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These are all the New Additions which have been added for the last 30 days.

NEW PIECES ARE ADDED EACH DAY, SO CHECK BACK!

Diaz, Tina – Black Jar with Avanyu

Tina Diaz is a daughter of Mary Cain and a sister of noted potters Joy, Linda and Billy Cain.  She makes very few pieces of pottery each year and this is one of the few carved black pieces.  The jar is very thin walled and fully carved.  The design is an avanyu (water serpent), which encircles the piece.  It is slipped in mica.  The remainder of the piece is fully carved and polished.  Note how her designs are very fluid from top to bottom.  As well, the background area which is matte is “rounded”, which adds another dimension to her pottery!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 400.00
Nampeyo, Janell – Bowl with Bat Wing Design

Janell Nampeyo is a daughter of Adelle Nampeyo, a granddaughter of Elva Tewaguna Namepyo, a great-granddaughter of Fannie Nampeyo, and a great-great-granddaughter of the Nampeyo of Hano.  She creates coil built pottery painted with bee weed.  This bowl has a batwing design painted from the neck of the bowl.  The rim is slipped with a red clay.  The bat-wing pattern is one that was revived by Nampeyo of Hano.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 125.00
Garcia, Shana – Wide Jar with Yucca Designs and Bird Design Rim

Shana Garcia is known for her creative shaped and sculptural rim pottery.   Each piece is coil built and painted with yucca to create the long thin lines.  This large jar has a spiraling yucca or plant design extending up from the shoulder to the rim. The rim is sculpted with additional clay to create the bird wing pattern and additional yucca and rain patterns.  Shana said the shape of the rim is meant to represent the birds over the kivas.  It is striking how she is able to combine such traditional imagery with such a modern appearance!

$ 800.00
Sarracino, Myron – Long Neck Jar with Tularosa Swirl Patterns

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. The imagery on much of his pottery is derived from pre-historic pottery designs. The shape of this jar has a long neck and low shoulder. The design is inspired by the Tularosa black-on-white pottery made from 1150-1325 in the Chaco Canyon and southern Colorado areas. The neck has a lightning pattern painted with very fine lines.  The Tulrosa swirl comes up from the base. The black and white coloration remains inspired by the historic colors.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 475.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Plainware Wide Mouth Water Jar

Mark Tahbo was known not just for his painted pottery, but especially for the blushes on his pottery.  This jar is fully polished and note how Mark polished it at an angle or swirl below the shoulder! It is just visible in the coloration. The jar is traditionally fired and there are color variations from white to dark orange.  Mark said about this piece,

“My first plainware pieces were done years ago. I was sure that these would be well received and gallery owner Charles king took a chance with them. They were an immediate hit!  I don’t do very much plainware for it has to be flawless.  The surface has to be free of all dips or air holes and the shape has to be elegant on its own, as there is no design to distract the eye.  The colors achieved on the pots are truly amazing.  Each piece is fired outdoors using sheep dung and coals.  This piece turned out a “pumpkin” color.  I love it!”

It is signed on the bottom with a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 700.00
Sarracino, Myron –  “Lightning Over the Mesa” Jar

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. The imagery on this jar is a classic lightning pattern over the mesas. The lightning pattern is painted around the top 3/4 of the ajr and the last section has a red for the earth and a painted mesa pattern.  The use of the red near the base in the design is visually striking.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 325.00
Clashin, Debbie – Large Jar with Bird and Plant Designs

This is a large wide shoulder jar by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. The wide shape created a perfect space for the tightly painted design.  There are two panels of design.  Each has a bird and bird wing connected with plant and rain patterns.  The  jar is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  It it was traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 2,400.00
Begay, Jr., Harrison – Jar with Heartline Bears

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This tall jar is a classic shape with a round body and a slightly turned out neck.  The rim of the jar is fully polished.  Around the side of the jar it is fully carved.  Harrison says that he tries to carve his pieces so that the imagery looks to be in motion.  This jar has two heartline bears carved into the clay. The heartline represents the strength of the animal.  As the jar clouds and water designs.  The carving is deep and the polishing is nearly glassy. The contrast of the matte and polished surfaces is perfection!  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 575.00
Whitegeese, Daryl  – Long Neck Water Jar with Clouds & Mountains

This is a classic long neck water jar by Daryl Whitegeese.  The jar has a round body and an elongated neck. The rim is very sharp, which is always a bit of a surprise that it didn’t crack in the drying or polishing stage.  The neck is fully stone polished and the body of the jar is fully carved.  There is a cloud, kiva step, mountain, wind and prayer feather design which encircle the piece.  What makes the design interesting is the variations of circular and angular designs.  The full designs tell a story as the jar is turned and there is no repetition.  Typical of Daryl’s carving there are sharp edges to the carving.  The bottom of the jar is also fully polished.  The jar is highly polished and fired a dark black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Daryl has won numerous awards at Santa Fe Indian Market and other events.  He remains one of the exciting traditional potters working today!

 

 

$ 3,500.00
Victorino, Katherine – Jar with Lightning Design

Katherine Victorino is a daughter of accomplished Acoma potter Monroe Victorino.   She began making pottery at nine years old and attributes her pottery education to her step-mother Beverly Garcia.  Katherine says; “I started by filling in the lines for my step-mother, and gradually I learned the traditional methods of hand-coil construction and fine line painting (using only yucca brushes) well enough to make pottery full time at the age of twenty.”  Her pieces are coil built and painted with bee-weed.  This jar is an elegant shape with a high shoulder and a slight neck.  The jar is painted with a classic lightning pattern made famous as a revival design by Lucy Lewis. The intricate designs encompass the entire surface, creating a strong graphic appearance with the contrast of the black and white.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Miniature 32 Rib Melon Bowl

This is an exceptional miniature by Nancy Youngblood.  This bowl is from 2017.   It is one of her classic deep carved miniature melon bowls. The bowl has thirty-two ribs and each is very deeply carved into the clay in a vertical manner. They are narrow at the base and neck and wider at the shoulder.  Each rib is individually polished.  Nancy has a particular stone which allows her to polish so deeply and the piece has a glassy surface.  She says she can only polish three ribs at a time.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nancy Youngblood”.  While it may be a small piece, it is certainly spectacular and an iconic work by this renowned artist.

$ 3,800.00
Namingha, Les – Hopi Birds Oval Jar

This is a uniquely shaped jar by Les Namingha. The shape has an oval body and an asymmetrical neck.  The design has four Hopi style birds painted on the surface.  The bodies of the birds are painted with more traditional designs.  Above the birds are stylized bird wing patterns.  The highly colored surface and unique shape give this jar a very modern appearance and yet with a classic Hopi-Tewa style of design.  Les is a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano and learned to make pottery from his aunt Dextra Quotskuyva.  It is signed on the bottom.

 

 

 

 

$ 1,500.00
Vigil, Phillip – “Blue River” Original Acrylic on Canvas

Phillip Vigil is one of the exciting, young native painters working today.  His modernist designs are a play on his life, culture and personal experiences.  Phillip has primarily been working on paper, but the transition to canvas has been an exciting change in his art. In a 2011 “Rethinking Contemporary Native American Art” article in “THE” magazine, they included Vigil saying,  “Phillip Vigil seeks his identity as a contemporary creative type who is also an indigenous person.  He is self-taught, inspired to paint by his love of the comic strip Calvin & Hobbes”.

