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King Galleries is pleased to have a variety of Pueblo and Tribal pottery from the 1920's to the present. We have created this "Signed Historic Pottery"  to identify work by those potters who were early innovators in the 1920's and began to sign their work. It also is used for any artists who have passed away, making their art part of the historical record. The history of Pueblo pottery during this period is one of an exciting change as it has evolved from utilitarian ware to folk art to the fine art of today. We hope you enjoy these amazing pieces!

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Naranjo, Teresita  – Small Fully Carved Jar with Feathers and Avanyu (1970’s)

Teresita Naranjo was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and know for her deeply carved pottery.  This jar is fully carved with a feather pattern around the neck and water serpent around the body of the piece.  It is very much like some of her larger pieces with complex designs.  Note how deeply it is carved and the intricate flow of design on the body of the avanyu.  It is traditionally fired black and signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita Naranjo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 650.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Mimbres Insects Seedpot (1982)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1982 and it is highly polished and fired red.  The design has six different Mimbres insects as the design.  There are a bee, butterfly, beetle, mosquito and two others.  Each is etched into the clay and then their bodies consist of additional designs.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  There are three different green clays, blue and white.  Near the base is the yearly symbol for 1982, which is a “+”.   The piece is very highly polished and intricately designed.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Joseph Lonewolf said of his use of Mimbres imagery in his pottery:

“I regard the Mimbres as my ancestors. Though I refine their designs, each design must have meaning for me. In my dreams I see how to use the design, how to make the pot happen. Then when I work the clay, everything flows. Some people wonder why I keep changing styles, colors, forms. But I can’t just sit there and make pots. Like any artist, I must try different things, different techniques. I must meet the challenge with my hands. The patterns and the methods I see in my mind during my dreams.” —Joseph Lonewolf, 1974, Spoken Through Clay

“I regard the Mimbres as my ancestors. Though I refine their designs, each design must have meaning for me. In my dreams I see how to use the design, how to make the pot happen. Then when I work the clay, everything flows. Some people wonder why I keep changing styles, colors, forms. But I can’t just sit there and make pots. Like any artist, I must try different things, different techniques. I must meet the challenge with my hands. The patterns and the methods I see in my mind during my dreams.” —Joseph Lonewolf, 1974, Spoken Through Clay

$ 1,800.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Rabbit and Rabbit Hunters (1987)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1987 and it is highly polished and fired black.  The design has two Mimbres inspired figures who are hunting a rabbit.  One is holding a “rabbit stick” and the other has just thrown his.  The opposite side has a Mimbres rabbit etched into the clay.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Near the base is an incised butterfly.  The 1987 symbol, the Propeller of Life, is also etched into the design.  The piece is very highly polished and intricately designed.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Joseph Lonewolf said of his use of Mimbres imagery in his pottery:

“I regard the Mimbres as my ancestors. Though I refine their designs, each design must have meaning for me. In my dreams I see how to use the design, how to make the pot happen. Then when I work the clay, everything flows. Some people wonder why I keep changing styles, colors, forms. But I can’t just sit there and make pots. Like any artist, I must try different things, different techniques. I must meet the challenge with my hands. The patterns and the methods I see in my mind during my dreams.” —Joseph Lonewolf, 1974, Spoken Through Clay

$ 1,400.00
Suina, Louise E. – Storyteller with 10 Children  (1980’s)

Louise E. Suina (1939-1992) was known for her intricately painted storytellers.  This figure has eight children who are formed and painted with activities from playing ball to playing a drum. Note as well the very intricately painted design for the apron she is wearing.   The figure is signed on the bottom, “Louise E. Suina”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 450.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Seedpot with Antelope (1979)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1979.  It has an incised antelope as the design on the top of the piece.  On the sides of the piece are rain and lightning designs and even a very small dragonfly!  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,100.00
Tafoya, Ray  – Mimbres Big Horn Sheep Seedpot (1987)

This is a very intricate miniature seedpot by Ray Tafoya.  The design has a Mimbres Big Horn Sheep as the main design.  It is surrounded by additional prayer feather, lightning and mountain designs.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  The seedpot is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay with his hallmark.

$ 300.00
Roybal, Tonita – Jar with Reverse Feather Design (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This jar reflects the exceptional nature of her pottery designs, shapes, and firing.  The jar has a round shoulder and then and a slight indention before extending up to the neck.  The jar itself is very highly polished and beautifully painted.  The design is interesting with a reverse feather pattern which extends up from the base.  What is interesting is the design leaves more open space and draws the eye to the shoulder.  The jar is fired to a gunmetal appearance with areas which even have a gold-tone coloration.  This “goldtone” is a rarity in her work and one which was achieved in the firing. The jar has a very metallic appearance with just the touch of yellow or gold in the light.  The jar is from the 1920’s and it has its original sticker on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Tonita” in the clay on the bottom.  As a provenance, the jar was de-acquisitioned from the American Indian Culture Research Center in Marvin, South Dakota.  It still has the tag for its catalog number of 00251.

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

$ 1,600.00
Pino-Martinez, Dominguita – Black-on-Red Jar (ca 1915)

This is a fascinating jar by Dominguita Pino Martinez.  She was the mother of Cresencia Martinez and Tonita Roybal and the grandmother of Alfonso Roybal (Awa Tsireh), Tomasita Montoya Sanchez, JD Robyal and Margaret Lou Gutierrez.  She was well known by the early 1900’s for her black-on-red pottery.  This jar is a classic example of her work and although it was not signed (she did not sign any of her work), it has a great provenance.  The piece was acquired from Dick Howard, who had shown the jar to Maria Martinez in 1965.  Maria identified it as the work of Dominguita Pino from around 1915.  Dick was one of the great early resources for getting pottery identified by Maria.  Dick had written this out on the receipt for the piece when it was acquired in 1999 (see the last photo). However, it is not just the identification from Dick Howard, but the jar itself is one of her classic styles. The shape with the straight style of neck and the high shoulder are certainly associated with her work. The painting style of the open designs is also in her manner.  Some of her later pieces are more detailed and probably painted by Tonita.  The jar was slipped red and then painted with the black to create the coloration.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair. There is a slight lean to one side and a small chip on the inside rim.

In “Spoken Though Clay” Dick Howard had an interesting quote (he had originally said to Richard Spivey) when talking about identifying historic San Ildefonso pottery.

“Because Maria—and I’ve found this to be true of other potters—considers the potter to be the one who does the potting. The painting is aside from that. Only rarely did she even comment on the painting. Once in a while she’d say, ‘Oh, that’s a nice design.’ But almost always she was really examining the potting, and she’d feel the pot or feel the inside. So unless I asked, as a follow-up, if the potter had also decorated it, she usually didn’t tell me one way or another, which I thought was interesting. Because to my eye what I often see first when I look at the decorated pot is the design, but that wasn’t what she saw. She always just sort of looked through the design.” —Richard Howard, 2000

 

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 5,800.00
Gutierrez, Margaret Lou – Mini Bowl with Cloud and Rain Designs (1990’s)

Margaret Lou Gutierrez was the only daughter of noted potters Tonita & Juan Roybal.  She began making pottery in the 1970’s and this is one of her pieces from the 1990’s.  It is a mini bowl which is fully polished and painted with a cloud and rain design.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Lou Gutierrez”. 

$ 75.00
Gutierrez, Margaret Lou – Small Jar with Feather Pattern (1990’s)

Margaret Lou Gutierrez was the only daughter of noted potters Tonita & Juan Roybal.  She began making pottery in the 1970’s and this is one of her pieces from the 1990’s. The jar has a long neck and a high shoulder.  It is painted with her sharp, elongated feathers and it is very highly polished.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Lou Gutierrez”. 

$ 200.00
Tafoya, Camilio -“Frogs and Mice” Original Etching (1981)  23/60

This is an original etching by Camilio Tafoya.  It uses similar designs to those in his pottery.  Here it depicts a charming combination of frogs and mice playing in the sun.  There are additional colors added to the etching.  This piece is 23/60 and it was printed by El Cerro Graphics, who printed all of Camilio and Jospeh’s etchings.  It is dated 1981 and signed, “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”.   It is in excellent condition.

