Loading the content... Loading depends on your connection speed!

Scottsdale 480.481.0187 | Santa Fe 480.440.3912
kgs@kinggalleries.com
Shopping Cart - $ 0.00

No products in the cart.

King Galleries is pleased to have a variety of Pueblo and Tribal pottery from the 1920's to the present. We have created this "Signed Historic Pottery"  to identify work by those potters who were early innovators in the 1920's and began to sign their work. It also is used for any artists who have passed away, making their art part of the historical record. The history of Pueblo pottery during this period is one of an exciting change as it has evolved from utilitarian ware to folk art to the fine art of today. We hope you enjoy these amazing pieces!

Showing 1–100 of 293 results

grid
list
Gutierrez, Denny – Bowl with 36 Swirl Faceted Melon Ribs (1992)

Denny Gutierrez was known for his faceted melon bowls.  As opposed to carving them, he would flatten out each rib out to create a “faceted” appearance.  The result was a reflective surface and a very striking piece of pottery.  This bowl is from 1992. It is larger in size and there are 36 faceted ribs swirling around the jar from the rim to the base. The bowl is very highly polished and fired a dark black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Denny Gutierrez”.

$ 550.00
Gutierrez, Denny – Jar with 16 Faceted Melon Ribs (1991)

Denny Gutierrez was known for his faceted melon bowls.  As opposed to carving them, he would flatten out each rib out to create a “faceted” appearance.  The result was a reflective surface and a very striking piece of pottery.  This jar is from 1991.  It has 16 straight melon ribs, each flattened out to create the “facet”. They encircle the jar from top to bottom.  The jar is very highly polished and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Denny Gutierrez”.

$ 175.00
Lewis, Emma – Bowl with Mimbres Rabbits

Emma Lewis was a daughter of noted potter Lucy M. Lewis.  This smaller bowl is very fully painted. There are two Mimbres style rabbits on the sides.  They are separated by lightning and rain designs.   Much of her imagery is inspired by the ancient Mimbres pottery of the 1100’s.  The bowl is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 110.00
Garcia, Tina – Red Jar with Bear Paws (1991)

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plain ware Santa Clara pottery.  This jar was from 1991 and it is a classic piece of her pottery.  The jar has a sharp shoulder and it slopes up to the mouth.  There are three bear paws impressed into the clay.  The entire piece is fully polished and fired a deep red.  The bear paws are part of a story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tina Garica”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00
Gutierrez, Margaret & Luther – Nativity Set – 22 pieces (1977)

This nativity set by Margaret and Luther Gutierrez contains 22 different figures. This is the middle size of the sets that they made. There are Mary, Joseph, baby Jesus and the three wise men.  The Wise Men are presenting gifts of bread and animals.  There are additional animals of a cow, donkey, pig, horse, duck and more!  This is also one of the few sets which includes three angels.  There are two koshari figures and even one miniature seedpot.  Each piece is signed and it does include pieces by Margaret & Luther, Pauline Naranjo (Luther’s daughter) and a couple by Margaret alone.  The set is from the collection of Richard Spivey and was begun in 1977 and put together over the course of several years.  They are each painted with native clay slips and they are all in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. Definitely a charming collection of work by this important family of potters!

$ 1,200.00
Martinez, Maria – Plainware Black Bowl “Maria Poveka”, 1950

In the 1950’s Maria Martinez created a series of pieces which were simply stone polished with no design.  As she primarily made the pottery and polished it this was fitting with the other pieces of her career.  This bowl is highly polished and fired a very deep black in coloration.  It has that “mirror-like” surface for which Maria was famous.  The bowl is signed in the clay, “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 1,000.00
Naranjo, Teresita  – Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1970’s)

Teresita Naranjo was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and know for her deeply carved pottery.  This bowl is one of her classic pieces in terms of the carving.  It is very deeply carved with a water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece. Note how the negative space around the rim becomes part of the design of the clouds and lightning above the avanyu.  The entire piece is fully carved and polished. The avanyu encircles the bowl and the body has cloud and rain designs.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita Naranjo” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 850.00
Navasie, Joy “Frogwoman” – Water Jar with Hopi Birds (1980’s)

This jar by Joy “Frog Woman” Navasie is a striking shape.  The jar has a round shoulder and a turned out rim.  The piece is fully designed with four panels painted around the sides.  The jar is slipped with the white clay and then painted with a red clay slips and bee-weed (black).   Two panels are birds and the other two are cloud and rain designs.  The red is a deeper red clay she began to use in the 1980’s.  The jar is very finely painted with delicate lines.  What is really wonderful about the jar is the firing. There are just slight blushes so the jar is not a perfect white, but the colors from the firing create almost a “meringue” color.  The jar is signed on the bottom with her Frog Hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 650.00
Roybal, Tonita – Black-on-Red Bowl with Storm Design (1922-5)

It is very unusual that we come across a black-on-red piece by Tonita Roybal.  This bowl is an early piece from the 1920’s.  Tonita and her mother, Dominguita Pino, were both very well known for their black-on-red pottery before the advent of the black-on-black pottery in 1920.  While numerous potters were making black-on-red pieces before 1920, Tonita was certainly among the best and her signed pieces in this style remain classics.  This bowl is fully designed with some of Tonita’s classic imagery. There are cloud, rain, lightning and other designs.  There are also striking areas of hatchwork patterns.  The black is painted onto the red clay surface.  The bowl is signed, “Tonita” on the bottom.  This is her earliest type of signature, with the very tightly written name.  It is an important and striking piece of her pottery both in terms of coloration and design.

