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King Galleries is pleased to have a variety of Pueblo and Tribal pottery from the 1920's to the present. We have created this "Signed Historic Pottery"  to identify work by those potters who were early innovators in the 1920's and began to sign their work. It also is used for any artists who have passed away, making their art part of the historical record. The history of Pueblo pottery during this period is one of an exciting change as it has evolved from utilitarian ware to folk art to the fine art of today. We hope you enjoy these amazing pieces!

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Martinez, Santana & Adam – Bowl with Lightning & Mountain Designs (1970’s)

This is a classic bowl by Santana and Adam Martinez.  The piece is very highly polished and perfectly painted with classic mountain and lightning design.  The bowl is traditionally fired with areas of gunmetal coloration to the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Santana + Adam”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic piece!

$ 600.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Large Jar with Sikyatki Birds (1990’s)

Mark Tahbo learned to make pottery from his great-grandmother, Grace Chapella.  His pieces reflect the wonderful symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter. The designs are painted using native clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black. This large jar is one of his pieces from the 1990’s. The shape is inspired by the ancient Sikyatki pottery, where the vessels were very wide and flat.  This jar is stone polished and the top is painted with a bird wing and bird head as the design.  The placement of the imagery gives the piece a very modern appearance.  The jar was traditionally fired which created the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom, “Mark Tahbo”  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,200.00
Navasie, Paqua- Ash Tray/Open Bowl (1930’s)

Paqua Naha was the mother of noted potter Joy “Frogwoman” Navasie and the mother-in-law of Helen “Featherwoman” Naha. She was known for her traditional designs and use of the various colors of clay at Hopi.  She developed the white ware in around 1951-2. She was the first to sign her pottery with her Frog Hallmark, as “Paqua” means Frog in Hopi. This is one of her “ash trays”, which was probably made for being a souvenir.  It is made from the red clay and the painted with designs around the side and on the top.  The piece is signed with her hallmark Frog.  The piece is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It appears as if it was varnished at some time, which was often typical with “utilitarian” pieces which would be used.

$ 175.00
Tafoya, Legoria – Open Bowl with Handle (1960’s)

Legoria Tafoya Legoria was a sister of painter Pablita Velarde. She was the mother of noted potter Celes Tafoya. This unique open bowl is actually a traditional shape. The form is a “scoop”, the type of which would be used as a serving bowl in traditional pueblo meals. This piece has a slight rim and the handle is braided clay.  The surface is stone polished and the piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 150.00
Redbird, Ida – Bowl with Cloud Design

Ida Redbird is one of the best known of the potters involved in the revival of Maricopa pottery from 1937-40. She was featured in Arizona Highways in 1948. Her pottery is made using a paddle-and-anvil technique and they are twice fired. The black designs are derived from a mixture of mesquite sap and cactus spines.  This bowl is a round shape with a polished exterior and matte interior.  The design is a cloud pattern which encircles the rim of the piece.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Ida Redbird” on the bottom.

$ 275.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Bowl with Mountain and Wind Design (1960’s)

This bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1960’s.  The shape is her classic bowl from that time period with the round shoulder.  The carving is deep and the edges are rounded from the polishing.  The design is a mountain pattern with the wind and lightning flowing across.  The interesting part of this bowl is that it is a smaller version of some larger pieces she made with this exact same shape!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is fired to a dark black coloration which is definitely expected with her pieces from this time period.

$ 1,200.00
Chino, Grace – Large Jar with Geometric Designs (1989)

This is one of the largest jars we have had by Grace Chino.  She was a daughter of noted potter Marie Z. Chino and a sister of noted potters Carrie Chino Charlie and Rose Chino. Over the years she won numerous awards for her pottery at Santa Fe Indian Market and her work was featured in the “7 Families in Pueblo Pottery” and in museums around the country.  This large jar is just black-on-white and it has the shape much like some of the ancient Chaco or Mesa Verde pottery.  This jar has a mountain design around the neck and the body of the piece has swirling patterns with flower and feather designs. The graphic pattern of the designs is further enhanced by the fineline interior designs in many of the sections. As the jar is turned there is a constant flow of imagery.  The jar was traditionally fired and so there is just a tinge of blush near the base.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed and dated on the bottom.

$ 3,000.00
Blue Corn – Tile with Lightning & Wind Design (1960’s) (14)

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she also made exquisite black-on-black pottery.  This tile is one of a group which has a fascinating history.  They were made in the 1960’s for a CG Wallace Hotel in Albuquerque.  Each tile is signed on the back in the clay and each also has a sequential number and how it should be placed (up, down, etc).  They were meant to be used as tiles in a wall but were never removed from their box! This tile is painted black-on-black and has a lightning and wind design.  Note how even the sides of the tile are fully polished!  The tile is signed, “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  It is tile number “14”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a fascinating piece of history! The last photo is one that I took of all the tiles in their correct sequence and placement.

$ 275.00
Blue Corn – Tile with Bird Wing Design (1960’s) (6)

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she also made exquisite black-on-black pottery.  This tile is one of a group which has a fascinating history.  They were made in the 1960’s for a CG Wallace Hotel in Albuquerque.  Each tile is signed on the back in the clay and each also has a sequential number and how it should be placed (up, down, etc).  They were meant to be used as tiles in a wall but were never removed from their box! This tile is painted black-on-black and has a bird wing design.  Note how even the sides of the tile are fully polished!  The tile is signed, “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  It is tile number “6”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a fascinating piece of history! The last photo is one that I took of all the tiles in their correct sequence and placement.

$ 275.00
Blue Corn – Tile with Rain and Cloud Designs (1960’s) (15)

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she also made exquisite black-on-black pottery.  This tile is one of a group which has a fascinating history.  They were made in the 1960’s for a CG Wallace Hotel in Albuquerque.  Each tile is signed on the back in the clay and each also has a sequential number and how it should be placed (up, down, etc).  They were meant to be used as tiles in a wall but were never removed from their box! This tile is painted red-on-red and has a rain and cloud design with very nicely painted fine line.  Note how even the sides of the tile are fully polished!  The tile is signed, “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  It is tile number “15”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a fascinating piece of history! The last photo is one that I took of all the tiles in order by number and placement.

$ 275.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Jar with Sikyatki Butterflies (1996)

Mark Tahbo learned to make pottery from his great grandmother, Grace Chapella.  His pieces reflect the wonderful symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter. The designs are painted using native clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black. This jar from 1996 harkens to his early work and it is unexpectedly thin, which makes it a delight to hold.  The jar is a shape which allows for the painted designs to flow up from the shoulder to the neck. It is an interesting pattern, as it one which Mark rarely used on his pottery.  It is a pair of opposing butterflies on each side of the jar.  Their bodies are made up of traditional Hopi-Tewa designs. and separating them are stylized wing patterns.  It is his own variation on the classic “eagle tail” pattern which is often used, but here with the butterflies as a replacement.  Of course, the jar was traditionally fired and the blushes, which  he loved on his  pottery, cover the surface and enhance the design.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Blue Corn – Red Tile with Rain Design (1960’s) (13)

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she also made exquisite black-on-black pottery.  This tile is one of a group which has a fascinating history.  They were made in the 1960’s for a CG Wallace Hotel in Albuquerque.  Each tile is signed on the back in the clay and each also has a sequential number and how it should be placed (up, down, etc).  They were meant to be used as tiles in a wall but were never removed from their box! This tile is painted red-on-red and has a variety of rain and lightning designs.  The lines are delicately painted across the surface of the tile.  Note how even the sides of the tile are fully polished!  The tile is signed, “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  It is tile number “13”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some color variation from the firing, which is not unexpected with traditionally fired red pottery.  Definitely a fascinating piece of history! The last photo is one that I took of all the tiles in their correct sequence and placement.