$ 150.00
Haungooah, Art Cody- Seedpot with Sun, Lizard and Frog (1981)

This seedpot by Art Cody Haungooah is from 1981.  It is fully polished and has etched designs. There is a sunface in one medallion.  The other medallion ahs a lizard and frog. This medallion is “two-toned” to make it black-and sienna.  The contrast of the highly polished surfaces and the color from the sienna is striking.  Art was Kiowa and married to Martha Suazo from Santa Clara and that is where he began to make pottery. The bowl is signed, “Haungooah” and a flute player.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 250.00
Haungooah, Art Cody- Seedpot with Mosquite Man (1977)

This seedpot by Art Cody Haungooah is from 1977.  It is fully polished and has a single etched medallion. The design is the “Mosquito Man”.  It is a design which is found on the kiva murals at Pottery Mound, NM.  The last photo is the Mosquito Man from the actual murals.  On this piece, Art depicted the figure with a striking similarity to the actual mural figure.  The remainder of the piece is highly polished.  It is signed, “Haungooah” and a flute player.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 200.00
Tafoya, SaraFina – Plate with Avanyu and Wild Boar (1930’s)

SaraFina Tafoya was the matriarch of a family of renowned potters,  including her children Margaret Tafoya, Camilio Tafoya, and Christina Naranjo. While she is known for her large vessels, in the 1930’s she created a series of smaller painted and plainware vessels which were signed.  They are unusual and scarce pieces, yet a fascinating part of the history of Santa Clara pottery.  This is an exceptional polychrome plate.  The design in the center is a boar and it is surrounded by an avanu (water serpent).  They are both painted with a red clay slip and accented with white and gray.  The design of the boar is unusual in Santa Clara designs from this period.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Serafina Santa Clara Pueblo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Signed, “Serafina”: The Signed Pottery of SaraFina Tafoya

To learn more about the SaraFina’s signatures, check out the new article by Charles S. King, “Signed SaraFina”.

$ 4,000.00
Tafoya, SaraFina – Bowl with Lightning Designs (1933)

SaraFina Tafoya was the matriarch of a family of renowned potters,  including her children Margaret Tafoya, Camilio Tafoya, and Christina Naranjo. While she is known for her large vessels, in the 1930’s she created a series of smaller painted and plainware vessels which were signed.  They are unusual and scarce pieces, yet a fascinating part of the history of Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is a classic piece of painted pottery and has a fascinating provenance.  The bowl was originally acquired in 1933 by the Denver Art Museum.  It was included in the book “Margaret Tafoya” by Mary Ellen and Lawrence Blair on p. 53 (fig. 2-19).  The bowl was later deaccessioned by the DAM and ended up in a private collection.  The bowl is fully polished and painted red-on-red with a lightning design.  The designs are highlighted with a white clay slip.  It is a complex and varied design which relies as much on the matte painted areas as the negative polished space.  The bowl is signed in the clay on the bottom, “Sarafina Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Interestingly, it still has the original catalog number for the museum as well as the museum card.  Definitely a great piece of history!

 

Signed, “Serafina”: The Signed Pottery of SaraFina Tafoya

To learn more about the SaraFina’s signatures, check out the new article by Charles S. King, “Signed SaraFina”.

$ 1,800.00
Martinez, Maxamiliana “Anna” – Plate with Avanyu and Flower Designs (1920’s)

This is a creatively designed plate by Maximiliana “Anna” Martinez, who was a sister of Maria Martinez.   It is fully polished on the front and matte on the back.  The plate has a checkerboard pattern in the center and a triangular design emanating out to the rim.  The charming part of the plate is the very thinly painted water serpent which encircles the central checkerboard medallion.  The plate is fired a deep black in coloration.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Anna”.   Why is the work of Anna Martinez important? Interestingly, Maria would often say she was the best painter in the family.  She was married to Cresencio Martinez, who was known for his paintings and was also a brother to Tonita Roybal.  One can begin to see how her talent was easily fostered by those around her making a plate such as this one a creative classic!

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 1,400.00
Tapia, Tom – Bowl with Katsina and Corn Designs

This is a smaller bowl by Tom Tapia.  It is highly polished and designed with a series of designs. There is a Tewa Dancer with a drum along with a sun and Pueblo scene.  There is another katsina figure and finally a corn plant.  The bowl was fired black and then the reddish clay coloration is added after the firing.  It is this color combination for which Tom achieved recognition.  The bowl is signed, “Tom Tapia”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 200.00
Montoya, Tomasita – Large Terraced Cloud Bowl (1950’s)

Tomasita Montoya is one of the early revivalists in San Juan pottery.  She was one of the original seven San Juan potters who revived the art form in the 1930’s.  The Pueblo was renown for their pottery but by about 1890 there were no potters left. In 1930 Regina Cata organized a pottery study group at San Juan Pueblo with the intent of revitalizing pottery production. The group studied ancient potsherds of wares made at San Juan in earlier times and selected Potsuwi‘i Incised Ware (1450-1500) as a basis for a contemporary pottery type.  This is a large open bowl with kiva steps or cloud designs.  The rim of the bowl has a step pattern which has incised mountain designs.  The center of the bowl is deeply carved and then slipped with additional clays for the coloration.  The fascinating part about this piece is that it combines both the Potsuw’i’i incised designs on the terraced edges and the San Juan carved designs.  The back is fully polished.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tomasita Montoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tomasita Montoya”.

$ 875.00
Tafoya, Ray  – Jar with Buffalo, Buffalo Dancers and Buffalo Lid (1982)

This is an exceptional lidded jar by Ray Tafoya.  The jar has a realistic buffalo etched around the neck.  Below is a stylized Buffalo Dancer.  On either side of the medallion are a male and female Buffalo Dancer.  Around the neck are etched feathers and separating the two dancers are prayer feather desigsn.  The lid of the piece has a buffalo on the top.  There are coral and turquoise additions on the buffalo lid.  Ray used an additional red clay color to accentuate the designs. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay along with his hallmark, “White Mountain”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Note how many of the geometric designs are similar to ones used today by his daughter, Jennifer Tafoya.  

$ 700.00
Koopee, Jacob -19″ Wide Bowl with Migration Pattern & Hopi Cradle Doll Designs

This is an amazing large open bowl by Jacob Koopee.  Jake was known for his large pieces and his variations on traditional Hopi-Tewa designs.  This large open bowl is coil built and it is painted on the outside and the inside. On the outside there is the classic migration pattern.  Jake had an ability to paint the fine lines of the pattern thin and even. The inside of the bowl is also fully painted with hand prints and cradle dolls.  Each of the cradle dolls is a different katsina, including a Qooqule, Grandmother, Runner and other figures.  The small hand prints were meant to represent the children given the cradle dolls as gifts.  The bowl is signed on the bottom with a flute player, which was one of Jake’s signatures.  This immense bowl is a striking example of his skill as both potter and painter.  It is traditionally fired and painted with bee weed (black) and natural clay slips. Jake won numerous awards during his career including “Best of Show” in 2005 at both Santa Fe Indian Market and the Heard Museum Market.  I was lucky to have been a pottery judge both years at both events, and it was exciting to see an artist create such dynamic work.  Our consignor has asked us to lower the price, which makes this large bowl an exceptional value.

$ 9,200.00
Martinez, Maria – Jar with Rain and Lightning Designs (1930’s)

This is a classic round jar by Maria Martinez and her husband, Julian.  Maria would make the pottery and Julian would paint the design.  This jar has a very round shape and a slight neck.  The design painted on the shoulder is a cloud, rain, and lightning pattern.  It has a striking stylistic pattern using extended lines, half-circles and open space imagery.  The jar has a highly polished surface and a slight gunmetal appearance.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie + Julian”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   It’s always great to see early work by Maria and Julian in such good condition.