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 3,400.00
Atencio, Isabel & Gilbert Atencio- Buff-on-Red Jar with Rain Designs (1970’s)

Isabel Atencio was a daughter of Nicolasa Montoya (the aunt who taught Maria Martinez to make pottery) and a sister of Rayita Montoya, Santana Montoya and Alfredo Montoya (the first husband of Tonita Roybal). Among her children, Gilbert Atencio is known primarily for his paintings. Her daughters Helen Gutierrez and Angelita Sanchez are both well-known potters.  This is one of her few collaborative pieces with her son, Gilbert.  It is also the largest collaborative piece of their work we have had (ok, we have only had two in over twenty years!).  The jar was made and polished by Isabel and painted by Gilbert.  His is a buff-on-red coloration with rain cloud designs.  It is a striking piece in shape and design.   It is signed, “Belle + Gilbert”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 1,050.00
Medina, Sofia – 16″ Storage Jar with Birds

This is a spectacular and massive storage jar bySofia Medina.  The jar is made in the traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece was coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This is jar is exception form, color and painting.  The jar is painted with four sections of birds.  Each opposing bird is different.  Over each bird is a polished rainbow band.  Under two of the rainbows there are rain clouds.  Under the other two are bird wings.  Note the overall complexity of design from the base to the rim!  The jar is simply beautifully polished and painted.  Note as well the coloration of the jar, which a more brownish coloration for which Sofia was famous.  Did you know that Zia potters use basalt as their temper for the clay, which gives these pieces their stability but also weight.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There is one small area of missing slip on the rim.  It is signed on the side, “Sofia Medina”.  Not just a classic piece of their pottery, but outstanding in size, design and color as well!

$ 2,600.00
Tafoya, Donicia – Jar with Plant Design (1960’s)

Donicia Tafoya was the mother of noted potter Juan Tafoya.  This jar is a striking piece of her pottery.  The jar is a classic shape with a low shoulder and a painted seed design.  It is the firing which is so distinctive on this piece. It is fired to a gunmetal appearance on one side and a darker black on the other.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Donicia Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair. 

$ 200.00
Tafoya, Donicia – Bowl with Wind Designs (1950’s)

Donicia Tafoya was the mother of noted potter Juan Tafoya.  This bowl is highly polished and painted with a cloud design around the neck.  It is fired a gunmeatal coloration so it has a silvery appearance.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Donicia Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair. 

$ 150.00
Tafoya, Juan – Plate with Avanyu & Coral (1983)

This is a small plate by Juan Tafoya from 1983.  It is fully polished and etched with a water serpent (avanyu) as the design.   Juan was known for his etched designs and how he would chip away at the polished slip to form a textured background for his design.  This can be seen around the body of the avanyu.  In the center is an inset piece of coral.  The plate is signed on the back, “Juan Tafoya”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Nampeyo, Elva Tewaguna – Bowl with Eagle Tail Design (1971, Fred Harvey Tag)

Elva Tewaguna Namepyo, was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo, a granddaughter of the Nampeyo of Hano and a sister of Iris and Tonita Nampeyo and Thomas Polacca.  Her pottery was coil built, stone polished and painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips. This wide shape bowl is one of her classic shapes.  The design is an eagle tail design which was made famous by Nampeyo of Hano.  The eagle tail design is delicately painted with the tail feathers extending over the shoulder of the bowl.  The piece was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom before fired, “Elva Nampeyo”.  Interestingly, it has an original Fred Harvey sticker from 1/71.  The original price was $55!  The tag adds a wonderful provenance to the piece.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Her daughter Adelle Nampeyo continues in the same family tradition.

$ 550.00
Nampeyo, Elva Tewaguna – Bowl with Blackbird Migration (1971, Fred Harvey Tag)

Elva Tewaguna Namepyo, was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo, a granddaughter of the Nampeyo of Hano and a sister of Iris and Tonita Nampeyo and Thomas Polacca.  Her pottery was coil built, stone polished and painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips. This wide shape bowl is one of her classic shapes.  The design is a blackbird migration pattern. Note the blackbird wings above the shoulder and the bird tails below.  The piece was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom before fired, “Elva Nampeyo”.  Interestingly, it has an original Fred Harvey sticker from 1/71.  The original price was $80!  The tag adds a wonderful provenance to the piece.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Her daughter Adelle Nampeyo continues in the same family tradition.

$ 700.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Wide Jar with Mesa & Rain Designs (1970’s)

This is a striking wide shoulder jar by Margaret Tafoya. It is from the 1970’s.  It is an unusual shape for Margaret’s pottery with a wide shoulder and a short neck.  The jar is carved around the shoulder with a mesa and rain pattern. The design is repeated four times around the jar.  The piece is very highly polished and deeply carved.  It was fired a deep black.  Interestingly, Margaet was at the peak of her career in the 1970’s.  It was 1978-9 when she won consecutive “Best of Show” awards at Santa Fe Indian Market for two storage jar.  There is certainly a wonderful precision in the carving, shape, and polish of this jar.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 6,800.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Jar with Carved Avanyu (1980’s)

This tall jar by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1980’s.  The jar is a very unusual and interesting piece on several levels.  The design on the jar is a carved avanyu.  This is one of the classic designs of Santa Clara pottery, which tells the story of how the water serpent saved the village from a flood.  What is unusual on this jar the style of the avanyu.  The head is more square and a square mouth.  When I first saw the design on this jar it looked both unusual and familiar.  Check out the very last image on this post and there is a jar by Margaret from the 1930’s with a very similar shape of avanyu!  It seems that at several times in the 1980’s Margaret revived older designs for her work, much as on this jar!  The next aspect of this piece is to check out the body of the avanyu and the very complex designs.  Typically they are more simple and flowing but this piece has very angular lighnting and cloud patterns for the body.  Finally, it’s the color of this jar which is so unusual.  It’s more of an orangeish red than a deep red.  It could be that it was a bit overfired or that she used a different slip for the color.  The result, however, is quite striking as it has a bold appearance.  The jar was originally purchased from Toni Roller at her studio during one of her shows for Margaret and the Tafoya Family.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This jar is definitely an important addition to any collection!