This painting, “Blue River”, is a large-scale piece painted on canvas.  Phillip said of this piece:

“I think of this painting as a metaphor for life.  Just as no river ever really flows in a straight line, neither do our lives.  The big blue streak of color is representational of the, ‘curving river’ and the way things always unexpectedly ‘pop-up’ in life to challenge us and change our direction.

The other elements of the painting, the splashes, marks, lines and drips, each of these speaks to the unexpected.  They are metaphors for our lives which rarely follow an imposed path no matter how hard we try to control events, people or the world around us.  Each day is like the paint, it will drip and splash around us and choose its own path.”

We are pleased to represent his paintings in our Scottsdale gallery and look for more from this amazing artist!

$ 3,500.00
Victorino, Katherine – Jar with Turtle Shell Design

Katherine Victorino is a daughter of accomplished Acoma potter Monroe Victorino.  She began making pottery at nine years old and attributes her pottery education to her step-mother Beverly Garcia.   This jar is a classic water jar or “olla” shape for Acoma with a narrow base, wide shoulder and turned in neck.  The jar is coil built and the pattern is a turtle shell design.  It combines strong black and white graphics with fine-line Acoma painting.  Katherine says, “I started by filling in the lines for my step-mother, and gradually I learned the traditional methods of hand-coil construction and fine line painting (using only yucca brushes) well enough to make pottery full time at the age of twenty.”  The intricate designs encompass the entire surface, creating a strong graphic appearance with the contrast of the black and white.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Youngblood, Nathan – Tan Polished “Egg” – 3 Pieces

Nathan Youngblood is one of those few potters who has actually created new shapes which are unique in Pueblo pottery.  His “tear drop shaped” plates and his “eggs” are the two most famous of his innovative forms.  This egg is three pieces, each perfectly designed to fit with the next piece. The base is carved with a cloud pattern. The top of the egg is carved with rain and cloud symbols. The bottom half of the egg has walking bear paw, mountain patterns and an encircling avanyu.  All three pieces are fired tan, which is one of the most difficult colors to achieve in Pueblo pottery.  Why?  It is water instead of a clay slip that is used to polish the piece.  Polish too hard and it is streaky, and not hard enough and it is dull.  When a piece is traditionally fired it also takes in more smoke which changes the color.  This piece has perfect firing and the result is a caramel coloration, which is always so rich and distinctive for the tan fired vessels.  All three piece are signed with Nathan’s name and deer tracks, which represents his name in Tewa.

$ 11,000.00
Archuleta,  Mary Ester – Red Jar with Tan Kiva Step Pattern

This is a beautifully shaped jar by Mary Ester Archuleta.  The jar has a round body and a slightly turned out neck.  It is fully polished red and carved around the body with a kiva step design.  The carved areas are polished tan in contrast to the red of the remainder of the jar.   The tan is the natural color of the clay and always difficult to achieve this coloration.  There is also the traditional cream colored slip painted into the carved areas.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mary E. Archuleta.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Mary is the second youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  She married into San Juan Pueblo in the late 1960’s and created most of her pieces in the San Juan inspired style.

$ 1,800.00
Eteeyan, Mary Louise – Mini Bowl with Butterfly Lid and Plant Designs

Mary Louise Eteeyan is known for her delicately painted pottery and carved lids.  This bowl is polished red around the base and painted with flowers around the side.  Mary Louise uses classic Jemez clays to create her designs.  The lid has a polished rim and a sculptured butterfly on top.  Note the detail in the design and shape of the butterfly!  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 75.00
Martinez, Maria – Wide Black Plainware Bowl “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

In the 1950’s Maria Martinez created a series of pieces which were simply stone polished with no design.  As she primarily made the pottery and polished it this was fitting with the other pieces of her career.  This wide bowl is very highly polished and it is fired a dark black.  The bowl is signed in the clay, “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,800.00
Gutierrez, Margaret Lou Roybal – Large Bowl with Feather Designs

Margaret Lou Gutierrez was the only daughter of noted potters Tonita & Juan Roybal.  She began making pottery in the 1970’s. This bowl is one of the largest we have seen of her pottery.  It is very highly polished and beautifully painted with a feather pattern.  Note how tight and sharp the feather are in the design!   This bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Lou Gutierrez”.

$ 875.00
Gutierrez, Margaret Lou -Bowl with Wind Designs

Margaret Lou Gutierrez was the only daughter of noted potters Tonita & Juan Roybal.  She began making pottery in the 1970’s. This bowl is very highly polished and one of her classic round shapes.  The design is a very tightly painted wind and cloud pattern with a mountain design.  The fine lines are certainly reminiscent of the designs painted by her father Juan in the 1930’s.  Margaret Lou no longer makes pottery.  This bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Lou Gutierrez”.

$ 225.00
Garcia, Shana – Jar with Bird Wing & Kiva Designs

Shana Garcia is known for her very thin walled pottery.  Each piece is coil built and painted with yucca to create the long thin lines.  This jar has a series of bird wing patterns as part of the overall design.  They swirl around the jar creating beautiful op-art imagery.  The rim of the jar is sculptured with three pieces of clay and a fineline bird wing pattern.  Shana said that this meant to represent the birds over the kivas.  It is striking how she is able to combine such traditional imagery with such a modern appearance!

$ 350.00
Garcia, Gloria “Golden Rod” – Bowl with Turtles and Fish

This bowl by Gloria Garcia is fully polished and fired black. The design is a series of fish and turtles. They are intermixed as they swim around the surface of the piece.  There are additional areas with a red clay slip in contrast to the polished black.  Gloria’s combination of polishing and etched designs is always striking.  This piece is signed on the bottom with her Tewa name “GoldenRod”.

$ 450.00
Lucas, Yvonne – Large Jar with Plant and Laguna Designs

Yvonne Lucas learned to make pottery from her husband, Steve Lucas and his aunt, Dextra Qutoskuyva.  She is one of the few Laguna potters who uses all traditional materials and traditionally fires their pottery.  The jar is slipped with a white clay and then painted with a red clay slip and bee-weed (for the black). The design has a plant motif around the neck, and then a Laguna Pueblo style checkerboard pattern.  The visually striking part of the jar is the shoulder design, with the fan-shaped plants.  They are slipped with a polished red cay and encircle the jar.  The contrast of the red and black on the white works perfectly for this size.  The jar is traditionally fired outdoors, so there are blushes on the surface creating the slightly tan areas.  The jar is thin-walled and perfectly shaped.  Yvonne focuses on the black-on-red coloration, as that was a style seen at Laguna Pueblo around 1900.  This is Yvonne’s way of paying tribute to these pieces but also giving it her own modern style.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 4,400.00
Medicine Flower, Grace & Camillio Tafoya – Large Red & Black Wedding Vase

This an unusual collaborative piece by Grace Medicine Flower and her father, Camilio Tafoya.  It is from the early 1970’s and it was fired “black-and-red”.  It is a distinctive firing technique where the piece is covered before the manure is put on to turn it black.  The bowl was made by Camilio and polished by Grace. She would then etch the designs into the clay before it was fired.  This piece has Koshari clowns dancers on either side.   They are in the center of the red “two-tone” medallion. The sides of the lip on the spouts are also two-tone red.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicne Flower and Camilio Tafoya”.   The wedding vase is in good condition with no chips,cracks, restoration or repair and a few light surface scratches.