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 3,500.00
Martinez, Maria – Jar with Cloud Designs (Maria Popovi 769)

This is a short neck jar by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the jar while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The jar is highly polished and has the classic cloud, wind and rain pattern which is painted around the shoulder.  The shape is iconic for Maria with the high shoulder and short neck.  While the painting and shape are beautiful, it is the firing which is striking.  The jar has a very gunmetal in coloration to the surface with a very high shine.  The jar is signed on thhttps://kinggalleries.com/maria-martinez-pottery-signatures/e bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi 769“. The signature indicates that it was made around in July 1969.  The jar is in excellent shape with no condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

 

$ 4,000.00
Lewis, Carmel  – Bowl with Rain & Lightning Design (2016)

Carmel Lewis was the youngest daughter of noted potter Lucy Lewis.  This bowl is coil built and painted with bee-weed and a red clay slip.  The design is a classic Acoma pattern with rain, lightning and cloud designs.  The pattern encircles the entire bowl.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Carmel Lewis”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00
Aguilar, Rosalie & Joe – Carved Plate with Ram Dancer (1930’s)

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional pottery throughout their time working together.  In the 1930’s they began to make carved pottery.  This plate is one of their most complex designs.  The design is a Ram Dancer, which is seen at San Ildefonso Pueblo during Feast Day in January.  The Ram Dancer is carved into the clay and there are incised designs on the kilt and legs along with painted designs on the neck and ram’s horn.  Surrounding the figure are cloud, rain and lightning designs.  The background area is matte against the polished surfaces of the design.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Rosalie & Joe”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a few light scratches on the rim and back and a bit of wear along the back of the dancer.  However, nothing unexpected which is not age-related.  This is certainly a unique piece both culturally and artistically. 

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

$ 1,400.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Bowl with Blue Corn Design (1980’s)

This is a striking large bowl by Blue Corn.  The bowl is a very round shape and it is fully polished with the white clay.  It is painted with a red clay for the designs.  Around the rim are rain and cloud designs.  Around the side of the bowl are corn patterns which are highlighted with a black clay.  However, the black clay has an almost-blusih tint in some light, which gives the piece a very striking appearance.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. Certainly a classic by this important San Ildefonso potter.

$ 2,300.00
Sanchez, Desideria – Large Jar with Bird Wing Designs (1920’s)

Desideria Montoya Sanchez was a sister of noted potter Maria Martinez.  She was known for her traditional pottery and use of both classic and innovative designs. This jar is from the 1920’s and has a wide shoulder and sloping sides.  There are three sections of design, each with a stylized bird wing pattern.  There are cloud patterns above the wings and below is a checkerboard design.  Separating each of the sections are a series of small dots.  The jar is highly polished and fired a slivery black coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Desideria”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It’s great to see a piece of her pottery with such complex designs.

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

$ 1,600.00
Navasie, Joy “Frogwoman” – Jar with Birds (1980’s)

This smaller jar by Joy “Frog Woman” Navasie is one of her classic shapes.  The jar has straight sides and it is polished on the inside and the outside.  The jar is slipped with the white clay and then painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black).   The sides of the jar are very tightly painted in four panels.  It’s nice to see a smaller piece with such precision to the lines!  Two panels are birds and the other two are bird tail designs. The black painted with bee-weed (a plant) and the red is a deeper red clay she began to use in the 1980’s.  It has been traditionally fired so there are some variations in the coloration from white to almost a pinkish color.   The jar is signed on the bottom with her Frog Hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 1,100.00
Martinez, Maria  – Plate with Cloud Designs “Marie + Santana”, 1940’s

This plate by Maria Martinez is one of her classic designs.  It was made and polished by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana. It is painted around the rim with a cloud design.  It is a style which Santana often used for her larger plates.  It’s nice to see it on a smaller piece!  The plate is signed on the back, “Marie + Santana”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair but some minor surface scratches.  Definitely a classic!  

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 1,200.00
Roybal, Tonita – Large Plate with Feather Design (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This is a very early plate by Tonita.  The entire piece is fully polished, including the front and back.  On the front, it is painted with a feather pattern in the center.  The feathers are the early style, as now how the rectangular matte area is at the center of each feather.  Later, they potters would move the rectangular section off to the side.  This earlier style is more reflective of the Mimbres pottery feather patterns.  Around the rim of the plate is a cloud and rain design.  The circular design with three lines on the rim of the plate was described as a “tassel on a man’s dance belt” by Maria Martinez in 1925.  The plate is fired a deep black.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration, or repair.  There are some surface scratched, one of which is in the center plainware area.  However, considering it’s age and the size, they are not exceptionally unusual or distracting.   The plate is signed on the back “Tonita”.  It is her earliest signature which is very tight and compact.  Definitely a striking piece for its size!

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

 

$ 1,500.00
Martinez, Maria – Fully Polished Open Bowl, “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

During the 1950’s Maria Martinez made and polished pottery and signed using her Tewa name, “Maria Poveka”.  Poveka means “Water Lilly”.  This is one of her classic open bowls, which are polished on both the inside and outside. Interestingly, today, few potters will attempt to fully polish the inside and outside of a piece, as it adds the possibility of it cracking.  The bowl is very highly polished and there are small areas of gunmetal and coloration in the black from the heat of the firing.  The bowl is signed in the clay on the bottom, “Maria Pove’ka”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

 

$ 1,100.00
Laate, Jennie – Kiva Bowl (1970’s)

Jennie Laate was among the most important revival potters at Zuni in the 1970’s.  This is a very traditional style Zuni Kiva bowl. The bowl is shaped with terraced “kiva” steps or cloud shapes.  In the center is a frog with a head in relief. Surrounding the frog are tadpoles.  On the outside are dragonflies with the wings painted with either red or black lines.  The purpose of the kiva bowls was often ceremonial and the inclusion of frogs, tadpoles, and dragonflies are representative of prayers.  The kiva bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 550.00
Tafoya, Severa – Jar with Polychrome Birds (1930’s)

Severa Tafoya was a sister of Van Gutierrez and her children included Angela Baca, Tonita Tafoya and, Lydia Tafoya.  Other direct descendants include Paul Speckled Rock, Ray Tafoya, Tina Garcia, Greg Garcia, Robert Cleto Nichols, Jennifer Tafoya, and Jason Garcia. She was known for her polychrome and carved pottery along with her more traditional shapes and designs.  This is one of the few polychrome pieces we have seen of work.  However, as her brother was Van Gutierrez, it’s not unexpected to see such beautifully painted pottery. This jar is polished at the top and the base.  The center band is painted with two birds. Each bird is highlighted with additional clay slips to create the coloration.  The design is charming with the use of classic Santa Clara imagery to create the head and feathers.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Severa”. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 225.00
Tafoya, Severa – Plate with Carved Avanyu (1960’s)

Severa Tafoya was a sister of Van Gutierrez and her children included Angela Baca, Tonita Tafoya and, Lydia Tafoya.  Other direct descendants include Paul Speckled Rock, Ray Tafoya, Tina Garcia, Greg Garcia, Robert Cleto Nichols, Jennifer Moquino and Jason Garcia. She was known for her polychrome and carved pottery along with her more traditional shapes and designs.  This plate is one of her iconic designs, with a carved avanyu encircling the piece.  Her style of avanyu is immediately recognizable with the elongated head and horn.  The piece is fully polished on the front and back. On the back note the area where it has almost a metallic appearance from the firing.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Severa”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are some light surface scratches.

