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 hopi potteryHopi Pottery - Tewa Group

Hopi Pottery (Tewa) created on the  Hopi Reservation is located in northeastern Arizona and is surrounded by the Navajo Reservation. Hopi consists of three Mesas, and each Mesa has several villages. The  Hopi Pueblo Pottery, Tewa speaking people are located in First Mesa in the villages of Hano and Polacca. They are descendants of the Tewa speaking Pueblo people of New Mexico who came to the Mesa around the time of the Pueblo Revolt in 1680. It is this group of artisans who are best known for their decorative pottery, especially the revival pottery of the ancient Sikyatki ruin near the base of First Mesa. Hopi - Tewa pottery is carefully hand constructed using the coil and scrape techniques their ancestors taught them.  The paints used are from naturally occurring materials.  For example, black paint is made by boiling Bee-weed for a long time until it becomes very dark and thick. It is then dried into little cakes which are wrapped in corn husk until ready for use. It is called guaco.  The intricate and beautiful designs are painted freehand using a yucca leaf brush. The pots are then fired in the open air out on the mesa using sheep dung and cedar as a heat source.

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Duwyenie, Preston – Tall “Earth in Balance” Jar

This piece by Preston Duwyenie is made from red Hopi clay. The shape has a taller form with an asymmetrical opening. The body of the piece is fully polished with a matte area near the top.  The polished area is meant to represent the earth, the raised area the waters and the higher matte areas the land and mountains.  It is “the earth in balance” as all three are connected.  The jar is vertically polished to give it an “onion skin” appearance, like much of the ancient Ancestral Puebloan pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child.  Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

$ 1,000.00
Clashin, Debbie – Dragonfly Plate

Debbie Clashin has become one of the exciting leaders in Hopi-Tewa pottery over the past several years.  She is known for her large-sized traditional fired vessels.  This plate is fully polished.  It is painted on the front with a larger dragonfly, several small dragonflies and a series of “dragonfly wings” extending across the surface.  It is a wonderful use of design and the space.  The plate is painted with bee-weed and a red clay slip and traditionally fired.  There are blushes across the surface of the plate.   It is signed on the back with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 1,200.00
Nampeyo, Rayvin – Large Jar with Moth Design

Rayvin Nampeyo (b. 1961) is a son of Leah Garcia Nampeyo, a grandson of Fannie Nampeyo and a great-grandson of Nampeyo of Hano. He is a brother of James Nampeyo.  This jar is a classic shape with the wide shoulder.  It has various moths painted on the top. Note how each has either different wings or different style of heads. Around the side of the jar there are classic Hopi cloud and rain designs.  The jar has blushes from the firing.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

$ 675.00
Huma, Rondina – Bowl with Hopi Bird Designs

Rondina Huma has certainly been one of the most influential Hopi potters working today.  Since her two-time “Best of Show” award at Santa Fe Indian Market, her tight style and intricately painted pottery has changed the face of contemporary Hopi pottery.   Each piece is coil built, fully stone polished and painted with native clays and bee-weed (black), and native fired.  This is one of her early pieces from the 1970’s.  The bowl is made from red Hopi clay and then painted with bee-weed. The bowl is fully polished on the inside and outside.  The design has two Hopi birds which are painted encircling the piece.  It is always interesting to see her early work and how it certainly evolved over time.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 800.00
Clashin, Debbie – Large Jar with Awatovi Birds & Bird Tails

Debbie Clashin has become one of the exciting leaders in Hopi-Tewa pottery over the past several years.  She is known for her large-sized traditional fired vessels.  This large jar is a wide shape and a slightly turned out neck.  The entire piece is stone polished and then it is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  The design has two large birds, bird tails and and panels with sun and mesa designs. The painting on the jar is delicate and flowing with the additional areas which are mottled.  The jar is traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar and a few little darker areas.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 2,500.00
Navasie, Fawn Garcia – Large Jar with Swirling Birds

Fawn Garcia Navasie (b. 1959) is also known as “Little Fawn”.  She is a daughter of Eunice “Fawn” Navasie and a sister of Dawn and Dolly Navasie.  This large jar is coil built and stone polished. The jar has a striking shape with the round body and the elongated neck.  There are three Hopi style birds painted on the shoulder with their tails extending down over the side.  The designs are painted with bee-wee for the black.  The jar is traditionally fired with elegant blushes to the surface.   It is signed on the bottom, “Fawn”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 650.00
Nampeyo, Camille “Hisi”  – Small Bowl with Hopi Birds

Camille “Hisi” Quotskuyva learned to make pottery from her mother, Dextra Quotskuyva, a sister of noted painter Dan Namingha and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano, Annie Healing and Rachel Nampeyo.  She is known for her use of traditional imagery and the delicate painting of her designs.  This is one of the smaller pieces of her pottery.  It is stone polished and painted with two Nampeyo style Hopi birds on the top.  It is painted with bee-weed and a red clay slip.  Note the subtle variations in color from the firing.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 300.00
Adams, Sadie – Jar with Cloud and Rain Designs

This is a small jar by Sadie Adams. It is fully polished on the inside and outside. The design is a classic Sikyatki inspired rain and cloud pattern.  It is painted with bee-weed  (black) and two sections of polished red.  The jar is signed on the bottom with her hallmark flower.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some fugitive black areas.

$ 225.00
Namingha, Les – “Cochiti Motifs” Painted Jar

This jar by Les Namingha is inspired by the wild spinach or Rocky Mountain bee weed plant, used to paint both Hopi-Tewa pottery and Cochiti pottery.  The oval shaped design with the sharp edges is a classic image on Cochiti pottery.  Les says that he was intrigued with the open space of the design and how it could be layered.  It is the dynamic painting on this jar which seems simple but is quite exceptional.  Les was able to paint the various colors and the look nearly transparent, one on top of another!  Les says the jar fits into his “Urban Polychrome” series as it looks at the layer of material and designs used throughout the Pueblos and Hopi.   It is dynamic blend of ideas, layers and forms.  This jar is part of his “Urban Polychrome” series, of which Les says:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”  Les Namingha

$ 3,800.00
Namingha, Les – “Polychrome II (Dextra Series)” Acrylic on Canvas

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Polychrome II (Dextra Series)”.  It is one of a series of acrylic paintings on canvas he made which explore both his pottery and that of his aunt, Dextra Quotskuyva.  I asked Les if he had any other paintings around and he brought in two pieces he had from the Dextra Series.  The painting is highly detailed with a top view of a piece of pottery, painted with classic design called “Prayer for Rain”.  The various colors depict both his work and Dextra’s.  Interestingly, in the center is a map of where he did his first show with Dextra, at Marti Struever’s gallery in Chicago!  What a great piece of history on so many levels!  It is signed on the front.

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 2,000.00
Namingha, Les – “Polychrome III (Dextra Series)” Acrylic on Canvas

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Polychrome III (Dextra Series)”.  It is one of a series of acrylic paintings on canvas he made which explore both his pottery and that of his aunt, Dextra Quotskuyva.  I asked Les if he had any other paintings around and he brought in two pieces he had from the Dextra Series.  The painting is highly detailed with a top view of a piece of pottery, painted with classic Hopi-Tewa designs.  The imagery blends the work of Les and Dextra as the pointilism dots seems to show the path of Les’s work navigating through the historic.  It is signed on the front.

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 2,000.00
Namingha, Les – “Carnival” Carved Jar with Hopi birds

This jar by Les Namingha a creative blend of Hopi-Tewa design and his own stylistic imagery. The piece is entitled, “Carnival” and it includes both carved and applique sections.  The Hopi birds painted near the base are layered with oval designs.  These same ovals are then replicated in the carved ovals around the shoulder.  The layers of carving, dimension and design on the jar are exceptional!  It is dynamic blend of ideas, layers and forms.  This jar is part of his “Urban Polychrome” series, of which Les says:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”  Les Namingha

$ 3,600.00
Namingha, Les – “Polyphonic Starburst” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Polyphonic Starburst”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series. The painting is on board and it is framed.  The painting is a dynamic overlay of various textures. The various layers and the depth of the painting gives the piece subtle shadows.  The linear patterns can be seen in the background while there is the migration pattern blue line and then the Hopi birds layered on top of one another.  The various colors add to the impact, as they become more vibrant as one moves to the surface.  It captures the strength of Les’s designs and the layering techniques. I included a close up view of one section to show the texture of the piece.  Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 2,800.00
Namingha, Les – Jar with Hopi Birds & Lightning Design Panel

This jar by Les Namingha a creative blend of Hopi-Tewa design and his own linear painting. The jar is unusual with two panels in relief.  They are each painted in black and white.  One panel has Hopi birds and a bat wing design and the other a detailed lightning design.  It is almost as if they are pottery shards on the surface of the jar.  He has then painted the jar with addition flowing layers of patterns.  Note how the imagery flow over onto the two panels!  It is a striking use of color and design.  This jar is part of his “Urban Polychrome” series, of which Les says:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”  Les Namingha