$ 5,000.00
Haungooah, Art Cody – Bowl with Insects, Turquoise and Lid

This is a very unusual lidded bowl by Art Cody Haungooah.  There are polished medallions on each side and the clay around them is carved away leaving the medallions raised. The medallion on one side has a moth and the other an ant.  They are each inset with two pieces of turquoise.  The surrounding matte area has been sanded down and works as a perfect contrast to the polished areas.  The lid is also fully polished.  It is a strong complement to the polished medallions.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 900.00
Gutierrez, Denny – 24 Swirls Faceted Melon Jar (1999)

Denny Gutierrez was known for his faceted melon bowls.  As opposed to carving them, he would flatten out each rib out to create a “faceted” appearance.  The result was a reflective surface and a very striking piece of pottery.  This jar has a low shoulder and sloping sides.  It is from 1999.  The jar has 24 faceted ribs swirling down from the rim to the base.  The top of the rim is also fully polished.   The narrowness of each rib adds to the amazing reflectiveness of this piece.  The jar is very highly polished and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 450.00
Da, Tony – Red Plate with Antelope (1971)

This is an unusual smaller plate by Tony Da.  Most of the smaller plates made by Tony Da between 1969 and 71 were either gunmetal or black-and-sienna in coloration.  He made very few of the smaller plates in red.  This one has an antelope as the design. Tony would etch the designs into the clay before the pieces were fired. The animals were inspired by the Mimbres imagery from the 1100’s. However, as with much of his work, Tony drew inspiration from these ancient works but did not copy them.  His animals became “spirit animals” and note how the feet of the antelope are its tracks. The animal extends backwards from the tracks to create the distinctive animal with a heartline.  Around the rim are painted lines, in contrast to the incised imagery.  Tony had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.   This plate is signed on the back in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The plate has a metal museum mount stand made for it.   This is certainly a rarity and a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

Da, Tony – Lidded Jar with Feather Design and Turquoise (1971)

This is a spectacular jar by Tony Da.  He had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike. This jar was originally purchased in 1971. It is fully polished a deep red and the design consists of three sections with a feather pattern.  The feather design on the plates by his grandmother Maria Martinez were iconic by the 1970’s, so Tony created this design as his own variation.  There are three sections of feather separated by inset pieces of turquoise.  As well, the jar has a lid, which is tightly made and it is one of his earliest styles.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

Martinez, Maria   – Gunmetal Fired Bowl “Maria Popovi 1268”

This gunmetal fired bowl is a classic piece by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the bowl and it was fired by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). Popovi focused on both the painted surfaces of the pottery as well as the firings.  This bowl is a gunmetal coloration with a metallic appearance across much of the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria / Popovi 1268”.  The firing date is when the pottery was made, so this bowl was from Dec, 1969. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Great gunmetal fired pieces by Maria and Popovi with such high polished surface are always stunning and a great addition to any collection!

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 2,200.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Seedpot with Chipmunks (1995)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is from 1995. It is the last series of pieces he made.  It was fully polished and etched with five chipmunks.  They are gathering nuts.  It is whimsical in style and there is a playfulness to the designs.  The various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  It is signed on the bottom “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00
Haungooah, Art Cody – Seedpot with Teepees

Art Cody Haungooah began making pottery in  1972.  He brought his Kiowa heritage and culture to the pottery of Santa Clara Pueblo.  This piece is from around 1980.  It is a seedpot and fully polished. It is an unusual design in that it is based more of Kiowa history than that of the Southwest.  There are two teepees as the design.  They are surrounded by cloud and feather patterns.  It is signed on the back, “AH, Haungooah”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

 

$ 775.00
Haungooah, Art Cody – Turtle with Hemis Mana Katsina (1974)

Art Cody Haungooah began making pottery in  1972.  He brought his Kiowa heritage and culture to the pottery of Santa Clara Pueblo.  This clay turtle is from 1974.  It is fully polished and the back is etched with a Hemis Mana katsina.  Note the more deeply incised and rounded lines around the katsina figure.  It is signed on the bottom on the neck, “Haungooah 2-74”. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

 

$ 375.00
Cain, Mary – Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1990’s)

Mary Cain was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and a granddaughter of SaraFina Tafoya.  She was known for her classic style carved and polished Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is carved with a water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece.  The body of the avanyu consists of cloud and rain designs.  The bowl is highly polished and fired a dark black.  It is signed on the bottom, “Mary Cain”.    It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00
Speckled Rock, Paul – Seedpot with Roses (1983)

Paul Speckled Rock is a grandson of Severa Tafoya but learned to make pottery from Joseph Lonewolf.  This seedpot is from 1983.  It is a very early piece of his pottery.  When he first started to make pottery, he began making unusual shapes, which were very much like “rocks”.  They were immediately distinctive in form and design.  This piece is highly polished and very lightly etched with three roses as the design.  They are highlighted with red and green clay slips.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Paul Speckled Rock, 1983”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 425.00
Haungooah, Art Cody – Mini Bowl with Deer Scene (1974)

This is an miniature bowl by Art Cody Haungooah is fully designed with a deer scene.  It is fully polished red and etched with a deer and forest scene encircling the bowl.  Note the distinctive style of Art’s etching of the matte background area.   The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 200.00
Shupla, Helen – Wedding Vase with Mesa and Cloud Designs

Helen Shupla is famous for her carved pottery as well as her exceptional melon jars.  This large wedding vase is coil built and it is carved around the body of the piece.  The style of carving is interesting as most of the work is carved into the negative space as opposed to caring it in a line around the vase.  There is a mesa design along with a cloud, mountain, and bird pattern.  The wedding vase is signed, “Helen Shupla” on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00
Naranjo, Teresita  – Wedding Vase with Water Serpent (1970’s)

Teresita Naranjo is famous for her deeply carved pottery.  Each piece was coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired outdoors.  She was a daughter of noted potter Christina Naranjo and a sister of Mary Cain.  This wedding vase by Teresita is from the 1970’s.  It is one of her classic shapes with the long necks and rounded spouts.  The body of the vase is deeply carved with a waters serpent (avanyu), which encircles the piece.  As the vase is turned there are additional cloud and rain designs.  The entire piece is beautifully polished and a classic for her work!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita Naranjo” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,250.00
Gonzales, Rayita – Carved Open Bowl with Avanyu (1930’s)

Rayita Gonzales was a sister of Louis  “Wo-Peen” Gonzales and Raymoncita Gonzales.  She did not make much pottery but it was mostly during the 1930’s.  This is the 4th piece of her work that we have come across for the gallery!  It is an open bowl and carved on the inside with a water serpent.  The style of her carving is very distinctive and especially the “horn” on the water serpent.  The back of the bowl is also fully polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rayita”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 400.00
Lewis, Lucy – Bowl with Rain and Lightning Design (1980’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the past century. This bowl is coil built and painted using bee-weed, a plant.  The design consists of a triangular mountain, rain and lightning design. The pattern is repeated around the shoulder of the bowl.  This bowl is thin walled and delicately painted.  It was traditionally fired so the white has much more of a pearlescent coloration, which creates added depth.  In the 1980’s the surfaces of her pieces were more highly polished, giving them a smoother feel.  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00
Martinez, Maria  – Bowl with Lightning Design  (Maria + Santana, 1954-6)

This is a classic bowl by Maria Martinez.  It was made by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana Martinez (the wife of Adam Martinez, Maria’s son).  It is very highly polished and has a glassy surface.  The design is a cloud and lightning pattern.  Note the highly polished surface on this bowl around the design!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria + Santana”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic!  

