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These are all the New Additions which have been added for the last 30 days.

NEW PIECES ARE ADDED EACH DAY, SO CHECK BACK!

Kaamasee, Derrick – Turquoise Eagle

This is a highly detailed eagle carved from turquoise.  The wings and tail are highly detailed and the eyes are from coral.

$ 100.00
Boone, Leland – Turquoise Beaver

This is a more traditional style fetish carving of a beaver with the medicine bundle on the back. The beaver is carved from turquoise and the arrowhead is from spiny oyster shell.

$ 70.00
Leekya, Hayes – Marble Horse

This carving of a horse is from Picasso Marble.  There are jet eyes and turquoise hooves.

$ 55.00
Natewa, Pete – Serpentine Frog

This carving of a frog is from a deep green serpentine.  The eyes are pink coral.  There is inlay on the back also in pink coral and turquoise.

$ 30.00
Lemintino, Ed – Double Alabaster Bears

This carving has two bear as a double fetish.  They are carved from white alabaster.  The bundle has coral and shell.

$ 35.00
Lonewolf, Greg – Cottontail Rabbit Black Seedpot

Greg Lonewolf is the son of Joseph Lonewolf and is known for his intricately incised miniatures.  This seedpot has a cottontail rabbit as the design on the top.  On the sides are four Mimbres style rabbits which are etched into the polished surface.  All the additional colors are derived from  natural clay slips.   It is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 750.00
Lonewolf, Greg – Realistic Parrot Seedpot

Greg Lonewolf is the son of Joseph Lonewolf and is known for his intricately incised miniatures.  This seedpot has a thick-billed parrot as the design.  It is intricately etched into the clay and highlighted with natural clay slips.  Around the side is a feather pattern.   It is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Lonewolf, Greg – Cottontail Rabbit Seedpot

Greg Lonewolf is the son of Joseph Lonewolf and is known for his intricately incised miniatures.  This seedpot has a cottontail rabbit as the design.  It is intricately etched into the clay and highlighted with natural clay slips.  Around the side is a feather pattern.   It is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Manymules, Samuel  – Long Neck Water Jar with Melon Rib Shoulder

This a very traditional style water jar shape by Samuel Manymules.  It is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar has a long neck and a slightly turned out rim.  On the shoulder there is a “double rainbow” band, which is pushed out in the clay. The low shoulder of the jar is a series of sixteen sharp, angular melon ribs.  Each rib is pushed out in the clay, which adds to the difficultly of its creation.  The color is red and brown with blushes of black around the surface. The color is created by the traditional outdoor firing.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 2,300.00
Moquino, Jennifer – Horned Lizard Clay Figure

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and also her amazing animal figures! This horned lizard is clay and the back is fully polished.  It is realistically etched with a lizard track design.  There is a little lightning design on the front legs.  Note as well the matte and polished areas on the head and the realistic etching of the scales!  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 200.00
Moquino, Jennifer – Six Sided Box with Birds

This is an intricately designed lidded box by Jennifer Moquino.  The entire box and the lid are fully polished.  Each of the side panels has a different bird etched into the clay. There are Pyrrhuloxia, Scaled Quail, Blue Jay, Northern Cardinal, Gambel’s Quail, Greater Roadrunner.  Each is intricately etched into the clay and then there additional clay slips added to create the various colors.  The lid of the box is exceptional with a Stellar’s Jay on the top.  It is highly detailed and stunning in its design sitting on the tree branches.  It’s not often that we see a box this size from Jennifer, or one so intricate!  Jennifer is extraordinary in her use of realism on her pottery and capturing a moment in time.

$ 2,600.00
Moquino, Jennifer – Seed Jar with Chickadee and Western Tanager

This is an intricately designed seed jar by Jennifer Moquino.  The jar has two sections of design, each with a different type of bird. There is a Mountain Chickadee (black & white) on one side and a Western Tanager on the other.  The birds are both realistically etched into the clay.  Separating them are flowers, which are highlighted with additional clay slips. The top and the bottom are both etched with cloud and rain patterns.  All the various colors are from natural clay slips. Jennifer is extraordinary in her use of realism on her pottery and capturing a moment in time.

$ 2,000.00
Moquino, Jennifer & Jason Ebelacker – Jar with Phoenix Birds

This is a collaborative jar by Jennifer Moquino and Jason Ebelacker.  Jason is a great-grandson of Margaret Tafoya and he make, polishes and fired the vessel.  Jennifer then etches the surface with her intricate designs. Together they have been winning awards for their exceptional collaborative works.  The phoenix is an image that Jennifer has used several times in her pottery.  The phoenix is a long-lived bird that is cyclically regenerated or reborn. Associated with the Sun, a phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor.  Ok, and living in Phoenix, it’s hard not to want to see her do it as a design! This jar is very highly polished.  The entire surface is fully etched with two phoenix birds.  Each bird is very highly detailed with design for the feathers.  Jennifer noted that the subtle coloration on each feather made this one of her more challenging pieces to date.  The colors are beautiful contrasted with the  highly polished black surface of the jar.   All the various colors are from natural clay slips.  Jennifer is extraordinary in her use of realistic elements on her pottery and capturing a moment in time.

$ 7,100.00
Moquino, Jennifer & Jason Ebelacker – Water Jar with Kirin Dragons

This is a collaborative jar by Jennifer Moquino and Jason Ebelacker.  Jason is a great-grandson of Margaret Tafoya and he make, polishes and fired the vessel.  Jennifer then etches the surface with her intricate designs. Together they have been winning awards for their exceptional collaborative works.  Jennifer made a smaller Kirin jar several years ago for one of our shows.  This one is larger and more complicated with four interconnected Kirin dragons.  Why the Kirin?  The Kirin is a mythical hooved chimerical creature known in Chinese and other East Asian cultures, said to appear with the imminent arrival or passing of a sage or illustrious ruler.  Jennifer has long been fascinated with Asian culture and tying imagery like the Kirin to that of the Avanyu in Pueblo culture.  Here, they are highly detailed and check out the expressions on the faces!  The deep black and very highly polished surface of the jar add to the overall impact of the piece.  All the various colors are from natural clay slips.  Jennifer is extraordinary in her use of realism on her pottery and capturing a moment in time.

$ 7,700.00
Moquino, Jennifer & Jason Ebelacker – Bowl with Asian Tigers

This is an intricately designed lidded box by Jennifer Moquino.  The entire box and the lid are fully polished.  Each of the side panels has a different bird etched into the clay. There are Pyrrhuloxia, Scaled Quail, Blue Jay, Northern Cardinal, Gambel’s Quail, Greater Roadrunner.  Each is intricately etched into the clay and then there additional clay slips added to create the various colors.  The lid of the box is exceptional with a Stellar’s Jay on the top.  It is highly detailed and stunning in its design sitting on the tree branches.  It’s not often that we see a box this size from Jennifer, or one so intricate!  Jennifer is extraordinary in her use of realism on her pottery and capturing a moment in time.

$ 2,500.00
Garcia, Jason – “Summer + Winter” Tile

This tile by Jason Garcia is part of his Corn Maiden series which features young women in traditional dress for the Corn Dance and placing them in a modern context.  This tile has a young Corn Maiden dancer and a young man, who are from the two major clans at Santa Clara.  One is Summer and the other is Winter.  This is somewhat of a “Romeo and Juliet” type of story, as Summer and Winter clans aren’t supposed to intermarry.  However, he has definitely captured them with a very amorous look!  Note as well the TV antennae in the background (a nod to St. Claire, the patron saint of television and Santa Clara Pueblo).  There is also a traditional rain cloud up in the sky and the kiva ladder off to the left.  Each piece is a hand built clay tile, made from native clay.  All of the colors are derived from Native clay.