$ 1,500.00
Allison, Marla – “Shawls and Pottery” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a member of Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. Marla lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

Marla began her expression through art in her youth and gained formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.

She was the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

Marla says of her painting:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Shawls and Pottery (Going to see Charles)“.  Ok, how you can you not LOVE the tile!  The painting utilizes what we love about her work:  a vibrant color scheme and Pueblo graphics.  It is a subtle but striking piece and a reflection of why she has become such an important name in contemporary Native painting!

$ 3,400.00
Victorino, Katherine – Jar with Butterflies & Flowers

Katherine Victorino is a daughter of accomplished Acoma potter Monroe Victorino.  She began making pottery at nine years old and attributes her pottery education to her step-mother Beverly Garcia.  Katherine says; “I started by filling in the lines for my step-mother, and gradually I learned the traditional methods of hand-coil construction and fine line painting (using only yucca brushes) well enough to make pottery full time at the age of twenty.”  This jar has a classic shape with the slope up from the base and the slightly indented shoulder.  The design is a series of flower motif connected with a four-part butterfly design. It encircles the entire surface of the jar creating a strong graphic appearance with the contrast of the black and white.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Tafoya-Sanchez, Linda –  Flower Petals and Pollen Jar

Linda Tafoya-Sanchez learned to make pottery from her father, Lee Tafoya, a son of Margaret Tafoya.  This jar is a short neck water jar and has flower petals carved around the neck.  The design below the shoulder is a series of circles which represent the flower pollen and the angular designs are the wind.  The final appearance of the jar is one that is both very traditional and very modern!  The carved areas are fully polished and there are sections with micaceous clay.  The contrast of the matte and mica are always striking on her potter!  This jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Linda is a granddaughter of Margaret Tafoya and the quality and creativity in her carving are readily apparent on this vessel!

$ 1,800.00
Vigil, Phillip – “Untitled No. 1″ Original Acrylic on Canvas – 61″ X 54”

Phillip Vigil is one of the exciting, young native painters working today.  His modernist designs are a play on his life, culture and personal experiences.  Phillip has primarily been working on paper, but the transition to canvas has been an exciting change in his art. In a 2011 “Rethinking Contemporary Native American Art” article in “THE” magazine, they included Vigil saying,  “Phillip Vigil seeks his identity as a contemporary creative type who is also an indigenous person.  He is self-taught, inspired to paint by his love of the comic strip Calvin & Hobbes”.

This painting, “Untitled, No. 1”, is a large scale piece painted on canvas.  This painting shows his first step in returning to canvas and doing it in a BIG way!  Phillip said of this piece:

“This painting represents my return to painting on canvas.  It is the largest of my first four recent canvas works. While I’m primarily known for works on paper, returning to the canvas has been a seamless process.  The larger expanse of space available to paint has ushered in a new perspective for me.  I no longer feel contained by the limits of the paper size and it is quite freeing.

“This painting is about life and my life, in particular.  These are internal landscapes I have created, which stretch back to my childhood and beyond.  The hand coming down from the left corner is picking up the marbles or gum ball drops.  The rest of the painting is in motion.  This is a metaphor for how life flows around us all at the same time.”

We are pleased to represent his paintings in our Scottsdale gallery and look for more from this amazing artist!

$ 4,800.00
Clashin, Debbie – Plate with Awatovi & Sikyatki Birds

This is striking plate by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. This plate is fully polished and painted with bee-weed for the black and an orange/red clay slip.  The design is derived from the Awatovi murals, which  were near Hopi.  The bird on the left is one of the Awatovi style birds. In the center is a band with cloud and rain designs and on the right a Hopi-Tewa style Nampeyo bird which was derived from the Sikyatki pottery.  It’s an interesting combination to have representations from both of the earlier styles of Hopi pottery on one piece.  The back is stippled with numerous dots from the black bee-weed.  The plate has been traditionally fired which creates the blushes across the surface.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 1,200.00
Ami, Loren – Total Eclipse Sun Canteen

This canteen by Loren Ami was made in recognition of the solar eclipse of 2017.  It has the sun design on the front and note on the left side he used the brown clay slip and the right the red.  It symbolizes the eclipse in a visually striking manner!  The handles and neck are polished with a red clay slip.  Loren also braided the leather strap.  He learned to make pottery from Dextra Quotskuyva and the canteens were one of the special pieces she taught him to make.  Each piece is coil built, painted with native clays (red) and bee-weed (black) and outdoor fired.  The red areas are stone polished and there is a bit of mica in the red clay.   This piece is signed on the back with his name and a spider design for the Spider Clan.  Loren is certainly one of the traditionalist Hopi-Tewa potters to watch.

$ 950.00
Ami, Loren – “Dance of the Ants” Seedpot

Loren Ami learned to make pottery from Dextra Quotskuyva.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and painted with native clay slips.  Loren said he entitled this seedpot, “Dance of the Ants”.  The ants encircle the seedpot and note how they alternate from being painted in red and the in black. The red top to the seedpot is the anthill.  The seedpot is traditionally fired, which creates the fire clouds.  This piece is signed on the bottom with his name and a spider design for the Spider Clan.  Loren is certainly one of the traditionalist Hopi-Tewa potters to watch.

$ 450.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Mimbres Insects Seedpot (1986)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This intricately designed seedpot has a Mimbres inspired inch worm along the base.  There are three butterflies flying overhead along with flowers in the background.  On the back side of the piece is an incised petal design and incised flowers along with a heart medallion.  This seedpot is from 1986 and it is perfectly polished and he has used a variety of green and white clay slips to create the various colors.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,100.00
Martinez, Maria – Large Bowl with Lightning and Wind Designs (1920’s)

It is not often that we come across a large bowl by Maria Martinez in such great condition.  This bowl is from 1920-25 and it was made and polished by Maria Martinez and painted by her husband, Julian.  These early pieces are signed, “Marie”, although Julian was painting the designs.  It was not until around 1925 that they began to sign both names to the pottery.   This bowl has a wide mouth and the painting is on the side around the shoulder.  The designs are rain, lightning, wind and prayer feather patterns.  They flow perfectly across the surface.  The bowl is highly polished and fired with near-gunmetal areas on the surface. The gunmetal color achieved on these early pieces was from the heat of the firing.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie”.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

 

$ 8,200.00
Roybal, Tonita – Long Neck Jar with Avanyu (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This is is one of the larger pieces we have had of her pottery. The jar is one of her early long neck vessels with a slight shoulder.  The design is the classic water serpent (avanyu), which is painted around the shoulder.  The jar is very highly polished and fired with a range of color from black to gunmetal.  Interestingly, when she would fire these long neck jars they would be fired on their side!  This jar has a slight lean to the form.  However, the size and classic design are the dynamic parts of this amazing jar!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

$ 4,000.00
Gonzales, Ramona Sanchez – Plate with Bird Design (1920’s)

This is a striking painted bowl by Ramona Gonzales.  Ramona was known for her delicately painted pottery.  This plate is almost more like an open bowl.  It is fully polished on the front and back. The design has a bird which fills up the entire surface of the plate.  The polished background and matte painted designs work perfectly on this piece.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Ramona”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some wear on the surface. This is definitely an important piece of her pottery.