$ 275.00
Blue Corn – Tile with Rain and Cloud Designs (1960’s) (16)

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she also made exquisite black-on-black pottery.  This tile is one of a group which has a fascinating history.  They were made in the 1960’s for a CG Wallace Hotel in Albuquerque.  Each tile is signed on the back in the clay and each also has a sequential number and how it should be placed (up, down, etc).  They were meant to be used as tiles in a wall but were never removed from their box! This tile is painted black-on-black and has a rain and cloud design with very nicely painted fine line.  Note how even the sides of the tile are fully polished!  The tile is signed, “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  It is tile number “16”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a fascinating piece of history! The last photo is one that I took of all the tiles in order by number and placement.

$ 275.00
Martinez, Maria – Feather and Bird Wing Plate (Maria + Popovi)

This is a variation on the classic eagle feather design plate by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the plate while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The plate is highly polished with a deep black shine.  The design has the eagle feathers and the bird wings.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was an early piece of their pottery from 1956-9).  The plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. I included photos of the plate turned in different directions to show how the shine appears on the piece.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,000.00
Blue Corn – Tile with Bird Wing Design (1960’s)(4)

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she also made exquisite black-on-black pottery.  This tile is one of a group which has a fascinating history.  They were made in the 1960’s for a CG Wallace Hotel in Albuquerque.  Each tile is signed on the back in the clay and each also has a sequential number and how it should be placed (up, down, etc).  They were meant to be used as tiles in a wall but were never removed from their box! This tile is painted black-on-black and has a bird wing design.  Note how even the sides of the tile are fully polished!  The tile is signed, “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  It is tile number “4”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a fascinating piece of history! The last photo is one that I took of all the tiles in their correct sequence and placement.

$ 275.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1970’s)

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery and her creative use of various clay slips on her pottery. She learned to make pottery from Maria Martinez at San Ildefonso.  This is one of her few carved pieces which is also polychrome. The bowl is carved with a water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece.  The bowl is polished tan and the avanyu and the carved areas are outlined with a black clay.  The background areas is slipped with a red clay.  The result is a striking appearance where the depth of the carving is enhanced by the coloration.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the claym “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Gonzales, Rose – Bowl with Bird Lid

This is a unique lidded bowl by Rose Gonzales.  She is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery.  The bowl is round and fully polished.  The lid is in the shape of a bird and it is also fully polished.  Note however, that the lid is very sculptural in appearance with an indented and rounded back.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Curran, Alvin – Bowl with Mountain and Snow Designs

Alvin Curran was possibly the most refined and sophisticated San Juan style potter of his generation. He was married to Dolores Curran and his daughter is Ursula Curran, both of whom continue to make pottery.  Alvin took the traditional style of incised San Juan polychrome pottery and refined his carving and painted designs.  Each piece is fully carved and then red and white clay slips are added to create the color.  Amazingly, each year at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market, he would enter his pottery in the “carved” categories and win against much more deeply carved and fully polished traditional Santa Clara pottery.  It was a reflection of the precision of his work. This bowl is one of his smaller pieces.  It is stone polished on the rim and the base.  Around the body of the jar, it is incised and has a mountain pattern and the white slip above represents the snow.  The other designs are wind and clouds.  The designs are precision cut into the clay before firing.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alvin Curran”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 350.00
Baca, Angela – Black Melon Bowl with 24 Ribs

This is a classic melon bowl by Angela Baca.  It is very deeply carved and each rib is stone polished.  The bowl has 24 melon ribs.  The bowl has a high shine and even the mouth of the bowl is fully polished. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Angela Baca” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00
Nampeyo, Elva Tewaguna – Bowl with Migration Pattern (1970’s)

Elva Tewaguna Namepyo, was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo, a granddaughter of the Nampeyo of Hano and a sister of Iris and Tonita Nampeyo and Thomas Polacca.  Her pottery was coil built, stone polished and painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips. This bowl has a very tightly painted classic migration pattern as the design.  The piece was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The original price tag from when it was purchased in the 1970’s is still on the bottom! Her daughter Adelle Nampeyo continues in the same family tradition.

$ 275.00
Nampeyo, Elva Tewaguna – Mini Bat Wing Bowl (1970’s)

Elva Tewaguna Namepyo, was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo, a granddaughter of the Nampeyo of Hano and a sister of Iris and Tonita Nampeyo and Thomas Polacca.  Her pottery was coil built, stone polished and painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips. This small bowl is a very traditional design with a batwing pattern.  The piece was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Her daughter Adelle Nampeyo continues in the same family tradition.

$ 200.00
Nampeyo, Fannie – Bowl with Migration Pattern (1970’s)

Fannie Nampeyo was the youngest daughter of noted potter Nampeyo of Hano and also the mother of noted potters Iris Nampeyo, Leah Nampeyo and Thomas Polacca.  She was certainly among the most skilled of her generation for painting designs pottery.  While her mother revived the “migration” or bird wing design, Fannie made is a signature design of her pottery and of the Nampeyo family.  This bowl is very flat, in the style of the ancient Sikyatki pottery. The design is a migration pattern painted onto the surface.  The bowl was traditionally fired so that it has some visually striking blushes on the surface.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Fannie Nampeyo”.

$ 800.00
Chavarria, Harvey & Debra Trujillo – Flat Seedpot with Flute Player (1980’s)

This is an intricate seedpot by Debra Trujillo (Duwyenie) and Harvey Chavarria.   The seedpot has a flute player etched into the clay next to a sun design inset with a piece of turquoise.  The bowl is highly polished and Debra etched the designs before it was fired.  The shape is narrow with a fully polished back.  It signed on the bottom in the clay.   The piece is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00
Nampeyo, Elva Tewaguna – Wide Bowl with Bat Wing Design (1970’s)

Elva Tewaguna Namepyo, was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo, a granddaughter of the Nampeyo of Hano and a sister of Iris and Tonita Nampeyo and Thomas Polacca.  Her pottery was coil built, stone polished and painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips. This wide shape bowl is a very traditional form for Hopi-Tewa pottery.  This design, the bat wing pattern, is one which was revived by Nampeyo of Hano.   The piece was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Her daughter Adelle Nampeyo continues in the same family tradition.