$ 950.00
Garcia, Jason – St. Pasquale Bailon Tile

This tile by Jason Garcia is one from his early “Saint” series. This is St. Pascuale Bailon. On the back he has written that St. Pasquale is the patron saint of the Eucharist, Italian women, Sheperds and cooks.  His feast day is May 17.  On the front he had depicted St. Pasquale inside a Pueblo home with food on the stove and oven during the Feast Day.  Note as well the Buffalo Dance going on out the window and the traditional raincloud in the sky.  He created a series of these tiles for one show and this is “#4” in the series.  The tile is made from native clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  All of the colors are derived from Native clay and it is traditionally fired. It is signed on the back.

$ 350.00
Garcia, Jason – “Anasazi Gothic” Clay Tile

This large tile by Jason Garcia is entitled, “Anasazi Gothic”.  Of course it is a play on Grant Wood’s “American Gothic”.  Here, the Ancestral Puebloan couple are holding an hoe and a jar.  Behind them is a cliff dwelling, which is intricately painted.  The colors are all derived from natural clay slips and the tile is made from native clay.  The tile is signed on the back with Jason’s name in Tewa.

$ 900.00
Garcia, Jason – St. Claire & the New Kiva Tile

This tile by Jason Garcia is one from his early “Saint” series. This is St. Claire ,the patron saint of Santa Clara Pueblo. St. Claire is portrayed here with Pueblo embroidered weavings on the sides of the tile.  There are TV antennae in the background to represent that she is also the patron saint of televisions.  In the background is also Black Mesa, the sacred mountain.  In the background is also a tractor tearing down one of the old kivas at Santa Clara to make way for a new one.  Jason has been one of the few potters who uses his work to document the changes and life at Santa Clara.  The tile is made from native clay.  All of the colors are derived from Native clay and it is traditionally fired.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the back.

$ 350.00
Garcia, Jason – St. Francis Tile

This tile by Jason Garcia is one from his early “Saint” series. This is St. Francis of Assisi.  On the back he has written that St. Francis is the patron saint of ecologists, animals, birds, merchants, zoos and Santa Fe, NM.  He created a series of these tiles for one show and this is “#1” in the series.  The front of the tile shows St. Francis in front of the pueblo buildings.  There are small birds, which represent not just that he is the patron saint of birds, but also Jason’s son Jacob’s Tewa name.  The tile is made from native clay.  All of the colors are derived from Native clay and it is traditionally fired.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the back.

$ 350.00
Garcia, Jason – St. Claire Tile

This tile by Jason Garcia is one from his early “Saint” series. This is St. Claire ,the patron saint of Santa Clara Pueblo. St. Claire is portrayed here with Pueblo embroidered weavings on the sides of the tile.  There are TV antennae in the background to represent that she is also the patron saint of televisions.  In the background is also Black Mesa, the sacred mountain.  The pueblo buildings and the kiva (with the ladder) are also represented.  Jason made a series of these pieces, each with a different saint.  The tile is made from native clay.  All of the colors are derived from Native clay and it is traditionally fired. It is signed on the back.

$ 350.00
Victorino, Sandra  – Snow & Rain Design Seed Jar

Sandra Victorino is  a niece of noted potter Dorothy Torivio.    Sandra has her own unique style of “op-art”, where the patterns start small, then get larger and then smaller again on the vessel.  These pieces reflect the variety and intricacy of her pottery designs. This jar has the white clay painted with the black bee-weed (a plant) and a red clay slip.  The jar has a checkerboard snow pattern swirling down from the rim.  There is also a red lightning pattern and a very fine-line painted rain design.  The imagery starts small at the neck and then gets larger and then small again at the base.  The intricacy of the designs and the use of the op-art imagery adds to the sophistication of the jar!  Sandra creates a beautiful sense of balance between the form and design.

$ 525.00
Lewis, Eric – Tile with Cloud Spirals

This small tile is by Eric Lewis.  The tile is part of a series of miniatures tiles he has made. Eric has taken the classic Acoma Pueblo designs and enlarged them and made them into bold graphics.  This tile has a stylized cloud spirals and angular mountain designs.   His innovative designs make him a younger potter to watch!

$ 50.00
Gonzales, Rose – Wedding Vase with Mountain Designs

Rose Gonzales is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery. This wedding vase is from the 1960’s. It is painted with a plant design on two sides and a very intricate mountain design on the sides.  Note the use of the linear lines for the mountain!  The wedding vase is fully polished it is not often that we see a wedding vase by Rose.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay “Rose”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are some scratches near the base of the piece.   Rose’s legacy an certainly be seen in the work of Tse-Pe, Dora Tse-Pe and Russell Sanchez.

$ 750.00
Namingha, Les – Spiraling Hopi Birds Jar

This is delicately painted jar by Les Namingha which is both ancient and modern.  The jar is one of his classic shape with the round body and slight neck and tiny opening.  The body of the jar is painted with a spiraling series of Hopi birds.  They bodies of the birds are painted with various traditional Hopi designs and in various colorations. Both birds are different and distinctive in style.  Below the birds is a classic interlocking line design and near the base a snow pattern.  The overall coloration is striking on this piece.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,600.00
Appleleaf, Martha Fender – Green-on-Black Water Jar

Martha Appleleaf learned to make pottery from her mother, Carmelita Vigil Dunlap. Today she continues to create distinctive pottery with traditional designs.  This is a classic shaped water jar with a sharp shoulder and a micaceous clay rim. The jar has been painted with a green clay slip, which has a very subtle green coloration after the firing. The design is a feather pattern around the shoulder and a prayer feather design around the neck.  Below the shoulder are tadpoles. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 850.00
Tafoya, Sherry – Large Jar with Carved Avanyu

This large jar by Sherry Tafoya is an elegant shape with a high round shoulder and elongated neck. The jar is carved around the body of the piece with a water serpent (avanyu) design.  The neck of the jar is fully polished.  The complexity of her designs is certainly reminiscent of the work of her aunt, Teresita Naranjo.  It is always nice to see a balance of form and design in pottery!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 850.00
Tafoya-Sanchez, Linda – Bowl with 96 Feathers

Linda Tafoya-Sanchez is a granddaughter of noted potter Margaret Tafoya and she is know for her carved pottery.  This bowl is polished on the top and the bottom.  The central section is fully carved with 96 feathers!  The feathers alternate between polished and micaceous slip.  The contrast of coloration with the mica helps accentuate the feather pattern.  As well, take a closer look at each feather, as they are very tightly cut into the clay and the lines are amazingly straight!  Linda was among the first Santa Clara potters to begin using the mica as a design element after she was given some by her San Juan Pueblo in-laws.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Linda Tafoya-Oyenque”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,800.00
Martinez, Maria – Feather Plate “Maria + Popovi”

This is a classic plate by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the plate while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The plate is highly polished and has a feather pattern as the main design.  The surface of the plate beautifully reflects the light.  The feathers are very tightly painted, which is typical of the early pieces from the late 1950’s.   It is  signed on the back in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was made around 1956-9.   The plate is in very good  condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,300.00
Da, Tony – Gunmetal & Sienna Jar with Seed Design (1970-1)

While the pottery of Tony Da has been well documented, it is still exciting to have a piece with such an exceptional provenance.  This gunmetal fired jar is an early piece of his pottery from 1970-71.  It is featured in the book, “The Art and Life of Tony Da” on page 57.  The jar is perfectly polished and fired to a gunmetal appearance. The rim has been “two-toned” sienna.  Note how on the black and sienna pieces there is a the sienna color (where the black has been burned back off) and then a “halo” of black and then the gunmetal. The jar is designed around the shoulder and has a seed and a prayer feather pattern.  This is a design that he did not often do in his pottery, which makes it distinctive.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Over the course of a career that spanned from 1967-82, Tony helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.  While he started out as a painter, he made his first pottery in 1967 and his first public showing was at Gallup Ceremonials of that year.