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 1,550.00
Clashin, Debbie – Polychrome Water Jar with Eagle Tail Design

This is is a wide shoulder water jar by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. This jar has a wide shoulder and a slightly turned out neck.  The body of the piece is painted with a mesa and eagle tail pattern.  In addition to the black (bee weed) she has used a deep red and an orange color of clay.  They provide a visual along with textural aspect to this jar. The rim is stippled with the bee weed.  Note how the design and the colors accentuate the shape fo this jar!  It has been traditionally fired which creates the blushes across the surface of the bowl.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 1,200.00
Vigil, Lonnie –  Open Bowl with Fireclouds

Lonnie Vigil is known for his creative use of micaceous clay and is one of a handful of potters from Nambe pueblo.  He has taken this style of pottery and transformed it from utilitarian into fine art.  This large open bowl is thin walled and beautifully fired. The shape is an open bowl with a slight rim.  The piece has been traditionally fired so that the exterior reveals the color of the micaceous clay while the interior has the smoke giving it a color variation from a metallic to deep black. The firecloud extend just around the edge of the lip.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   It is this refinement of a traditional art form for which Lonnie won “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market in the 1998.

$ 1,950.00
Peynetsa, Jamie – Jar with Rainbirds & Rosettes

Jamie Peynetsa is the son of noted potters Anderson and Avelia Peynetsa.  Avelia, his mother, coil builds the clay vessel.  Jamie paints the design.  He has a strong attention to the detail of the painting as well as his inspiration from classic Zuni pottery.  This jar is a distinctive shape with the very low indented base and the wide shoulder.  There are two large rosettes on either side of the jar.  Separating them are bands of rainbirds and Zuni birds.  Along the top of the shoulder are cloud designs with fineline patterns.  Note how well Jamie paints to match design and form.  The patterns bends and flows with the shape of the piece!  It is a striking jar and striking coloration! It is signed by Jamie and his mother on the bottom.  At only 20 years old, he certainly has a great future in pottery!

$ 1,400.00
Manymules, Samuel  – Large Water Jar with Billowing Ribs

This is a striking combination of shape and firing by Samuel Manymules.  The jar is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar has rounded ribs which billow up from the base and get larger as they reach the neck.  Each rib is pushed out from the inside of the jar as the piece is made.  The round ribs are in contrast to the sharp ridge before the neck and rim, which is slightly turned out.  The jar is polished and it is traditionally fired outdoors.  The coloration, which ranges from red to black to tan in areas.  The color changes as the jar is turned and the strong black areas seem to perfectly enhance the shape of the ribs.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 2,300.00
Naranjo, Johnathan – Buffalo & Buffalo Dancers

This bowl with buffalo and Pueblo Buffalo Dancers by Johnathan Naranjo is certainly a timely piece for winter.  Nearly every pueblo at the end of the year perform the Buffalo Dance.  There are male Buffalo Dancers and the female Buffalo Maiden.  This bowl is highly polished and the two figures are etched into the clay with realistic precision.  Separating them are stampeding buffalo. Noe as well the detail to the animals and even the sense of movement in the dust being stirred up by their feet!  The coloration of the bowl is derived from the firing technique.  The various shades of red and tan are achieved by lightly scraping away layers of polished surface!  This is a very difficult technique but visually is striking.  Johnathan has won numerous awards for his pottery and  Johnathan is definitely one of the young potters to watch!

$ 1,200.00
Ortiz, Virgil – Jar with Wildflower and Tattoo Designs

This jar by Virgil Ortiz is a modern variant on some classic Cochiti designs. The shape of the jar is one which Virgil has perfected to give the most space for his painted designs to show.  The design is a combination of both the wildflowers and the tattoo imagery of his previous work.  The result is a striking design which flows from angular to flowing plant tendrils.  Around the neck is a small cloud pattern.  The imagery is both modern and ancient.  The piece is painted with wild spinach (a plant) for the black and the cream and red are natural clay slips.  The jar is certainly the best of both the traditional and contemporary styles of design by this important Cochiti potter.  Not as well that there is a space on the rim of the neck where it is unpainted, which is the “heartline”, which Virgil always paints on his clay vessels.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,900.00
Duwyenie, Debra & Preston – Seedpot with Turtles and Silver Turtle Lid

Debra Duwyenie is well known for her wonderful miniatures and incised designs. Each piece is stone polished and then it is etched before it is fired! This seedpot has eight turtles encircling the piece.  Each of them has a different design etched onto its back.  The turtles are surrounded by fish and one lizard which has a mesa shaped head and a lightning tail.  Usually Debra etches one of the lizards to have a “shifting sand” design to represent her husband, Preston Duwyenie.  On this piece, it is the lid, which is in the shape of a turtle, was made by Preston.  The back of the turtle on the lid has the shifting sand pattern which is cast from cuttlefish!  Note that the lighter red matte areas are where Debra has only etched away the polished surface but not down as far as the tan color of the clay. Debra also pays close attention to the little details like the tan background area and how evenly she etches the vertical lines.  The bottom of the lid is stamped with Preston’s hallmark. and the bottom of the seedpot is signed by both.

$ 850.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Red Flame Design Bowl

Nancy Youngblood is known for her swirl melon bowls and carved pottery.  This amazing piece is one of what she calls her “micro-minis”.  It is even smaller than her usual miniatures!  This piece has melon ribs carved into the clay and polished red.  They are in a variety of designs from rain drops on one side, to clouds and almost a heart shaped design on another.  They ribs are deeply carved and flow around the surface of the piece. The top is matte in contrast to the polished ribs.  Consider that each rib has two “sides” to be polished and the surface area of the piece is about double its size! It may seem small, but it is a gem!  Nancy has won numerous awards for her melon bowls, and this is undoubtedly an amazing example of her skill!

$ 2,800.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Shifting Sand Tall Seedpot with Silver Road Runner Lid

Preston Duwyenie is know for his Hopi pottery which blends modern and traditional aspects of the art. This seedpot is made from a red clay which he finds near Second Mesa at Hopi.  The clay fired a tan coloration.  The body of the piece is fully polished.  The top area above the shoulder has the shifting sand design.  What makes the sand area so fascinating is how he carves it so that it has a very natural appearance.  It flows around the entire surface, just as if the clay has been swept away.  The lid is made from silver and cast against cuttlefish bone. Preston cut the lid so that it has the shape of a road runner.  The casting creates a  similar style of ‘shifting sand’ design to complement the clay areas!  The seedpot and the silver lid are signed on the bottom with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child and his Hopi name, which means “carried in beauty”.   Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

“Why the shifting sand designs? Preston says he remembers watching a smooth pebble caught in sand being shifted by the wind, “there was beauty in its isolation within the sea of sand. It was like an island.  The endless sands of time, and the fact that people, too are tossed about by the wind. There is always rippling in our lives”.