$ 2,200.00
Nampeyo, Iris – Bowl with Corn Design & Sun Design

Iris Nampeyo is a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and a well known for her elegant asymmetrical vessels with corn as part of the design in relief.  Iris began using the corn in relief on the surface of her pottery in the early 1980’s. The corn is symbolic of being part of the Corn Clan.  The surface of the bowl is stone polished and the corn on the front is in applique relief.  The husk of the corn is sharp and the matte area extends around to the base of the jar.  The matte areas are in contrast to the remainder of the piece which is polished.  The opening is asymmetrical which is in keeping with the organic style of the form.  There is a simplicity and elegance in her pottery.  At the base of the jar is a deeply carved and etched rising Tewa sun. It was most likely etched by her husband, Wallace Youvella, who often assisted her with her pottery.  It is a wonderful little surprise in the design!  While she no longer makes pottery, her vessels remain classic.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Open Bow with Bird Man and Hummingbirds (2000)

This is a large open bowl which is fully painted by Mark Tahbo.  He learned to make pottery from his great grandmother, Grace Chapella.  His pieces reflect the wonderful symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter. The designs are painted using native clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black. The bowl is shallow and has a slight extended rim.  On the inside is one of his anthropomorphic “bird men”.  He made this figures in place of using katsinas on his pottery.  They were part of the stories he would tell about his work and certainly an influence came from the Awatovi murals. This figure has a bird head and is holding a white bird and a gourd canteen. The rim of the bowl is painted with a checkerboard pattern.  It is the surprise of the back which is so dynamic.  The center is a very tightly painted hatchwork flower.  There are four hummingbirds encircling the flower.  The bodies of each are painted with various colored clay slips.  There is a distinctive rainbow band with four different colors connecting each bird.  Mark would seek out the various colors used on his pottery and the mauve clay (the bottom rainbow band) was always the most difficult to find.  The plate was traditionally fired and has dynamic colored blushes across the surface.  The plate is signed on the rim, “Mark Tahbo 2000”.  It won a “Challenge Award” at the 2000 Santa Fe Indian Market.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,800.00
Nampeyo, Priscilla Namingha – Migration Design Jar (1970’s)

This is an exceptional jar by Priscialla Namingha Nampeyo.  She was a great-granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano and granddaughter of Annie Healing,  She was also a sister of Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo. Priscilla was the matriarch of a family of renown potters, including Rachel, Bonnie, Nyla and Jean Sahmie.  Priscilla began making pottery when she was only seven years old, under the guidance of Nampeyo of Hano. This jar is thin walled and painted with the classic migration pattern.  It is one of those pieces that captures the essence of her pottery skill with very thin lines and a design which matches the shape.  Priscilla was known for her traditional work and this jar is simply one of her best.  It was traditionally fired and so it has blushes across the surface.  It is signed on the bottom “Priscilla Namingha Nampeyo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Clashin, Debbie – Jar with Hopi Moth Design

This is a unique shaped jar by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. The shape has high shoulders, a flat top and just a small neck. The top of the jar has two Hopi-Tewa moths as the design.  It is a design which was originated by Grace Chapella.  Next to each moth is a three-pointed section which represents the three Hopi mesas.   The rest of the design are the stars in the sky at night.  Around the side of the jar it is also fully painted with bird wing, bird tail and cloud patterns. The jar is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  It was traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 1,200.00
Quotskuyva, Dextra – Bowl with Migration Pattern (1970’s)

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This is an earlier bowl from the 1970’s.  It is very thin walled and a classic bowl shape. The piece is painted with the classic migration pattern.  Dextra said of this design:

“This is the one design that was really stressed for us to use, the migration pattern. Nothing but lines, representing the migration of all the people to all the places, including down below and up above. It has seven points at the top and bottom. All the x’s represent life from the bottom and top, telling you the universe is one. The thin lines, I just wanted to paint them real fast and real close to try and include everyone.”  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo, Spoken Through Clay

The bowl has deep red clay near the rim and the remainder is painted with bee-weed (black).  The lines are very thin and close, as would be expected from her pottery!  This bowl is signed on the bottom, “Dextra Quotskuyva (Nampeyo)”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. Simple, elegant and a classic!

$ 4,000.00
Quotskuyva, Dextra – Jar with Migration Pattern (1970’s)

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This is an earlier jar  from the 1970’s.  It is one of the most unique shapes we have seen in her early work.  The jar narrow base just up to create a round surface for the design.  That style of form certainly seems to have an influence of Zuni pottery forms.  The bowl is painted with the classic migration pattern which encircles the piece. The piece has very thin lines painted for the migration pattern and in a manner for which Dextra became famous in the 1970’s.  The red areas are interesting, as they have a more “painterly” appearance. This is striking as it seems to be more reminiscent of the early Hopi-Tewa pottery before the 1930’s when a new red clay slip was introduced.  The jar reads as a history of early Hopi-Tewa pottery from their influence of Zuni shapes and designs, then the introduction of Sikyatki patterns (migration design) and then the early style of red clay slip.  It’s not surprising that Dextra would be able to combine all these elements into a single jar and have the result be simply striking in appearance!    It is painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired to create the blushes or fire-clouds on the surface.   The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dextra Quotskuyva (Nampeyo).  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,000.00
Naha, Tyra – Large Bowl with Tumbling Hummingbirds

This may be the largest piece we have had from Tyra Naha.  She is a daughter of Rainy Naha.   She learned to make pottery from her mother and continues to make traditional style Hopi-Tewa pottery in the style her grandmother, Helen “Feather Woman” Naha.  This is a large, wide shoulder bowl made in the form of the classic Sikyatki pottery.  The bowl is slipped white and then painted with four “tumbling” hummingbirds.  Each bird is painted with bee-weed (black) and then highlighted with additional clay slips for the color.  The style of the birds is inspired by the tumbling birds on Rainy’s pottery. Around the neck of the bowl is an eternity band.  This design was always on Helen Naha’s Awatovi designed vessels.  The bowl is traditionally fired and signed on the bottom with a feather and spider (Spider Clan ) and a “3” for being Third Generation of the Naha family.

 

 

 

 

$ 975.00
Sahmie, Jean – Tile with Moth

Jean Sahmie is a daughter of noted potter Priscilla Nampeyo and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano. This is one of her intricately painted tiles.  The design is a classic Hopi-Tewa moth. Below the moth are two dragonflies and a rain design. The black is bee-weed and the red is a clay slip.  The tile is traditionally fired.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the back with her hallmark and a corn plant (for Corn Clan).  While Jean no longer makes pottery, there is a wonderful creativity in each of her pieces!

$ 175.00
Nampeyo, Iris – Mauve Jar with Corn Design

Iris Nampeyo is famous for her pottery with the corn in relief.  This jar is unusual as it is slipped with a “mavue” colored clay.  It is an interesting story about the color, as Iris found this mauve colored clay in the early 1990’s and began to use it as a slip to polish her pottery.  What’s interesting is that other potters (Mark Tahbo and Jake Koopee) also found some of the mauve colored clay, but they were never able to polish it and have it retain its coloration.  To this day, Iris is the only HopiTewa potter to have found a polish-able form of the mavue clay.  However, Hopi potters Al Qoyawayma and his aunt, Elizabeth White also found a mauve colored clay from another source.  The result, as in this jar, is an unusual and striking coloration.  While it has a more purple hue, she always called it “mavue”.  Iris began using the corn in relief on the surface of her pottery in the early 1980’s. The corn is symbolic of being part of the Corn Clan.  The surface of the bowl is stone polished and the corn on the front is in applique relief.  The husk of the corn is sharp and the matte area extends around to the base of the jar.  The matte areas are in contrast to the remainder of the piece which is polished.  The opening is asymmetrical which is in keeping with the organic style of the form.  There is a simplicity and elegance in her pottery.  While she no longer makes pottery, her vessels remain classic.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,600.00
Naha, Rainy – Bowl with Interlocking Birds

The “interlocking” or “tumbling” parrots is a design originated by Rainy Naha. This piece has a taller shape, so that the top and bottom parrots are easily seen. The bowl is fully polished with a white clay slip and then there are five sections of interlocking birds.  Each bird is painted with various Hopi-Tewa designs and then additional clay slips.  Rainy uses bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips for her colors. Each piece is traditionally fired.  The bowl is signed on the bottom with the feather hallmark and “Rainy”.