Da, Tony – Gunmetal Jar with Avanyu & Lid (1969)

While the pottery of Tony Da has been well documented, it is still exciting to have a piece with such an exceptional provenance.  This gunmetal fired jar is an early piece of his pottery from 1969, just two years after he began making pottery!   The jar is first featured in the book, “Maria” by Richard Spivey as a full plate (the correct caption is figure 6.25).  It captures the elegance of the shape and the lid.  The second time it is published is in the book, “The Art and Life of Tony Da”.  The shape of the jar reflects Tony having  learned to make pottery from Maria.  It has a round should and an elongated neck.  It is around the shoulder that the water serpent (avanyu) is etched into the clay before the firing. The lid has a long handle and it is formed on the inside so that it fits perfectly on the jar.  The jar was fired by Popovi Da (who fired most of Tony’s gunmetal pottery) and it has a stunning gunmetal appearance.  It is only near the base of the piece that there is more of a black coloration.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Over the course of a career that spanned from 1967-82, Tony helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.  While he started out as a painter, he made his first pottery in 1967 and it’s first public showing was at Gallup Ceremonials of that year.

Da, Tony – “Corn Dancer” Original Casein Painting (1975)

Tony Da is famous for his intricately etched and stylized pottery.  However, throughout his career he always wanted to be known as a painter.  His early work was all painted in casein and then after 1977 he also began to paint with acrylic.  This painting is from 1975 and one of his few later figurative pieces. The detail in the corn dancer is extraordinary, with little details on the branches in his hands.  As well, the very angular nature of the figure harkens back to some of his earliest paintings from the 1960’s, with elongated and angular figures.  The coloration and movements is  exceptional, as is the subject matter.  The painting is signed in the lower right corner “DA”.  It is in its original frame and the painting was originally purchased from Tony in 1975.   Paintings of his in this style and quality are certainly among the most visionary of his career.

$ 6,500.00
Ortiz, Virgil – “Alter-Native Equality” Jar, Taboo Series

This jar by Virgil Ortiz is part of his new series, “Taboo”.  The jar is coil built, rag polished and painted with wild spinach (a plant) for the black.  Virgil says he has wanted to go back to the traditional shapes and techniques as part of his message for the Taboo series.  He says of Taboo:

“Creativity comes to me from continuing the story of my Cochiti people and how we see the world around us.  Our art from the late 1800’s told the stories of what those people were experiencing at that time.  That opened the door for me to use Taboo topics to engage people about today’s society, culture, politics, religion and even social media.  There are so many issues that people are increasingly afraid to talk about.  It’s important to show the type of imagery I’ve painted for “Taboo” and record it, even if people are afraid of it or it makes them uncomfortable.  I want to demonstrate that Native artists can innovate while using traditional methods.  We don’t have to be pigeonholed by those who want the same piece of pottery over and over again.  It’s time to give the voice back to the clay.”

Virgil writes of his particular jar…

“The Zuni “princess” We’wha (WAY-wah; b.1849), as the local media dubbed her, was an instant celebrity. She boldly stepped forward in the late 1800s as the embodiment of the two-spirit, an individual who combined male and female traits into a socially-recognized third gender roll. As much as she mesmerized Eastern American society, she also characterized the strength of her role in her tribal community. Natives often considered two-spirit people to be among the strongest and most intelligent. Today’s transgender issues and controversy find inspiration in the life of We’wha, and also a voice in pop culture through musical icons like Boy George, Pete Burns, Ru Paul, Grace Jones and others who are shaping and pushing forward the agenda of the LGBT rights movement.” Virgil Ortiz

The jar has the “spirit line” which is a break in the painting on the rim.  The piece is signed on the bottom. The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

Click here to see other pieces in the Taboo Series

$ 9,000.00
Quotskuyva, Dextra – Large Jar with Kiva Opening & Star Pattern (1988-90)

This is a highly detailed larger jar by Dextra Quotskuyva.  She is certainly one of the great innovators among Hopi-Tewa potters.  Her work began with more classic imagery and then has evolved over the years to more unique and stylized designs. This piece is from the late 1980’s, which can be see in the color of the red clay, as well as her signature and use of the cut out kiva door. The jar is a beautiful shape with a high shoulder and slightly turned out neck. The design around the top of the piece is a star pattern painted with a red caly slip.  The red area is stone polished. The surrounding cloud and lightning designs are painted with bee-weed (black). The cut out section is what Dextra calls the “kiva openings”.  She used this style on several pieces from this time period. The carved out section is clean and painted on the inside rim.  Note as well the band of design above the lighting, with the break in the pattern, which is a stylistic deference to Nampeyo of Hano, who often used this style in her design.  The tight, creative painting, the unique shape and the highly stone polished surface, are all reflective of the high quality pieces created by Dextra.  The bottom of the jar is signed with bee-weed, “Detra” with an ear of corn representing the Corn Clan.   The jar is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Dextra has been the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture called, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 8,400.00
Quotskuyva, Dextra – Jar with Two Birds (1990’s)

This is a classic jar by Dextra Quotskuyva.  She is certainly one of the great innovators among Hopi-Tewa potters.  Her work began with more classic imagery and then has evolved over the years to more unique and stylized designs. This jar is from the late 1990’s, which can be seen in the use of the red polished areas as well as the etched signature.  The jar has two different birds on each side.  One bird is a hummingbird, the other is a water bird. The birds are painted with bee-weed (black) and then highlighted with a red clay slip which is highly polished.  There is also the white clay used on the bodies of the birds. Note the very delicately painted lines on this piece!  The jar has been traditionally fired to create the coloration to the clay, which ranges from light to dark.  The open areas without design are typical of much of Dextra’s pottery, as she gives the clay some room “to breathe” on her pieces.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dextra” and an ear of corn, as she is Corn Clan.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Dextra has been the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture called, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 3,600.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Red Bear with Mountain Designs and Turquoise

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This bear is one of his classic shapes.  The bear is fully polished with a deep red clay slip.  Russell has brought back the deep red clay slip which was used at San Ildefonso in the 1920’s and 30’s.  It is an extraordinary coloration! The black area along the back is slipped with a black micaceous clay and then stone polished. This is a relatively new technique for Russell and one which adds another level of complexity to his pottery.  The black polished area harkens back to the black-on-red pottery of the late 1800’s at San Ildefonso.  This bear is fully designed with a heartline and a mountain pattern surrounding the two sides of the  black band.  The black micaceous area is etched with a prayer feather pattern.  What you can’t feel is that the black polished areas on the legs and across the back, while it would normally be rough in texture.  It is as smooth as the red polished surface! There are inset band of turquoise hei-shi beads and a single large inset piece of Kingman turquoise along the neck of the bear.  Note as well the use of the black micaceous clay for the legs of the bear!  The bears are symbolic of good luck and in many of the pueblos are carved from stone.  The bear is hollow as the piece is coil built.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Stunning!

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 5,800.00
Swentzell, Roxanne – “In Crisis” Original Clay Figure

Roxanne Swentzell is a granddaughter of Rose Naranjo, and part of one of the most innovative families at Santa Clara pueblo.  She began making smaller clay figures, and they have evolved from traditional figures to more representational forms of women. This is one of her clay figures from 1999.  She wrote about this piece:

“When we accept the idea that we need to change the way we look or act in order to be beautiful, to be accepted or to fit in, we automatically reject a part of ourselves. It‘s a treacherous, self-destructive attitude, but it often affects us in subtle, insidious ways. In Roxannes thinking, a healthy step has been taken when we become aware of the threat and struggle to fight it off, when we‘re terrified enough to grip the hand with its clawing, bright red nails and hold it at bay. She recognizes that these images of what shes supposed to be, especially from television, are an attack on her. She’s conscious that this is a scary thing, that this is a dangerous thing.

