Virgil Ortiz, Simultaneously exhibiting at King Galleries and Mesa Contemporary Arts” 

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King Galleries Receives 2010 Best of Scottsdale Award

WASHINGTON D.C., October 2, 2010 — For the third consecutive year, King Galleries has been selected for the 2010 Best of Scottsdale Award in the Art Galleries & Dealers category by the U.S. Local Business Association (USLBA).The USLBA “Best of Local Business” Award Program recognizes outstanding local businesses throughout the country. Each year, the USLBA identifies companies that they believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and community.

Nationwide, only 1 in 120 (less than 1%) 2010 Award recipients qualified as three-time Award Winners.Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2010 USLBA Award Program focused on quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the USLBA and data provided by third parties.

About U.S. Local Business Association (USLBA)

U.S. Local Business Association (USLBA) is a Washington D.C. based organization funded by local businesses operating in towns, large and small, across America. The purpose of USLBA is to promote local business through public relations, marketing and advertising.

The USLBA was established to recognize the best of local businesses in their community. Our organization works exclusively with local business owners, trade groups, professional associations, chambers of commerce and other business advertising and marketing groups. Our mission is to be an advocate for small and medium size businesses and business entrepreneurs across America.

SOURCE: U.S. Local Business Association

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Where Magazine – Phoenix + Scottsdale

May, 2010

30 Things we Love about Phoenix + Scottsdale

“#10 – A distinct emphasis on all sorts of Pueblo pottery, all the time, at King Galleries” 

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Review of King Galleries in “American Indian Art Dealers

by Danielle Battaglia, American Indian Art Dealers

March 2010

“There are many dealers who carry Indian pottery, but there are only a few that you must visit. One of those, even and especially if you are not into pottery, is King Gallery. By the time I left I found my interest in the art form piqued. Charles will do that for you.

Not only is the pottery he has wonderful, but he is pretty terrific himself. He really works with his artists to help them push their talents to the edge and flower as artists. He believes that potters should always be trying new things, developing their craft. That’s what makes it interesting to the collector, he says, and keeps them coming back to the same artist to see what new things he is producing. It makes the collector happy and keeps the artist in business.

Charles’s parents owned a gallery and he developed a relationship with potters from a very young age. He takes the time to get to know each of the artists he represents, understanding their designs and motivations. He can get truly excited about his pieces.

He showed me a comic book tile by Jason Garcia, Santa Clara, and said that it’s one of the few pieces that gets the young crowd in the front door of the gallery. It was an experiment initially and his tiles have now won awards for ingenuity and execution. Since he, among other dealers in Native American arts, is concerned about waning interest in collecting among younger people, he sees Jason’s work as a gateway to the future in a sense. In fact, he calls artists like Jason, Gateway Artists.

Charles is a frequent judge at the most prestigious Indian Markets, lectures on pottery at the Heard and Pueblo Grand Museums, has published a book on Margaret Tafoya’s pottery and is currently working on a book about Tony Da’s pottery and paintings. See his website to get full information. Some pieces in his shop may be expensive and rightfully so since they are wonderful. But new collectors don’t have to break the bank since he has pottery by some new and upcoming artists who are not yet known.”

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Native Peoples Magazine

July/August, 2009

“Santa Clara & San Ildefonso Pottery: Black is Beautiful

Featuring:  Marvin Martinez, Erik Fender, Sharon Garcia, Daryl Whitegeese, Dolores Curran, Gloria “GoldenRod” Garcia

by Charles S. King

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King Galleries Receives 2009 Best of Scottsdale Award

WASHINGTON D.C., March 20, 2009 — For the second consecutive year, King Galleries has been selected for the 2009 Best of Scottsdale Award in the Art Galleries & Dealers category by the U.S. Local Business Association (USLBA).

The USLBA “Best of Local Business” Award Program recognizes outstanding local businesses throughout the country. Each year, the USLBA identifies companies that they believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and community.