$ 1,600.00
Naha, Rainy – Solstice Jar

This is an intricately designed jar by Rainy Naha.  She learned to make pottery from her mother, Helen “Featherwoman” Naha.  Rainy continues is a similar style using a white clay slip as the foundation for her work.  This jar  is a classic Sikyatki style with a wide sloping shoulder.  The jar is slipped with a white clay and then painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black).  The design around the jar is a striking use of the solstice pattern.  Around the neck are the four phases of the moon.  Below are various Hopi-Tewa designs representing sun, cloud, rain, and corn. Some of the colors are polished and some are left matte.  The painting on the surface is wonderfully intricate and varied.  The jar is signed on the bottom with her name and father hallmark.

$ 1,800.00
Howato, Ramon – Seedpot with Wind Designs

Ramon Howato is a son of noted potter Diana Tahbo.  He learned to make pottery from his uncle, Mark Tahbo.  This seedpot is coil built, painted with bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired.  The piece is fully painted with a variety of cloud, rain and other Sikyatki inspired designs.  The painting seems both traditional in style and yet with a stylistic sense of designs matching the form.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ramon Howato” and a pipe, as he is “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 175.00
Howato, Ramon – Jar with Hummingbirds

Ramon Howato is a son of noted potter Diana Tahbo.  He learned to make pottery from his uncle, Mark Tahbo.  This jar is coil built, painted with bee-weed and native clay slips and traditionally fired.  The jar has four stylized birds painted around the shoulder.  The neck has a checkerboard pattern.  The painting seems both traditional in style and yet with a stylistic sense of designs matching the form.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ramon Howato” and a pipe, as he is “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 375.00
Naha, Tyra – Bowl with Turtles and Star

Tyra Naha is a daughter of Rainy Naha.   She learned to make pottery from her mother and continues to make traditional style Hopi-Tewa pottery in the style her grandmother, Helen “Feather Woman” Naha.  This bowl is coil coil built and painted with native clay slips and bee-weed (black).  The top and bottom have the classic Awatovi star design painted onto the surface.  On the sides are four turtles.  Each turtle has a medallion for its “shell”.  Note that each of the medallions has a different color of clay used for the stripes.  The bowl is traditionally fired and signed on the bottom with a feather and spider (Spider Clan ) and a “3” for being Third Generation of the Naha family.

 

 

 

 

$ 600.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Shifting Sand Jar with Silver Insets

The coloration on this wide shoulder jar by Preston Duwyenie is striking.  It is made from Hopi clay and stone polished on the neck and below the shoulder.   Around the shoulder of the jar it is carved in a natural manner to represent the sand in the desert and its constant movement.  The “sand” sections are matte with  just a bit of mica visible int he clay.  There are three inset pieces of silver, which have an additional “shifting sand” pattern.  The silver is cast against cuttle-fish bone (a type of squid).  This process creates a similar style of shifting sand design to complement the clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child as the hallmark for his name in Hopi.  Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

“Why the shifting sand designs? Preston says he remembers watching a smooth pebble caught in sand being shifted by the wind, “there was beauty in its isolation within the sea of sand. It was like an island.  The endless sands of time, and the fact that people, too are tossed about by the wind. There is always rippling in our lives”.

$ 1,800.00
Tahbo, Dianna – Jar with Bird Tail Designs (2001)

Diana Tahbo was known for her tightly painted pottery and especially her beautiful miniatures.  This tall jar is vertically polished and then painted.  The design has bird tails in two sections and bird wings in two others.  The jar was traditionally fired, which created the blushes on the surface.  The interesting thing about when she vertically polished her pottery (as well as when Mark did the same thing) is that the lines of the polishing are visible after the firing.  It adds one more layer of depth to the piece.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 575.00
Namingha, Les – “Segment with Line Break” Acrylic Painting on Board

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Segment with Line Break”.  It is a painting on board using a acrylic. The piece has a texture in the “line break”.  First about the “line break”.  This might be seen as a “spirit line” used in pottery, which is a space in the painted line around the the neck of a jar.  In the pottery of Nampeyo of Hano, using a “line break” is often considered a hallmark of her pottery.  Interestingly on this piece, the line is impressed into the painting, so that it has a recessed feel!  The “segment” part of the painting are the four shapes (two triangles, one half circle and a trapezoid).  They are all shapes seen in the designs on Hopi-Tewa pottery.  Les has both minimalized them and used primary colors for them.  Much as they are the “primary” shapes, they are represented here in the primary colors.  It’s fascinating that such a small painting can have such a depth of context! It is signed on the front and also on the back.

$ 600.00
Namingha, Les – “Spiral” Acrylic Painting on Board

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Spiral”.  It is a painting on board using a acrylic. The piece has a textured background with linear impressed “grid”.  On top is an impressed spiral, which circles out from the center.  It’s a classic Hopi-Tewa design seen in everything from jewelry to pottery.   Les brought in this small painting, which certainly captures his creativity in even the most simplistic of styles.

$ 400.00
Namingha, Les – “Hopi Bowl Design” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Hopi Bowl Design”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series. The painting is on board and it is framed.  The painting has a crackled back layer with a large Hopi bird painted on the surface.  The body of the bird is highlighted with various Hopi-Tewa designs.  The area around the bird is painted with pointilism dots and lines.  The background is striped.  Take a closer look at the second photo and you can see the crackling. It gives a feeling of pottery and clay with the acrylic.  Exceptional! Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 1,600.00
Namingha, Les – “Patterns” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Patterns, Black on Bronze”. The painting is acrylic and metallic pigments on canvas.  I think in the photos don’t quite capture the texture of the background.  However, the painting is a series of very delicately painted bird wings which ebb and flow across the canvas.  Stepping back and various new shapes appear.  It is a striking use of a very classic Hopi design in a repetitive style to create a larger and more dynamic painting. I attached a few additional photos of the piece installed in the gallery.

 

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 4,000.00
Namingha, Les – “Window in Time” Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Window in Time”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series.  The paining is graphite, ink pencil and wax crayon on paper.  It is a very dramatic painting.  The black lines form the window which presents the viewer looking out into the past.  Hopi-Tewa designs are painted boldly in clay colors while the other designs are simply outlines.  The further back one looks, the more (or maybe less) one sees.  Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 1,200.00
Namingha, Les – “Raven & Crow” Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Raven & Crow”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series.  The paining is graphite, ink pencil and wax crayon on paper.  It is a very powerful and very dramatic painting.  The raven and crow are the top layer of design in black.  Look a bit further and there is so much painted behind them with other Hopi imagery and coloration.  Stunning!  Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 1,200.00
Namingha, Les – “Existence” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Existence”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series. The painting is on board and it is framed.  The painting is a powerful painting with various Hopi birds, shapes and designs.  Look at the top left and there is even one of his tiles!  The bold bird in yellow on top and the layers underneath require an in depth viewing of this piece.  Simply exceptional! Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 1,800.00
Namingha, Les – “Polychrome Abstraction” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Polychrome Abstraction”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series. The painting is on board and it is framed.  The painting is a dynamic overlay of various Hopi birds and designs.  Look closer and the initial layer of bird wings in turquoise color.  While not a huge painting it captures the strength of Les’s designs and the layering techniques. Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 2,000.00
Namingha, Les – “Kiva Wall Painting” Jar

This is a very traditionally inspired jar by Les Namingha.  He is one of those potters who continues to defy expectations in his innovative clay art.  He pulls from his artistic background as well as his Zuni and Hopi heritage.  This jar is inspired by the classic Kiva wall paintings from Awatovi and other kiva ruins.  Here, one of the classic figures is the “mosquito man” and he is depicted with stalks of corn. Les has painted variations on each of them.  The designs below are pollen patterns. It is exciting to see how Les reinterprets such pivotal historic designs on his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 4,400.00
Naha, Tyra – Jar with Tumbling Parrots

Tyra Naha is a daughter of Rainy Naha.   She learned to make pottery from her mother and continues to make traditional style Hopi-Tewa pottery in the style her grandmother, Helen “Feather Woman” Naha.  This jar is coil built and painted with native clay slips and bee-weed (black).  The designs is a series of tumbling parrots. They are each painted with different clay slips to create the striking coloration.  The rim and base are a checkerboard pattern.  The jar is traditionally fired and signed on the bottom with a feather and spider (Spider Clan ) and a “3” for being Third Generation of the Naha family.

 

 

 

 

$ 800.00
Pavatea, Garnet  – Ladle with Lightning Designs (1955)

Garnet Pavatea is one of the great names in Hopi-Tewa pottery.  She created traditional Hopi pottery, but was also well known for her corrugated pieces and especially the use of the red clay.  This ladle is a classic Hopi shape with the hook on the end where it could set against a bowl.  The ladle is made from the red Hopi clay and the handle is painted with bee-weed (black). The design on the handle is a lightning design. The piece was made in 1955 and exhibited at the Museum of Northern Arizona’s Hopi show.  It comes with the original tag from the show with the description, “Garnett Pavatea, Tewa, Red Dipper”.  The ladle is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There are some slight areas of wear.  It is signed, “Garnett Pavatea” on the back.