$ 750.00
Naranjo, Madeline – Lidded Box with Parrots

Madeline Naranjo creates beautifully carved and polished pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This box is rectangular in shape.  It has carved parrots on two sides.  They are both matte and polished in sections.  On the ends of the box are plant designs carved into the clay.  The lid is fully polished and has a lip on the inside so that it rests inside the box.  Note as well how her matte areas are sanded and perfectly smooth so that there are no indentions or areas where the matte might make a shadow.  Her designs are always innovative and beautifully executed.  The box is signed on the bottom.

$ 500.00
Victorino, Katherine – Jar with Zig Zag Design

Katherine Victorino is a daughter of accomplished Acoma potter Monroe Victorino.  She began making pottery at nine years old and attributes her pottery education to her step-mother Beverly Garcia.   This jar is a classic water jar or “olla” shape for Acoma with a narrow base, wide shoulder and turned in neck.  The jar is coil built and the pattern is a rain design but painted in a “zig-zag” manner. The resulting triangular patterns are visually striking on the jar!  Katherine says of her pottery,  “I started by filling in the lines for my step-mother, and gradually I learned the traditional methods of hand-coil construction and fine line painting (using only yucca brushes) well enough to make pottery full time at the age of twenty.”  The intricate designs encompass the entire surface, creating a strong graphic appearance with the contrast of the black and white.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Diaz, Tina – Red & Tan Jar with Rain Design

Tina Diaz has skillfully created her own unique style of carving pottery.  She is one of only a handful of Santa Clara potters who has mastered the technique of polishing her pottery tan.  The tan is the natural color of the clay and the most difficult to polish to achieve a high shine.  This red and tan jar is fully carved with very sharp geometric patterns.  The jar has rain patterns which are the melon ribs extending across the design.  The remainder of the piece consists of tan polished prayer feather patterns. The number of individual sections makes this a very complex piece for both carving and polishing!  It is always technically difficult to carve such sharp angles and delicate edges into the clay.  The background has a red colored slip for contrast with the tan.  The piece is signed on the bottom, “Tina Diaz”. 

$ 375.00
Vigil, Phillip – “Sunset” Original Acrylic on Canvas – 54″ X 28″

Phillip Vigil is one of the exciting, young native painters working today.  His modernist designs are a play on his life, culture and personal experiences.  Phillip has primarily been working on paper, but the transition to canvas has been an exciting change in his art.  In a 2011 “Rethinking Contemporary Native American Art” article in “THE” magazine, they included Vigil saying,  “Phillip Vigil seeks his identity as a contemporary creative type who is also an indigenous person.  He is self-taught, inspired to paint by his love of the comic strip Calvin & Hobbes”.

This painting, “Sunset”, is a visually stunning use of color and design to reveal his experiences.  Phillip said of this piece:

“This painting, “Sunset” is a representation of the spectacular and visually varied event which is each sunset here in the high desert.  The light, the shape of the clouds and the quickly changing colors are stunning.  They amaze and inspire me.  Where I live in Jemez Pueblo, just south of the main village, the light pollution is limited and just as the sun sets, the first stars come out.  For most people this remarkable visual experience is something taken for granted.  For me, when I look up and see the sunset and then the first light of the stars in the darkening sky, I can’t help but think, ‘what more inspiration does one need’”.

 

We are pleased to represent his paintings in our Scottsdale gallery and look for more from this amazing artist!

$ 2,500.00
Vigil, Phillip – “Rain” Original Acrylic on Canvas – 46″ X 55″

Phillip Vigil is one of the exciting, young native painters working today.  His modernist designs are a play on his life, culture and personal experiences.  Phillip has primarily been working on paper, but the transition to canvas has been an exciting change in his art.  In a 2011 “Rethinking Contemporary Native American Art” article in “THE” magazine, they included Vigil saying,  “Phillip Vigil seeks his identity as a contemporary creative type who is also an indigenous person.  He is self-taught, inspired to paint by his love of the comic strip Calvin & Hobbes”.

This painting, “Rain”, is a large scale piece painted on canvas.  Phillip said of this piece:

“’Rain’ is about the rains which come during the monsoons throughout our southwestern summers.  The big thunder clouds build up in the distance and the you can see the rain flowing downward from them.  I currently live in Jemez Pueblo and here, rain is our everything.  It sustains our people or grows the chili or corn which are part of my daily life.

The recent droughts have put a strain on Pueblo life and has caused me to reflect on the importance of water to me, the pueblo and our culture.  The cleansing, sustaining rains which come each summer remind me that Water is Life.”

We are pleased to represent his paintings in our Scottsdale gallery and look for more from this amazing artist!

$ 3,500.00
Manymules, Samuel  – Tan Melon Jar with Fire Clouds

This is a very traditional melon jar by Samuel Manymules.  The jar is coil built and stone polished and then traditionally fired. The coloration of the surface of the jar is the natural color of the clay.  The ribs on this jar swirl around the from the base to the neck and are rounded.  The lip is thin and slightly turned out.  The flow of the ribs without a stopping point at the neck creates elegance.  The traditional firing created the blushes which are deep black and encompass areas from the rim to the base of the jar.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 800.00
Duwyenie, Preston – White Narrow Shifting Sands Plate with Silver

This plate by Preston Duwyenie is made from white Hopi clay found near Third Mesa at Hopi.  The back of the plate is stone polished and the front is carved to have the appearance of “shifting sand”.  The sand design has an organic and natural flow to each ribbon of sand, giving the appearance of them flowing across the surface.  On this plate, each of the bands is very tightly carved against the next, which creates a very striking appearance.  I photographed the plate with a quarter turn, which shows off how each line of sand has a different shadow as the piece is turned!  The center of the plate has a single inset piece of silver which is cast from cuttlefish bone.  The textured surface of the silver is similar to that of the surface of the plate.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child, which comes from Preston’s Hopi name, which means “carried in beauty”.  Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

$ 900.00
Kasero, Sr., Robert – Seedpot with Red & Black Op-Art Spiral Design

This is an intricately painted seedpot by Robert Kasero.  It is very thin walled and painted with an “op-art” style of spiral mountain design.  It starts small at the top then enlarges as the shoulder and small again at the base.  It is dynamic in the flow of the tightly painted designs.  Note how the base of the seedpot is also indented keeping in the style of historic Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom. 

$ 650.00
Honyumptewa, Kimberly Riley – Picuris Micaceous Jar

Kimberly Riley Honyumptewa is from Laguna/Picuris Pueblo and married to Aaron Honyumptewa who is Hopi/Picuris. She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law in the traditional Picuris style and using native clay from the area. Each piece is coil built and traditionally fired.  Kimberly has a strong sense of form as the jar has a sharp shoulder and a elongated neck. The piece is traditionally fired so there are beautiful blushes across the surface. Will be exciting to see how her work evolves in creating more Picuris pottery!