Nationwide, only 1 in 70 (1.4%) 2008 Award recipients qualified as 2009 Award Winners. Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2009 USLBA Award Program focused on quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the USLBA and data provided by third parties.

About U.S. Local Business Association (USLBA)

U.S. Local Business Association (USLBA) is a Washington D.C. based organization funded by local businesses operating in towns, large and small, across America. The purpose of USLBA is to promote local business through public relations, marketing and advertising.

The USLBA was established to recognize the best of local businesses in their community. Our organization works exclusively with local business owners, trade groups, professional associations, chambers of commerce and other business advertising and marketing groups. Our mission is to be an advocate for small and medium size businesses and business entrepreneurs across America.

SOURCE: U.S. Local Business Association

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King Galleries Receives 2008 Best of Scottsdale Award

WASHINGTON D.C., July 12, 2008 — King Galleries has been selected for the 2008 Best of Scottsdale Award in the Art Galleries & Dealers category by the U.S. Local Business Association (USLBA).

The USLBA “Best of Local Business” Award Program recognizes outstanding local businesses throughout the country. Each year, the USLBA identifies companies that they believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and community.

Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2008 USLBA Award Program focused on quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the USLBA and data provided by third parties.

About U.S. Local Business Association (USLBA)  U.S. Local Business Association (USLBA) is a Washington D.C. based organization funded by local businesses operating in towns, large and small, across America. The purpose of USLBA is to promote local business through public relations, marketing and advertising.  The USLBA was established to recognize the best of local businesses in their community. Our organization works exclusively with local business owners, trade groups, professional associations, chambers of commerce and other business advertising and marketing groups. Our mission is to be an advocate for small and medium size businesses and business entrepreneurs across America.  SOURCE: U.S. Local Business Association.

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“Scottsdale Native Arts Mecca”, Native Peoples Magazine Jan/Feb 2008

Visit King Galleries of Scottsdale, opened by Charles King in 1996.  In a contemporary space with a rustic touch – a white-wood beam ceiling – you’ll see the work of many of today’s leading Pueblo potters, including fineline Acoma black-and-white designs, black-on-black pots from San Ildefonso and polychrome works from Santa Clara, as well as some select works in other media.  Pottery includes historic and contemporary pieces. King says, “Over the years, we’ve taken the time to know each of our gallery artists.”

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“Made in the Southwest” by Laura Morelli, August, 2006

The owner of King Galleries used to sit on the Board of Directors of the Indian Arts & Crafts Association, which is indicative of the gallery’s commitment to high quality pueblo pottery.  Whether your fancy leads towards the black and white designs of Acoma, or the black on black decorated vessels from Santa Clara, or something else entirely, chances are you can find a quality piece here and learn more about it than you ever imagined from the knowledgeable staff.”

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Native Peoples Magazine, March/April 2006

“King Galleries  is of particular interest to pottery collectors. Founder Charles King is celebrating his 10th anniversary, representing of many of today’s leading Pueblo potters.  Each piece of pottery in the gallery is handmade, stone polished and painted, and almost all are traditionally fired. “Tradition with a twist” is how King describes the featured work of Santa Clara potter LuAnn Tafoya. The daughter of renowned potter Margaret Tafoya, LuAnn has continued her mother’s legacy of large-scale vessels, which remains unique to the Tafoya family. Her high polish and use of traditional shapes and firing techniques yield spectacular masterpieces in clay.

Margaret Tafoya’s legacy also continues through the technical superiority in the innovative as well as traditional designs and presentations in the works of her grandson, Nathan Youngblood. A sixth-generation potter, Youngblood preserves the ancestral philosophy of his grandmother and mother, Mela, both of whom instilled in him that “clay is a gift; it is a privilege that the Clay Mother gives us.” King showcases Youngblood’s diligently sculpted pottery. ”

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Arizona Republic, February 2005

“A savvy observer might have noticed the swell of aqueous turquoise hues and Indian-inspired creations.
Don’t feel un-hip if you didn’t.
Arizona has long embraced the at-once earthy and ethereal fashions of Indian artists that East and West Coast trendsetters are now sporting.