$ 500.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Red Bowl with Clouds over the Mesa Design (1980’s)

This  is a smaller red bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1980’s. The bowl is carved and fully polished.  The design is deeply carved and represents the clouds coming over the mesas and then the rain. The the carved line below represents the path taken around the mesas.  It is a simple but striking piece.  The carving is deep and it is highly polished and fired a deep red.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,500.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Large Wedding Vase with Bear Paws & Ribbon (1972)

Margaret Tafoya was known for her large-scale pottery.  This exceptional wedding vase is 16 inches tall and fully polished. There are bear paws on both sides. The bear paw is symbolic on her pottery of a Santa Clara story where the bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  The fully polished pieces by Margaret are always the most difficult to make. The entire piece has to be polished at one time!  It is amazing that she could get such an exceptional polish on these large pieces.  As well, not the shape.  Margaret was known for her wedding vases and their round body and the very straight and tall spouts. The symmetry of her wedding vases is something that few other potters have been able to achieve!  It is certainly a testament to the skill, shape, and shine of this piece that it received a blue ribbon at the 1972 Santa Fe Indian Market!  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.   Definitely a piece of significance in size and history!

$ 14,800.00
Lewis, Lucy –  Large Jar with Lightning Design (1968)

Some of the best work of the career of Lucy M. Lewis is from the period when she dated her pottery in the late 1960’s.  This large jar is a classic from that period and one of the larger pieces we have seen from her from this time.  It is a jar shape with a high shoulder and a slight neck.  The patter is her famous “Lightning Design” which was inspired by the ancient pottery from Chaco Canyon. The design is one that is free-flowing and covers the entire surface of the jar. The lines are tight and crisp against the white background.  The jar is signed on the bottom “Lucy M. Lewis” and it is dated 1968.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks restoration or repair.  Certainly one of the classic vessels and an impressive piece by this important matriarchal potter!Some of the best work of the career of Lucy M. Lewis is from the period when she dated her pottery in the late 1960’s.  This large jar is a classic from that period and one of the larger pieces we have seen from her from this time.  It is a jar shape with a high shoulder and a slight neck.  The patter is her famous “Lightning Design” which was inspired by the ancient pottery from Chaco Canyon. The design is one that is free flowing and covers the entire surface of the jar. The lines are tight and crisp against the white background.  The jar is signed on the bottom “Lucy M. Lewis” and it is dated 1968.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks restoration or repair.  Certainly one of the classic pieces by this important matriarchal potter!

 

$ 4,000.00
Da, Tony – Black & Sienna Plate with Antelope (1969)

While the pottery of Tony Da has been well documented, it is still exciting to have a piece with such an exceptional provenance.  This gunmetal fired plate is a significant piece in the history of his pottery.  It is one of approximately 6 pieces which he dated during his career.  In 1969 he created a group of plates, of which each was different.  These plates were all dated.  This is the only black and sienna one without a stone, which has a date. The plate was fired a gunmetal silver and then the rim was two-toned to make it sienna.  The design is an antelope, which was etched into the clay before the firing. The antelope style of the design was inspired by the Mimbres pottery of the 1100’s.  While he made other black and sienna plates, this one has a unique historic legacy.  It is signed and dated on the back in the clay, “DA 6 69”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Over the course of a career that spanned from 1967-82, Tony helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.  While he started out as a painter, he made his first pottery in 1967 and his first public showing was at Gallup Ceremonials of that year.

Nampeyo, Fannie – Large Migration Pattern Jar (1960’s)

Fannie Nampeyo was the youngest daughter of noted potter Nampeyo of Hano and also the mother of noted potters Iris Nampeyo, Leah Nampeyo and Thomas Polacca.  She was certainly among the most skilled of her generation for painting designs pottery.  While her mother revived the “migration” or bird wing design, Fannie made is a signature design of her pottery and of the Nampeyo family.  This larger jar is coil built and very tightly painted.  The migration pattern, or bird wings, extend around the entire jar in 10 sections.  The jar was traditionally fired so that it has some visually striking blushes on the surface.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Fannie Nampeyo”.

$ 1,500.00
Tafoya, Ray  – Green Seedpot with Butterflies & Flowers

This miniature seedpot by Ray Tafoya is fully polished and round in shape.  It has a Mimbres inspired flowers and butterflies as the design. The entire piece is fully polished with a green clay slip.   It is etched with the designs and then he used additonal clay colors to accentuate the designs. The seedpot is signed on the bottom in the clay with his hallmark, “White Mountain”.  The seedpot is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Note how many of the designs are similar to ones used today by his daughter, Jennifer Moquino.  

$ 400.00
Tafoya, Kelli Little Katchina – Carved Bowl with Avanyu (1989)

This is a very intricately carved bowl by Kelli Little Katchina Tafoya.  She was a daughter of Lucy Year Flower, a granddaughter of Camilio Tafoya and a niece of Joseph Lonewolf and Grace Medicine Flower.  She began making pottery in the 1970’s and focused mostly on miniatures.  This bowl is very deeply carved with a water serpent (avanyu) as the design.  Note in the background areas where it is matte, she has also carved it into a circular texture.  As the bowl is turned there are rain clouds, mountain designs and at the base rain designs.  The striking feature of the bowl is the firing, which is very metallic in appearance.  This is achieved from a very high firing.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 150.00
Lewis, Emma – Jar with Figure and Deer

Emma Lewis was a daughter of noted potter Lucy M. Lewis.  This is a smaller piece of her pottery with an oval shape and a handle near the opening.  On one side is a human figure with a cane and on the other are two deer.  They are separated by a sun design.  All the imagery is inspired by the ancient Mimbres pottery of the 1100’s.  The jar is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 125.00
Gutierrez, Margaret & Luther – Polychrome Octopus (1980’s)

This polychrome standing octopus is by Margaret & Luther Gutierrez.  Margaret would make the pottery and Luther (her brother) would paint them.  Each leg of the octopus has a different insect or animal.  The back of the head has water designs and the face is whimsical like much of their work at this time.  The colors are all derived from natural clay slips.  It is signed on the bottom “Margaret/Luther”. The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Gonzales, Rose – Clay Bear Figure

Rose Gonzales is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career, she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This is one of the few figurative pieces we have seen of her work.  It is fully polished and signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rose”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 150.00
Naha, Helen “Feather Woman – Water Jar with Bat Wing Design (1970’s)

Helen Naha created distinctive pottery using the white kaolin clay slip throughout her career.  The designs were all painted using bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law, Paqua Naha yet had her own style in form, imagery, and composition. This jar has a wonderful shape with a low shoulder and slightly turned out rim.  The design is the classic batwing pattern which extends down below the shoulder.  The bottom has her hallmark “feather”.  It is really wonderful to note her attention to the little details and that even the entire inside of the jar is fully polished! Note the wonderful bold lines of Helen’s painting!  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,800.00
Navasie, Joy “Frogwoman” – Mini Bowl with Lid (1980’s)

Joy Navasie was known for her white slipped pottery and classic use of design elements. She learned to make pottery from her mother, Paqua, who also used the white clay and signed with a frog as a hallmark.  The white kaolin clay is a slip which is applied to the surface of the bowl and then black (bee-weed) and red clay slips are used for painting.  This is one of her few miniatures.  It is from the 1980’s, which can be determined by both the color of the red clay slip she used and the detail in the painting.  Not only did she not make many miniatures, but I’m not sure I’ve seen one with such a complicated lid!  The lid is carved so that it rests inside the mouth of the bowl.  The bowl is painted with a classic bird wing pattern.  It is painted with a red clay slip and the black bee-weed. It is signed on the bottom with her frog hallmark.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one small area of the black which is fugitive.