$ 125.00
Namingha, Les – “Urban” Jar

This is an exceptional and important large vessel by Les Namingha.  The title of the piece is “Urban” and Les says it is inspired by the work of Basqiat, Haring, Lewitt, Jersey Joe and Nampeyo.  One one side the word, “Urban” is tagged in a grafitti style.  The opposite side has a Hopi bird pattern in graffiti form.  The overall imagery has such an extraordinary blend and balance of influences, it makes it very exciting.  Note as well the one katsina mask as part of the designs!  The bottom has a wonderful Harring inspired linear design which is also feels very much like Zuni linear patterns.  Les remains one of those potters who continues to defy expectations in his innovative clay art.  He pulls from his artistic background as well as his Zuni and Hopi heritage.   The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 4,800.00
Begay, Jr., Harrison – Jar with Hummingbirds and Flowers

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This jar has a taller shape with a turned out rim, which is fully polished. The entire side of the jar is very deeply carved with hummingbird and flower motifs. The hummingbirds are very highly polished and Harrison has used matte areas to accentuate the complex designs.  Harrison says that he tries to carve his pieces so that the imagery looks to be in motion.  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,100.00
Vigil, Minnie – Red Jar with Feather Pattern (1970’s)

Minnie Vigil is renown for her polychrome and highly polished pottery.  This jar is fully polished red and painted with a feather pattern around the shoulder of the jar. Below the shoulder are rain and wind designs and above the feathers are cloud designs.  The clay used to paint the area at the base of the feathers is almost a blue coloration!  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Minnie”.  She is a sister to potters Gloria Garcia (Goldenrod), Lois Guiterrez and Thelma Talachy and an aunt to Jason Garcia.

$ 175.00
Clashin, Debbie – Wide Bowl with Mesa & Sun Designs

This is traditional shaped bowl by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. This bowl has a narrow base and a wide shoulder. The symmetry is exceptional for the width of the piece!  The bowl is painted with bee-weed (black) and red clay slips.  The design is a mesa, cloud and rising sun pattern.  The lines are delicately painted and thin.  The creative patterns flows across the surface of the piece.  It is traditionally fired which creates the blushes across the surface of the bowl.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 975.00
Kasero, Sr., Robert – Seedpot with Op-Art Rain Design

This is an intricately painted seedpot by Robert Kasero.  It is very thin walled and painted with an “op-art” style of rain design.  It starts small at the top then enlarges as the shoulder and small again at the base.  It is dynamic in the flow of the tightly painted designs.  Note how the base of the seedpot is also indented keeping in the style of historic Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom

$ 550.00
Honyumptewa, Kimberly Riley – Large Picuris Micaeceous Jar

Kimberly Riley Honyumptewa is from Laguna/Picuris Pueblo and married to Aaron Honyumptewa who is Hopi/Picuris. She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law in the traditional Picuris style and using native clay from the area. Each piece is coil built and traditionally fired. This is one of her first larger jars and Kimberly says she was inspired by both the utilitarian nature of the clay but also the classic Picuris shapes.  This jar has a high shoulder and a slight neck. She said she polished the bottom as that is how they would be made to be used for cooking!  The jar is traditionally fired and has beautiful blushes on the copper colored clay.  Will be exciting to see how her work evolves in creating more Picuris pottery!

$ 300.00
Naha, Sylvia – Awatovi Star and Migration Tall Jar

Sylvia Naha was a daughter of Helen “Featherwoman” Naha and a sister of Rainy and Burell Naha.  She was known for her distinctive pieces painted with intricate designs on a white polished clay surface.  Throughout the 1980’s, Sylvia was considered among the most innovative of the Hopi potters.  Her pieces were classic in form and amazingly intricate in design.  This is a tall jar and it is painted with the Awatovi Star pattern on the top and bottom.  Under the star are bird wing designs.  The striking feature to this jar are all the finely painted lines!  This style was inspired by the “migration pattern” which Sylvia modified and made more complex with her flow of lines across the surface of the piece.  The black on the painting is from Bee-Weed (a plant) and the red and other colors are natural clay slips.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The jar is signed on the bottom with a feather and an “S”.  It is certainly a striking piece by his exceptional Hopi-Tewa potter!

$ 900.00
Clashin, Debbie – Jar with Moth Design

This is classic jar by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. The shape of this jar has a wide shoulder and an elongated neck with a slight turn at the rim. The piece is painted with two moths, it is a design which was originated by Grace Chapella. The imagery has a moth and the three pointed sections to the right of each moth are the three Hopi mesas.  The rest of the design are the stars in the sky at night.  The jar is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  It it was traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 650.00
Honyumptewa, Aaron – Picuris Micaceous Double Handle Canteen

Aaron Honyumptewa is both Hopi and Picuris. He is known for his very intricately carved katinsa dolls.  He recently moved back to Picuris Pueblo in New Mexico, the home of his mother and family and has begun to learn to make pottery from his mother.  The pottery is traditional style of Picuris pueblo and Aaron says he is hoping to help revive the art form!  This small canteen has a classic shape with the rounded shoulder and the double handles.  The clay itself is a beautiful coloration with the classic gold clay color.  It was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  If Aaron works  with the clay with the same creativity in which he carved katsinas, he has a bright future!

$ 80.00
Begay, Jr., Harrison – Three Handle Jar with Turtle & Dragonfly

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This jar is inspired by a canteen shape, but here Harrison has made three handles. They are each highly polished, which is amazing that they didn’t break in polishing or firing!  The design has a turtle on one side and then a dragonfly and stars on the other.  The highly polished surfaces are a striking contrast to the matte areas.  As the design flows around the surface of the jar, Harrison contrasts angular and circular designs.  Harrison says that he tries to carve his pieces so that the imagery looks to be in motion.  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,200.00
Diaz, Tina – Black Jar with Dragonflies

Tina Diaz is a daughter of Mary Cain and a sister of noted potters Joy, Linda and Billy Cain.  She makes very few pieces of pottery each year and this is one of the few carved black pieces.  The jar is very thin walled and fully carved.  The design is a series of three dragonflies and and flowers.  The top has rain designs and there is wind around the dragonflies.  As there jar is turned there is also a rain fall created with carved melon ribs!  It is highly polished and a stunning jar!  Note how her designs are very fluid from top to bottom.  As well, the background area which is matte is “rounded”, which adds another dimension to her pottery!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 450.00
Naranjo, Madeline – Jar with Dragonflies

Madeline Naranjo creates beautifully carved and polished pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This jar is one of her few red pieces.  There are four dragonflies on the jar, alternating from polished to matte.  Below them are wind or cloud designs.  Dragonflies are symbolic of prayers and are often seen on pottery from all the Pueblos.  The jar is traditionally fired and signed on the bottom.

$ 250.00
Martinez, Maria  – Wide Bowl with Feather Design (Maria + Santana, 1954-6)

This wide bowl by Maria Martinez is one of her classic pieces in both shape and design.  It was made by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana Martinez (the wife of Adam Martinez, Maria’s son).  It is very highly polished and has a glassy surface.  The design is a feather pattern which encircles the shoulder of the jar.  The shape of the bowl is a very traditional one for Maria.  She would often say that this wide shape was made so the bowl could be easily held in both hands.  The deep black firing and the tightly painted designs using the matte clay work perfectly together.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria + Santana”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one very small rub on the rim, but otherwise the condition is exceptional, which can also be seen from the bottom of the bowl, which has virtually no wear!