    High-profile designers such as Ralph Lauren lit the wildfire for Southwestern fashion. Last fall, he highlighted turquoise belts and jewelry. Designer Michael Kors has since made turquoise stones the centerpiece of his high heels, pendants and belts. And after interviewing designers, the Pantone Color Institute reports that “blue turquoise” is the choice for the spring/summer 2005 season after apple green.
Arizona jewelry sellers have felt the rush of foot traffic and the inconvenience of trendy admiration.  “Some of my suppliers are having trouble keeping concha belts in as a result of this craze,” said Martin Kim, museum store manager at the Arizona State Museum in Tucson.  Since finding favor with high fashion, the market has been flooded with Southwestern ersatz jewelry and designs. Selling fake jewelry disguised as Native American hand-made art is illegal by federal law and is likely to continue to be an issue in Arizona.
But Charles King, owner of King Galleries in Scottsdale, said if the hot fashion moment sparks interest in the authentic art form of Indian crafts, the trend could be good for Indian jewelers and dealers.  “There’s always going to be those fakes,” King said. “If Gucci watches are popular, then there will be people making fake Gucci watches as well. And there’s always going to be a certain value in spending a little more for the real thing.” 

    Longtime Indian jewelry collector Andy Eisenberg of Scottsdale agreed that a household name like Ralph Lauren will promote the popularity of authentic Indian crafts. “He has had that sincere interest in the state and things Southwestern for a long time, although he’s using much more pieces in his ads now,” Eisenberg said. “And I think they’re gorgeous. I like his use of the heavy concha belts.”
Fashion has had a long off-again, on-again love affair with Western dress, and turquoise in particular.  The pioneers adopted moccasins and beading in their garments. In the 1960s and ’70s women adopted the individuality of fringe and turquoise as they expressed their independence. During the bicentennial, the Southwestern look returned as people yearned for the nostalgia and romance of America’s roots, said Dennita Sewell, fashion curator at the Phoenix Art Museum.  “It’ll go beyond forever because it’s been going on forever,” Sewell said. “It’s an American tradition. It’s iconic of American style.”  In other words, don’t toss any turquoise collected during this reign of popularity in the yard-sale pile.
Far from the runways but no less timely, Phoenix’s Heard Museum presents the work of New Mexico pueblo potter artist/fashion designer Virgil Ortiz. Ortiz collaborated with New York designer Donna Karan on her 2003 spring line. His display of traditional clay figures and haute couture continues through June 2. Tote bags inspired by Ortiz’s very pricey purses will sell for a reasonable price at the upcoming Heard’s 47th annual Indian Fair & Market. The finest Indian jewelry makers in the country will display their wares at the fair March 5 and 6. 

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Arizona Republic, March 23, 2004

Appraisals draw unique items: Native American artifacts judged

 by Laura Dobbins, The Arizona Republic

SCOTTSDALE – Scottsdale silversmith Jon Bonnell noticed something unique about one of the old yucca-leaf baskets belonging to Phoenix collector Dorthy Goodman.  The Papago weaver added a rim to the top of the vase-shaped basket – almost as an afterthought.  “You can see she worked backwards, adding the rim after she had already finished the basket,” said Bonnell, one of the appraisers at this weekend’s Native American Art and Artifacts Appraisal Day at the Heard Museum North.
“It shows this person was very skilled. It also gives the basket a unique finish,” he told Goodman, who learned that one of the baskets in her 30-piece collection could bring as much $3,400 at auction.  The thought of possibly owning a collector’s item worth thousands spurred visitors to bring Native American jewelry, pots, clothing, baskets and rugs so professionals could appraise them.  “Some learned they had imitations that weren’t worth much, while others found they had inherited a prize,” said Charles King of Leona King Gallery in Scottsdale.   
For example, one customer had four items, but only one was authentic. It was a basket purchased for 75 cents at a garage sale that appraised at $1,400.  Another customer learned that she owned two prehistoric pots dating back to A.D. 1100.  Bonnell learned about Native American baskets more than a half-century ago as a youth working for his dad at the Fred Wilson Trading Post on Central Avenue in Phoenix. In those days, Native American women wove baskets outside the shop, selling them for $15 each.