$ 475.00
Martinez, Maria – Plainware Pitcher “Marie + Julian” (1920’s)

This pitcher is a piece by Maria Martinez from the late 1920’s.  It is a creative shape with indented sides and a square base. The handle and spout are both fully polished.  It is also indented in the base where it was signed in the clay. Throughout the 1920’s Maria made numerous pieces that were “utilitarian” in style, such as pitchers, creamers, and bowls for sugar.  Because they were often used, they rarely survived well over time, and especially those pieces with handles. This pitcher is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is just a bit of wear on the side rim. Otherwise, it is amazing that a piece this complicated has survived intact for so many years!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie + Julian”.    

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 1,600.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Bowl with Walking Bear in the Rain Design (1980’s)

This bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1980’s.  Amazingly, she was in her 80’s when she made this.  Her later pieces are often smaller in size, but the carving is more exacting and the polish is excellent. This bowl has a “walking bear in the rain” design. The “walking bear paw” was a symbol often used by Margaret in her potter.  It is the “L” shaped design, which is the bear walking.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  Margaret would usually sign her pottery with a stone in the clay before it was fired.  This bowl is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are some very tiny surface imperfections which can be seen in the photos, which are more likely from the actual firing than from poor care.  It is definitely a classic piece from this era of her work.

$ 1,500.00
Martinez, Maria – Sienna Feather Bowl “Maria Popovi 265”

This is stunning sienna bowl by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the jar while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The bowl is highly polished and has a feather pattern as the main design.  It is unusual, however, as it is sienna in coloration. The sienna coloration is some of the rarest of the various colorations which Popovi Da created.  I think this is the first sienna piece we have had in the gallery in four years!  To achieve this coloration, the piece is first fired black and then it is re-fired a second time to burn off the black and create the sienna.  This increases the risk of it breaking in the firing.  Today, there are no potters who are double firing their entire piece to create the sienna coloration!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi 265“. The signature indicates that it was made around in February 1965.   The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 4,000.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Mimbres Rabbit Seedpot (1976)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This seedpot is from 1976 and it is fully designed. On the top is a Mimbres inspired rabbit.  The surrounding designs are water, grass and plant imagery.  The piece is highly polished and fired red.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay with the date.   It is in condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,500.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Red & Black Bowl with Wolf Track (1971)

Joseph Lonewolf began making pottery in 1970-1.  This is a very early piece of his pottery.  It is not just the unique firing which makes it special, but the design.  The firing is one where he created a “red and black” coloration at the end of the firing process before the manure was added to turn the piece black.  The design is also special, as it is a wolf track.  It seems to be the “introduction” of the “Lone Wolf” to the art world!   The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,600.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Bowl with Antelope Medallions (1973)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This bowl is very thin walled and has an indented bottom.  It is fully polished red and there are three medallions.  Each medallion has an antelope as the design.  The antelope are etched into the clay before firing.  The border of each medallion is polished green.  Joseph was one of the first potters to begin using clays that were not red and this is a very early example of his green clay slip.  The remainder of the bowl is fully polished red.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 2,400.00
Da, Tony – Bowl with Feather Design and Turquoise (1972-3)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike. This bowl is from 1972-3.  It is fully polished red and the design is etched into the clay after firing.  This bowl has two series of eagle feathers etched into the clay.  It was Tony’s modernistic interpretation of the classic feather pattern seen on Maria’s pottery.  Connecting the two sections of the feather there is a triangular design and a single inset piece of turquoise on each side.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

$ 8,000.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Jar with Avanyu (1971)

Joseph Lonewolf began making pottery in 1970-1.  This is a very early piece of his pottery.  It is a more classic shape with a wide shoulder which slopes upward.  The bottom half of the piece is fully polished. The top is etched with a water serpent (avanyu) with a feather pattern, which is the style used by him and his family.  The matte background area is deeply etched swirls up from the shoulder and over the rim.  It must have been exciting in 1971 to see work that was so new and unique at the time!  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,600.00
Da, Tony – Wide Red Bowl with Avanyu (1972-3)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike. This wide shaped bowl is from 1972-3.  It is a period when the red clay slip was a bit deeper in coloration.  This bowl is fully polished and has a water serpent (avanyu) as the design. The avanyu is etched into the clay and note the sharpness of the horn. The avanyu is symbolic of the village being saved from a flood by the water serpent.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had, and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

$ 9,800.00
Da, Tony – Red Jar with Avanyu (1972-3)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike. This jar with a slightly elongated neck is from 1972-3.  It is a period when the red clay slip was a bit deeper red in coloration.  This bowl is fully polished and has a water serpent (avanyu) as the design. The avanyu is etched into the clay and note the sharpness of the horn. The avanyu is symbolic of the village being saved from a flood by the water serpent.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had, and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

Lonewolf, Joseph – Mini Bowl with Avanyu (1973)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This seedpot is  one of the smallest early pieces we have seen!  It is fully designed with a feathered water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece.  This style of avanyu is one used by Joseph and his entire family. The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 600.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Seedpot with Chipmunk (1973)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This seedpot is polished red and etched with a central medallion.  The design is a chipmunk with lines deeply etched towards the edge of the circle.  The edge of the medallion has a green slipped mountain design.  Joseph was one of the first potters to begin using clays that were not red and this is a very early example of his green clay slip.  The remainder of the bowl is fully polished red.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,500.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Seedpot with Fish and Sunface (1975)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This is larger black fired seedpot has complex designs across the entire surface. On one side there is Sun Face design.  The opposite side has Mimbres style fish and tadpoles. The areas separating these two sections have feather pattern.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is from 1975.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,800.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Flight”, published in “Pottery Jewels” Book (1975)

Joseph Lonewolf is certainly one of the most impactful potters from the 1970’s onward.  His creativity in designs and the realism of his sgraffito work has influenced numerous potters over the years.  Over the past 20 years, we have only had a couple of pieces come back to the gallery which were published in, “The Pottery Jewels of Joseph Lonewolf” book in 1976.  This is one of the seminal books on his pottery.  This piece is entitled, “Flight” and the photo of is a fascinating one in the book, where there was an attempt to photograph it “life size”.  Joseph wrote of this piece,

“The mule deer buck and doe are shown in the blow-up of this pot, in flight from an unfamiliar sound or scent that has reached them deep in the forest.  The traditional kilt design is shown on the back of the pot, actual size, on the top of the basket.  The deer provides many things worn in the winter dances along with the kilt.”

Technically, note the etching in the background area surrounding the two deer and how it accentuates the forms and polish.  this piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It signed on the bottom in the clay.  The amazing provenance on this piece is that this is the first time it has been on the market, as it was acquired from Joseph at the time of the release of the book and has been in one collection since then.   It is very unique opportunity to own a imporant piece of history by this exceptional and influential Pueblo artist!

$ 5,800.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Red Wedding Vase (1960’s)

This is an unusual red wedding vase by Margaret Tafoya from the early 1960’s.  It is fully polished with the deep red clay slip which was used in Santa Clara through the late 1950’s.  The piece was traditionally fired and the cream colored clay slip is painted into the background area of the carving.  The design is also an unusual one for her pottery.  There is a rain design above the kiva step pattern which is then surrounded byclouds.  The sides have a mountain design.  The shape of the spouts with the squared ends is also typical of Margaet’s work throughout her career.  This piece is in good condition and some slight wear indicative of age.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.