$ 675.00
Lewis, Lucy – Large Seedpot with Star Design (1970’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the past century. This large seedpot is coil built and painted with bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  The design is painted on the top of the piece.  It is a star pattern in black-and white and extends out from the opening.  This seedpot is from the 1970s.   It has been native fired and has a beautiful coloration to the white clay slip.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00
Nampeyo, Fannie – Mini Jar with Cloud Design (1970’s)

This is one of the smallest pieces we have had from Fannie Nampeyo. She was the youngest daughter of noted potter Nampeyo of Hano and also the mother of noted potters Iris Nampeyo, Leah Nampeyo, and Thomas Polacca.  She was certainly among the most skilled of her generation for painting designs pottery.  This miniature is in the shape of a water jar  It has a cloud or water swirl encircling the shoulder of the piece.  It is signed on the bottom, “Fannie Nampeyo” and a corn plant representing the corn clan.   It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo said of  the migration pattern:

$ 175.00
Navasie, Joy “Frogwoman” – Jar with Birds and Bird Wing Neck (1980’s

This jar by Joy “Frog Woman” Navasie is one of her classic water jar shapes.  The jar has a high shoulder, an elongated neck and a turned out rim.  The body of the jar is painted with four panels of designs.  The jar is slipped with the white clay and then painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black).   It’s nice to see this period of her work painted with such precision to the lines!  Two panels are birds and the other two are bird wings.  Note the very complex hatchwork patterns, which are an unusual addition to her painting.  The red clay on this jar is a deeper red clay she began to use in the 1980’s.  It has been traditionally fired so there are some variations in the coloration from white to almost a pinkish color.   The jar is signed on the bottom with her Frog Hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 1,400.00
Nampeyo, Fannie – Large Migration Pattern Jar (1970’s)

This is a spectacular large jar by Fannie Nampeyo. She was the youngest daughter of noted potter Nampeyo of Hano and also the mother of noted potters Iris Nampeyo, Leah Nampeyo, and Thomas Polacca.  She was certainly among the most skilled of her generation for painting designs pottery.  While her mother revived the “migration” or bird wing design, Fannie made is a signature design of her pottery and of the Nampeyo family.  This larger jar is very wide in shape with a round shoulder and a short neck. The neck is slightly turned out on the rim.  However, it is the migration pattern which dominates the surface of this piece.  The migration pattern, or bird wings, extend around the entire jar in 10 sections.  The jar was traditionally fired so that it has some visually striking blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom, “Fannie Nampeyo” and a corn plant representing the corn clan.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo said of  the migration pattern:

“This is the one design that was really stressed for us to use, the migration pattern. Nothing but lines, representing the migration of all the people to all the places, including down below and up above. It has seven points at the top and bottom. All the x’s represent life from the bottom and top, telling you the universe is one. The thin lines, I just wanted to paint them real fast and real close to try and include everyone.”  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo, Spoken Through Clay

$ 2,800.00
Haungooah, Art Cody- Large “Buffalo Hunt” Bowl (1973)

This large bowl by Art Cody Haungooah is from 1973.  It is fully polished and has an etched design on one side. The imagery is a buffalo hunt where the design has been etched into the clay and then “two-toned” to make it black-and sienna.  Note the depth and yet the symmetry of the area surrounding the figure. Interestingly, Art left the buffalo black so that it would be in contrast with the sienna of the horse and rider.  Art was Kiowa and married to Martha Suazo from Santa Clara and that is where he began to make pottery. The bowl is signed, “Art Cody Haungooah” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 1,200.00
Lewis, Lucy – Bowl with Fineline Star and Mountain Designs (1970’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the past century. This bowl is coil built and painted with bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  The bowl has alternating fine-line painted star patterns with triangular mountain patterns. The alternating designs create a dramatic appearance on the bowl.  This piece is from the 1970s.   It has been native fired and has a beautiful coloration to the white clay slip.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,400.00
Da, Popovi-  Feather Plate (1965)

Popovi Da was a son of noted potter, Maria Martinez.  While he worked with her painting designs on her pottery, he also created a few pieces on his own beginning in 1962.  He was planning to continue making pottery on his own after Maria retired but unfortunately passed away before this could occur.  His pottery pieces are definitely a rarity among Pueblo pottery and it is not often that we come across his work.  This is one of his classic feather plates.  It is fully polished and delicately painted and traditionally fired.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Popovi 1165” which is the firing date of November, 1965.  That makes this an early piece of his pottery.  The plate is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair and it is certainly an important addition to any collection!

$ 4,400.00
Lewis, Emma – Water Jar with Parrots (1970’s)

Emma Lewis was a daughter of noted potter Lucy M. Lewis.  This jar is a striking piece of her pottery.  It is coil built and thin walled.  The shape is elegant with the round body and very straight neck.  It is polished with a white clay and then painted with a bee-weed (black) and a red clay slip.  The design on either side are very classic Acoma parrots.  They are very tightly painted and note the thin lines around the bird and for the flowers.  The parrots are a clan symbol and often used on pottery in Acoma.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Emma Lewis”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 450.00
Bell, Seferina  – Jar with Birds and Clouds (1960’s)

Seferina Bell has long been considered one of the great Zia potters of the 20th century.  This is a classic jar with three large birds.  The birds are painted large and note the lines on the wings.  Separating the birds are large cloud patterns which are polished red.  They extend from the neck to the base.  The bowl was slipped with the white clay and painted with the black and red clay.  There is a beautiful patina to the surface of this large jar.  It is signed on the side with a bell, which was her hallmark.  Overall it is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair but there is a slight lean to the form. It is certainly a classic of her work in design and form.

$ 900.00
Nahohai, Randy – Jar with Dragonflies (2001)

Randy Nahohai was known for his innovative Zuni pottery.  This is one of his classic thin-walled vessels.  The jar shape is inspired by historic Zuni pottery with a high shoulder and slight neck.  The jar is slipped with mica and painted with natural clay paints.  The design consists of five dragonflies encircling the piece.  Dragonflies are often represented as carrying prayers to heaven or the stars in Zuni culture.  Above the dragonflies are triangular designs which represent clouds.  The jar is beautifully painted with various clays for coloration.  It is signed on the bottom, “R. Nahohai” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00
Nampeyo, Iris – Large Tan Bowl with Corn Design

Iris Nampeyo was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and well known for her elegant asymmetrical vessels with corn as part of the design in relief.  Iris began using the corn in relief on the surface of her pottery in the early 1980’s. The corn is symbolic of being part of the Corn Clan.  The surface of the jar is stone polished and the corn on the front is in applique relief.  The shape of this jar is striking with the wide shoulder and the short, asymmetric neck.  The husk of the corn is sharp and the matte area extends around to the shoulder of the jar.  The matte areas are in contrast to the remainder of the piece which is polished.  The opening is asymmetrical which is in keeping with the organic style of the form.  There is a simplicity and elegance in her pottery.  Sadly, Iris passed away in September 2018, but her pottery remains a classic.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00
Garcia, Tina – Red Bowl with Bear Paws (2000)

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plain ware Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is from around 2000 and it is a classic piece of her pottery.  The bowl is very round in shape and there are two large bear paws impressed in the sides. The entire piece is fully polished and fired a deep red.  The bear paws are part of a story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tina Garcia”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Naranjo, Teresita  – Mini Carved Bowl (1970’s)

Teresita Naranjo was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and know for her deeply carved pottery.  This bowl is one of her few miniatures.  The bowl is very deeply carved with cloud and lightning designs. The designs spiral around the surface of the bowl.  It is traditionally fired black. The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita Naranjo” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Nampeyo, Iris – Tan Bowl with Corn Design

Iris Nampeyo was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and well known for her elegant asymmetrical vessels with corn as part of the design in relief.  Iris began using the corn in relief on the surface of her pottery in the early 1980’s. The corn is symbolic of being part of the Corn Clan.  The surface of the jar is stone polished and the corn on the front is in applique relief.  The husk of the corn is sharp and the matte area extends around to the shoulder of the jar.  The matte areas are in contrast to the remainder of the piece which is polished.  The opening is asymmetrical which is in keeping with the organic style of the form.  Note there is just a bit of a blush on the rim of the jar from the firing.  There is a simplicity and elegance in her pottery.  Sadly, Iris passed away in September 2018, but her pottery remains a classic.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,100.00
Koopee, Jacob – “All Roads Lead to Home” Bowl (2005)

This is very intricately designed bowl by Jacob Koopee.  It is entitled, “All Roads Lead to Home”.   The bowl is made from the red Hopi clay, and not something that he used very often.  The designs are very tightly painted shard patterns.  There is a similar (but larger) piece at the Museum of Northern Arizona with shard designs.  The setup and placement of each of the squares allowed him to use different imagery for each square within a section.  The sections are divided up by vertical bands of polished red and a horizontal band of polished mauve.  Check out the very thin lines around the rim of the bowl!  Of course, these very intricately painted lines were inspired by the work of Rondina Huma.  However, Jake gave the bowl his own touch with the hands at the bottom.  The hand designs were cut from paper and then he would blow the black bee-weed through a straw to get the little dots!  The bowl was traditionally fired so there are blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom with his hallmark Flute Player and Koopee.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Jake won numerous awards during his career including “Best of Show” in 2005 at both Santa Fe Indian Market and the Heard Museum Market.  I was lucky to have been a pottery judge both years at both events, and it was exciting to see an artist create such dynamic work.