It is featured in the book, “Extra Ordinary People” on p. 32-33.  Roxanne continues to be one of the pivotal Pueblo artists, and her work continues to be among the most dynamic and innovative in contemporary figural pottery.  She has won numerous awards for her work, along with being the subject of several museum exhibitions and books, such as “Women Potters:  Transforming Traditions” and “Clay People”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed in the clay, “ROX”.

$ 8,800.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Red Bear with Sun Designs and Hei-Shi Band

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This bear is one of his classic shapes.  The bear is fully polished with a deep red clay slip.  Russell has brought back the deep red clay slip which was used at San Ildefonso in the 1920’s and 30’s.  It is an extraordinary coloration!  This piece reflects on a very significant design, which is associated with Tonita Roybal.  It is the “sun” pattern which is on the back of the bear.  This design, which is painted with a black mica, is a very tight hatchwork pattern. The sun pattern is one that Tonita was inspired to use from some Acoma pottery, which speaks to the potters looking at a variety of designs and styles in the 1920’s.  Tonita modified it and it was identified in Guthe’s “San Ildefonso Pueblo Pottery Making” in 1925 by Tonita as one of her designs. The last photo is a close up of the “sun” design on a black-on-red jar by Tonita Roybal.  Here, Russell has strikingly painted and then etched the design into the clay.  There is also a heartline from the mouth of the bear.  The back has a series of five horizontal rows of hei-shi beads.  The eyes are also turquoise.  Note as well the use of the black micaceous clay for the legs of the bear!  The bears are symbolic of good luck and in many of the pueblos are carved from stone.  The bear is hollow as the piece is coil built.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Stunning!

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 6,800.00
Medina, Elizabeth – Tall Jar with Birds, Rainbow & Turtle Lid

Elizabeth Medina is known for traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece is coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This jar is painted in a traditional style with a bird or roadrunner on each side.  The bodies of the birds are stone polished.  There is a rainbow band over each of the birds.  Separating the rainbows are a section of plants and birds at the rim.  There are fine-line clouds on the edge of the rainbow.  The lid is in the shape of a turtle and there is a bird and plants painted on the top.  Throughout the piece the red and tan clay slips are polished while the other clay is matte.  The jar is signed on the side “Elizabeth Medina, Zia.

$ 350.00
Gonzales, John – Large Plate with Feather & Avanyu Designs (2003)

This plate by John Gonzales is from 2003.  John was well known for his plate and their intricate etched designs.  This plate is matte tan and the feather design is etched into the clay. The central medallion has a water serpent and in the very center is an inset piece of turquoise. The eye of the avanyu also has a piece of turquoise.  The background area which has been etched away has a micaceous clay slip.  There is also a band of shell hei-shi beads inlaid into the clay near the rim. The plate is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the back.

$ 1,200.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Shifting Sand Seedpot with Silver Corn Plant Lid

Preston Duwyenie is know for his Hopi pottery which blends modern and traditional aspects of the art. This seedpot is made from a red clay which he finds near Second Mesa at Hopi.  The clay fired a tan coloration.  The body of the piece is fully polished.  The top area above the shoulder has the shifting sand design.  What makes the sand area so fascinating is how he carves it so that it has very natural appearance.  It flows around the entire surface, just as if the clay has been swept away. The top view of the piece shows the design nicely and the shadows the design creates.  The lid is made from silver and cast against cuttlefish bone. Preston cut the lid so that it has a stylized corn plant shape.  The casting creates a a similar style of ‘shifting sand’ design to complement the clay areas!  The the seedpot and the silver lid are signed on the bottom with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child and his Hopi name, which means “carried in beauty”.   Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

Why the shifting sand designs? Preston says he remembers watching a smooth pebble caught in sand being shifted by the wind, “there was beauty in its isolation within the sea of sand. It was like an island.  The endless sands of time, and the fact that people, too are tossed about by the wind. There is always rippling in our lives”.

$ 725.00
Candelaria, Daryl – Pottery “Shard” Design Bowl

Daryl Candelaria is one of the few potters working at San Felipe Pueblo.  He studied both historic and contemporary pottery at the School of American Research in Santa Fe, NM.  This jar is one of his classic “Shard” pots.  It is coil built and each of the “shards” is carved into the clay.  What makes it so extraordinary is that each shard is either painted, polished or carved in a representative manner the various Pueblos.  Few potters have the technical ability to create so many diverse surfaces, let alone on one vessel!  As the jar is turned the classic Zia, Jemez and Hopi designs.  The carved and polished red section with the avanyu head is reminiscent of San Ildefonso.  The figure and parrot are inspired by the Awatovi murals.  There are San Felipe geometric designs along with a red polished and micaceous section.  Note as well the red-on-red section and the black-on-black section.  Amazingly the various styles and techniques blend beautifully on the jar.   It is signed by the artist and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  What a perfect way to portray the history and techniques of Pueblo pottery in one vessel!

$ 1,800.00
Ortiz, Virgil – Classic Monos Clay Figure

Virgil Ortiz is known for his innovative style of Cochiti pottery, inspired by the Monos figures of the 1880’s.  This is one of his traditional clay figures made from native clay and painted with native clays and wild spinach (black).  The figure has been traditionally fired.  The Monos figures were originally created as objects of social criticism and reflection.  Virgil continues on this same path in his contemporary work.  This figure is highly detailed with sun, mountain and wildflower patterns around the entire body.  There is always something fun and almost mischiveous on the faces of Virgil’s figures.  Note how deeply the black fired on this piece!  The earrings are also traditional red clay and added after the firing. It is signed on the bottom.

$ 6,800.00
Aragon, Rachel – Fine Line Water Jar with Birds

Rachel Aragon is one of the remaining traditionalist potters working at Acoma.  Born in 1938, she is still making pottery at almost 80 years old!  Her classic olla (water jar) shapes have long been the standard for Acoma pottery, as well as her stunning painting. This jar is a new piece and while not quite as refined as some from the past, it still captures a dynamic strength to the shape and design.  The classic water jar from Acoma has the high shoulder and the slight neck.  It’s the painting, however, which is so beautiful on this jar!  There are small sections with classic parrots in panels.  However, it is the larger thunderbirds which rise up to the rim and are filled in with fine lines which capture the eye.  They swirl and round and energize this elegant jar.  It has the traditional concave base which was to make the jar wearable on the head.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 750.00
Manymules, Samuel  – Melon Rib Water Jar

This is a classic water jar shape by Samuel Manymules.  It is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar has a turned out neck and edge at the shoulder. The ribs are each pushed out from the body of the piece to create the melon ribs.  The coloration on this jar is striking with variations from red to black.  The color is created by the traditional outdoor firing.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 1,000.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Shifting Sand Seedpot with Silver Road Runner Lid

Preston Duwyenie is know for his Hopi pottery which blends modern and traditional aspects of the art. This seedpot is made from a red clay which he finds near Second Mesa at Hopi.  The clay fired a tan coloration.  The body of the piece is fully polished.  The top area above the shoulder has the shifting sand design.  What makes the sand area so fascinating is how he carves it so that it has very natural appearance.  It flows around the entire surface, just as if the clay has been swept away. The top view of the piece shows the design nicely and the shadows the design creates.  The lid is made from silver and cast against cuttlefish bone. Preston cut the lid so that it has the shape of a road runner.  The casting creates a a similar style of ‘shifting sand’ design to complement the clay areas!  The the seedpot and the silver lid are signed on the bottom with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child and his Hopi name, which means “carried in beauty”.   Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

“Why the shifting sand designs? Preston says he remembers watching a smooth pebble caught in sand being shifted by the wind, “there was beauty in its isolation within the sea of sand. It was like an island.  The endless sands of time, and the fact that people, too are tossed about by the wind. There is always rippling in our lives”.