$ 200.00
Chapella, Grace – Open Bowl with Checkerboard Star Pattern (1960’s)

This is a classic open bowl by Grace Chapella. This open bowl is made using the traditional Hopi clay and painted with bee-weed.  The design is a star pattern surrounded by a complex checkerboard pattern.  It is an interesting design and one that is also seen for a brief period in the work of Nampeyo of Hano.  The design work has a complex feel in this piece and it is enhanced by the native firing. The bowl is signed on the bottom “Grace Chapella” and a Bear Paw Track, which was her hallmark.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a piece of history!

Grace Chapella was born into the Bear Clan on February 14, 1874 at Tewa on First Mesa.  She learned to make pottery from her mother, TaTung Pawbe and also from Nampeyo of Hano, who was her neighbor.  Her name in Tewa as “White Squash Blossom”.  She was one of the great Hopi matriarchs of the last century. Grace  was the sister of Laura Tomosie and Dalee, the mother of Alma Tahbo, and the great grandmother of Mark Tahbo and Diana Tahbo. She led a remarkable life, becoming the first Hopi to fly in an airplane in 1927 and living over a century (107 years!). Grace revived designs from the Sikyatki ruins at the base of First Mesa and it is the classic butterfly or moth pattern for which she is the most famous.

$ 700.00
Chapella, Grace – Open Bowl with Moth (1973)

This is a classic open bowl by Grace Chapella.  She was born into the Bear Clan on February 14, 1874 at Tewa on First Mesa.  She learned to make pottery from her mother, TaTung Pawbe and also from Nampeyo of Hano, who was her neighbor.  Her name in Tewa as “White Squash Blossom”.  She was one of the great Hopi matriarchs of the last century. Grace  was the sister of Laura Tomosie and Dalee, the mother of Alma Tahbo, and the great grandmother of Mark Tahbo and Diana Tahbo. She led a remarkable life, becoming the first Hopi to fly in an airplane in 1927 and living over a century (107 years!). Grace revived designs from the Sikyatki ruins at the base of First Mesa and it is the classic butterfly or moth pattern for which she is the most famous.

This open bowl is made using the traditional red Hopi clay.  It is painted with bee-weed and a white clay slip. The bowl has a moth, the pattern for which Grace is the most famous. The outside of the bowl is also painted with cloud and wind designs.  The bowl is signed on the back “Grace Chapella, 99 years old, Polcacca, AZ”. I remember Mark Tahbo told me that when Grace was getting older, her daughter Alma would add her age to the back of the bowl.  This  piece is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a piece of history!

$ 1,600.00
Navasie, Joy “Frogwoman” – Small Jar with Birds (1980’s)

This smaller jar by Joy “Frog Woman” Navasie is one of her classic shapes.  The jar has straight sides and it is polished on the inside and the outside.  The jar is slipped with the white clay and then painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black).   The sides of the jar are very tightly painted in four panels.  It’s nice to see a smaller piece with such precision to the lines!  Two panels are birds and the other two are bird tail designs. The black painted with bee-weed (a plant) and the red is a deeper red clay she began to use in the 1980’s.  It has been traditionally fired so there are some variations in the coloration from white to almost a pinkish color.   The jar is signed on the bottom with her Frog Hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 500.00
Lucas, Steve – Bowl with Three Bird Wings

This bowl by Steve Lucas has a design inspired by Nampeyo of Hano.  There are three bird wings painted encircling the piece.  Each is painted with bee-weed (black) and a polished red clay slip.  The wings are then designed with additional feather patterns.  Separating them, Steve has used white and red clay slips to give the background polished area more of a painterly appearance.  The bottom of the bowl is fully polished red. Note that the red clay has mica.  It is this highly polished micaceous red clay which Steve introduced to Hopi-Tewa pottery.  The bowl was traditionally fired and has slight color variations from the firing.  It is signed on the bottom with his name and an ear of corn (Corn Clan) and a Mudhead Katsina.

$ 1,500.00
Maho, Garrett –  Tile with Hopi Bird

Garrett Maho is known for his traditional and innovative Hopi-Tewa pottery.  This tile is very tightly painted with a traditional Hopi style bird as the design. The bird is intricately painted and note the checkerboard pattern on the body!  The tile is painted with a deep red is an additional clay slip while the black is painted with bee-weed (a plant).  The tile has been traditionally fired so that there are blushes on the surface.  The piece is signed on the back in the clay.

$ 300.00
Nampeyo, Tonita – Jar with Double Hummingbirds

Tonita Nampeyo is a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and a granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano.  She is known for her traditional pottery using natural clay slips and bee-weed for the black.  This jar is a taller shape with a rounded shoulder that leads to the mouth of the piece.  On one side it is painted with a traditional style hummingbird with the red polished head and wings.  On the opposite side there is another hummingbird, but the body is painted with a series of smaller Hopi designs. There are sections which are polished red.  The lines on the jar are very delicately painted in Tonita’s famous thin lines.  It has also been traditionally fired, which gives the jar the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair but some fugitive slip in the black.

$ 800.00
Nampeyo, Priscilla Namingha – Large Eagle Tail Bowl (1990’s)

Priscilla Namingha Nampeyo was a great-granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano and granddaughter of Annie Healing,  She was also a sister of  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo. Priscilla was the matriarch of a family of renown potters, including Rachel, Bonnie, Nyla and Jean Sahmie.  Priscilla began making pottery when she was only seven years old, under the guidance of Nampeyo of Hano. This large bowl is a classic of her style.  It is thin walled and painted with the classic “eagle tail” pattern, which was made famous by Nampeyo.  The top section is slipped with red clay while the design itself is painted with bee-weed (a plant) for the black. Each of the four eagle tails extends down over the shoulder and are surrounded by the bird wings.  The bowl was traditionally fired, so there are striking blushes on the surface.  Priscilla was known for her traditional designs along with the tightly painted designs.  The bowl is signed on the bottom “Priscilla Namingha Nampeyo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is nice to see such a large and classic designed piece of her work in the gallery!

$ 3,200.00
Abeita, Karen –  Bowl with Eagle Tail Designs

Karen Abeita is known for her traditional and innovative Hopi-Tewa pottery.  This bowl is painted with bee-weed (black) and a red clay slip and then traditionally fired.  Karen is known for her very intricately painted pottery. The bowl has an eagle tail and wings pattern painted around the surface.  Note as well the Hopi sash design around the mouth of the bowl!  It is very intricately painted.  The bowl is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,400.00
Kahe, Val – Seedpot with Shard Design

Val Kahe is a daughter of noted potter Gloria Kahe.  She is known for her intricately painted pottery.  This is one of her more complex designed seedpots. The top half has a series of pottery shards, which are inter-connected.  Most are painted with bee-weed (black) while some are polished a deep red and then painted with the black bee-weed.  Each of the red shards is a different bird or moth or flower or mosquito!  Check out the very fine lines used in her painting!  The seedpot has then been traditionally fired to create the fire clouds.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 875.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Plate with Four Birds (2002)

This is an unusual plate by Mark Tahbo.  The plate is recessed with a small rim.  It is fully polished and the center is fully painted. The design has four Hopi birds encircling the piece.  The center square is slipped with the mauve clay he was using at this time. The square styling is similar to that used by Nampeyo of Hano in the painting on the top of her pottery.  Note on the birds and the delicately painted lines.  The plate was traditionally fired and has some great blushes on the surface.  It was painted with bee-weed (black) and then clay slips. The plate is signed on the back rim, “Mark Tahbo” and dated 2002.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,600.00
Lucas, Steve – Jar with Spider Design

Steve Lucas has been one of the most influential traditional Hopi potters of the past several decades. His large, thin walled vessels along with his detailed painting, precise lines and neo-traditional designs are hallmarks of his pottery. This jar is thin walled and highly polished.  The design is painted with delicate lines onto the polished surface.  It is a traditional spider pattern that was revived by Nampeyo of Hano.  The spider design is on one side and there is a bird wing pattern on the other. The red used for the design has mica in it and the black is bee-weed.  The jar is traditionally fired and the blushes are stunning!  Steve has won numerous awards for his pottery, from Best of Show at Santa Fe Indian Market, to the Helen Naha “Traditional” award.  The bowl is signed on the bottom with his name and an ear of corn (Corn Clan) and a Mudhead Katsina.

$ 2,600.00
Sahmie Nampeyo, Rachel – Triple Lobe Jar

Rachel Sahmie is a daughter of noted potter Priscilla Nampeyo and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano.  She is a sister of noted potters Jean Sahmie and Bonnie Sahmie.  This is a fascinating piece, as there are three “lobes” to the piece, which technically is difficult to create.  It is almost as if there are three pots place one on another!  The bottom section has an eagle tail design.  The center section has a bird wing pattern and the top has stars.  The jar is painted with bee-weed (black) and slipped with a polished red clay to accent the designs.  It has been traditionally fired which creates the blush on the surface.  The jar is signed on the bottom with her name (hallmark) “RS”.