$ 1,800.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Large Wide Shoulder Plainware Jar (2001)

Mark Tahbo is known not just for his painted pottery, but especially for the blushes on his pottery.  This jar is from 2001.  It is one of his largest plainware pieces that I remember him finishing.  The shape of this jar is exceptional, as there is a slight edge below the shoulder where he started it in the puki.  Then it extends out to the shoulder and rounds into the neck.  The piece is vertically polished to create an “onion-skin” appearance.  It was then outdoor fired to create the coloration.  Mark was masterful at firing and always wanted to achieve dramatic blushes on the surface of his pottery.  When they turned out with variations like on this jar, from white to deep orange, he was the most pleased.   Mark told me about his plainware work:

“My first plainware pieces were done years ago. I was sure that these would be well received and gallery owner Charles King took a chance with them. They were an immediate hit!  I don’t do very much plainware for it has to be flawless.  The surface has to be free of all dips or air holes and the shape has to be elegant on its own, as there is no design to distract the eye.  The colors achieved on the pots are truly amazing.  Each piece is fired outdoors using sheep dung and coals.  I love it!”

The jar is signed on the bottom “Mark Tahbo” and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic of his pottery!

$ 2,800.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Lidded Jar with Women and Parrot Men (2001)

Mark Tahbo was renown for his creative pottery shapes, designs, and firings.  He learned to make pottery from his great-grandmother, Grace Chapella.  Each piece reflects the symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter. The designs are painted using native clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  This jar has a refined form with a wide shoulder and slight neck.  Mark hated to make lids for his pottery and made very few.  This is one of the best constructed lids I have seen of his with the clay used to keep it secure on the neck.  While the shape and lid are visually interesting, it’s the design which is the center of this vessel.  The imagery is a series of Hopi-Tewa women and Parrot men.  The women are holding gourds for water while the Parrot men are holding corn pollen.  The idea of the Parrot men was partially inspired by the figures in the Awatovi murals.  However, Mark would often innovate his own creative designs for his pottery.  He said of this:

“For traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery, there are no shortcuts. I feel that the younger people, they aren’t as fortunate as I was. I was born at a time where I was with the elder women who revived Hopi-Tewa pottery and brought it to this level. I learned the old style. From how to get the clay, how to process it, from start to finish. Today, it seems like the storytelling is almost gone. I always tell younger potters that it’s one of the most important foundations we can have as Hopi-Tewa potters. A story. Something to lean back on. If you don’t have that root or that foundation, you have nothing. You are just floating on your own. Soak it all in and listen to all the old stories that you can. There are just no shortcuts. You have to learn the hard way and have patience.” Mark Tahbo, Spoken Through Clay

The eight figures encircle the jar.  They are painted with additional clay slips to give them color and note the little area when he etched designs on the gourds or the hair!  On the bottom of the jar are swirls parrots or birds.  It is almost as if they are the shadow of the figures dancing above.  The jar was traditionally fired which created the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom, “Mark Tahbo”.  There is a pipe to represent the Tobacco Clan.  It is in excellent good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,850.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Wide Bowl with Hummingird Design (1998)

Mark Tahbo was renown for his creative pottery shapes, designs, and firings.  He learned to make pottery from his great-grandmother, Grace Chapella.  Each piece reflects the symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter. The designs are painted using native clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  This bowl is wide with a flat top.  Mark would work hard to create this form inspired by the ancient Sikyatki pottery.  I remember when Mark originally made this piece and he said that it wasn’t the classic eagle tail design.  It’s hummingbirds!  The tail feathers are extending down and on the sides with the points are the hummingbirds.  Mark would often innovate his own creative designs for his pottery.  He said of this:

“There is so much in this pottery career that you have to go through. So many different stages. You are constantly learning. I finally came to this point in my life that when I choose a design it has to have a meaning or a story to connect all together. Today on some of my pieces I might even make the story up myself in order to create a new tale of my own.” Mark Tahbo, Spoken Through Clay

The placement of the imagery on this bowl looks classic, but it actually gives the piece a very modern appearance.  The bowl was traditionally fired which created the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom, “Mark Tahbo”.  There is a pipe to represent the Tobacco Clan.  It is in excellent good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00
Loloma, Charles – Stoneware Vertical Line Jar

Charles Loloma is a name synonymous with innovative Hopi jewelry. He began his jewelry career with a brief period of time also making pottery in the 1950’s.  The pieces were made form earthenware and were painted and glazed.  By the 1960’s his jewelry was already achieving some fame and he discontinued making pottery.  His clay pieces are relatively rare but fascinating in terms of form, design and glaze. In many ways they mirror the innovative style of his jewelry relative to the other work being created at Hopi at the same time.  This jar is made from stoneware and it is striated in designs.  This is a style which he often used in his pottery, keeping them simple in form and design.  In many ways, this matched the underlying themes to his jewelry.  This is a classic piece of his pottery! It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom into the clay, “Loloma”.

$ 1,200.00
Loloma, Charles – Hummingbird Bowl (1950’s)

Charles Loloma is a name synonymous with innovative Hopi jewelry. He began his jewelry career with a brief period of time also making pottery in the 1950’s.  The pieces were made form earthenware and were painted and glazed.  By the 1960’s his jewelry was already achieving some fame and he discontinued making pottery.  His clay pieces are relatively rare but fascinating in terms of form, design and glaze. In many ways they mirror the innovative style of his jewelry relative to the other work being created at Hopi at the same time.  This bowl is glazed on the outside with a series of hummingbirds.  The rim and the inside are fully glazed to a shiny brown coloration.  This is certainly a striking piece of his pottery! It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom into the clay, “Loloma”.

$ 1,800.00
Garcia, Tina – Black Melon Bowl (1985)

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plainware Santa Clara pottery. This is one of the few melon bowls which we have seen of her work.  The bowl is deeply carved with “melon” ridges extending from the neck to the base.  The entire piece is fully polished and fired a deep black.   Tina was always focused on form and polish and this created some exceptional vessels.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tina Garcia”.

$ 850.00
Shupla, Helen – Melon Jar with 16 Ribs (1980’s)

Helen Shupla is certainly most famous for her exceptional melon jars.  Her melon jars are the very traditional form with the ribs pushed out in the clay.  This melon jar is one of her classic shapes with an elongated body showing the full length of each rib.  Each of the 16 ribs is pushed out into the clay.  She would do this by placing her fingers inside the bowl and pushing against the clay from both the inside and outside!  Can you see the slight angle to each section?  This is how she would turn her hand as she was pushing against the clay to create the separate ribs!  The entire piece is fully polished and fired black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Helen Shupla”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,600.00
Garcia, Tina – Black Water Jar with Rainbow Ridge (1991)

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plainware Santa Clara pottery. This water jar is one of her classic pieces.  It is an elegant shape with a double shoulder or “rainbow ridge”.  The entire piece is fully polished to a high shine and fired a deep black.   Tina was always focused on form and polish and this created some exceptional vessels.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,000.00
Naranjo, Dominguita Sisneros – Large Jar with Incised Rain Cloud Designs

Dominguita Sisneros Naranjo is a daughter of noted Ohkay Owingeh potter Tomasita Montoya and a sister of Rosita de Herrera. This large jar is a classic style for San Juan Pottery.  It is polished at the top and bottom. The inside is slipped with a micaceous clay.  The central band is incised with cloud patterns.  There are single vertical lines representing the rain which are slipped with a bluish color of clay.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dominguita Naranjo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00
Haungooah, Art Cody – Bowl with Avanyu (1978)