$ 750.00
Cling, Alice – Lightning Rim Jar with Green Rim

This jar by Alice Cling has a lightning carved shape to the rim.  The remainder of the jar is highly polished red but note that she has added a band of green clay slip around the rim of the jar.  It creates a striking visual contrast after the firing.  The jar is traditionally fired and ranges in color from deep red to black. The piece was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery water proof. Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 225.00
Medina, Elizabeth – Jar with Bird Family & Turtle Lid

Elizabeth Medina is known for traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece is coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This jar is a traditional design with a bird or roadrunner on each side.  One side has the male, the other the female and there are four baby birds as well. Surrounding the birds are various plant patterns.  Separating the birds are single flowers which are painted in an open space style.  Throughout the piece the red clay slip is polished while the other clay is matte.  The lid has a turtle with the bird painted on the top.  The jar is signed on the side “Elizabeth Medina, Zia

$ 200.00
Wall, Marcus – Brown Bear with Fish

This is a two pieces set by Marcus Wall.  There is a larger bear, which is coil built.  It is holding the fish.  The larger bear has etched bear paws on the feet.  The bear has a shell necklace. The larger bear is signed on the side.

$ 150.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Shifting Sand Seedpot with Silver Quail Lid

Preston Duwyenie is know for his Hopi pottery which blends modern and traditional aspects of the art. This seedpot is made from a red clay which he finds at Hopi.  The clay fired a tan colorattion.  The body of the piece is fully polished.  The top area above the shoulder has the shifting sand design.  What makes the sand area so fascinating is how he carves it so that it has very natural appearance.  It flows around the entire surface, just as if the clay has been swept away. The top view of the piece shows the design nicely and the shadows the design creates.  The lid is made from silver and cast against cuttlefish bone. Preston cut the lid so that it has the shape of a quail.  The casting creates a a similar style of ‘shifting sand’ design to complement the clay areas!  The the seedpot and the silver lid are signed on the bottom with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child and his Hopi name, which means “carried in beauty”.   Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

Why the shifting sand designs? Preston says he remembers watching a smooth pebble caught in sand being shifted by the wind, “there was beauty in its isolation within the sea of sand. It was like an island.  The endless sands of time, and the fact that people, too are tossed about by the wind. There is always rippling in our lives”.

$ 800.00
Youngblood, Christopher – Oval Swirl Melon Bowl

This unique bowl by Christopher Youngblood combines modern and traditional imagery.  This bowl is a unique shape with a oval form. The shape is difficult to make, but works nicely for carving the melon ribs to extends across the surface at different angles.  Each rib is deeply carved into the clay, and then polished.  Note how one side has an “s” swirl of ribs, with a sharp edge, while the opposite side has a longer swirl of the design.  Joining the variations in the ribs on the edge is difficult but Chris handles it with strength through his carving.  After the carving the bowl is stone polished to achieve the high shine.  It is traditionally fired and it is a deep, rich black.  He remains one of the young potters to watch, especially after his 2014 “Best of Pottery” award at Santa Fe Indian Market!

$ 2,200.00
Naranjo, Jody – Large Jar with Women Holding Pottery (2006)

Jody Naranjo is renown for her etched pottery with whimsical subjects.  This long neck jar by Jody Naranjo is from 2006.  It is highly polished below the shoulder and at the neck. The shoulder of the jar is matte and has women holding pottery in the styles of the various pueblos.  Check out the one holding a jar with fish on it, similar to Jody’s pottery! The neck and base are fully designed with a rug pattern.  It is subtle but adds to the overall impact of the piece.  The jar is signed, “Jody Naranjo” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,800.00
Garcia, Tina – Brown Water Jar with Indented Shoulder (1986)

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plainware Santa Clara pottery. This jar is one of her early classic piece.  It is a beautiful shape with a wide shoulder and slightly turned out neck.  The shoulder has a sharp edge and then drops down as it rises up to the neck.  This is a technically difficult technique to master and it is one at which Tina was among the best! This jar is one of the few we have seen which is fired brown.  The color and the way the light hits the jar is beautiful!    It is signed on the bottom and  it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 575.00
Salvador, Theresa – Olla with Parrots & Rainbow

This jar is by Theresa Salvador (b. 1964).  She began making pottery around 1987 with her sister, Vivian Seymour.  Each piece is coil built and painted with natural clay slips.  This jar is a classic Acoma style olla, with a high shoulder and a slight neck. The design is a series of three parrots encircling the jar.  Around the parrots are flowers and plants and additional flowers around the neck of the jar.  There are rainbow patterns above the birds.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “T. Sal”.

$ 175.00
Malie, Dean & Rita – Bowl with Fine Line Star Pattern

This bowl is made by Dean & Rita Malie.  Rita Malie (1946-2008) made the pottery and it was painted by her husband, Dean (1953).  This bowl is very tightly painted with very complex interlocking star patterns. The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “D. & R.  Malie”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 150.00
McHorse, Christine -Large Gourd Jar with Lightning Rim

This jar is certainly one of those shapes for which Christine McHorse has become renown. It is an organic shaped gourd jar made from micaceous clay.  The rim of the jar has been carved into a lightning pattern and the edge of the rim is raised with a single coil.  The jar has been traditionally fired to create the fire clouds and blushes on the surface. The coloration which is coppery in color, shows all the variations from the flame.  After the firing it has been covered in pine pitch, much as traditional Navajo pottery has been made for the last century.   The jar is perfectly smooth and thin walled.  It is a classic of her pottery, in form and style.  There is always such a delicate nature to her pottery!  There is a simplicity to the jar and yet it is certainly striking among her traditional style.  Today she is creating more sculptural works with her pottery currently in the “Dark Light” exhibit which is travelling nationally.  This jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 3,600.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Miniature Carved Jar with Avanyu (1988)

While Nancy Youngblood is known for her swirl melon bowls and carved pottery, she started out her career making miniatures.  This miniature is from 1988.  It is a classic shape water jar with an elongated neck and a slightly turned out rim.  The body of the piece is carved with a water serpent as the design.  Note how the design changes as the piece is turned.  There is certainly a feminine touch to how Nancy carved the swirls and circles used in her designs.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nancy Youngblood”

$ 2,500.00
Navasie, Charles – Red Jar with Parrots (1989)

Charles Navasie is a grandson of noted potter Joy “Frogwoman” Navasie and the son of Loretta Navasie. This jar is an early piece of his pottery from 1989.  It is very classic shape seen in the pottery of Joy Navasie, with the high, rounded shoulder. The jar is painted in four panels with alternating parrot and bird tail designs. The jar is the classic red clay from Hopi and then painted with bee-weed for the black.  It is signed on the bottom “Chas Navasie”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 200.00
Monahan, Grace – Wedding Vase (1960’s)

Grace Monahan (1901-73) wasn’t one of the original potters in the 1937 Maricopa Pottery Cooperative, she worked alongside celebrated artists like Ida Redbird, Mary Juan, Mabel Sunn and Alma Lawrence, and today her work has a similar importance. Her designs are distinctive enough so that most of her pieces are instantly recognizable without the signature.  Each piece is traditionally hand crafted from native clay with the paddle and anvil method, iron oxide red slip is decorated with black mesquite sap paint, pit fired.  This wedding vase is a classic of her style with designs painted on both sides along with the rim.  The piece is signed on the bottom, “G. M”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There are a few small blisters in the slip near the base, which can be seen in the last photo.