$ 8,800.00
Torivio, Dorothy – Long Neck Jar with Yucca Design

This is a classic shaped miniature jar by Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  The shape of the jar is one which Dorothy created to emphasize her patined designs.  The long neck has a yucca leaf pattern, which is repeated in smaller and then larger sizes.  The open space of the white and the contrasting black give the jar a very modern appearance.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Dorothy Torivio” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 700.00
Gutierrez, Denny – Swirl Faceted Melon Bowl

Denny Gutierrez was known for his faceted melon bowls. As opposed to carving them, he would flatten them out to create a “faceted” appearance.  The result was a reflective surface and a very striking piece of pottery.  This bowl has 25 ribs and each swirls from the neck to the base.  The bowl is very highly polished and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 500.00
Torivio, Dorothy – Mini Seedpot with Snowflake Design

This is a classic shaped miniature seedpot by Dorothy Torivio.  She was was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  The design is a snowflake pattern which starts small at the top and then larger by the shoulder.  When looking straight down on it the design is very tightly painted and striking.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom, “Dorothy Torivio” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 550.00
Sale!
Naranjo, Paul  – Long Neck Jar with Dancers & Eagle (1987)

This is an exceptional jar by Paul Naranjo.  It is fully polished to a glassy surface.  Honestly, one of the toughest pieces to photograph!  However, the polish is amazing and the entire surface of the jar is fully polished!  There are two maidens in traditional dress and they are separated by an eagle head.  There is a water serpent in the background, which is a designs often used by Paul on the background of his pieces.  Along the neck and the base are kiva step designs, and there are plant patterns around the base as well.  Paul fired his pottery a dark, chocolate color, for which he was well known. His pieces can be seen in the “Beyond Traditions” book by Jerry Jacka.  The jar has unique color variations in the brown which further enhance the designs.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The jar also won a ribbon at the 1987 Gallup Ceremonials, which adds to its important provenance.

$ 1,100.00 $ 650.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Fully Polished Open Bowl (1950’s)

This is open bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1950’s.  The bowl has high walls and it is fully polished on the inside and carved on the outside.  Traditionally potters would polish the inside of the bowls before firing. However, over time, this practice decreased as there was a great chance that it would crack in drying or polishing.  The added risk comes from putting all the wet slip on the inside of the bowl and hoping that it doesn’t cause cracks in the exterior.  However, the risk is often worth it as the polished interior of the bowl creates a striking appearance with the carved designs.  This bowl has a rain and cloud pattern around the outside.  It is deeply carved into the clay.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,500.00
Da, Popovi-  Feather Plate (1965)

Popovi Da was a son of noted potter, Maria Martinez.  While he worked with her painting designs on her pottery, he also created a few pieces on his own beginning in 1962.  He was planning to continue making pottery on his own after Maria retired but unfortunately passed away before this could occur.  His pottery pieces are definitely a rarity among Pueblo pottery and it is not often that we come across his work.  This is one of his classic feather plates.  It is fully polished and delicately painted and traditionally fired.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Popovi 1165” which is the firing date of November, 1965.  That makes this an early piece of his pottery.  The plate is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair and it is certainly an important addition to any collection!

$ 4,400.00
Ebelacker, Richard – Water Jar with Carved Avanyu (1972)

Richard Ebelacker was the first grandson of Margaret Tafoya and a son of Virginia Ebelacker.  He was known for making large sized vessels, much like his mother and grandmother before him.  This is a striking jar which has a high round shoulder and a turned out neck. The jar is fully polished and carved with a water serpent (avanyu), encircling the shoulder of the jar.  The area behind the carved avanyu is tan while the mouth of the avanyu has been slipped with a red clay.  This large jar certainly reflects the varied flow of the carving in Richard’s designs.  The jar received a blue ribbon at the 1982 New Mexico State Fair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,400.00
Torivio, Dorothy – Long Neck Jar with Spiral Design

This is a classic shaped miniature jar by Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  The shape of the jar is one which Dorothy created to emphasize her patined designs.  The long neck has smaller triangular designs which spiral outward to the shoulder and then back to the base.  When looking straight down on it the design is very tightly painted and striking.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom, “Dorothy Torivio” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 750.00
Blue Corn – Large Polychrome Water Jar with Feather Pattern

This is an exceptional large polychrome jar by Blue Corn.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This tall water jar is fully polished tan and then it is painted.  The black is a black clay and the red are additional clays.  The shoulder of the jar has a feather pattern and the neck has alternating geometric patterns in each section.  The lines are perfectly painted and match the shape of the jar.  The intricately painted neck is unique in her design and not something we have often seen yet it emphasizes the elongated neck.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.

$ 2,400.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Black & Red Bowl with 3 Medallions (1972)

This large bowl by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1972.  It is very highly polished and has three etched medallions. There is a rabbit, fish and double birds.  The bowl is has been fired “black-and-red”, which is the signature coloration of Joseph’s early pottery.  This unique firing technique was created between the end of the firing and the reduction process of turning the bowl black.  However, all the sgraffito etching work was done before the piece was fired.  The lines and detail of each medallion are exceptional, as is the overall polishing. Near the base is a small etched Mimbres style bird and fish.  Joseph was very interested in Mimbres pottery and it was an important part of his early pottery.  The bowl is dated 1972 and the other number, “10” and “5”, indicate that this is the 5th bowl of 1972 and his 10th piece overall!  Certainly making it an important piece of Joseph’s pottery history!  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 6,500.00
Tafoya, Betty – Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1980’s)

This is a large deep carved bowl by Betty Tafoya.  She was taught to make pottery by her husband, Lee Tafoya, who was a son of Margaret Tafoya.  While they often collaborated on pottery throughout his career, she also made pieces on her own.  This bowl is deeply carved with a water serpent as the design.  The shape is a classic bowl form and it is beautifully polished.  Betty was well known for the polishing on her pottery and taught that art to her daughter, Linda Tafoya.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 800.00
Tafoya, Margaret -Jar with Sun & Cloud Designs (1960’s)

This jar by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1960’s.  The design is very deeply carved into to the clay and then it is stone polished.  The triangular designs are the sun rays while they are separated by cloud and mountain patterns. It is a more complicated design for this period of her pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is fired to a dark black coloration.  It is good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,100.00
Da, Tony – Gunmetal & Sienna Jar with Seed Design (1970-1)

While the pottery of Tony Da has been well documented, it is still exciting to have a piece with such an exceptional provenance.  This gunmetal fired jar is an early piece of his pottery from 1970-71.  It is featured in the book, “The Art and Life of Tony Da” on page 57.  The jar is perfectly polished and fired to a gunmetal appearance. The rim has been “two-toned” sienna.  Note how on the black and sienna pieces there is a the sienna color (where the black has been burned back off) and then a “halo” of black and then the gunmetal. The jar is designed around the shoulder and has a seed and a prayer feather pattern.  This is a design that he did not often do in his pottery, which makes it distinctive.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Over the course of a career that spanned from 1967-82, Tony helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.  While he started out as a painter, he made his first pottery in 1967 and his first public showing was at Gallup Ceremonials of that year.