This is a larger bowl by Art Cody Haungooah who was known for his miniatures.  The entire bowl is fully polished and fired red.  It is etched with a very stylized water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece.  Around the rim are clouds while the body of the avanyu is etched with scales.  The tongue is like a bolt of lightning and crosses the tail. It is an interestingly designed piece.  Event he background matte area is textured!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Haungooah”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair with some wear near the base.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 650.00
Haungooah, Art Cody – “The Ancient Ones” (1977)

This is a complex smaller bowl by Art Cody Haungooah. The bowl is fully polished and fired black.  It is entitled, “The Ancient Ones”.  There is a single medallion which is etched humanized grasshopper along with a stylized grassopper figure.  This is one of those pieces where I wish I knew the story of “The Ancient Ones” as Art was masterful as a story teller.  The bowl has some deeper carving (the circular lines) along with Art’s classic straffito.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Haungooah  “The Ancient Ones”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 500.00
Haungooah, Art Cody – Black Jar with Feather Design (1978)

This is a small intricately designed bowl by Art Cody Haungooah. The bowl is fully polished and fired black.  The shoulder of the piece is etched with a feather pattern.  Typically, Martha would make and polish the pottery while Art would etch the designs into the clay.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Haungooah”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 350.00
Haungooah, Art Cody & Martha – Bowl with Howling Coyote and Moon (1976)

This is one of the few pieces signed by both Art Cody Haungooah and his wife, Martha.  Martha made the small jar and polished the surface.  Art Cody etched the design.  The central medallion is a howling coyote.  In front of the coyote is a quarter moon.  On the opposite side of the moon is a stylized bird.  There is just a slight lip to the jar.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Art & Martha Haungooah  1976”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 500.00
Garcia, Tina – Red Water Jar with Fluted Rim (1991)

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plainware Santa Clara pottery. This water jar is classic in both form and color.  The jar has a sharp shoulder which dips down before extending up to the neck.  It is this indention at the shoulder, which is difficult at times to see in photos but easy to feel, which was a distinctive technique of Tina’s pottery.  The result is often the “surprise” of feeling it when it is not really seen.  The rim is fluted which means that it is undulating.  This is always a more difficult technique as there are more opportunities for it to crack in drying or polishing.  The jar is fully polished and traditionally fired red.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 625.00
Trammel, Jennie – Jar with Feather Pattern (1970’s)

This is classic smaller jar by Jennie Trammel.   She was a daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  Over the years Jennie did not make a lot of pottery as she lived a very private life and was virtually never involved in markets or gallery shows.  However, she created striking pottery with classic shapes and designs which were distinctive to her work.  Each piece was coil built and it was the carving, with the rounded edges, which was a visual key to her work.  This jar is a water jar shape and it has carved feathers as the design.  It is both classic in shape and style.  The feathers are deeply carved and the entire jar is highly polished.  It is fired a deep black.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Jennie Trammel” in the clay on the bottom.

$ 800.00
Martinez, Santana & Adam – Bowl with Feather Designs (1970’s)

This bowl by Santana and Adam Martinez is a smaller but classic piece of their pottery.  Adam was the youngest son of Maria Martinez, and Santana (his wife) painted Maria’s pottery in the 1940-50’s.  The entire surface of this is fully polished.  The design was then painted around the top shoulder of the bowl.  It is a classic feather pattern encircling the piece.  The bowl was traditionally fired to a very dark black appearance.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Santana + Adam”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic piece!

$ 600.00
Martinez, Maria   – Gunmetal Bowl with Cloud Designs “Maria Popovi 569”

This gunmetal fired bowl is a classic piece by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the bowl and it was fired by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). Popovi focused on both the painted surfaces of the pottery as well as the firings.  This bowl is one of Maria’s classic shapes with her low shoulder and sloping sides. The design is a very tightly painted rain and lightning pattern which encircles the piece. The openness of the design elements reveals the gunmetal coloration from the firing.  The piece is about three-quarters gunmetal with one section that is a darker black.  However, the entire bowl is very highly polished with a “mirror-like” surface. The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria / Popovi 569”.  The firing date is when the pottery was made, so this bowl was from May 1969. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Great gunmetal fired pieces by Maria and Popovi with such high polished surface are always stunning and a great addition to any collection!

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 3,300.00
Martinez, Maria – Large Plate with San Ildefonso Birds (1920’s)

This is an extraordinary large plate by Maria Martinez and her husband, Julian.  Maria would make the pottery and Julian would paint the design.  The unique aspects of this piece are the size and the design.  Many of their early plates were under 12″ diameter, as they were less likely to break in the firing.  As well, this design is one which is an early pattern and one which was very rarely used in their pottery.  The design is a series of three San Ildefonso birds.  The heads are near the rim and the wings are extending backwards with the triangle in the center making up their legs.  However, as a whole pattern, it has a beautiful flow and dynamic appearance.  The “wings” on this piece are a design which in Richard Spivey’s book, “The Legacy of Maria Poveka Martinez”, it is identified as an “avanyu” (see last photo).  However, I spoke at length with a San Ildefonso potter about this particular design and he explained how it was a bird and that it is a design often seen around the Pueblo.  To have his input gives an important addition of cultural knowledge about these pieces!  As for the plate, it is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are some light surface scratches which are not unexpected in a piece from this time period.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Marie + Julian”.  In terms of the photos, I tried to take them at different angles and different lighting to reveal both design and condition.  The curve of the plate makes it difficult but I think if you view the various photos it is possible to have a good idea of the overall condition.   This is definitely one of those exciting pieces by Maria & Julian Martinez which rarely come around to the marketplace!

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 6,800.00
Speckled Rock, Paul – Red Bear with Feathers (1991)

Paul Speckled Rock is a grandson of Severa Tafoya but learned to make pottery from Joseph Lonewolf (his then father-in-law).  Paul’s son Adam Speckled Rock has made pottery, as well as his niece, Jennifer Tafoya.  This is one of his iconic clay bears.  He began making them in the early 1980’s and they remained one of his most famous forms.  The bear is more modernized and this one is polished and fired red.  There is a geometric heartline on the piece which he has highlighted with a blue clay slip.  There is a stone arrowhead on the back and three parrot feathers.  This is the bear’s “medicine bundle”.  The piece is signed on the inside of the back leg, “Paul Speckled Rock, 1991”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 650.00
Speckled Rock, Paul – Plainware Seedpot (1983)

Paul Speckled Rock is a grandson of Severa Tafoya but learned to make pottery from Joseph Lonewolf.  This seedpot is from 1983.  It is a very early piece of his pottery.  When he first started to make pottery, he began making unusual shapes, which were very much like “rocks”.  They were immediately distinctive in form and design.  This piece is highly polished but with not design. It is the shape and angels of the piece and the highly polished surface which make it so striking. The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Paul Speckled Rock, 1983”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 275.00
Ortiz, Seferina – Skunk Clay Figure

Seferina Ortiz is the matriarch of a family of renowned potters, including Virgil Ortiz, Janice Ortiz, and Lisa Holt. This is one of her animal figures.  It is a clay skunk which is slipped with a white clay and the painted with wild spinach (black).  The piece is signed on the bottom.  It was traditionally fired and in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a charming piece by this historically important potter!

$ 650.00
Ortiz, Seferina – Drummer Figure

Seferina Ortiz is the matriarch of a family of renowned potters, including Virgil Ortiz, Janice Ortiz, and Lisa Holt. This is one of her drummer figures.  The drummer is sitting down and the drum is part of the piece.  The drumstick is made from wood and leather and added after firing.  It is more charming as her husband, Guadalupe, also made Cochiti drums.  The piece is slipped with a white clay and then painted with a red clay slip and wild spinach (black).  The piece is signed on the bottom.  It was traditionally fired and in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic figure by this historically important potter!

$ 975.00
Gutierrez, Denny – Bowl with 36 Swirl Faceted Melon Ribs (1992)

Denny Gutierrez was known for his faceted melon bowls.  As opposed to carving them, he would flatten out each rib out to create a “faceted” appearance.  The result was a reflective surface and a very striking piece of pottery.  This bowl is from 1992. It is larger in size and there are 36 faceted ribs swirling around the jar from the rim to the base. The bowl is very highly polished and fired a dark black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Denny Gutierrez”.