$ 300.00
Nampeyo, Leah  – Large Jar with Migration Pattern (1960’s)

Leah Nampeyo was a daughter of noted potter Fannie Nampeyo.  This is an excepitonal larger piece of her pottery with a wide shoulder and a slightly turned out neck.  The design is a migration pattern which is painted around the body of the piece.  Note the tight lines and the complexity of the pattern.  The jar was traditionally fired so there are blushes and fireclouds around the surface which add to the overall appearance of the jar.  It is signed on the bottom, “Leah Nampeyo”.   The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,100.00
Roller, Cliff –  Bowl with Eternity Design (1988)

Cliff Roller is a son of noted potter Toni Roller. Each piece is coil built and stone polished.  This bowl is carved iwth a classic eternity pattern, which is the square closing in on itself.  The design is very deeply carved into the clay.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ciff Roller”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While these days Cliff makes very little pottery, each piece remains a statement to his skill as a potter!

$ 650.00
Sale!
Martinez, Lucy – Jar with Feather Pattern (1980’s)

Lucy Martinez is known for her traditional style San Ildefonso pottery.  This jar is highly polished and painted with a feather pattern around the neck. Around the shoulder is a cloud pattern.  Typically she would make the pottery and it would be polished by her husband, Richard. The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Lucy M.”.

$ 125.00 $ 75.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Miniature Carved Avanyu Bowl (1980)

While Nancy is known for her swirl melon bowls and carved pottery, she started out her career making miniatures.  This miniature is from 1980.  It is red and matte and note how deeply it is carved for the size!  The design is a water serpent (avanyu), which encircles the bowl.  The water serpent is polished a deep red and the remainder of the piece is matte.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nancy Youngblood”

$ 1,200.00
Komalestewa, Alton – Brown 11 Rib Melon Jar

Alton Komalestewa learned to make pottery from his mother-in-law, Helen Shupla.  She was famous for her traditional melon bowls and over the years Alton has taken and refined this form with thinner walls and a highly polished surface.  This melon jar is fired brown, which is unusual for his pottery.  It is made with undulating ribs, which are pushed out from the inside.  It is technically difficult to stretch the clay and create even ribs.  This jar has 11 ribs and a very highly polished sturface.  It has been traditionally fired and it is signed on the bottom by Alton and he also uses a katsina face as part of the hallmark of his name.

$ 900.00
Fragua, Glendora – Mini Plate with Dragonflies

This miniature plate by Glendora Fragua is fully polished tan.  It is fully incised on the front with three dragonflies.  There are painted designs on the rim.  The back of the plate has flowers.  The various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  It is signed on the back in the clay with Glendora’s corn hallmark.

$ 125.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Jar with Bird Tails & Red Rim (2017)

This is a classic style Hopi-Tewa jar by Mark Tahbo.  The jar has a wide, round body and a slight neck.  The neck and the base are both fully polished a deep red. The sides of the jar have the traditional eagle tail pattern which was seen on the historic Sikyatki pottery.  The bird tails are painted with two different colors of red clay slip.  Mark has left open areas on the jar to reveal more the coloration of the clay from the firing.  Note the intricately painted patterns and how Mark flows them across the shoulder and reinforces the shape of the piece!  The red on the jar is a the classic red clay slip, which is  a beautiful contrast to the blushes of the clay.  The black is bee-weed (a plant).  The jar is traditionally fired to create the various colorations from the heat of the fire. It is signed on the bottom with a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 800.00
Tahbo, Mark  – “Coming of Spring” Jar (2017)

This is a striking jar by Mark Tahbo.  He has titled this piece, “The Coming of Spring”. The jar has two sections with birds painted onto the surface of the piece.  Each of the birds is different and each is painted with different colors of clay for the heads, bodies and tails.  Separating each of the birds is a large round, bird tail pattern. There is a white prayer feather at the top of the circles.  The red, mauve and white are all natural clay slips.  The black is bee-weed (a plant).  The jar is traditionally fired to create the various colorations from the heat of the fire. It is signed on the bottom with a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 800.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Small Jar with Bird Tail Designs (2017)

This is a smaller jar by Mark Tahbo.  The jar has a wide, round body and a slight neck. The designs painted on the sides are three different bird tails.  Each of them is different in color and style.  One of them is just black, the others combined more red.  Note the intricately painted patterns and how Mark flows them across the shoulder and reinforces the shape of the piece!  The red on the jar is a the classic red clay slip, which is  a beautiful contrast to the blushes of the clay.  The black is bee-weed (a plant) and the red is a natural clay slip.  The jar is traditionally fired to create the various colorations from the heat of the fire. It is signed on the bottom with a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 400.00
Whitegeese, Daryl  – Water Jar with Bear Paws

This jar is a traditional jar by Daryl Whitegeese.  The jar has a double shoulder and a slightly turned out neck.  The inside rim of the neck is also polished.    It has four bear paws, which are impressed into the clay and then the entire surface is fully polished. The polishing on this piece gives it a very “glass-like” appearance.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,800.00
Youngblood, Nathan – Jar with Double Avanyu

This is charming smaller water jar by Nathan Youngblood.  The jar is is a striking shape with a high shoulder and a slightly turned out neck.  Around the body of the piece there are two very deeply carved avanyu encircling the piece.  The bodies of the avanyu (water serpent) are made up of cloud, rain and water designs. Note the complexity and intricacy of the carved sections!  The jar is fully polished and has Nathan’s “glass-like” appearance to the stone polished surface.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay with his name and deer tracks, which represent his name in Tewa.

$ 3,800.00
Tse-Pe, Dora – Red Jar with Avanyu (1990)

This is a classic jar by Dora Tse-Pe.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law Rose Gonzales and continued her work in a similar style of cameo carving. This jar has a water serpent (avanyu) carved around the top of the shoulder.  The avanyu is slipped in a micaceous clay.  There is a single inset piece of turquoise for the eye.  The neck and base of the jar are both fully polished to a very high shine. The contrast of the matte and polished surfaces work perfectly on this jar.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dora of San Ildefonso”.

$ 1,400.00
de la Cruz, Juan and Lois Gutierrez  – Grandmother Spider & Blue Corn Sisters Jar

Juan Cruz is creating some beautifully painted polychrome pottery.  He is a son of noted potter Lois Gutierrez.  Lois made the jar and Juan, who is noted for his illustrations, painted the design using natural clay slips..  The jar is a classic water jar with a low shoulder and elongated neck.  Juan wrote a description of the jar as follows,

“This piece depicts a scene from a story of the two Blue Corn sisters who receive a special song that Grandmother Spider promises to bestow upon them.  It relates how the song they were taught was sung: Formerly we were Blue Corn women, now we are Morning Star.  With this song and other aid provided by Grandmother Spider, they were prepared for the forthcoming battle.”

The jar is truly polychrome (more than three colors of clay).  Note the intricacy of the painted designs and especially how he depicts Grandmother Spider with her basket and the web.  There is an open section of the jar and the intricate designs and the Blue Corn are tightly painted and utilize a variety of colors. There is simply a striking flow of design as the jar is turned and captures the sophistication of Juan’s painting style.  The jar has been traditionally fired outdoor and overall is a striking coloration.  It is signed on the indented bottom of the jar by both Juan and Lois.  The description is written on the back of a hand painted graphic of a Pueblo woman.  What a phenomenal addition to this piece and the painting helps to better understand how exceptional Juan is with his art.

$ 1,000.00
Roller, Cliff – Melon Bowl (1987)

Cliff Roller is a son of noted potter Toni Roller. Each piece is coil built and stone polished.  This distinctive melon bowl is from 1987.  It has 16 ribs and the entire surface is fully polished, including the area between the ribs!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Cliff Roller”.  This jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While these days Cliff makes very little pottery, his work remains a statement to his skill as a potter!