Da, Tony – Gunmetal Jar with Avanyu & Lid (1969)

While the pottery of Tony Da has been well documented, it is still exciting to have a piece with such an exceptional provenance.  This gunmetal fired jar is an early piece of his pottery from 1969, just two years after he began making pottery!   The jar is first featured in the book, “Maria” by Richard Spivey as a full plate (the correct caption is figure 6.25).  It captures the elegance of the shape and the lid.  The second time it is published is in the book, “The Art and Life of Tony Da”.  The shape of the jar reflects Tony having  learned to make pottery from Maria.  It has a round should and an elongated neck.  It is around the shoulder that the water serpent (avanyu) is etched into the clay before the firing. The lid has a long handle and it is formed on the inside so that it fits perfectly on the jar.  The jar was fired by Popovi Da (who fired most of Tony’s gunmetal pottery) and it has a stunning gunmetal appearance.  It is only near the base of the piece that there is more of a black coloration.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Over the course of a career that spanned from 1967-82, Tony helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.  While he started out as a painter, he made his first pottery in 1967 and it’s first public showing was at Gallup Ceremonials of that year.

Martinez, Maria – Wide Black Plainware Bowl “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

In the 1950’s Maria Martinez created a series of pieces which were simply stone polished with no design.  As she primarily made the pottery and polished it this was fitting with the other pieces of her career.  This wide bowl is very highly polished and it is fired a dark black.  The bowl is signed in the clay, “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,800.00
Gutierrez, Margaret Lou Roybal – Large Bowl with Feather Designs

Margaret Lou Gutierrez was the only daughter of noted potters Tonita & Juan Roybal.  She began making pottery in the 1970’s. This bowl is one of the largest we have seen of her pottery.  It is very highly polished and beautifully painted with a feather pattern.  Note how tight and sharp the feather are in the design!   This bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Lou Gutierrez”.

$ 875.00
Gutierrez, Margaret Lou -Bowl with Wind Designs

Margaret Lou Gutierrez was the only daughter of noted potters Tonita & Juan Roybal.  She began making pottery in the 1970’s. This bowl is very highly polished and one of her classic round shapes.  The design is a very tightly painted wind and cloud pattern with a mountain design.  The fine lines are certainly reminiscent of the designs painted by her father Juan in the 1930’s.  Margaret Lou no longer makes pottery.  This bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Lou Gutierrez”.

$ 225.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Mimbres Insects Seedpot (1986)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This intricately designed seedpot has a Mimbres inspired inch worm along the base.  There are three butterflies flying overhead along with flowers in the background.  On the back side of the piece is an incised petal design and incised flowers along with a heart medallion.  This seedpot is from 1986 and it is perfectly polished and he has used a variety of green and white clay slips to create the various colors.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,100.00
Martinez, Maria – Large Bowl with Lightning and Wind Designs (1920’s)

It is not often that we come across a large bowl by Maria Martinez in such great condition.  This bowl is from 1920-25 and it was made and polished by Maria Martinez and painted by her husband, Julian.  These early pieces are signed, “Marie”, although Julian was painting the designs.  It was not until around 1925 that they began to sign both names to the pottery.   This bowl has a wide mouth and the painting is on the side around the shoulder.  The designs are rain, lightning, wind and prayer feather patterns.  They flow perfectly across the surface.  The bowl is highly polished and fired with near-gunmetal areas on the surface. The gunmetal color achieved on these early pieces was from the heat of the firing.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie”.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

 

$ 8,200.00
Roybal, Tonita – Long Neck Jar with Avanyu (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This is is one of the larger pieces we have had of her pottery. The jar is one of her early long neck vessels with a slight shoulder.  The design is the classic water serpent (avanyu), which is painted around the shoulder.  The jar is very highly polished and fired with a range of color from black to gunmetal.  Interestingly, when she would fire these long neck jars they would be fired on their side!  This jar has a slight lean to the form.  However, the size and classic design are the dynamic parts of this amazing jar!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

$ 4,000.00
Gonzales, Ramona Sanchez – Plate with Bird Design (1920’s)

This is a striking painted bowl by Ramona Gonzales.  Ramona was known for her delicately painted pottery.  This plate is almost more like an open bowl.  It is fully polished on the front and back. The design has a bird which fills up the entire surface of the plate.  The polished background and matte painted designs work perfectly on this piece.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Ramona”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some wear on the surface. This is definitely an important piece of her pottery.

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 1,550.00
Naha, Sylvia – Awatovi Star and Migration Tall Jar

Sylvia Naha was a daughter of Helen “Featherwoman” Naha and a sister of Rainy and Burell Naha.  She was known for her distinctive pieces painted with intricate designs on a white polished clay surface.  Throughout the 1980’s, Sylvia was considered among the most innovative of the Hopi potters.  Her pieces were classic in form and amazingly intricate in design.  This is a tall jar and it is painted with the Awatovi Star pattern on the top and bottom.  Under the star are bird wing designs.  The striking feature to this jar are all the finely painted lines!  This style was inspired by the “migration pattern” which Sylvia modified and made more complex with her flow of lines across the surface of the piece.  The black on the painting is from Bee-Weed (a plant) and the red and other colors are natural clay slips.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The jar is signed on the bottom with a feather and an “S”.  It is certainly a striking piece by his exceptional Hopi-Tewa potter!

$ 900.00
Martinez, Maria  – Wide Bowl with Feather Design (Maria + Santana, 1954-6)

This wide bowl by Maria Martinez is one of her classic pieces in both shape and design.  It was made by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana Martinez (the wife of Adam Martinez, Maria’s son).  It is very highly polished and has a glassy surface.  The design is a feather pattern which encircles the shoulder of the jar.  The shape of the bowl is a very traditional one for Maria.  She would often say that this wide shape was made so the bowl could be easily held in both hands.  The deep black firing and the tightly painted designs using the matte clay work perfectly together.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria + Santana”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one very small rub on the rim, but otherwise the condition is exceptional, which can also be seen from the bottom of the bowl, which has virtually no wear!

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,200.00
Martinez, Maria – Jar with Storm Designs”Maria / Popovi” (1956-9)

This is a classic shaped smaller jar by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the jar while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The jar is highly polished and it painted with a storm design. The design is painted horizontally and there is a rain, lighting and thunder motif in each of the sections.  Around the rim is a cloud pattern.  The jar is fired to a dark black with some gunmetal areas. The gunmetal or metallic appearance is achieved in the firing process.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was made between 1956-9, before Popovi began adding a firing date.   The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,200.00
Blue Corn – Jar with 39 Feathers (1970’s)

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she also made exquisite black-on-black pottery. She learned to make pottery from Maria Martinez at San Ildefonso. This jar is fully polished and patined with 39 feathers around the shoulder of the piece.  The shape is a classic one for Blue Corn, with the low shoulder and elongated sides.  The contrast of the matte feathers and the highly polished surface works perfectly!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a few light surface scratches seen in the photos.