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,200.00
Naranjo, Madeline – Box with Bears

Madeline Naranjo creates beautifully carved and polished pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This past year she has been making some stunning boxes! This piece is fully carved on all four sides. There are two polished bears on either side.  On the opposite ends are kiva step patterns.  Those fit into the meaning of the boxes, which were often used for cornmeal.  The contrast of the polished and matte surfaces is striking on this piece and certainly helps to show off the design.  Her matte areas are an important part of her pottery as they are sanded perfectly smooth so that there are no indentions or areas where the matte might make a shadow.  Her designs are always innovative and beautifully executed.  The box is signed on the bottom.

$ 300.00
Martinez, Maria – Jar with Storm Designs”Maria / Popovi” (1956-9)

This is a classic shaped smaller jar by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the jar while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The jar is highly polished and it painted with a storm design. The design is painted horizontally and there is a rain, lighting and thunder motif in each of the sections.  Around the rim is a cloud pattern.  The jar is fired to a dark black with some gunmetal areas. The gunmetal or metallic appearance is achieved in the firing process.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was made between 1956-9, before Popovi began adding a firing date.   The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,200.00
Blue Corn – Jar with 39 Feathers (1970’s)

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she also made exquisite black-on-black pottery. She learned to make pottery from Maria Martinez at San Ildefonso. This jar is fully polished and patined with 39 feathers around the shoulder of the piece.  The shape is a classic one for Blue Corn, with the low shoulder and elongated sides.  The contrast of the matte feathers and the highly polished surface works perfectly!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a few light surface scratches seen in the photos.

$ 1,200.00
Peters, Franklin – Jar with Star Design

This is a very intricately painted jar by Franklin Peters.  He is known for his thin walled pottery and use of traditional Acoma imagery on his pottery. The jar is coil built with native clay and painted with native slips. The design has a star pattern in each of the central medallions.  There is a cloud band above and below and small plant designs. The fully painted design is inspired by classic Laguna pottery but has a very modern appearance. The base and inside rim are painted red. The jar has an indented base which is reminiscent of historic Acoma pottery when water jars were made to be carried on one’s head!  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 350.00
Quandelacy, Faye – Orothocera Fossil Corn Maiden

This Zuni Corn Maiden fetish carving is by Faye Quandelacy.  She is certainly one of the most famous descendants of Ellen Quandelacy and known for her very classic style of corn maidens. They are each hand carved and the horizontal eyes are indicative of her style.  This corn maiden is one of her best uses of the stone and the design.  On one side of the maiden there is a turquoise face and the fossil elements make up part of the shawl.  On the opposite side has a mother of pearl face and note how the fossil makes up the center of the body!  It is an exceptional piece of her carving.   The figure is in excellent condition.

$ 225.00
Quandelacy, Faye – Dolomite Corn Maiden

This Zuni Corn Maiden fetish carving is by Faye Quandelacy.  She is certainly one of the most famous descendants of Ellen Quandelacy and known for her very classic style of corn maidens. They are each hand carved and the horizontal eyes are indicative of her style.  This corn maiden is carved from dolomite.  One side has the corn maiden with insets of turquoise and coral.  The opposite side has a Hopi maiden and her daughter.  The piece is in excellent condition.

$ 100.00
Quandelacy, Faye – Jet Corn Maiden with White Face

This Zuni Corn Maiden fetish carving is by Faye Quandelacy.  She is certainly one of the most famous descendants of Ellen Quandelacy and known for her very classic style of corn maidens. They are each hand carved and the horizontal eyes are indicative of her style.  This corn maiden is carved from jet, but the jet itself has a very shiny, almost metallic appearance.  One might think it is pyrite if it wasn’t so light.  The one side is carved with the corn maiden and turquoise insets for her necklace. The opposite side has a Hopi maiden with a white face and single inset turquoise. The shawl is also fully carved with swirl designs.  The piece is in excellent condition.

$ 150.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Mini”Gourd” Bowl with Bear Lid

This is an exceptional mini gourd bowl by Russell Sanchez.  The piece is a classic “gourd” bowl.  There are eight “gourd” indentions on the side.  The name for this style of impression comes from the round sections of gourds used when making the pottery to smooth the surface.  The entire surface is fully polished to a nearly gunmetal shine. The lid is one of his classic bear lids, which fits perfectly onto the piece.  The bowl is simple and the angles and shine are what make it so impressive.  Note the position of the indentions, which are at the perfect angle to catch and reflect the light!  The difficulty in a jar like this comes from polishing the gourd indentions and getting a high shine.  This piece was traditionally fired and has a glassy black surface.  The bottom of the bowl has the classic indention of traditional San Ildefonso water jars.  Of course, the amazing part of this piece is its size.  It is a miniature and yet it is scaled to the precision that it seems as if it could be much larger!  It’s fascinating to see how he has updated the gourd style from a piece made nearly 100 years ago!  It’s exciting how Russell uses these historic elements to keep them alive on his contemporary pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

 

$ 2,200.00
Begay, Jr., Harrison – Jar with Heartline Bear and Sun

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This jar is a classic shape with a round body and a slightly turned out neck.  The rim of the jar is fully polished.  Around the side of the jar it is fully carved.  Harrison says that he tries to carve his pieces so that the imagery looks to be in motion.  This jar has a heartline bear carved into the clay. The heartline represents the strength of the animal.  As the jar is turned there is a sun and rain pattern along with a wind design.  The carving is deep and the polishing is nearly glassy. The contrast of the matte and polished surfaces is perfection!  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 575.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Waterfall Rim & Gourd Base Water Jar

This is a classic form of water jar by Russell Sanchez.  The shape is a very traditional form with a wide round shoulder and straight rim.  The edge of the rim is flat, but the inside of the neck is carved and polished with 16 melon ribs creating the “waterfall” effect!  The neck of the jar has four bear paws and the shoulder has a micaceous clay slip which, when fired, is a mettalic coloration.  Above and below the mica band are jet hei-shi beads.  The base of the jar is carved or indented with a “gourd” design. The way the light hits is perfect creating a sort of “shimmer” when the piece is turned!  The entire surface is stone polished and it is always amazing that when Russell polishes the inside of the neck, the jar doesn’t crack.  It is fascinating how Russell has gone back to revive old style and create their modern versions.  Russell continues to creatively revive historic San Ildefonso designs with his innovative style of pottery.  The bottom of the jar has the classic indention of traditional San Ildefonso water jars. Russell uses these historic elements to keep them alive on his contemporary pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 3,000.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Mini Box with Rain Designs

It is not often that we get in miniatures from Russell Sanchez.  He is well known for the distinctive pottery and not only the polishing and shapes but the firing. While this box is small, it is complicated!  It has black and sienna medallions on two of the ends, which are inset with very old Morenci turquoise.  The longer sides are etched with rain designs and inset with small pieces of hemitite. The hemitite reflects much the same coloration as the gunmetal fired surface.  The lid has a carved handle and it is also fully polished.  The style of this box is similar to the earlier ones made at San Ildefonso in the 1920’s.    For such a small piece, it is wonderfully intricate in design!  The box and lid are both signed on the bottom.