$ 600.00
Sanchez, Russell – “Double” Water Jar with Skunk & Avanyu

This is a traditional water jar by Russell Sanchez.  The shape is classic with the narrow base, round shoulder and flared out rim.  So, what’s the “double” part? Look at the outline of the black mica on the front of the jar.  That section is deeply carved into the clay and rounded out.  The concept Russell has created is a ‘modern’ jar (i.e. the black water jar, which is recessed in the carving) surrounded by the historic jar.  The central medallion of the jar has a sgraffito skunk and tracks above and below.  The black micaceous area is also polished, which is an additionally new technique for Russell and gives more of an appearance of a “gunmetal” jar.   It is the surrounding jar which is equally as fascinating. The rim and below the shoulder are polished deep red.  The neck is a tan colored clay.  The neck has classic designs which are inspired by the work of San Ildefonso potter Susana Aguilar.  The flowing patterns are typical of her work.  The base of the jar also has a similar connection to her work with the butterflies. The central band is a water serpent and note how as the tail or tongue reach the section of the black, it is almost as if they are breaking away to reveal the jar below.  Extraordinary!  Around the shoulder is a rounded section of the polished mica, and there are two inset bands of hei-shi beads.  For a jar with a lot going on, it is beautifully balanced and creative in concept. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 5,600.00
Sale!
Naranjo, Luciano – Jar with Deer & Ram Animals & Dancers

There are a deer and Big Horn Sheep on each side of the jar.  Separating are a Deer Dancer and a Ram Dancer.  The jar captures connection between the animals and the dancers who portray them in various Pueblo ceremonies.  Flowing through the background of the jar is a water serpent (avanyu), which ties the entire piece together.  The area where he has etched away the polished surface he has then scraped down to create a striking contrast between the polished and matte surface.  The color from the firing on this jar is a dark brown.  Luciano is definitely one of those younger potters to watch!

$ 650.00 $ 375.00
Garcia, Tammy – Birds, Rainbows and Flowers Jar (2017)

Tammy Garcia is known for her contemporary designs and use of traditional clay. This jar incorporates her evolving style of carving her pieces in various layers in the clay.  There are carved and polished birds on two sides of the jar.  They are surrounded by rainbow bands.  One bird is polished red while the other is polished tan. The rainbow bands are matte.  While the birds are intricately carved, on the sides are flowers which are both carved and etched into the clay.  Again the are polished both red and tan.  The neck of the jar has a micaceous clay slip with red polished plant designs.  Tammy has won numerous awards for her pottery for nearly the past 30 years.  Her creative work in clay, glass and bronze is found in museums worldwide.  It is exciting to see how her contemporary work continues to move Pueblo pottery forward with it innovations.

$ 7,000.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Seedpot with Thunderbird (1973)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1973 which has been fired black-and-red.  This coloration was created by Joseph Lonewolf and was distinctive for keeping the red color while having the reduction process turn the rest of the piece black!  The design in the red section is a Mimbres style bird. Note how the bird is lightly etched into the clay while the surrounding designs are much deeper incised.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00
Zane Smith, Jamie – Iroquois Jar with Flower Design

Jamie Zane Smith creates dynamic pieces which combine strong forms with stamped surface designs. This striking jar is made with Oklahoma clay and coil built.  Jamie carves a stamp out of wood and uses that to texture his pottery.  This jar has a series of flowers which are impressed into the clay.  The rim of the jar is polished to create a visual contrast to the matte areas of the flowers.  The entire enterior of the jar is also fully polished.  Jamie brings together a multitude of dimensions in his work blending the historic past with his modern visions.  Jamie remains one of the young creative potters bringing life to the clay in an area outside the southwest.

$ 1,000.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Bowl with Rain & Lightning Design (1960’s)

This bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1960’s.  It is a classic shape with a sloping shoulder.  The bowl is deeply carved with a lightning and rain pattern. The pattern extends from one section into another.  The surface is fully polished.  The bowl is signed, “Margaret”. It is only in the 1960’s that she signed this way.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Mini Jar with Flute Player, Frogs & Turtles (1998)

This miniature red jar by Grace Medicine Flower is fully polished and incised.  The design is a central medallion with a Mimbres inspired flute player.  Around the shoulder are alternating turtles and frogs.  The jar is from 1998 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.

$ 1,800.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn & Linda Cain  – Large Asymmtrical Figurative Jar

This is a fascinating piece by Autumn Borts-Medlock and her mother, Linda Cain. Over the years they have created some extraordinary collaborative pieces.  This large jar is very feminine in shape and this follows through to the design.  The jar has a series of women surrounded by large flowers.  The design is intricately carved into the clay.  It is polished red and tan and there are white and purple matte clay areas.  It is definitely a fun and fanciful jar!  The piece was made in 2004 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  The scale of the jar along with the complexity of the carving make this a exceptional piece of their art.  Autumn is a sister of noted potter Tammy Garcia.  Both Autumn and Linda have won numerous awards for their pottery, recognizing their creative and contemporary style of carving.

$ 9,800.00
Sale!
Tse-Pe, Jennifer Sisneros – Plate with Avanyu

Jennifer Sisneros Tse-pe learned her distinctive style of pottery from her late husband, Tse-Pe.  Each piece is coil built and etched with designs after the firing. This is one of her few plates. The entire surface is fully polished. The center of the plate has an etched medallion with a water serpent (Avanyu) as the design. Around the rim of the plate are semi-circular lightly etched areas.  She has stippled the background in contrast to the polished surface.  It is signed on the back with her hallmark.

$ 500.00 $ 400.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn  – Box with Foxes

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her often fanciful carved pottery and use of unique shapes.  The boxes are inspired by the traditional corn meal boxes which were used ceremonially. Today, few potters consider making boxes, as they are technically so difficult.  This amazing box is a larger size and captures that amazing ability Autumn has to combine her fanciful designs with classic Santa Clara imagery.  This box has a fox craved on one side and it is fully polished.  The head and eyes are highlighted with white a mauve clays.  On either side of the fox are flower patterns which are polished and surrounded by a micaceous clay slip.  The other sides of the box have lightning pattern, rain and additional flower patterns.  Now the corners of the box where the flowers are polished, which is very complicated to achieve a good polish at that angle.  The lid is micaceous and there is a single inset piece of Damale Turquoise on the back of the fox figure.  The fox figure is sculptural and matches the fox on the box.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 6,500.00
Suina, Dena – Storyteller with 14 Kids and Bowl

Dena Suina is known for her intricately designed storytellers.  This figure has 14 kids on the body.  Take a closer look and note how they are each very intricately painted and highly detailed.  Each one is interacting with another!  There is also a bowl she is holding on her lap.  Inside the bowl are various colored kernels of corn.  The bowl is in the shape of a kiva bowl.  Note as well the intricacy on the braid on her hair!  Dena creates amazingly intricate and very charming storytellers!

$ 550.00
Paquin, Gladys – Large Jar with Triple Rainbow

Gladys Paquin is one of the revivalist potters of Laguna Pueblo.  Each piece is coil built, painted with bee-weed (black) and native clay slips and traditionally fired.  This large jar is one of her most classic designs.  The jar itself is thin walled and an exceptional form.  However, it is the polychrome rainbow pattern which is considered her most complicated and elegant design.  This jar has three interlocking rainbow pattern which encompass the surface of the piece. They are painted with two different clay slips and the brownish red color is polished.  This creates a visual contrast between the polished and matte surfaces.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Gladys Sratyu’we Paquin”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,600.00
Suina, Dena – Storyteller with 19 Kids

Dena Suina is known for her intricately designed storytellers.  This figure has 19 kids on the body.  Take a closer look and note how they are each very intricately painted and highly detailed.  Each one is interacting with another!  Note as well the intricate designs on the back of her dress!  It is a beautifully painted piece.  Dena creates amazingly intricate and very charming storytellers!