$ 1,200.00
Laate, Jennie – Large Jar with Deer and Rosettes (1970’s)

Jennie Laate was among the most important revival potters at Zuni in the 1970’s.  This miniature jar is shaped in the style of the classic Zuni vessels of the late 1800’s.  The design has flower medallions along with rain patterns and heartline deer.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,000.00
Gutierrez, Helen – Small Feather Jar (1980’s)

Helen Gutierrez (1935-1993) was a daughter of Isabel Atencio, a sister of Gilbert Atencio and the mother of Geraldine, Carol and Rose Gutierrez. She was known for her traditional San Ildefonso pottery.  This jar is highly polished and painted with a feather pattern.  The design and style are classic for San Ildefonso.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 200.00
Gutierrez, Margaret & Luther – Polychrome Turtle (1970’s)

This polychrome standing turtle is by Margaret & Luther Gutierrez.  Margaret would make the pottery and Luther, her brother, would paint them.  This turtle is carved on the back and the “shell” has seven sections. They have painted bugs, animals, and a human figure.  Typical of their pottery the face of the turtle is quite whimsical with the buck teeth!  The colors are all derived from natural clay slips.  It is signed on the bottom “Margaret/Luther”. The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 200.00
Gutierrez, Margaret & Luther – Bowl with Avanyu (1970’s)

This polychrome bowl is by Margaret & Luther Gutierrez.  Margaret would make the pottery and Luther, her brother, would paint them.  This bowl is painted with at least five different colors of clay!  The design is a water serpent which encircles the bowl.  It is signed on the bottom “Margaret/Luther”. The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Navasie, Dolly Joe “White Swann” – Jar with Bird Tail Design

Dolly Joe Navasie is best known by her name White Swann.  She is the daughter of Eunice “Fawn” Navasie and a sister of Dawn and Fawn Navasie.  This jar is coil built and painted with bee-weed (black) and a red clay slip. The design is a classic eagle tail pattern which extends down from the shoulder.  The jar is traditionally fired to create the blushes.  It is signed on the bottom, “White Swann”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 325.00
Setalla, Pauline – Canteen with Bird Design (1970’s)

Pauline Talasyousia (Setalla) (b. 1930) married Justin Navasie Setalla.  She was raised in the village of Mishongovi and learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law, Agnes Navasie and her sister-in-law Eunice “Fawn” Navasie.  She had ten children, including Dee Stealla, Agnes Nasonhoya, Gwen Setalla and Stetson Setalla, who are all potters.  This is one of her canteens from the 1970’s.  It is a classic Hopi shape with the round belly.  The design is a bird pattern which is painted on the front of the piece.  The black is bee-weed and the white and red are clay slips. The canteen is flat on the back but it also stands.  It was traditionally fired which created the coloration of the pink and white.  The canteen is in good condition with some fugitive black and a small chip on the back of the lip.  It is signed, “Pauline S.” on the back.

$ 500.00
Nampeyo, Nellie – Bowl with Rain and Cloud Design

Nellie Nampeyo Douma was the second daughter of Nampeyo of Hano and a sister of Fannie Nampeyo and Annie Nampeyo.  This small bowl is white slipped and painted with a rain and cloud motif.  The design is repeated around the shoulder of the bowl. The black is bee-weed and the bowl was traditionally fired and it is signed on the bottom, “Nellie Nampeyo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 350.00
Koopee, Jacob – Bowl with Migration Pattern (2004)

This bowl by Jacob Koopee is from 2004. This jar I originally purchased from Jake and now it has come back to the gallery!  First about the color. The jar is made with the red Hopi clay and it is almost a brown coloration from the firing!  The rim and various other areas have the purple or mauve colored clay slip that he started to use on his pottery.  The design is a migration pattern with the bird wings but note how he modified it.  The rim has the migration lines over a mauve clay.  The bird wings extend down from the top and up from the shoulder and are etched with small lines.  Separating them are the bird heads which are again painted with the mauve clay.  All the designs are outlined with a white clay slip.   The bottom has small hand designs which Jake cut out and would use the white clay to spray around the hands.  The impact of the hands and the birds is striking and the white clay has just a little texture!  The jar was traditionally fired to create the colorations.   The piece is signed on the bottom, “Koopee” and a flute player hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Jake won numerous awards during his career including “Best of Show” in 2005 at both Santa Fe Indian Market and the Heard Museum Market.  I was lucky to have been a pottery judge both years at both events, and it was exciting to see an artist create such dynamic work.

$ 4,800.00
Begaye, Nathan – Kiva Bowl with Frog in Center

Nathan Begaye was a unique innovator among Pueblo and Navajo potters.  His ethnic connection to both Hopi and Navajo let his style flow between the two distinctive cultures and yet find their own unique space.  His work used traditional designs, forms and techniques, yet somehow appeared very modern.  This is a very unusual and traditional style bowl.  The shape is a “kiva” bowl with the kiva steps on the side.  On the outside they are painted with dragonflies and on the inside with clouds.  The center of the bowl has a traditional frog as the pattern with a cloud design on its head.  The bowl is slipped with a white clay and the painted with natural clay slips and traditionally fired.  It is signed on the bottom with his wave/cloud hallmark.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 750.00
Koopee, Jacob – Bowl with Eagle Tail Design (2000)

This bowl by Jacob Koopee is from 2000.  It is one of his classic shapes with the narrow base and wide shoulder.  The design is the classic eagle tail which extends down over the side of the jar.  The jar is vertically polished to create the “onion skin” appearance.  There is a red and white clay used for the designs on the tails.  The jar was traditionally fired to create the colorations.   The piece is signed on the bottom, “Koopee” and a flute player hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Jake won numerous awards during his career including “Best of Show” in 2005 at both Santa Fe Indian Market and the Heard Museum Market.  I was lucky to have been a pottery judge both years at both events, and it was exciting to see an artist create such dynamic work.

$ 1,400.00
Naha, Helen “Featherwoman” – Wedding Vase with Birds (1970’s)

This tall wedding vase is by Helen “Featherwoman” Naha.  It is her classic shape with the sharper shoulder and spouts. The design has two birds on each side.  The tails of the birds go up the spout.  The designs are painted with bee-weed (black) and red clay slips.  The white is a kaolin clay which is first applied to the jar and then stone polished.  The wedding vase is signed on the bottom with a feather, which was Helen’s hallmark.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Chino, Marie Z. – Large Rainbow Water Jar with Heartline Deer and Parrots (1970’s)

This is an exceptional large water jar by Marie Z. Chino.  The piece is from the 1970’s and it is a striking shape and design. The jar has a high shoulder and a straight neck.  The design is a series of alternating Heartline Deer and parrots.  Separating them is a rainbow design.  Note how the parrots are painted in red with no outline, as are the flowers.  The black areas include rain designs and fine-line patterns.  The shape of the jar and the designs are a perfect balance as the imagery flows across the surface of the piece.  It is easy to see with a jar of this quality in form and design why Marie Z. Chino is one of the great names in Acoma pottery!  The jar is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,800.00
Navasie, Joy “Frogwoman” – Jar with Bird Designs (1970’s)

Joy Navasie was known for her white slipped pottery and classic use of design elements. She learned to make pottery from her mother, Paqua, who also used the white clay and signed with a frog as a hallmark.  The white kaolin clay is a slip which is applied to the surface of the bowl and then black (bee-weed) and red clay slips are used for painting.  This jar is a classic of her pottery from the early 1970’s.  The design is painted in four panels and they are separated by fine lines.  Each panel has a different bird or parrot as the image.  The red areas are the wings of the birds in each of the sections. Note the color of the red which is typical of her work at this period of time.  Later she would change slips and use the darker colored red clay. The jar is signed on the bottom with her frog hallmark.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Martinez, Santana & Adam – Bowl with Feather Pattern (1970’s)

This is a classic tall bowl by Santana and Adam!  This piece is very highly polished and perfectly painted with a feather pattern around the shoulder of the piece.  Above the feather pattern is a tightly painted cloud design. The highly polished surface is perfect for the classic design.  It was Julian Martinez, the husband of Maria Martinez, who began painting the feather pattern.  It was inspired by the feather pattern on a piece of Mimbres pottery from the 1100’s.  The style of feather painted by Santana is very distinctive in form.   The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Santana + Adam”. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic piece of their pottery.