$ 1,800.00
Folwell, Susan – “Plaza Rail Runner” Plate

Susan Folwell is known for her innovative and unique Santa Clara pottery.  This is a rectangular curved plate which can sit flat or on its side.  The piece is entitled, “Plaza Rail Runner”. The design is painted onto the clay and depicts the Plaza and cathedral in Santa Fe.  Int he foreground is a woman with binoculars watching the crowd.  Behind her are the tents of Santa Fe Indian Market and the train logo for the Rail Runner train in New Mexico.  The title of the piece is a clever play on the scene.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 975.00
Folwell, Susan – “Lizards and Roses” Bowl

Susan Folwell is known for her innovative and unique Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is entitled, “Lizards and Roses”.  For this piece the bowl is left the natural color of the clay on one side an there are etched roses and a lizard.  On the opposite side the bowl is fully etched with the Folwell family “x’s” and there are medallions with roses.  The roses are etched into the clay and highlighted. There is a striking contrast of the colorations on the bowl and the various designs.  The bowl is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,200.00
Folwell, Susan – “Thunder Heart” Jar

This is a very creative jar by Susan Folwell.  The jar is entitled, “Thunder Heart”.  It is etched with frogs around the shoulder of the piece.  Susan said the inspiration for the frogs was that desert frogs or toads rely on water and burrow underground where it stays cool and damp to hibernate through the dry months.  During the first rain storms they are “revived” and return to life from their hibernation.  There the frogs have clouds behind them and lightning below.  The rim and the inside of the jar have carved stars!  Yes, carved! This is technically difficult to carve the inside of a jar.  Then as one looks down the neck of the jar there is a basket pattern painted in the clay.  Note how the sections of the basket have a very “op art” appearance! For the inside of the jar there is a moon, on which she has painted a lightning bolt on one side and butterflies on the other.  In the photos, I placed the moon outside the jar. It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 2,400.00
Folwell, Susan – Large Seedpot with Butterflies

Susan Folwell is known for her innovative Santa Clara pottery.  This large seedpot is fully polished and etched with a butterfly as the design. The surrounding imagery is a mosaic checkerboard pattern with additional butterfly designs. The contrasting coloration of matte and polished surfaces is striking!  The seedpot is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 975.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Long Neck Jar with Avanyu & Shell Lid (2007)

Russell Sanchez continues to use traditional techniques and materials to create his stunning works in clay.  This long neck jar is made in the style of Russell’s great-aunt Rose Gonzales. The jar is from 2007 and has a blue ribbon from the Heard Indian Market.  The jar is fully polished and has  an avanyu etched around the shoulder. The body of the jar is polished red while the neck is polished brown. The lid is red and has a matte shell carved on the top of the lid.  In the neck there are 9 bands of hei-shi beads in shell and turquoise. There are additional bands of hei-shi beads on the lid and the around the shoulder. The eye and the body of the jar also have inset turquoise.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 16,000.00
Naranjo, Luciano – Wide Bowl with Wildlife Scene

Spectacular!  This is a remarkable piece from Luciano.  It is one of his largest vessels to date and it is a technically difficult wide shoulder jar!  Few Santa Clara potters attempt this shape as the native clay does not always work well for making wide pieces.  This jar has been fired a dark, rich brown coloration.  There is just a slight lip, which adds to the overall elegance of the form.  However, it is the incised imagery which makes the jar so dynamic.  There is an etched eagle, elk, geese, rabbit, bugling elk, big horn sheep and butterfly!  They are each etched into the surface of the clay in a blend of realism and traditional Santa Clara two-dimensional style of art.  Note as well how Luciano has scraped down the tan background area, which creates such and elegant appearance and also a strong visual contrast with the design.  Again, it is a distinguishing technical aspect of this piece which is very time consuming.  It is great to see a younger potter taking chances on such major work.  Luciano is definitely one of those younger potters to watch!

$ 2,800.00
Nampeyo, Camille “Hisi” – Jar with Fluted Rim & Eagle Tail Design (1995)

Camille “Hisi” Quotskuyva learned to make pottery from her mother, Dextra Quotskuyva, a sister of noted painter Dan Namingha and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano, Annie Healing and Rachel Nampeyo.  She is known for her use of traditional imagery and the delicate painting of her designs.  This is one of her classic shapes with an elongated neck and a fluted rim. The rim is fully polished red.  The body of the jar has a series of eagle tail designs.  They are highlighted with red and white clay slips! Note the delicate lines of her painting.  The black is painted with bee-weed and the jar is traditionally fired to create the fire clouds on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Curran, Ursula – Jar with Buff-on-Red Rain Designs

Ursula Curran is a daughter of noted potter Dolores Curran and Alvin Curran.  She is named after her grandmother Ursulita Naranjo.  Ursula is known for her painted pottery.  This jar is fully polished and intricately painted with a buff clay.  Amazingly, she would paint each piece up to five times to get the color of the matte painted areas deep and consistent enough!  This jar has a cloud pattern around the neck.  The body has a band of rain, cloud and plant designs and a single band of red. There is another band of cloud and kiva step designs near the base. The thin lines and are exceptional on this jar! It is signed on the bottom in the caly.

 

$ 250.00
Fender, Erik – Large Water Jar with Feather Pattern

Erik Fender is the son of Martha Appleleaf and the grandson of noted potter Carmelita Dunlap. Erik combines classic San Ildefonso imagery with his own creative style. His pottery is signed, with his Tewa name, “Than Tsideh”.  This is a classic San Ildefonso water jar with a high shoulder.  The design is painted on the polished surface. There is a feather pattern separated by a rain and cloud design.  Note the precision of his painting!  It is nearly perfect! Around the shoulder is a cloud pattern.  The jar is fired a distinctive coloration.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 975.00
Laate, Jennie – Large Jar with Deer and Rosettes (1970’s)

Jennie Laate was among the most important revival potters at Zuni in the 1970’s.  This miniature jar is shaped in the style of the classic Zuni vessels of the late 1800’s.  The design has flower medallions along with rain patterns and heartline deer.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,000.00
Duwyenie, Debra – Plate with 19 Hummingbirds

This plate was made by Preston Duwyenie and polished and incised by Debra Duwyenie.  The design on the front is fully polished and full of imagery. The design is a flowering plant which extends up from the vase.  Each of the flowers are etched into the clay and the center of each is matte, which is just where the polished slip has been etched away.  For nearly each flower is a hummingbird, each of which are also etched into the clay and with matte bellies.  There are 19 hummingbirds on the plate!  There are also additional butterflies and note near the top is a sunface and extending from the sun are rain and cloud designs.  The back of the plate is fully polished and signed with Debra’s name and Preston’s hallmark.

 

$ 650.00
Gutierrez, Helen – Small Feather Jar (1980’s)

Helen Gutierrez (1935-1993) was a daughter of Isabel Atencio, a sister of Gilbert Atencio and the mother of Geraldine, Carol and Rose Gutierrez. She was known for her traditional San Ildefonso pottery.  This jar is highly polished and painted with a feather pattern.  The design and style are classic for San Ildefonso.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 200.00

All Contemporary

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