$ 550.00
Gutierrez, Denny – Jar with 16 Faceted Melon Ribs (1991)

Denny Gutierrez was known for his faceted melon bowls.  As opposed to carving them, he would flatten out each rib out to create a “faceted” appearance.  The result was a reflective surface and a very striking piece of pottery.  This jar is from 1991.  It has 16 straight melon ribs, each flattened out to create the “facet”. They encircle the jar from top to bottom.  The jar is very highly polished and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Denny Gutierrez”.

$ 175.00
Garcia, Tina – Red Jar with Bear Paws (1991)

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plain ware Santa Clara pottery.  This jar was from 1991 and it is a classic piece of her pottery.  The jar has a sharp shoulder and it slopes up to the mouth.  There are three bear paws impressed into the clay.  The entire piece is fully polished and fired a deep red.  The bear paws are part of a story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tina Garica”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00
Gutierrez, Margaret & Luther – Nativity Set – 22 pieces (1977)

This nativity set by Margaret and Luther Gutierrez contains 22 different figures. This is the middle size of the sets that they made. There are Mary, Joseph, baby Jesus and the three wise men.  The Wise Men are presenting gifts of bread and animals.  There are additional animals of a cow, donkey, pig, horse, duck and more!  This is also one of the few sets which includes three angels.  There are two koshari figures and even one miniature seedpot.  Each piece is signed and it does include pieces by Margaret & Luther, Pauline Naranjo (Luther’s daughter) and a couple by Margaret alone.  The set is from the collection of Richard Spivey and was begun in 1977 and put together over the course of several years.  They are each painted with native clay slips and they are all in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. Definitely a charming collection of work by this important family of potters!

$ 1,200.00
Naranjo, Teresita  – Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1970’s)

Teresita Naranjo was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and know for her deeply carved pottery.  This bowl is one of her classic pieces in terms of the carving.  It is very deeply carved with a water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece. Note how the negative space around the rim becomes part of the design of the clouds and lightning above the avanyu.  The entire piece is fully carved and polished. The avanyu encircles the bowl and the body has cloud and rain designs.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita Naranjo” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 850.00
Navasie, Joy “Frogwoman” – Water Jar with Hopi Birds (1980’s)

This jar by Joy “Frog Woman” Navasie is a striking shape.  The jar has a round shoulder and a turned out rim.  The piece is fully designed with four panels painted around the sides.  The jar is slipped with the white clay and then painted with a red clay slips and bee-weed (black).   Two panels are birds and the other two are cloud and rain designs.  The red is a deeper red clay she began to use in the 1980’s.  The jar is very finely painted with delicate lines.  What is really wonderful about the jar is the firing. There are just slight blushes so the jar is not a perfect white, but the colors from the firing create almost a “meringue” color.  The jar is signed on the bottom with her Frog Hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 650.00
Atencio, Isabel & Gilbert Atencio- Buff-on-Red Jar with Rain Designs (1970’s)

Isabel Atencio was a daughter of Nicolasa Montoya (the aunt who taught Maria Martinez to make pottery) and a sister of Rayita Montoya, Santana Montoya and Alfredo Montoya (the first husband of Tonita Roybal). Among her children, Gilbert Atencio is known primarily for his paintings. Her daughters Helen Gutierrez and Angelita Sanchez are both well-known potters.  This is one of her few collaborative pieces with her son, Gilbert.  It is also the largest collaborative piece of their work we have had (ok, we have only had two in over twenty years!).  The jar was made and polished by Isabel and painted by Gilbert.  His is a buff-on-red coloration with rain cloud designs.  It is a striking piece in shape and design.   It is signed, “Belle + Gilbert”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 1,050.00
Medina, Sofia – 16″ Storage Jar with Birds

This is a spectacular and massive storage jar bySofia Medina.  The jar is made in the traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece was coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This is jar is exception form, color and painting.  The jar is painted with four sections of birds.  Each opposing bird is different.  Over each bird is a polished rainbow band.  Under two of the rainbows there are rain clouds.  Under the other two are bird wings.  Note the overall complexity of design from the base to the rim!  The jar is simply beautifully polished and painted.  Note as well the coloration of the jar, which a more brownish coloration for which Sofia was famous.  Did you know that Zia potters use basalt as their temper for the clay, which gives these pieces their stability but also weight.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There is one small area of missing slip on the rim.  It is signed on the side, “Sofia Medina”.  Not just a classic piece of their pottery, but outstanding in size, design and color as well!

$ 2,600.00
Tafoya, Donicia – Jar with Plant Design (1960’s)

Donicia Tafoya was the mother of noted potter Juan Tafoya.  This jar is a striking piece of her pottery.  The jar is a classic shape with a low shoulder and a painted seed design.  It is the firing which is so distinctive on this piece. It is fired to a gunmetal appearance on one side and a darker black on the other.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Donicia Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair. 

$ 200.00
Tafoya, Donicia – Bowl with Wind Designs (1950’s)

Donicia Tafoya was the mother of noted potter Juan Tafoya.  This bowl is highly polished and painted with a cloud design around the neck.  It is fired a gunmeatal coloration so it has a silvery appearance.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Donicia Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair. 

$ 150.00
Nampeyo, Elva Tewaguna – Bowl with Eagle Tail Design (1971, Fred Harvey Tag)

Elva Tewaguna Namepyo, was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo, a granddaughter of the Nampeyo of Hano and a sister of Iris and Tonita Nampeyo and Thomas Polacca.  Her pottery was coil built, stone polished and painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips. This wide shape bowl is one of her classic shapes.  The design is an eagle tail design which was made famous by Nampeyo of Hano.  The eagle tail design is delicately painted with the tail feathers extending over the shoulder of the bowl.  The piece was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom before fired, “Elva Nampeyo”.  Interestingly, it has an original Fred Harvey sticker from 1/71.  The original price was $55!  The tag adds a wonderful provenance to the piece.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Her daughter Adelle Nampeyo continues in the same family tradition.

$ 550.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Wide Jar with Mesa & Rain Designs (1970’s)

This is a striking wide shoulder jar by Margaret Tafoya. It is from the 1970’s.  It is an unusual shape for Margaret’s pottery with a wide shoulder and a short neck.  The jar is carved around the shoulder with a mesa and rain pattern. The design is repeated four times around the jar.  The piece is very highly polished and deeply carved.  It was fired a deep black.  Interestingly, Margaet was at the peak of her career in the 1970’s.  It was 1978-9 when she won consecutive “Best of Show” awards at Santa Fe Indian Market for two storage jar.  There is certainly a wonderful precision in the carving, shape, and polish of this jar.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 6,800.00
Haungooah, Art Cody – Bowl with Insects, Turquoise and Lid

This is a very unusual lidded bowl by Art Cody Haungooah.  There are polished medallions on each side and the clay around them is carved away leaving the medallions raised. The medallion on one side has a moth and the other an ant.  They are each inset with two pieces of turquoise.  The surrounding matte area has been sanded down and works as a perfect contrast to the polished areas.  The lid is also fully polished.  It is a strong complement to the polished medallions.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 900.00
Gutierrez, Denny – 24 Swirls Faceted Melon Jar (1999)

Denny Gutierrez was known for his faceted melon bowls.  As opposed to carving them, he would flatten out each rib out to create a “faceted” appearance.  The result was a reflective surface and a very striking piece of pottery.  This jar has a low shoulder and sloping sides.  It is from 1999.  The jar has 24 faceted ribs swirling down from the rim to the base.  The top of the rim is also fully polished.   The narrowness of each rib adds to the amazing reflectiveness of this piece.  The jar is very highly polished and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 450.00
Da, Tony – Red Plate with Antelope (1971)

This is an unusual smaller plate by Tony Da.  Most of the smaller plates made by Tony Da between 1969 and 71 were either gunmetal or black-and-sienna in coloration.  He made very few of the smaller plates in red.  This one has an antelope as the design. Tony would etch the designs into the clay before the pieces were fired. The animals were inspired by the Mimbres imagery from the 1100’s. However, as with much of his work, Tony drew inspiration from these ancient works but did not copy them.  His animals became “spirit animals” and note how the feet of the antelope are its tracks. The animal extends backwards from the tracks to create the distinctive animal with a heartline.  Around the rim are painted lines, in contrast to the incised imagery.  Tony had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.   This plate is signed on the back in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The plate has a metal museum mount stand made for it.   This is certainly a rarity and a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