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 1,800.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Bowl with Corn and Star Patterns

This is a classic polychrome bowl by Blue Corn.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This bowl is fully polished tan and painted with black and ochre-colored clays.  The design around the rim is a rain and cloud design.  ARound the body of the piece are squares which represent corn while they are separated by star designs.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.

$ 1,500.00
Martinez, Maria – Bowl with Mesa & Prayer Feather Design “Marie + Julian” (1920’s)

This bowl by Maria Martinez is a classic of her early pottery from the late 1920’s.  It was made and polished by Maria and then painted by her husband, Julian Martinez (1897-1943).  The bowl is Maria’s classic rounded shoulder shape and the entire piece is fully stone polished, including the base.  The design around the sides is painted with a mesa and a prayer feather pattern. The prayer feathers are held in the hands of Pueblo dancers and are often depicted as a series of triangles one on top of the other.  The bowl is very highly polished and was fired to a gunmetal appearance. This metallic or “gunmetal” was achieved by the heat of the firing and note how the coloration changes as the bowl is turned!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay,  “Marie + Julian”.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one small rub below the shoulder but very little wear on the polished bottom, which is unusual, as one might expect more wear just from moving the bowl around over the past 100 years!

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 2,200.00
Roybal, Tonita – Jar with Reverse Feather Design (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This jar reflects the exceptional nature of her pottery designs, shapes, and firing.  The jar has a round shoulder and then and a slight indention before extending up to the neck.  The jar itself is very highly polished and beautifully painted.  The design is interesting with a reverse feather pattern which extends up from the base.  What is interesting is the design leaves more open space and draws the eye to the shoulder.  The jar is fired to a gunmetal appearance with areas which even have a gold-tone coloration.  This “goldtone” is a rarity in her work and one which was achieved in the firing. The jar has a very metallic appearance with just the touch of yellow or gold in the light.  The jar is from the 1920’s and it has its original sticker on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Tonita” in the clay on the bottom.  As a provenance, the jar was de-acquisitioned from the American Indian Culture Research Center in Marvin, South Dakota.  It still has the tag for its catalog number of 00251.

Click here to read about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators

$ 1,800.00
Martinez, Maria – Large Wide Plainware Bowl “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

In the 1950’s Maria Martinez created a series of pieces which were simply stone polished with no design.  As she primarily made the pottery and polished it this was fitting with the other pieces of her career.  This wide bowl is very highly polished and it is fired a dark black but with areas that are gunmetal.  This shape is one which she made, often saying it was made so that it would fit when being held by two hands.   The bowl is signed in the clay, “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,200.00
Aguilar, Rosalie & Joe – Carved Jar with Storm Designs (1930’s)

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional pottery throughout their time working together.  In the 1930’s they began to make carved pottery.  This large jar is carved with two different designs. There is a rain and lighting design and it is separated by a cloud and lightning design.   The carving is done into the negative space creating a visually strong appearance.  The remainder of the jar is fully polished and fired to a gunmetal coloration. The metallic surface and the matte black areas of the carving are beautiful on this jar.  The jar is in is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Rosalie + Joe” on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 1,000.00
Sanchez, Desideria – Bowl with Cloud & Wind Designs (1920’s)

Desideria Montoya Sanchez was a sister of noted potter Maria Martinez.  She was known for her traditional pottery and use of both classic and innovative designs. This bowl is a round shape and painted with a series of bold line cloud and wind patterns. The thick lines and the style of the imagery give the bowl a very modern appearance and are certainly unusual in the imagery of San Ildefonso.  The firing of the bowl has given it a somewhat gunmetal appearance in areas.  The gunmetal coloration is due to the heat of the firing and note how areas are more black and others are more metallic.   The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Desideria”.

$ 975.00
Naranjo, Madeline – Large Jar with Avanyu (1970’s)

Madeline Naranjo (b. 1916) was known for her deep carved pottery.  This is a larger jar with a very deeply carve avanyu (water serpent). The avanyu is an important image in Santa Clara pottery, telling the story of the water serpent who saved the village from a flood. The jar has a wide shape with a sharp shoulder. The avanyu encircles the jar and note the deeply carved clouds around the neck of the jar.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Madeline Naranjo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is a small rub on the side below the shoulder, which can be seen in the photos and I’ve priced the jar accordingly.  While Madeline no longer makes pottery, her work is certainly a classic and her legacy continues in the pottery of her granddaughter, Madeline E. Naranjo.

 

$ 875.00
Tafoya, Myra Little Snow – Jar with Carved Sun and Avanyu

Myra Little Snow Tafoya was known for her creative deep carved pottery. She is a daughter of Lucy Yearflower Tafoya, a granddaughter of Camilio Tafoya and the sister of Shawn, Kelli Little Katchina and Forrest Tafoya. She began making pottery in the early 1970’s and was featured in the “7 Families in Pueblo Pottery” book. While Myra no longer makes pottery, her early pieces are a wonderful part of the history of Camilio Tafoya’s family legacy.  This jar is a larger piece of her pottery.  It is carved around the shoulder with a cloud pattern.  Around the sides there is a feather pattern along with a sun and an avanyu.  The designs are tighly carved and highly polihsed.  The background is also fully etched to create a striking contrast with the highly polihsed designs.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Myra Little Snow”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 450.00
Aragon, Florence – Jar with Rainbow Band and Birds (1980s)

Florence Aragon was one of the great traditional Acoma potters.  This water jar is indicative of the influence of her pottery and the continuation of traditional designs and forms. The jar is the traditional water jar or “olla”. The high shoulder and sloping neck are part of this form. The jar is painted with Acoma birds on two of the sides.  Above the birds are a rainbow band, which is designed with cloud and lightning patterns.  Separating the birds are two sections with cloud and rain motifs.  The thin lines and tight painting were signatures of Florence’s pottery.  The bottom of the jar is indented in the traditional manner when the pots were made to be worn on the head to carry water!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “F. Aragon”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 850.00
Aragon, Florence – Jar with Fine-Line Rain Patterns (1980s)