 

$ 600.00
Maho, Garrett –  Bowl with Raven Design

Garrett Maho is known for his traditional and innovative Hopi-Tewa pottery.  This bowl has an unusual raven design.  There are two of the birds and they are painted on both sides of the piece. The deep red is an additional clay slip while the black is painted with bee-weed (a plant).  The bowl has been traditionally fired so that there are blushes on the surface.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 650.00
Sale!
Sahmie, Jean – Large Bowl with 16 Flute Players

Jean Sahmie is a daughter of noted potter Priscilla Nampeyo and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano. This large bowl is fully vertically polished and painted with bee-weed (a plant)f or the black.  The vertical polish harkens to historic pottery which had this “onion skin” type of polished surface.  There are sixteen flute players encircling the bowl.  Each is painted with lines of rain separating them.  The bowl has been traditionally fired and it has some striking blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom, “Jean Sahme”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While Jean no longer makes pottery, there is a wonderful creativity in each of her pieces!

 

$ 800.00 $ 600.00
Sahmie, Jean – Jar with Awatovi Style Designs

Jean Sahmie is a daughter of noted potter Priscilla Nampeyo and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano. This jar has a wide shoulder and slightly turned out rim.  The shoulder of the jar is painted with a linear design and below that is a lightning pattern. The base has another lightning design. The designs for the jar are inspired by the classic Awatovi pottery.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom with her hallmark and a corn plant (for Corn Clan).  While Jean no longer makes pottery, there is a wonderful creativity in each of her pieces!

 

$ 500.00
Quotskuyva, Dextra – “Bird Wings” Jar (1984), Painted Perfection p. 75

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This is an earlier jar from 1984.  It is painted with a very fine-line bird wing pattern. The design is repeated four times around the shoulder of the piece.  The rim of the jar is also very tightly painted. It is painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired to create the blushes or fire-clouds on the surface.   The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dextra” along with a corn plant to represent the Corn Clan.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is a little superficial slip crack on the base, which can be seen in the photo of the signature.  This jar is also published in the book, “Painted Perfection” on page 75.  Dextra was the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture, along with a companion book entitled, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 1,950.00
Maho, Garrett –  Butterfly Tile

Garrett Maho is known for his traditional and innovative Hopi-Tewa pottery.  This tile is very tightly painted with a traditional Hopi style butterfly as the design.  Garrett has taken classic designs and used them for the wings of the butterfly!  It is very finely painted and traditionally fired.  The tile is painted with a deep red is an additional clay slip while the black is painted with bee-weed (a plant).  The tile has been traditionally fired so that there are blushes on the surface.  The piece is signed on the back in the clay.

$ 300.00
Adams, Sadie – Tile with Hopi Bird

Sadie Adams is one of the great names in Hopi pottery throughout the 1900’s.  There was a creativity in her shapes and use of Hopi and Sikyatki designs.  As well, there was a wonderful perseverance in her work for nearly a century!  This is one of her tiles.  It is painted with a Hopi or Sikyatki style bird.  The sections of the bird are paitned with rain, wind and cloud designs.  The tile is fully polished and traditionally fired.  It is signed on the back with her hallmark and name.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is certainly and beautiful example of her pottery and painting skill.

$ 400.00
Cheeda, Zella – Plate with Geometric Designs (1970’s)

Elva Tewaguna Namepyo, was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo, a granddaughter of the Nampeyo of Hano and a sister of Iris and Tonita Nampeyo and Thomas Polacca.  Her pottery was coil built, stone polished and painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips. This bowl has a very tightly painted classic migration pattern as the design.  The piece was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The original price tag from when it was purchased in the 1970’s is still on the bottom! Her daughter Adelle Nampeyo continues in the same family tradition.

$ 175.00
Tahbo, Mark  – 16″ Wide Eagle Tail Shoulder Jar (1999)

This is a striking very large wide shoulder jar by Mark Tahbo.  The jar is a classic Hopi or Sikytaki shape, with the wide shoulder and a slight neck. The neck is just slightly turned out, which for Mark, it was the little details in his pottery which were important to him.  The shoulder of the jar is painted with an intricate eagle tail design.  Mark would often try and stylize patterns so that they were not just a repetition of previous work.  Here, the tail feathers can be seen in the center of the design, and then the wings extruding outward and mottled.  The jar was painted with bee-weed (black) and then clay slips.  Note that he used a deep red clay, but also a mauve clay slip in the center areas.  It was only around 1998-9 that he began to use the mauve clay, which he found near Hopi.  It was difficult to use and he didn’t have much, so he used it as an accent in his designs.  The jar is traditionally fired and the blushes are simply amazing!  The color variations range from white to orange almost red!  Mark worked diligently to create blushes on the surface of the pottery so that they would almost function as another design element!  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Mark Tahbo” and dated ’99.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. The owners of the jar acquired it directly from Mark. Finding pieces of his this size, design and coloration is a great testament to his skill as a potter and painter!

$ 5,000.00
Tahbo, Grace – Mini Canteen and Ladle

Grace Tahbo is a relative of Mark Tahbo’s who is known for her miniature pottery.  This miniature canteen is painted with a cloud and lightning design  The black is bee-weed (a plant) and the red and orange are two different clay slips.  Grace also made the little fiber handle for the canteen.  The little ladle goes with the canteen and it is also clay. Both are traditionally fired.  The canteen is signed, “G. Tahbo” and a pipe for Tobacco Clan.

$ 100.00
Folwell, Susan & Les Namingha – “Corn Maiden: Earth Mother” Jar

Susan Folwell (Santa Clara )and Les Namingha (Hopi-Tewa/Zuni) collaborated together for the first time on a series of vessels in a show entitled “Corn:Maiden:Cultures” in 2015. The concept for the exhibition was that the Corn Maiden in Pueblo culture can also be found as a primal female archetype in cultures throughout the world.  There is play back and forth on these vessels as the multi-cultural figures are placed within a Pueblo context as the “Corn Maiden”, who brings the corn, the harvest and life.  This jar has been in an exhibit at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture since 2016.

This large jar was made by Les.  The designs painted by Susan on two sides show a Hopi maiden and a Pueblo maiden.  Her idea was to leave the faces empty, so that they did not represent just one person, but all women.  The two women represent the Pueblo and Hopi ancestry of Les and Susan. Playing from Susan’s more realistic portrayals, Les painted a more modern version of the women on the other two sides.  The angular shape of this vessel, made from Zuni clay, is unusual but also perfect for this important imagery.  In many ways, this powerful jar brings together the ideas of womanhood, femininity, modernism and the continuing importance of the Corn Maiden concept in Pueblo culture.  The dark brown background works perfectly for this intense jar.  Check out more of their exceptional collaborative pottery in the book, “Spoken Through Clay”.

$ 8,800.00
Clashin, Debbie – Bowl with Moth Design

This is classic design bowl by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. The shape of this bowl has a sloping shoulder.  The piece is painted with two moths, one on each side.  It was a design which was originated by Grace Chapella.  Next to each moth is a three-pointed section which represents the three Hopi mesas.   The rest of the design are the stars in the sky at night.  The jar is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  It was traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar along with a few darker areas from the smoke.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 975.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Black Shifting Sand Jar with Silver Insets

This is a striking wide shoulder jar by Preston Duwyenie.  It is made from Hopi clay and then slipped with mica on the base and neck. The shoulder of the jar is carved in a natural manner to represent the sand in the desert and its constant movement.  The “sand” sections are matte while the remainder is slipped with mica.  The entire jar is fired black and the result is stunning!  The micaceous areas are almost metallic in appearance.  The matte is a perfect contrast.  There are also three inset pieces of silver, which have an additional “shifting sand” pattern.  The silver is cast against cuttle-fish bone (a type of squid).  This process creates a similar style of shifting sand design to complement the clay.  The jar is flat on the bottom and signed in the clay with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child as the hallmark for his name in Hopi.  Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

“Why the shifting sand designs? Preston says he remembers watching a smooth pebble caught in sand being shifted by the wind, “there was beauty in its isolation within the sea of sand. It was like an island.  The endless sands of time, and the fact that people, too are tossed about by the wind. There is always rippling in our lives”.