$ 650.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Traditional Ladle with Silver Inset

This is a traditional ladle or spoon by Preston Duwyenie.  It is made from a red clay found near Hopi.  The entire piece is fully polished. There is an inset piece of silver on the handle. The silver is meant to represent the shifting sands found in the areas around Hopi.  The silver is cast against cuttle-fish bone (a type of squid).  The silver is inset after the firing and there is a design etched on both ends.  The ladle is signed on the back in the clay with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child.  Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

$ 275.00
Suina, Dena – Drummer Storyteller with 13 Kids

Dena Suina is known for her intricately designed storytellers.  This figure is a male drummer.  The first storyteller figures were men or grandfather figures.  The figure has 13 kids on the body.  Take a closer look and note how they are each very intricately painted and highly detailed.  Each one is interacting with another!    Dena creates amazingly intricate and very charming storytellers!

$ 500.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Flight”, published in “Pottery Jewels” Book (1975)

Joseph Lonewolf is certainly one of the most impactful potters from the 1970’s onward.  His creativity in designs and the realism of his sgraffito work has influenced numerous potters over the years.  Over the past 20 years, we have only had a couple of pieces come back to the gallery which were published in, “The Pottery Jewels of Joseph Lonewolf” book in 1976.  This is one of the seminal books on his pottery.  This piece is entitled, “Flight” and the photo of is a fascinating one in the book, where there was an attempt to photograph it “life size”.  Joseph wrote of this piece,

“The mule deer buck and doe are shown in the blow-up of this pot, in flight from an unfamiliar sound or scent that has reached them deep in the forest.  The traditional kilt design is shown on the back of the pot, actual size, on the top of the basket.  The deer provides many things worn in the winter dances along with the kilt.”

Technically, note the etching in the background area surrounding the two deer and how it accentuates the forms and polish.  this piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It signed on the bottom in the clay.  The amazing provenance on this piece is that this is the first time it has been on the market, as it was acquired from Joseph at the time of the release of the book and has been in one collection since then.   It is very unique opportunity to own a imporant piece of history by this exceptional and influential Pueblo artist!

$ 5,800.00
Cain, Linda – Lidded Square Seedpot with Bird & Clouds

This is an intricately carved square seedpot by Linda Cain.  She is a daughter of Mary Cain and the mother of potters Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts-Medlock. This seedpot has flat sides and each side is deeply carved with designs.  There is a bird. cloud and rain designs. She has used polished and micaceous surfaces to create visual contrasting with her carved designs.  The top of the seedpot has a flower pattern and the lid is the stem of the flower, creating an unique 3D appearance.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,800.00
Baca, Alvin – Red Melon Jar with 25 Ribs

Alvin Baca is known for his classic melon ribbed jars.   He is a son of noted potter Angela Baca.  This red jar is carved with 25 ribs.  It is fully polished, including the base.  The shape is a classic for Alvin with the high shoulders but the use of the rounded neck is a new addition to his style.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 300.00
Roybal, Tonita – Jar with Rain Design & Goldtone Firing

This is an exciting jar by Tonita Roybal, from the 1920’s.  The bowl was made and paintd by Tonita.  The shape of the jar is one of her classic shapes with the high shoulder and sloping neck.  The design is a prayer feather and rain pattern.  However, what really makes this jar exciting is the firing. There are areas which are gunmetal, which is the more metallic coloration. There are also areas with the “goldtone” firing, which gives them a more yellow-gold appearance.  This is a technique which Tonita attempted to create on her pottery to create a distinctive appearance.  It is not of then that we see it on her pottery but it is one of the many creative innovations she added to San Ildefonso pottery in the 1920’s.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Tonita”.

$ 2,400.00
Roybal, Tonita – Gunmetal Fired Jar with Cloud Designs

This is a visually striking jar by Tonita Roybal, from the 1920’s.  The jar was made and painted by Tonita.  It has a wide, round shoulder, and a slight neck. The jar is painted with a series of cloud patterns separated by rain and wind designs.  Note the strength of the painting on the piece and the wide lines, which enhance the design.  While beautifully painted, it is the firing, which gave this jar a very metallic gunmetal appearance.  It is a beautiful surface and great designs. The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Tonita”.

$ 800.00
Baca, Alvin – Black Melon Jar with 24 Ribs

Alvin Baca is known for his classic melon ribbed jars. This black jar is carved with 24 ribs.  It is fully polished even to the base! The shape is a classic for Alvin with the high shoulders but the use of the rounded neck is a new addition to his style.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 275.00
Fender, Erik – Open Bowl with Avanyu & Feather Pattern

Erik Fender is the son of Martha Appleleaf and the grandson of noted potter Carmelita Dunlap. Erik combines classic San Ildefonso imagery with his own creative style. His pottery is signed, with his Tewa name, “Than Tsideh”.  This open bowl is carved on the outside with an avanyu and has a micaceous clay slip. The inside of the bowl is very fully painted with a feather, rain and cloud pattern.  It is a striking contrast between the polished interior and the mica exterior.  However, it is the complexity of a fully designed piece which makes this bowl so extraordinary.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 900.00
Baca, Alvin – Miniature 16 Rib Melon Rib Jar

Alvin Baca is known for his classic melon ribbed jars. This red jar is one of his few miniatures.  There are sixteen ribs on the jar.  It is fully polished even to the base! The shape is a classic for Alvin with the high shoulders but the use of the rounded neck is a new addition to his style.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 150.00
Folwell, Jody – “The Anachronism” Large Jar

This is a striking and massive jar by Jody Folwell.  The jar has a very old style shape and is inspired by the historic vessels in a painting by E.I. Couse.  The colors in the photos are probably more accurate in the group shot. That being said, the jar is carved and has a series of designs, from a large hummingbird to a very old style Avanyu.  The figures are separated by the Folwell family “x” design, which encompasses much of the surface.  Speaking of the surface, note that the jar almost appears worn.  Jody used sandpaper on the surface, after she slipped and painted the jar, to give the appearance of age.  She says she wanted it to feel as if it was in one of Couse’s paintings, but “an anachronism”.  The “x’s” would be the design that would place it later in time.  In person, this is a stunnign piece and again, the color is just extraordinary.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 7,400.00
Folwell, Susan – “Hennings at Sunset in the Show” Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series for, “Peering through Taos Light”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This jar is inspired by the painting “Passing By” by Ernest Hennings.  Susan says of this piece,

“In the painting, it is a scene with the two women walking down the lane. When I was working on this jar in Taos, it was the first snow of the season.  I deiced to make it a snow scene instead of an autumn scene.

The color of the jar is the key to this piece.  It captures the mood of the sky after a snow and at sunset.  The piece is mostly matte, with a single band of the Folwell family “x’s” etched into the clay.  The figures are painted but note the use etching around the plants, which gives them just a slight sense of relief.   Sometimes less is more and the strength of the design is powerful enough for the jar.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 4,500.00
Folwell, Susan – “The Wedding” Large Open Bowl

This open bowl by Susan Folwell is entitled, “The Wedding”.  It is part of her series for, “Peering through Taos Light”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. The bowl is inspired by the E.I. Couse painting “The Wedding”.  Susan says of this piece,

“I chose to keep the faces neutral, because you can still feel the tension between the newlyweds.  The line between them is meant to symbolize their new life together.  The back has dragonflies, the messengers of our prayers.  The edges are left rough, as if the bowl is one that has stood the test of time as these newlyweds look back at their first moment together.”

This open bowl is beautifully painted and certainly captures the essence of the story.  The design and flow are in balance, as is the use of the open clay spaces throughout the piece.  It is signed on the back.

$ 3,400.00
Folwell, Jody –  Santa Clara Gunmetal Water Jar

This is a classic Santa Clara water jar Jody Folwell.  This jar is inspired by a classic Santa Clara water jar used in an EI Couse painting. Seeing this jar set against a reproduction of the painting certainly captures Jody’s intent. The double shoulder and flared neck create a beautiful balance.  The jar it fired and has gunmetal colorations, which were often seen on pieces from the early 1900’s due to the high temperature of the firing.  Amazingly, they flow around the entire surface of the jar and are beautifully reflect the light.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 4,400.00

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