Florence Aragon was one of the great traditional Acoma potters.  This water jar is indicative of the influence of her pottery and the continuation of traditional designs and forms. The jar is the traditional water jar or “olla”. The high shoulder and sloping neck are part of this form. The jar is painted with classic fine-line rain and lightning patterns. The lines are thinly painted and perfectly match the from.  The thin lines and tight painting were signatures of Florence’s pottery.  The bottom of the jar is indented in the traditional manner when the pots were made to be worn on the head to carry water!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “F. Aragon”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 450.00
Martinez, Maria – Bowl with Feather Pattern (Maria Popovi 665)

This is a rounded neck bowl by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the bowl while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The bowl is highly polished and has the traditional eagle feather pattern painted in matte around the shoulder.  Typical of the work of Popovi Da, the feathers are perfectly painted with each feather nearly the same width as the one next to it. It is remarkable as Popovi painted them free-hand and each feather would be painted over several times. The shape of this bowl is one of Maria’s classics, as the round shoulder accentuated the shape of the feathers.  The firing is a very highly polished black with a mirror-like shine.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi 665“. The signature indicates that it was made around in June 1965.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 4,400.00
Martinez, Maria – Jar with Plant Design “Marie + Julian” (1930’s)

This jar by Maria Martinez is a classic of her early pottery from the late 1930’s.  It was made and polished by Maria and then painted by her husband, Julian Martinez (1897-1943).  The jar has a distinctive form with a sharp shoulder and a sloping neck.  The design is a plant pattern which extends up from the shoulder to the neck.  The bowl is highly polished and fired a deep black.  It is signed, “Marie + Julian” on the bottom.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one small rub below the shoulder and a small pre-firing indention on the shoulder (last photo).

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 1,800.00
Martinez, Maxamiliana “Anna” – Bowl with Avanyu (1920’s)

This is a very traditional style bowl by Maximiliana “Anna” Martinez, who was a sister of Maria Martinez.   It is fully polished and painted with a water serpent (avanyu), encircling bowl.  The avanyu is delicately painted with cloud and rain motifs.  The bowl was fired was fired black and has near-gunmetal appearance.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Anna”.   Why is the work of Anna Martinez important? Interestingly, Maria would often say she was the best painter in the family.  She was married to Cresencio Martinez, who was known for his paintings and was also a brother to Tonita Roybal.  One can begin to see how her talent was easily fostered by those around her making a jar like this simply a classic!

Click here for more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 1,000.00
Martinez, Maria  –  Jar with Rain and Plant Designs “Marie + Santana”, 1940’s

This jar by Maria Martinez is one of her classic pieces.  It was made and polished by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana. It has a very highly polished surface. The design around the shoulder is a rain and plant pattern.  It is tightly painted while allowing the polished surface of the bowl to remain exposed.  The firing has given the bowl a nearly gunmetal appearance.   The rounded shoulder and sloping neck are an excellent example of Maria’s pottery from this time.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Marie + Santana”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic!  

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,000.00
Martinez, Maria – Jar with Avanyu (Maria Popovi 1069)

This is a short neck jar by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the jar while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The jar is highly polished and has the classic water serpent (avanyu) painted around the shoulder. This particular shape, with the round body and the short neck, is one which is easily one of Maria’s most famous forms.  The firing is nearly gunmetal in coloration with a very high shine.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi 1069“. The signature indicates that it was made around in October 1969.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 4,400.00
Naranjo, Madeline – Carved Jar with Avanyu (1970’s)

Madeline Naranjo (b. 1916) was known for her deep carved pottery.  This jar has a round body and an elongated neck. The body of the jar is fully carved with a water serpent.  Around the neck is a cloud pattern.  The jar is very deeply carved with a lot of variation to the design around the piece.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Madeline Naranjo” on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While Madeline no longer makes pottery, her work is certainly a classic and her legacy continues in the pottery of her granddaughter, Madeline E. Naranjo.

 

$ 475.00
Medina, Sofia & Lois Medina – Four Color Stoarge Jar with Birds & Rainbows

Sofia Medina and her daughter Lois Medina were known for a traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece was coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This is jar is striking in design and a very classic Zia shape with the high shoulder and slight neck.  The jar has two large sections with birds and very complex double rainbow band.  Separating each of the rainbow bands are small cloud designs.  The bird is surrounded by complex rain and flower designs.  The opposite sides have large birds with a single rainbow band and flower patterns.  Note how the rainbow bands are stone polished areas!  There are equally complex variations of fine-line and hatchtwork patterns.  Did you know that Zia potters use volcanic basalt as their temper for the clay, which gives these pieces their stability but also weight.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the side, “Sofia & Lois Medina”.

$ 2,800.00
White, Elizabeth – Large Red Jar with Bean Dance Figures (1970’s)

Elizabeth White created distinctive pottery using the various colors of Hopi clay. She originated the use of the ear of corn as a design in repousse (pushed out from the inside) on her pottery. Her pottery is all signed in the clay with her Hopi name Polingaysi, which means, “butterfly sitting among the flowers in the breeze”.  This jar is one of her classic narrow jars with two ears of corn.  The coloration of the clay is the traditional red clay (well, reddish-orange), which is used in Hopi pottery.  The coloration is striking on this larger jar.   The entire piece is stone polished in a vertical manner and the figures are matte.  There are two figures, which are taken from an Awatovi mural design.  They are part of the winter “Bean Ceremony” when they grow bean sprouts in the kivas. The figures are pushed out from the inside of the jar, not applique on top of the surface.  The jar is in good condition and a few rough area in the matte.  Interestingly, Polingaysi was a school teacher and taught at Hopi and  Navajo schools for almost 40 years.  On retirement from teaching, she became an artist, a poet, and a philosopher.  Her career as a potter was begun late in life, after her retirement, so there is very little of her work available.  This is certainly one of the largest pieces we have had of her work in the gallery.  The last photo is one of Elizabeth White working on this piece! Definitely check out the work of her nephew, Al Qoyawayma for comparison and the evolution of this style!