$ 900.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Tall Double Shoulder Water Jar (1960’s)

This is a striking plainware water jar by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1960’s.  It is an elegant shape with a long neck and a “double shoulder”.  The double shoulder was also called a “rainbow ridge” by Margaret and her mother, Sarafina. It adds to the difficulty of a piece as the second ridge requirest he potters to step up the ridges for each rise from the shoulder to the neck.  The jar is stone polished and fired to a deep black.  It is from the 1960’s and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  This shape and size is definitely a classic of her work!

$ 14,800.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Hopi Birds Lidded Bowl (2003)

Mark Tahbo learned to make pottery from his great grandmother, Grace Chapella.  His pieces reflect the wonderful symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter. The designs are painted using native clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black. This is a classic bowl from 2003. On this piece Mark included a variety of styles of Hopi birds.  Each was painted with different clay slips and he wanted to create a sense of motion.  They fly around the bowl and in, under and around the lid.  This is one of the few pieces where Mark made a lid for his pottery.  Note the use of all the various clay colors from mauve to red to burgundy.  It is an exciting and complicated vessel bringing together a all these Hopi birds in a contemporary manner!  Mark has made it an important part of his career to create the blushes in the firing process.  The depth of the coloration gives his vessels such life!  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,800.00
Nampeyo, Fannie – Bowl with Blackbird Migration Pattern (1960’s)

This bowl by Fannie Nampeyo is a classic bowl shape.  form.   The design is a black bird migration pattern with the bird in black above the shoulder and the bird tail below the shoulder.  The design has a great flow around the entire piece.  It was traditionally fired creating the striking color variations on the surface.  It’s not often that we see such complex painting on Fannie’s smaller pieces.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom, “Fannie Nampeyo” and it is from the 1960’s.

$ 775.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Large “Gourd” Jar (1974) with Ribbon

This is an exceptional jar by Margaret Tafoya is from 1974.  It is one of our favorite shapes that she made.  It is called a “gourd bowl”.  The name comes from the small gourd “shards” that are used to smooth the inside of the pottery when it is being made. The shape of these pieces of gourd are similar in shape to the indentions on the shoulder of the piece.  They are also technically difficult as the indentions are areas pushed into the clay.  As well, the entire piece has to be polished at one time. This jar is highly polished and has a beautiful shine.  The additional highlight of the shape is how the various curves on the surface reflect the light.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It has the additional provenance of having received a blue first place ribbon from the 1974 Eight Northern Pueblos Indian Market!  While ribbons do not influence the value, they do add a wonderful additional provenance to a piece and on older work attach them to a particular point in time.  This jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.

$ 5,600.00
Gutierrez, Margaret & Luther – Nativity Set – 22 pieces (1977)

This nativity set by Margaret and Luther Gutierrez contains 22 different figures. This is the middle size of the sets that they made. There are Mary, Joseph, baby Jesus and the three wise men.  The Wise Men are presenting gifts of bread and animals.  There are additional animals of a cow, donkey, pig, horse, duck and more!  This is also one of the few sets which includes three angels.  There are two koshari figures and even one miniature seedpot.  Each piece is signed and it does include pieces by Margaret & Luther, Pauline Naranjo (Luther’s daughter) and a couple by Margaret alone.  The set is from the collection of Richard Spivey and was begun in 1977 and put together over the course of several years.  They are each painted with native clay slips and they are all in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. Definitely a charming collection of work by this important family of potters!

$ 1,200.00
Naha, Sylvia – 14″ Tall Lizard, Corn & Shard Design Jar (1980’s)

Sylvia Naha created pieces with the white clay polished surface painted with bee-weed (black) and native clay slips.  Throughout the 1980’s, Sylvia was considered among the most innovative of the Hopi potters.  Her pieces were classic in form and amazingly intricate in design.  This seedpot is a “miniature” version of complicated “shard” pattern pottery.  Half of the seepdot has a lizard and stalk of corn.  The other half is a very intricate pottery shard design. The shards have various images taken from both Sylivas pottery (like the turtle) and traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom with a feather and an “S”.

$ 4,500.00
Naha, Helen “Featherwoman” – Wide Awatovi Star Design Jar (1980’s)

Thiswide jar by Helen “Featherwoman” Naha is and interesting stylization of her classic “Awatovi Star” pattern.  Helen revived the black-and-white Awatovi star design from the ruins of the village pottery in the 1950’s.  This jar has the familiar star pattern on the top and the bottom.  What is unusual is that she added a single band of color which accentuates the star design!  In addition to the star pattern there are additional areas of rain and plant designs.  This jar is painted with bee-weed (a plant) and the red is an additional clay slip.  The jar was traditionally fired outside and has some very light blushes to the clay. It is signed on the bottom with a feather, which was Helen’s hallmark.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00
Naha, Helen “Featherwoman” – Jar with Star and Bird Tails (1980’s)

This jar by Helen “Featherwoman” Naha is one of her more complex designs from the 1980’s.  The jar is coil built and the white is a kaolin clay slip which is applied to the surface.  Helen learned to make this style of pottery from her mother-in-law, Paqua (the first Frogwoman).  This jar is painted with a star pattern around the neck.  This is the “Awatovi Star”, for which she is most famous.  Below the shoulder is a stylized eagle tail pattern.  The black is bee-weed (a plant) and the red is an additional clay slip.  The jar was traditionally fired outside and it fired a very even white. It is signed on the bottom with a feather, which was Helen’s hallmark.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 950.00
Martinez, Maria – Plainware Gunmetal Fired Plate (1930’s)

This plate by Maria Martinez is a classic plainware piece of her early pottery.   It was made and polished by Maria but doesn’t have any design painted on the surface.  It is fired to a gunmetal coloration on the front and black on the back.  Finding plainware plates in such great condition is always difficult, as they were often used or scratched over the years.  It is signed, “Marie + Julian” on the back in the clay.  The plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 1,800.00
Chino, Grace – Jar with Rain and Lightning Designs (1970’s)

Grace Chino was a daughter of noted potter Marie Z. Chino and a sister of noted potters Carrie Chino Charlie and Rose Chino. Over the years she won numerous awards for her pottery at Santa Fe Indian Market and her work was featured in the “7 Families in Pueblo Pottery” and in museums around the country.  This small jar has a classic rain and lightning design.  It is painted with bee-weed (black) and a red clay slip.  The jar was traditionally fired and it is signed on the bottom.  It is from the collection of Richard Spivey, known for his books on Maria Martinez.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair but some wear on the rim.

$ 125.00
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