$ 2,500.00
Naha, Helen “Feather Woman” – Large Awatovi Star Design Jar

This is a classic wide shoulder jar by Helen Naha, also known as “Feather Woman”.  She created distinctive pottery using the white clay slip throughout her career.  The designs were all painted using bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law, Paqua Naha yet had her own style in form, imagery, and composition.  Helen is known for her revival of the pre-historic Awatovi pottery.   Awatovi is one of the ruins near Hopi where a white slipped style of pottery was made.  It is a fascinating place as it was where Coronado made contact with the Hopi in 1540.  During the excavations in the 1930’s the whiteware pottery was rediscovered.  It was the imagery from his work which inspired much of Helen’s early pottery, as opposed the more classic Sikyatki inspired pottery of Nampeyo.  This jar has the “Awatovi Star” pattern painted on the top and the bottom.  The shape of the jar has a more open mouth, which reveals more of the painted imagery when viewing from the side.  Just above the shoulder is her “eternity band” design.  The inside of the bowl is also polished, which Helen tried to do on most of her pottery when she could reach her hand inside.  The jar has been traditionally fired and there is some variation to the color with the fired cloud, which certainly adds to the beauty of the piece.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom with her hallmark feather.

$ 2,800.00
Sale!
Duwyenie, Preston – Traditional Ladle with Silver Inset

This is a traditional ladle or spoon by Preston Duwyenie.  It is made from a red clay found near Hopi.  The entire piece is fully polished. There is an inset piece of silver on the handle. The silver is meant to represent the shifting sands found in the areas around Hopi.  The silver is cast against cuttle-fish bone (a type of squid).  The silver is inset after the firing and there is a design etched on both ends.  The ladle is signed on the back in the clay with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child.  Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

$ 275.00 $ 200.00
Nampeyo, Adelle L. –  Wide Shoulder Bat Wing Design Bowl

Adelle Lalo Nampeyo is known for her stylistic use of traditional Hopi designs.  This wide bowl is a classic shape with a wide shoulder.  The design is the classic bat wing pattern, made famous by Nampeyo of Hano.  The opening is slipped red and the remainder is painted with intricate lines.  The bowl is traditionally fired to create the coloration on the surface of the jar.  The coloration works beautifully with this piece with shades from white to orange.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 150.00
Quotskuyva, Dextra – Double Opening Bowl with Hummingbird & Star (1990’s)

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This is a fascinating bowl which has two openings.  On one side there is a flower painted on the clay with a tiny hummingbird.  The other side has a black painted star pattern.  The bowl is signed on the inside.  The bowl sits on a clay tile, which has been traditionally fired and is also signed in the clay.  The fine lines of the painting, along with the blush from the traditional firing make this an exceptional piece of her pottery. It is painted with red clay slips along with bee-weed (black).  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Dextra was the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture, along with a companion book entitled, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 3,600.00
Setalla, Stetson – Large Wide Bowl with Mountain and Cloud Patterns

Stetson Setalla is a son of noted potter Pauline Setalla.  This wide bowl is fully painted triangular mountain designs along with cloud patterns. The designs are intricately painted with hatchwork and geometric patterns. The bowl is coil built and painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  Note the various colors he has used on this bowl, which is certainly unusual!  The bowl is traditionally fired with striking fire clouds on the surface.  Interestingly, the first time I met Stetson was through the famous photographer Jerry Jacka, around 1998.  Jerry was photographing Stetson’s pottery for is book on Hopi art and asked Stetson to stay until I arrived so I could see his pottery!  Definitely a talented potter from the very beginning!  This bowl is signed on the bottom.

$ 800.00
Namingha, Les – Sikyatki Sunrise Canteen

This is a exceptional large jar by Les Namingha.  Les is a descendant of Nampeyo and learned to make pottery from his aunt Dextra Quotskuyva.  This jar is one of his famous shapes, as it is inspired by a canteen, but reformed with a wider surface for more design.  One side of the jar has a Sikyatki (Hopi pottery from the 1400’s) bird with extended wings. The colors are all reminiscent of Hopi with the black and red and intricate patterns in the body of the piece. The circles are like the reflections of light at sunrise.  As the jar is turned there is the dramatic painted section.  It is a complex compilation of Hopi designs which encompass most of the surface of the jar.  The setting of the white clay and painted surface adds to the dramatic effect.  There is something both modern and very ancient about this jar!  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 3,800.00
Naha, Sylvia – Jar with Lizard & Corn Plant Designs

Sylvia Naha created pieces with the white clay polished surface painted with bee-weed (black) and native clay slips.  Throughout the 1980’s, Sylvia was considered among the most innovative of the Hopi potters.  Her pieces were classic in form and amazingly intricate in design.  This jar has two of her classic designs, the lizards and the corn plants. Each lizard is painted with a series of triangular geometrics.  They are painted at a slant on the jar.  Separating the lizards are two corn plants. Corn has strong symbolism for prosperity and abundance.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The jar is signed on the bottom with a feather and an “S”.

$ 800.00
Navasie, Joy “Frogwoman” – Large Water Jar with Birds (1980’s)

This is a large water jar by Joy Navasie.  It is slipped with the white clay and then painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black).  The shape is a classic for her with a round body and a slightly turned out neck.  The neck has a single band of rain and cloud designs. The sides of the jar are fully painted in four panels.  Two panels are birds and the other two are bird tail designs. The black painted with bee-weed (a plant) and the red is a deeper red clay she began to use in the 1980’s.  The jar is fully polished, even on the inside!  It has been traditionally fired so there are some variations in the coloration from white to almost a pinkish color.   The jar is signed on the bottom with her Frog Hallmark.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. 

$ 1,800.00
Sale!
Nahsonhoya, Agnes – Carved Seedpot with Bird

Agnes Nahsonhoya is a daughter of noted potter Pauline Setalla and a niece of Eunice “Fawn” Navasie. She is also the sister of Dee Setalla and Stetson Setalla. She learned to make pottery from her mother and her aunt. Her pieces are signed her name and also a bear paw, as she is bear clan.  This seedpot is coil built and carved with a bird circling the side and top of the piece.  The sections of the bird are carved into the clay and consist of rain and cloud patterns.  The head of the bird sprials onto the top of the piece.  It is signed on the bottom.

 

$ 300.00 $ 200.00
Naha-Nampeyo, Cheryl – Small White Bowl with Ants

 

Cheryl Naha Nampeyo is a daughter of Shirley Benn and a granddaughter of Daisy Hooee.  She is also a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano. This is one of her small “ant bowls”.  She says of these:

The story was told to me by my grandmother Daisy Hooee Nampeyo as it was told to her grandmother.  Long ago, the People wanted to get rid of the ants around the house.  They would hunt for the hives in the bushes or trees.  Once a hive was found, they would use honey.  The honey was poured into small pots and place on top of anthills. All the ants would come out because they found that it was sweet.  The people would use a hoe to move the pots of ants away from the home.  That is how they got rid of the ants and that is why we call them “Ant pots”.

This small bowl is made from white clay and it is painted with bee-weed (black).  There are a series of ants encircling the bowl as part of the story of moving the ants.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “C. Naha Nampeyo”.

$ 25.00
Naha, Tyra – Bowl with Bird Designs

Tyra Naha is a daughter of Rainy Naha.   She learned to make pottery from her mother and continues to make traditional style Hopi-Tewa pottery in the style her grandmother, Helen “Feather Woman” Naha.  This bowl is coil built and painted with native clay slips and bee-weed (black).  It is a classic design with a series of birds encircling the bowl and connected with fineline patterns.  It is a variation on the classic “migration” pattern.  The bowl is is traditionally fired and signed on the bottom with a feather and spider (Spider Clan ) and a “3” for being Third Generation of the Naha family.

 

 

 

 

$ 250.00
Nampeyo, Tonita – Migration Jar

Tonita Nampeyo is a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and a granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano.  She is known for her traditional pottery using natural clay slips and bee-weed for the black.  This jar is a classic shape with a wide shoulder and a slightly turned out neck.  The design is called the, “Migration pattern” and it is one that was revived by Nampeyo of Hano in the late 1800’s from ancient Sikyatki pottery.  The design is meant to tell the story of the migration of people from the third to the fourth world in Hopi legends as well as the migration of people around the world.  This jar is delicately painted and note the exceptional thin lines!  It is traditionally fired for the amazing color.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair but some fugitive slip in the black.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 275.00
Koopee, Jacob -19″ Wide Open Bowl with Migration Pattern & Cradledolls

This is an amazing large open bowl by Jacob Koopee.  Jake was known for his large pieces and his variations on traditional Hopi-Tewa designs.  This large open bowl is coil built and it is painted on the outside and the inside. On the outside there is the classic migration pattern.  Jake had an ability to paint the fine lines of the pattern thin and even. The inside of the bowl is also fully painted with hand prints and cradle dolls.  Each of the cradle dolls is a different katsina, including a Qooqule, Grandmother, Runner and other figures.  The small hand prints were meant to represent the children given the cradle dolls as gifts.  The bowl is signed on the bottom with a flute player, which was one of Jake’s signatures.  This immense bowl is a striking example of his skill as both potter and painter.  It is traditionally fired and painted with bee weed (black) and natural clay slips.  Jake won numerous awards during his career including “Best of Show” in 2005 at both Santa Fe Indian Market and the Heard Museum Market.  I was lucky to have been a pottery judge both years at both events, and it was exciting to see an artist create such dynamic work.