$ 5,500.00
Cain, Mary – Bowl with Cloud and Lightning Design (1990’s)

Mary Cain was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and a granddaughter of SaraFina Tafoya.  She was known for her classic style Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is carved with a cloud, lightning and wind pattern which encircles the piece.  There is always a fluidity to her designs as they ebb and flow around the piece.  The bowl is fired a dark black.  It is signed on the bottom, “Mary Cain”.    It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Incised Feathered Water Serpent Bowl (1971)

This is an exceptional and unique larger bowl by Joseph Lonewolf form 1971.   It is very highly polished and has the classic water serpent (avanyu) etched into the clay.  Note that it is the gray area which is etched and the polished area makes up the avanyu!  It still has a great polish so the design is difficult to see in the photos.  However, note that Joseph always used the feathered water serpent, which is different in style from the others used at Santa Clara Pueblo.  This bowl is also historically important relevant to the signature on the bottom, as it is actually before he began to number his pieces!  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Jospeh Lonewolf”.

$ 3,000.00
Naha, Helen “Feather Woman” – Awatovi Star Design Bowl (1978)

This smaller bowl by Helen Naha, also known as “Feather Woman”, has her iconic Awatovi Star design.  Helen created distinctive pottery using the white clay slip throughout her career.  The designs were all painted using bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law, Paqua Naha yet had her own style in form, imagery, and composition.  Helen is known for her revival of the pre-historic Awatovi pottery.   Awatovi is one of the ruins near Hopi where a white slipped style of pottery was made.  It is a fascinating place as it was where Coronado made contact with the Hopi in 1540.  During the excavations in the 1930’s the whiteware pottery was rediscovered.  It was the imagery from his work which inspired much of Helen’s early pottery, as opposed the more classic Sikyatki inspired pottery of Nampeyo.  This bowl has the “Awatovi Star” pattern painted on the top and the bottom.  The bowl has a larger opening and the entire interior is also fully polished!  Around the shoulder is an eternity band.  The bowl was traditionally fired and there is some variation to the color with the fired cloud, which certainly adds to the beauty of the piece.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom with her hallmark feather.  It was originally purchased in 1978.

$ 1,000.00
Naha, Sylvia – Large Bowl with Lizard and Shard Designs

This large bowl is an exceptionally intricate piece by Sylvia Naha.  She was a daughter of Helen “Featherwoman” Naha and a sister of Rainy and Burell Naha.  She was known for her distinctive pieces painted with intricate designs on a white polished clay surface.  Throughout the 1980’s, Sylvia was considered among the most innovative of the Hopi potters.  Her pieces were classic in form and amazingly intricate in design.  This bowl is a wide shape and half of the piece has a lizard and corn design.  The other side is a series of pottery “shard” with designs from her various pottery designs.  There are about 15 different designs including a bat wing, Awatovi star, lizard and turtle.  What is really amazing, however, is the amount of fine-line painting!  There are so many sections with small, fine lines and hatchwork patterns.  Those are so time involved to paint, but very dramatic in appearance!  The black on the painting is from Bee-Weed (a plant) and the red and other colors are natural clay slips.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The jar is signed on the bottom with a feather and an “S”.  It is certainly an extraordinary piece by his exceptional Hopi-Tewa potter!

$ 1,500.00
Gonzales, Rose – Red Carved Long Neck Jar

This carved jar is a classic vessel by San Ildefono potter Rose Gonzales.  She is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career, she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This jar is carved on the sides with lightning and rain patterns.  Rose was famous for her “cameo” style of carving with the use of negative space and rounded edges.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rose”.

$ 600.00
Laate, Jennie – Large Jar with Deer and Rosettes (1970’s)

Jennie Laate was among the most important revival potters at Zuni in the 1970’s.  This is one of the largest pieces of her pottery we have ever seen!  She usually made miniatures so something this large and complex is definitely unusual.  It is also striking in appearance.  The jar is large and round and just a slight neck.  The sides are painted with deer in their “houses” and separating them are large rosettes.  Around the neck are rainbird patterns, which are painted with fine lines.  All of these are design elements which are seen on classic Zuni vessels of the late 1800’s.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,000.00
Aguilar, Rosalie & Joe – Carved Red Jar with Rain Designs (1930’s)

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional pottery throughout their time working together.  In the 1930’s they began to make carved pottery.  This jar has a carve rain and lightning pattern separated by a negative space mountain design.  The jar is polished red and the background area is a matte red clay slip.  The style of the carving is known as “cameo carving”, which was typical at San Ildefonso in the 1930’s. The jar is in is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Rosalie + Joe” on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 600.00
Roybal, Tonita – Bowl with Geometric Rain Designs (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This smaller jar has her classic sharp shoulder and sloping neck.  The neck has a geometric rain and cloud pattern.  Note the small design with the three rows of rain. This particular design is one which she often used on her pottery.  Sometimes it was attached to the other designs, sometimes simply floating on the polished surface.  The bowl is highly polished and fired to a great gunmetal coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

$ 625.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Lone Wolf” Seedpot (2000)

This is extraordinary seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 2000.  The piece is one from the period when he began to create exceptionally detailed and realistic animals on his pottery surfaces.  The seedpot is entitled, “Lone Wolf” and it has the full body of the wolf etched into the clay.  Joseph said of this piece,

“Positioned in such a manner, somewhat a side view, yet frontal, against a dark background, brightened only by the magenta tones of the setting sun, it is easy to recognize the wolf’s heavy frame and long limbs.  Since he stands in clumps of dry-colored grasses, we are unable to see his forefeet or his back feet. Meticulously designed, the wolf’s fur is moderately long, thick and varies in color shades of white, gray, brown and black.  The open winged butterfly is symbolic of beauty.  Sketched in a side view manner is a full body designed buck, a big game food source for the wolf.  It is depicted in the Mimbres form. In front of the buck is a multi-color toned design depicting with several feathers the symbol of strength, and a badger print, symbolic of strength and good fortune.”  Joseph Lonewolf

The detail on the head of the wolf is exceptional. It is not just the eyes, but fur and the various levels of carving into the clay.  It’s hard to capture in the photos but even the tongue of the wolf is perfectly designed.  On the back are two “yearly” medallions on this piece, which signify 2000 and are symbolic for his mother (Agapita, a daisy) and father (Camilio, a sunflower).  The two symbols are reflective of their names in Tewa.  An interesting note about his piece is that was included as the image on his business cards for the year.  The piece includes one of these business cards along with the typed card with the information on the piece.  It is one of the more complicated and ornate realistic animal seedpot we have had by Joseph.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Needless to say, again, it is not just extraordinary but a great piece of history!