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Native Peoples Magazine, Jan/Feb 2003

“I remember my first show, in the he late 1980’s”, recalls (Mark) Tahbo.  “I was like a leaf rattling in the he wind, but I  quickly learned how to mingle and talk with people.  I always wanted gallery representation, and I kept wondering if I’d ever get approached.  I metCharles at the Heard Market, and we immediately hit it off.  We throw ideas back and forth, and he goes beyond what’s expected.  It’s a great relationship”.  Another potter King has worked with extensively over the past decade, providing her with her first regular exposure, is Rainy Naha.  She concludes, “I knew I had the talent, but he knows the business side so well.  this is so important for artists.  He has also told me, ‘Don’t be afraid.  Go beyond.  Build on traditions.’ “

While many art galleries represent the work of Native American potters, just a select few specialize in showing only the very best talents in this ancient art form.  King Galleries, an understated and compact art space … is one of  those select few.  Its focus is on the top Pueblo potters, both deceased and living.  It’s the kind of gallery whose support of an artist’s work means that individual is among the very best talents in his or her field”
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Luxury Golf Magazine, 2000

“During the 1980’s, better technical execution and an trend toward more refined and detailed work triggered increasing interest in pottery, according to Charles King of King Galleries of Scottsdale in Arizona.  In the last five years, special pieces with designs that have transcended folk art to become fine art have been eagerly snatched up, King says.”

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Travel & Leisure Magazine, January 1999

King Galleries of Scottsdale.  One of the best sources for contemporary Native American pottery is Charles King, who ferrets out the unusual.”

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Art Talk, December 1997

Tradition in Transition.  “But for now the market seems to have entered a winnowing out stage where the abundance of cream is forcing the absolute best and brightest to the top. Charles King has a lovely gallery on Main Street in Scottsdale. He puts it succinctly:  “It really has changed.  There’s so much Native artwork.  The whole filed of quality has risen and there’s much more creativity going on.  You have to do more and rise and stand out than ever before.”  And collectors are paying close attention to the competition  While in other areas of collecting the buyers are looking for the older, established names, serious collectors of Native art look through the other end of the telescope.  “With collectors in the filed of Native American art there’s always this desire to find who’s going to be the next  big name.  It’s the complete opposite of other kinds of art.  The established names almost get set aside in the search for the young ones coming up. People are on the hunt for whoever is going to be the next Maria.” 

    According to King the market is “very good” for the highest quality, most tasteful fine art pieces, especially jewelry and pottery.  “Lower down it’s not so good.  Unfortunately, those top-end artist do the least work, ”  adds King, echoing the sad lament that can be heard among dealers of any kind of quality art.”

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Art Talk, December 1996

“Speaking of wishing people well, there’s a person I don’t need to wish well because he’s going to do quite well, thank you very much – and that would be Charles King.  Now, if you flipped his name around, he would be King Charles and that’s a more appropriate moniker . . . as in King of Native American pottery.  It has been a long time since I have seen a new gallery with the were-with-all to become an instant success, but Charles is doing just that.  He recently opened King Galleries of Scottsdale on Main Street and what a jewel of a gallery.  Loaded with top quality (NO JUNK) Native American crafts but specializing in pottery (which I have always loved) and because of that, I think he will be enormously successful. “

Contact King Galleries at

(480) 440-3912

or

kgs@kinggalleries.com

 

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