$ 16,000.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Tall Black Micaceous Jar with Silver Insets

This is a distinctive jar by Preston Duwyenie.  The piece is a tall jar with a narrow opening. The piece is slipped in a micaceous clay and then fired black. The mica then gives the piece a very metallic appearance.  There are two inset pieces of silver on one side of the jar.  Each silver piece has the appearance of “shifting sands”, much in a similar style to the pottery where he has carved a shifting sand pattern.  They are cast by Preston against cuttlefish bone, to create the distinctive texture.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay with Preston’s hallmark, which means “carried in beauty”.  There is certainly something both modern and ancient about this striking piece!   Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.  He is married to pottery Debra Duwyenie and now resides in Santa Clara Pueblo.  Preston has won numerous awards for pottery, including “Best of Show” at the Heard Indian Market.

$ 2,100.00
Lucas, Steve – Small Jar with Bird Tail Designs

This small bowl by Steve Lucas has a very complex design.  The bowl is stone polished and then painted. The design is a series of bird tails which are then highlighted with both red and white clay slips.  The overall appearance is very modernistic yet based in classic Hopi imagery.  The bowl was traditionally fired and has slight color variations from the firing.  It is signed on the bottom with his name and an ear of corn (Corn Clan) and a Mudhead Katsina.

$ 425.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Shifting Sand Seedpot with Fan Design

Preston Duwyenie is know for his Hopi pottery which blends modern and traditional aspects of the art. This seedpot is made from a red clay which he finds near Second Mesa at Hopi.  The clay fired a tan coloration.  The body of the piece is fully polished.  The top area above the shoulder has the shifting sand design.  What makes the sand area so fascinating is how he carves it so that it has very natural appearance.  It flows around the entire surface, just as if the clay has been swept away. The top view of the piece shows the design nicely and the shadows the design creates.  The lid is made from silver and cast against cuttlefish bone. Preston cut the lid so that it has a stylized fan half-circle or plant shape.  The casting creates a similar style of ‘shifting sand’ design to complement the clay areas!  The the seedpot and the silver lid are signed on the bottom with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child and his Hopi name, which means “carried in beauty”.   Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

Why the shifting sand designs? Preston says he remembers watching a smooth pebble caught in sand being shifted by the wind, “there was beauty in its isolation within the sea of sand. It was like an island.  The endless sands of time, and the fact that people, too are tossed about by the wind. There is always rippling in our lives”.

$ 750.00
Nampeyo, James Garcia – Large Jar with Eagle Tail Design

James Garcia Nampeyo is a son of Leah Garcia Nampeyo, a grandson of Fannie Nampeyo and a great-grandson of Nampeyo of Hano.  This is a large wide shoulder jar by James.  It is fully polished and painted with a very classic eagle tail design. This motif was made famous in the pottery of Nampeyo of Hano when she revived it from historic Sikyatki pottery. The design is painted in four sections and the black is bee-weed and the red, a clay slip.  The jar is traditionally fired with some slight blushes to the surface.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 775.00
Begaye, Nathan – Large Polychrome Jar with Cloud Swirls

Nathan Begaye was a unique innovator among Pueblo and Navajo potters.  His ethnic connection to both Hopi and Navajo let his work flow between the two distinctive styles and yet find their own unique space.  His pottery used traditional designs, forms and techniques, yet somehow appeared very modern.  This large jar by Nathan is coil built and stone polished vertically to create an “onion skin” appearance to the surface.  The jar is then painted with different clay slips of various colors. All his different colors were always natural clays.  The design on this jar takes it inspiration from the ancient Tularosa pottery and their swirl patterns, as well as the cloud designs on Hopi pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

 

$ 1,100.00
Qoyawayma, Al – Polycrome Triangular Box with Moth Man

This triangular “box” by Al Qoyawayma is an exceptional piece of his pottery. The shape is distinctive with the three flat sides and the flat lid.  The three sides allow him space to create his multi-layer carved designs.  On the “back” panel is the classic Month Man which is derived from ancient kiva art. Here he is depicted with a plant design. On the there is a Hopi style bird with cloud and lightning designs above.  On the opposite side is a complex pattern of bird wings and a old style bird near the base.  I included some close shots of the sides to show the real depth of the layers of carving and the textural nature of the corn patterns in the carved areas.  The lid is carved in multiple layers and has a swirled bird and prayer feathers.   The various layers of carving allow for him to give additional depth to the piece.  The colors are all natural clay slips which are often stone polished to create the shine in contrast to the matte surfaces.  The colorations on this piece are stunning and add to the striking appearance and balance of form, sculpture and design!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Simple perfection!

$ 11,000.00
Qoyawayma, Al – Cliff Dwelling and Butterfly

Al Qoyawayma calls the shape of this jar his “Serenity vase”.  It is a distinctive form with the two overlapping spouts. This polychrome jar is carved with a very old style Sikyatki butterfly on one side.  It has various layers of carving which give added depth to the design and the various colors are all from different clay slips. The opposite side has a pueblo cliff dwelling which has areas which are recessed and the entire surface is fully carved!  Note the various shapes of the doors with the keyhole, square the even ones with the fallen beams!    It is a classic piece with a striking balance of designs and form. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 3,900.00
Qoyawayma, Al – Large Full Arch Mesa Verde Jar

This is a spectacular large piece from Al Qoyawayma.  It is one of his architectural pieces from his “Mesa Verde” series.  The oval area is pushed into the clay and then the building is pushed back out from the inside of the bowl. I have included photos of the process, as I think they are both fascinating and also show the incredible skill and time it takes to make a piece like this happen!  Beyond the technical, this large bowl has a very intricate designed Mesa Verde series of buildings. There are the tall towers in the background, both round, and square. In the front is a fully covered kiva with a ladder and an older kiva with the roof missing.  The front has the rocks sculpted into the clay.  Note how Al etches and then paints all the “bricks” that make up the buildings!  This is one of the largest and most complex architectural pieces we have had from Al in several years.  Al’s architectural pieces are among his most iconic works!

$ 18,000.00
Qoyawayma, Al – “Modern Migration” Polychrome Lidded Jar

This large jar by Al Qoyawayma is stunning in his use of numerous clay slips, various levels of carving and his own innovative shape.  Al says his inspiration for his polychrome pieces is to imagine how Hopi Sikyatki pottery might have evolved without western contact. This jar has two sharp shoulders and a central band which is fully carved.  The band is designed with corn, various birds, and prayer feather patterns.  Each is slipped and polished with various clays!  The top has a stylized version inspired by the Migration pattern.  Here there are two sections which are like the historic migration design and they spiral into a larger red parrot and a green eagle. The center of the jar (which is the lid), has a star pattern and then a spiral for the galaxy.  Note the various layers of carving along with all the different colors of clay.  The amount of time to design, carve and polish this jar is extraordinary!  There are over five different clay slips used on this piece!  This piece is a striking balance of form, sculpture, color, and design!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 17,500.00
Qoyawayma, Al – Double Lobe Jar with Doorways & A Star

This is a thoughtful piece from Al Qoyawayma.  It is one of his architectural pieces, with the pueblo wall scene carved into the center of the jar. The shape has two lobes and the top and bottom part are vertically polished.  It is the center section which is fascinating with three different pueblo doorways and one window, found in ruins throughout the southwest.  Each of these are carved into the clay and note the detail on the walls.  The color variations are created using various clay slips.  Al says about this piece:

There are four opening shapes….only three are doorways. The “cross” or Star design is that used in weavings, pottery and petroglyphs. One could ask “which star”. Well it is likely more emblematic of many different stars depending on location.  The Polynesians used stars to navigate.  A late 1970’s recreation of the double hulled vessel used to navigate the Pacific is called Hokulea, or the “Star of Gladness”.  I like that metaphor. In Hopi, star is “soohu” and gladness is “háalayi”.  Although Hopi and Polynesian language may have no relation I like that “Ho-ku” and “soo-hu” are phonetically similar and “lea” might sound a little like “-layi”.  No matter.  I worked with and was a friend of Hawaiian artist and historian Herb Kané.  I asked if I could create a piece by that name (and he said yes)….and created a star in the motif. So a “long story” short I have an affinity for a star that brings or gives us gladness or happiness…..and especially the “Star of Bethlehem”.