$ 4,400.00
White, Elizabeth – Red Clay Jar with Double Corn (1981)

Elizabeth White created distinctive pottery using the various colors of Hopi clay. She originated the use of the ear of corn as a design in repousse (pushed out from the inside) on her pottery. Her pottery is all signed in the clay with her Hopi name Polingaysi, which means, “butterfly sitting among the flowers in the breeze”.  This jar is one of her classic narrow jars with two ears of corn.  The coloration of the clay is the traditional red clay (well, reddish-orange), which is used in Hopi pottery.  The coloration is striking on this larger jar.   The entire piece is stone polished to a high shine except for the two ears of corn which are unpolished matte.  The narrow shape is very much like the jars that her nephew Al Qoyawayma makes which he calls “wish pots”.  He tells the story that the name comes from Elizabeth as she said people would look at the pieces and say, “I wish I could have one”.  This jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Interestingly, Polingaysi was a school teacher and taught at Hopi and  Navajo schools for almost 40 years.  On retirement from teaching, she became an artist, a poet, and a philosopher.  Her career as a potter was begun late in life, after her retirement, so there is very little of her work available.  This jar was originally purchased in 1981.  It is a classic of her work and an important addition to any collection!

$ 1,800.00
Da, Tony – Red Bowl with Avanyu (1971)

This is a classic smaller red bowl by Tony Da.  He had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike. This bowl was originally purchased in 1971.  It is fully polished a deep red and etched with the classic avanyu (water serpent).  Tony would etch the designs into the clay before the piece was fired so that there was a sharpness to the designs.  Note the precision of the horn and the clouds on this piece!   The avanyu is symbolic of the village being saved from a flood by the water serpent.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had, and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

$ 5,000.00
Gonzales, Rose – Polished Black Jar (1968)

This is a distinctive plainware jar San Ildefono potter Rose Gonzales.  She is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career, she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This jar is fully polished and fired black. There is a slight gunmetal coloration to the surface. The jar won a second place ribbon at the 1968 Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonials.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rose”.

$ 975.00
Martinez, Maria –  Bowl with Cloud and Lightning Designs (1920’s), “Marie”

This is a classic bowl by Maria Martinez from 1920-25.  It was made and polished by Maria Martinez and painted by her husband, Julian.  These early pieces are signed, “Marie”, although Julian was painting the designs.  It was not until around 1925 that they began to sign both names to the pottery.   This bowl has a slightly rounded shoulder and the design is painted in the area between the shoulder and the neck.  The pattern is a cloud and lightning design.  The bowl was highly fired to create a near gunmetal (metallic) appearance.  The gunmetal color achieved on these early pieces was from the heat of the firing.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie”.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 1,800.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Seedpot with Realistic Deer (1995)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is very intricately designed.  It would seem that it most likely was made, polished and the designs were begun by Camilio and then the designs were finished by his son, Joseph Lonewolf.  While it is signed by Camilio, it would suggest that the piece was already polished.  However, there are indicators that it was finished by Joseph, as he finished several of the pieces which Camilio had in process before he passed.  The deer are all very intricately etched and designed than on any of the piece finished by Camilio from 1990-5.  There is is a large buck with antlers extending over the top of the seedpot. On the opposite side there is another deer with smaller antlers and two does.  The deer are very intricately designed and they are much closer in style to those of Joseph.  As well, there is the number on the bottom, which is precision-etched, and the last letters are JL, which are probably Joseph’s initials as the end of the numbering system. The numbering system used by Camilio was typically much shorter and a bit more stylistic in design.  Overall, the piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Bowl with Grasshopper Medallions (1973)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This bowl is very thin walled and has an indented bottom.  It is fully polished red and etched with a single medallion. There is a Mimbres style grasshopper or cricket as the design.  Not the depth and precision of the matte area behind the insect!  There are rectangular green polished areas surrounding it, which represent the grass.  The use of the green clay slip in 1973 was quite new and a extraordinary addition to native clay colorations at the time.   The remainder of the bowl is fully polished red.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,800.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Feathered Water Serpent Seedpot (1990’s)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This seedpot is from the 1990’s.  It has the yearly symbol of a heart with a cross in it on the back.  On the front is the classic Feathered Water Serpent which was used by Joseph Lonewolf and his family.  Note the intricate detail in the head and the feathers.  There is an additional butterfly etched into the back of the piece.   The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,250.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Mini Seedpot with Flute Players (1986)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This is a very small seedpot and yet it is very fully designed!  The seedpot has two Mimbres style flute players as the design.  They are surrounded by plant and rain designs. There is a butterfly on the opposite side.  The heart medallion is the yearly symbol for 1986.  There is an additional green clay slip used to highlight the designs.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Baca, Angela – Large Melon Bowl with 32 Ribs

This is one of the largest pieces we have had by Angela Baca.  She was famous throughout her career for her melon ribbed pottery.  The form is derived from the melon and squash grown in the area and so there is always an organic style to the shape.  This piece is round and has 32 ribs carved into the clay. The entire surface of the bowl is fully polished, including the space between each of the ribs!.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Angela Baca” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,375.00
Torivio, Dorothy – Wide Jar with Yucca Leaf Design

This is a classically shaped jar by Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took traditional Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  The shape of the jar has a wide, sharp shoulder and a very tiny neck.  The design is a yucca leaf which extends from the neck to the shoulder and then to the base.  The open space of the white and the contrasting black give the jar a very modern appearance.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Dorothy Torivio” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 975.00
Medicine Flower, Grace & Camillio Tafoya – Red & Black Jar with Figures & Avanyu (1970’s)

This an unusual collaborative piece by Grace Medicine Flower and her father, Camilio Tafoya.  It is from the early 1970’s and it was fired “black-and-red”.  It is a distinctive firing technique where the piece is covered before the manure is put on to turn it black.  The jar was made by Camilio and polished by Grace. She would then etch the designs into the clay before it was fired.  This piece has a lightly etched avanyu on two sides.  Separating them are two red medallions.  One has a Mudhead Clown figure and the other a Rain Dancer.  There is a striking coloration of the red against the black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicne Flower and Camilio Tafoya”.   The jar is in excellent with no chips,cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00
Tafoya, Camilio –  Black & Red Jar with Feathers (1972)