Da, Tony – Lidded Jar with Feather Design and Turquoise (1971)

This is a spectacular jar by Tony Da.  He had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike. This jar was originally purchased in 1971. It is fully polished a deep red and the design consists of three sections with a feather pattern.  The feather design on the plates by his grandmother Maria Martinez were iconic by the 1970’s, so Tony created this design as his own variation.  There are three sections of feather separated by inset pieces of turquoise.  As well, the jar has a lid, which is tightly made and it is one of his earliest styles.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

Martinez, Maria   – Gunmetal Fired Bowl “Maria Popovi 1268”

This gunmetal fired bowl is a classic piece by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the bowl and it was fired by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). Popovi focused on both the painted surfaces of the pottery as well as the firings.  This bowl is a gunmetal coloration with a metallic appearance across much of the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria / Popovi 1268”.  The firing date is when the pottery was made, so this bowl was from Dec, 1969. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Great gunmetal fired pieces by Maria and Popovi with such high polished surface are always stunning and a great addition to any collection!

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 2,200.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Seedpot with Chipmunks (1995)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is from 1995. It is the last series of pieces he made.  It was fully polished and etched with five chipmunks.  They are gathering nuts.  It is whimsical in style and there is a playfulness to the designs.  The various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  It is signed on the bottom “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00
Haungooah, Art Cody – Seedpot with Teepees

Art Cody Haungooah began making pottery in  1972.  He brought his Kiowa heritage and culture to the pottery of Santa Clara Pueblo.  This piece is from around 1980.  It is a seedpot and fully polished. It is an unusual design in that it is based more of Kiowa history than that of the Southwest.  There are two teepees as the design.  They are surrounded by cloud and feather patterns.  It is signed on the back, “AH, Haungooah”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

 

$ 775.00
Haungooah, Art Cody – Turtle with Hemis Mana Katsina (1974)

Art Cody Haungooah began making pottery in  1972.  He brought his Kiowa heritage and culture to the pottery of Santa Clara Pueblo.  This clay turtle is from 1974.  It is fully polished and the back is etched with a Hemis Mana katsina.  Note the more deeply incised and rounded lines around the katsina figure.  It is signed on the bottom on the neck, “Haungooah 2-74”. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

 

$ 375.00
Shupla, Helen – Wedding Vase with Mesa and Cloud Designs

Helen Shupla is famous for her carved pottery as well as her exceptional melon jars.  This large wedding vase is coil built and it is carved around the body of the piece.  The style of carving is interesting as most of the work is carved into the negative space as opposed to caring it in a line around the vase.  There is a mesa design along with a cloud, mountain, and bird pattern.  The wedding vase is signed, “Helen Shupla” on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00
Naranjo, Teresita  – Wedding Vase with Water Serpent (1970’s)

Teresita Naranjo is famous for her deeply carved pottery.  Each piece was coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired outdoors.  She was a daughter of noted potter Christina Naranjo and a sister of Mary Cain.  This wedding vase by Teresita is from the 1970’s.  It is one of her classic shapes with the long necks and rounded spouts.  The body of the vase is deeply carved with a waters serpent (avanyu), which encircles the piece.  As the vase is turned there are additional cloud and rain designs.  The entire piece is beautifully polished and a classic for her work!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita Naranjo” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,250.00
Gonzales, Rayita – Carved Open Bowl with Avanyu (1930’s)

Rayita Gonzales was a sister of Louis  “Wo-Peen” Gonzales and Raymoncita Gonzales.  She did not make much pottery but it was mostly during the 1930’s.  This is the 4th piece of her work that we have come across for the gallery!  It is an open bowl and carved on the inside with a water serpent.  The style of her carving is very distinctive and especially the “horn” on the water serpent.  The back of the bowl is also fully polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rayita”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 400.00
Lewis, Lucy – Bowl with Rain and Lightning Design (1980’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the past century. This bowl is coil built and painted using bee-weed, a plant.  The design consists of a triangular mountain, rain and lightning design. The pattern is repeated around the shoulder of the bowl.  This bowl is thin walled and delicately painted.  It was traditionally fired so the white has much more of a pearlescent coloration, which creates added depth.  In the 1980’s the surfaces of her pieces were more highly polished, giving them a smoother feel.  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00
Martinez, Maria – Bowl with Mesa & Prayer Feather Design “Marie + Julian” (1920’s)

This bowl by Maria Martinez is a classic of her early pottery from the late 1920’s.  It was made and polished by Maria and then painted by her husband, Julian Martinez (1897-1943).  The bowl is Maria’s classic rounded shoulder shape and the entire piece is fully stone polished, including the base.  The design around the sides is painted with a mesa and a prayer feather pattern. The prayer feathers are held in the hands of Pueblo dancers and are often depicted as a series of triangles one on top of the other.  The bowl is very highly polished and was fired to a gunmetal appearance. This metallic or “gunmetal” was achieved by the heat of the firing and note how the coloration changes as the bowl is turned!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay,  “Marie + Julian”.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one small rub below the shoulder but very little wear on the polished bottom, which is unusual, as one might expect more wear just from moving the bowl around over the past 100 years!

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 2,200.00
Martinez, Maria – Large Wide Plainware Bowl “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

In the 1950’s Maria Martinez created a series of pieces which were simply stone polished with no design.  As she primarily made the pottery and polished it this was fitting with the other pieces of her career.  This wide bowl is very highly polished and it is fired a dark black but with areas that are gunmetal.  This shape is one which she made, often saying it was made so that it would fit when being held by two hands.   The bowl is signed in the clay, “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 2,200.00
Sanchez, Desideria – Bowl with Cloud & Wind Designs (1920’s)

Desideria Montoya Sanchez was a sister of noted potter Maria Martinez.  She was known for her traditional pottery and use of both classic and innovative designs. This bowl is a round shape and painted with a series of bold line cloud and wind patterns. The thick lines and the style of the imagery give the bowl a very modern appearance and are certainly unusual in the imagery of San Ildefonso.  The firing of the bowl has given it a somewhat gunmetal appearance in areas.  The gunmetal coloration is due to the heat of the firing and note how areas are more black and others are more metallic.   The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Desideria”.

$ 975.00
Martinez, Maria – Bowl with Feather Pattern (Maria Popovi 665)

This is a rounded neck bowl by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the bowl while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The bowl is highly polished and has the traditional eagle feather pattern painted in matte around the shoulder.  Typical of the work of Popovi Da, the feathers are perfectly painted with each feather nearly the same width as the one next to it. It is remarkable as Popovi painted them free-hand and each feather would be painted over several times. The shape of this bowl is one of Maria’s classics, as the round shoulder accentuated the shape of the feathers.  The firing is a very highly polished black with a mirror-like shine.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi 665“. The signature indicates that it was made around in June 1965.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 4,400.00
Martinez, Maria – Jar with Plant Design “Marie + Julian” (1930’s)

This jar by Maria Martinez is a classic of her early pottery from the late 1930’s.  It was made and polished by Maria and then painted by her husband, Julian Martinez (1897-1943).  The jar has a distinctive form with a sharp shoulder and a sloping neck.  The design is a plant pattern which extends up from the shoulder to the neck.  The bowl is highly polished and fired a deep black.  It is signed, “Marie + Julian” on the bottom.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one small rub below the shoulder and a small pre-firing indention on the shoulder (last photo).

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 1,800.00
Martinez, Maria  –  Jar with Rain and Plant Designs “Marie + Santana”, 1940’s

This jar by Maria Martinez is one of her classic pieces.  It was made and polished by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana. It has a very highly polished surface. The design around the shoulder is a rain and plant pattern.  It is tightly painted while allowing the polished surface of the bowl to remain exposed.  The firing has given the bowl a nearly gunmetal appearance.   The rounded shoulder and sloping neck are an excellent example of Maria’s pottery from this time.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Marie + Santana”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic!  

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,000.00
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