The three doorways can be found in various ruins in the Southwest.  The “tee-door” is the most recognizable.  It’s possible origin in the americas is a much longer discussion. We don’t have a precise story about the T-door shape….at least I don’t, but I like it. It can be found in other locations around the world. The “trapzodial” shaped door is common throughout the Americas, especially pre-Ican precision stone architecture.  The last polygonal shape is just part of a doorway where the beam above the door has rotted away and the outline created by doorway rock falling away….I saw it in a ruin

Al’s architectural pieces are among his most iconic works!  This one encompasses much of the story of his art!

$ 6,900.00
Qoyawayma, Al – Two Spout Polychrome Stirrup Jar

This stirrup jar by Al Qoyawayma is inspired by historic pieces with a similar handle and wide body. The jar has two spouts and he has carved on both sides of the piece.  The design on one side is a wave pattern, while the other has a prayer feather pattern.   The carved areas are also polished, which is striking with this carving of some of the sections!  The ends are carved with a figure and a sun design.  The colors are derived from various clay slips.  The contrast of carved, polished and matte surfaces works beautifully on this piece.  The various layers of carving allow for him to give additional depth to the piece.

$ 8,500.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Large Jar with 16 Kastsina Masks (1998)

This is an exceptional large jar by Mark Tahbo. It came from a collector who purchased it directly from Mark. It looked very familiar and when I went though some old photos, I realized I had been at Hopi the day it was fired!  Mark had been firing pieces for Santa Fe Indian Market in1998 and asked me to come up and photograph some of the firings.  At the end of the photos are some photos of this being taken out of the firing! What an amazing coincedence!  It’s no surprise that this jar is thin walled and a great shape.  The entire surface is fully polished. The jar was made in 1998 and it was one of the first times he had deviated from more classic Sikyati designs of Nampeyo and his great-grandmother Grace Chapella.  Here each of the figures around the shoulder has a different katsina mask including the grandmother katsina, hornet, cloud, star, and others.  Note how the mask of each one is different and painted with both red, white and mauve clay slips!  The band closer to the neck has star, bird, corn, raincloud, butterfly and flower patterns.  Again, they are painted with the various clay slips!  The complexity in design and the variations in color are certainly a hallmark of this period of his pottery. The jar was traditionally fired and there are great blushes on the surface. Mark fired his pottery outdoors using sheep dung and the smoke created the intense colorations.  He was always fascinated with the blushes in the clay and worked hard to give his pottery a rich appearance. This jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed and dated on the bottom. 

$ 3,000.00
Quotskuyva, Dextra – Jar with Swans (1990’s)

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This is a more classic piece of her pottery.  It is painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired to create the blushes or fire-clouds on the surface.  The jar has four swans painted around the shoulder.  Note how the deep red is polished on the neck and the rim of the jar.  The base of the jar is matte red and the inside of the mouth of the jar is an unusual tan coloration.  The swans are painted to extend up from the shoulder.  Note the photo of the jar from the top and how she has squared the rim but has the birds swirls around! It is this attention to the small details which makes her work so spectacular.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dextra” along with a corn plant to represent the Corn Clan.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Dextra was the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture, along with a companion book entitled, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 4,500.00
Nampeyo, Elva Tewaguna – Bowl with Migration Pattern (1970’s)

Elva Tewaguna Namepyo, was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo, a granddaughter of the Nampeyo of Hano and a sister of Iris and Tonita Nampeyo and Thomas Polacca.  Her pottery was coil built, stone polished and painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips. This bowl has a very tightly painted classic migration pattern as the design.  The piece was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The original price tag from when it was purchased in the 1970’s is still on the bottom! Her daughter Adelle Nampeyo continues in the same family tradition.

$ 275.00
Nampeyo, Elva Tewaguna – Mini Bat Wing Bowl (1970’s)

Elva Tewaguna Namepyo, was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo, a granddaughter of the Nampeyo of Hano and a sister of Iris and Tonita Nampeyo and Thomas Polacca.  Her pottery was coil built, stone polished and painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips. This small bowl is a very traditional design with a batwing pattern.  The piece was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Her daughter Adelle Nampeyo continues in the same family tradition.

$ 200.00
Nampeyo, Fannie – Bowl with Migration Pattern (1970’s)

Fannie Nampeyo was the youngest daughter of noted potter Nampeyo of Hano and also the mother of noted potters Iris Nampeyo, Leah Nampeyo and Thomas Polacca.  She was certainly among the most skilled of her generation for painting designs pottery.  While her mother revived the “migration” or bird wing design, Fannie made is a signature design of her pottery and of the Nampeyo family.  This bowl is very flat, in the style of the ancient Sikyatki pottery. The design is a migration pattern painted onto the surface.  The bowl was traditionally fired so that it has some visually striking blushes on the surface.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Fannie Nampeyo”.

$ 800.00
Nampeyo, Elva Tewaguna – Wide Bowl with Bat Wing Design (1970’s)

Elva Tewaguna Namepyo, was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo, a granddaughter of the Nampeyo of Hano and a sister of Iris and Tonita Nampeyo and Thomas Polacca.  Her pottery was coil built, stone polished and painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips. This wide shape bowl is a very traditional form for Hopi-Tewa pottery.  This design, the bat wing pattern, is one which was revived by Nampeyo of Hano.   The piece was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Her daughter Adelle Nampeyo continues in the same family tradition.

$ 500.00
Komalestewa, Alton – Large Wide Shoulder Melon Jar

This is stunning wide shoulder melon jar by Alton Komalestewa.  It is the combination of color, form and polish which makes it exceptional.  Alton learned to make pottery from his mother-in-law, Helen Shupla.  She was famous for her traditional melon bowls and over the years Alton has taken and refined this form with thinner walls and a highly polished surface.  This large jar is thin walled and highly stone polished.  As it was being made, each of the undulating ribs are pushed out from the inside.  It is technically difficult to stretch the clay and create even ribs.  This jar was then fired brown, but it is a color that ranges from brown to red to nearly black . The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay and Alton has also included his hallmark, which isa  katsina face. The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 3,000.00
Nampeyo, Fannie – Large Migration Pattern Jar (1960’s)

Fannie Nampeyo was the youngest daughter of noted potter Nampeyo of Hano and also the mother of noted potters Iris Nampeyo, Leah Nampeyo and Thomas Polacca.  She was certainly among the most skilled of her generation for painting designs pottery.  While her mother revived the “migration” or bird wing design, Fannie made is a signature design of her pottery and of the Nampeyo family.  This larger jar is coil built and very tightly painted.  The migration pattern, or bird wings, extend around the entire jar in 10 sections.  The jar was traditionally fired so that it has some visually striking blushes on the surface.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Fannie Nampeyo”.

$ 1,500.00
Nampeyo, Camille “Hisi”  – Large Jar with Swan Design (1999)

Camille “Hisi” Quotskuyva learned to make pottery from her mother, Dextra Quotskuyva, a sister of noted painter Dan Namingha and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano, Annie Healing, and Rachel Nampeyo.  She is known for her use of traditional imagery and the delicate painting of her designs.  This is one of the largest pieces we have had of her work in years.  It is a very wide shoulder jar in the classic Sikyatki shape. The designs are painted on the surface.  It is a series of four swans, each encircling the piece.  They are painted with bee-weed and the red is a highly polished clay with just a bit of mica.  The jar was traditionally fired which created the blushes on the surface.  This jar is from 1999 and while Hisi makes very few pieces today, the delicate lines of her work from this period are among her best.  The jar is signed and dated on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,900.00
Naha, Helen “Feather Woman – Water Jar with Bat Wing Design (1970’s)

Helen Naha created distinctive pottery using the white kaolin clay slip throughout her career.  The designs were all painted using bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law, Paqua Naha yet had her own style in form, imagery, and composition. This jar has a wonderful shape with a low shoulder and slightly turned out rim.  The design is the classic batwing pattern which extends down below the shoulder.  The bottom has her hallmark “feather”.  It is really wonderful to note her attention to the little details and that even the entire inside of the jar is fully polished! Note the wonderful bold lines of Helen’s painting!  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,800.00
Navasie, Joy “Frogwoman” – Mini Bowl with Lid (1980’s)

Joy Navasie was known for her white slipped pottery and classic use of design elements. She learned to make pottery from her mother, Paqua, who also used the white clay and signed with a frog as a hallmark.  The white kaolin clay is a slip which is applied to the surface of the bowl and then black (bee-weed) and red clay slips are used for painting.  This is one of her few miniatures.  It is from the 1980’s, which can be determined by both the color of the red clay slip she used and the detail in the painting.  Not only did she not make many miniatures, but I’m not sure I’ve seen one with such a complicated lid!  The lid is carved so that it rests inside the mouth of the bowl.  The bowl is painted with a classic bird wing pattern.  It is painted with a red clay slip and the black bee-weed. It is signed on the bottom with her frog hallmark.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one small area of the black which is fugitive.

$ 475.00
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