This bowl by Camilio Tafoya is from 1972.  It is fully polished and the design around the shoulder is a stylized feather pattern.  The piece was then fired black-and-red.  This distinctive coloration is one that was only used by Camilio and his children Joseph Lonewolf and Grace Medicine Flower.  It was achieved during the firing, although nobody has been able to replicate the process.  Note the coloration and technique is different from the black-and-sienna colorations on pottery by artists such as Tony Da.  The contrast of the black and red is very striking on this piece.  It is signed on the bottom “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 350.00
Suina, Auerlia Montoya – Storyteller with 8 Children  (1974)

Aurelia Suina (1912-1997) was a daughter of Ioalido Montoya and Victoria Quintana.  She began making pottery in the 1960’s and is known for her storyteller and classic Cochiti pottery.  Her work can be found in the Peabody Museum at Harvard University and the Laboratory of Anthropology of the Museum of New Mexico.  While less prolific than many of the other potters of her time, the work is all traditionally built and painted with native clay slips and wild spinach (black). This storyteller was originally purchased in1974.  It is a traditional style of figure and there are eight children.  Each of the children is in a different position, giving the piece a charming appearance.  Note as well the painting of the squash blossom necklace and the belt.  The figure is signed on the bottom, “Auerlia Suina”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00
Cordero, Helen – Grandfather Storyteller with 12 Kids

Helen Cordero is undoubtedly one of the great names in Cochiti pottery.  It was in 1964 that Cordero said she made her first storyteller.  According to her, “I made some more of my Storytellers with lots of children climbing on him to listen, then I took them up to the Santo Domingo Feast Day” and the rest is history.  Her pieces were all males, to honor her grandfather, whom she would hear telling children stories of Pueblo life and culture.  She received the New Mexico Governor’s award in 1982 and the NEA Heritage Fellowship in 1986.  This storyeller is one of her pieces from the 1970’s.  It is complex in terms of its painting and figurative work.  There are twelve children all around the figure. Each one is dressed differently and they are very interactive with one another.  Note the details on the larger figure, including the sash on the side and the squash blossom necklace!  The piece is signed  on the bottom, “Helen Cordero”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is not often that we see one of her storytellers with so many children and with such intricate designs.  Definitely a classic!

$ 9,800.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Jar with Feather Pattern and Band Design

This polychrome jar by Blue Corn combines her polished and mica clay slips.  The jar is fully polished tan and then painted with a black clay, a red clay and a micaceous clay band below the shoulder.  The jar was traditionally fired and maybe a bit overfired, as the black areas are lighter in areas and a smoke area can be seen below the shoulder.  The feather pattern is tightly painted and the jar is still striking in appearance and reflect the traditional firing techniques.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.

$ 800.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Jar with Feather Pattern

This is striking polychrome jar by Blue Corn.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This water jar is fully polished tan and then it is painted.  The black is a black clay and the is an additional clay slip.  The jar  has a feather pattern painted along the neck.  Blue Corn used a green clay slip at the tips of the feathers and in the cloud design above.  Interestingly, the body of the jar is all one coloration but as it was traditionally fired outside, the area above the shoulder appears to be a lighter coloration than the base, adding one more visually striking dimension to this piece.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There is one small area of black slip loss and a small air bubble along one feather.  Both can be seen in the same photo.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.

$ 1,200.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Jar with Feather Pattern (1976)

This is a classic polychrome jar by Blue Corn.  It was originally purchased in 1976.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This water jar is fully polished tan and then it is painted.  The black is a black clay and there is an additional red or peach colored clay slip.  The jar has a feather pattern painted along the shoulder and neck.  Around the rim of the jar is a checkerboard pattern.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There are some small areas where the black is lighter.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.

$ 950.00
Gachupin, Candelaria – Jar with Birds (1976)

Candelaria Gachupin was a granddaughter of noted potter Rosalea Toribio and the daughter of Maria Bridgett. She taught both her daughter Dora Tse-Pe and son-in-law Ralph Aragon to make pottery.  This jar was originally purchased in 1976.   Candelaria was known for her stylized birds, which have long legs and are a visual “signature” to her pottery.  This jar has three sections of birds with plants, separated by a polished red lightning band.  Around the neck is a could pattern.  We do not often see a lot of her pottery but there is certainly a striking appearance to her designs. This jar is signed on the side, “Candelaria Gachupin, Zia Pueblo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the side, “Sofia & Lois Medina”.

$ 450.00
Aguilar, Rosalie -Bowl with  Cloud and Rain Designs

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional plates during their brief career working together.  This is one of their carved pieces. It has the “cameo” style of carving which was typical at San Ildefonso in the 1930’s.  The design is carved around the neck of the piece.  It is a cloud and rain design.  The remainder of the bowl is fully polished.  It was fired a dark black but with additional small gunmetal colored areas from the firing..  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Rosalie + Joe” on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 475.00
Chino, Rose – Jar with 16 Heartline Deer (1971)

Rose Chino was a daughter of noted potter Marie Z. Chino. This jar is a classic Acoma shape with a high shoulder and short neck.  It is painted with two rows of heartline deer.  There are eight deer in each row.  They are painted with bee-weed (black) and the heartline is a red clay slip. The jar was traditionally fired.  It received a third prize at the 1971 Gallup Intertribal Ceremonials.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Rose Chino”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a few small areas of spalling, which is typical for pieces from this period.

$ 850.00
Naha, Helen “Feather Woman – Wide Jar with Bat Wing Design (1970’s)

Helen Naha created distinctive pottery using the white kaolin clay slip throughout her career.  The designs were all painted using bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law, Paqua Naha yet had her own style in form, imagery, and composition. This jar has a wide shoulder and a slight neck.  It is a shape which Helen frequently used on her pottery. The sides are painted with a batwing design which extends down below the shoulder.  Helen would often make the mouth of the vessel large enough so she could get her hand in to polished the inside. The interior of this jar is fully polished.  The bottom has her hallmark “feather”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 975.00
Naha, Helen “Feather Woman – Bowl with Cloud Designs (1978)

Helen Naha created distinctive pottery using the white kaolin clay slip throughout her career.  The designs were all painted using bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law, Paqua Naha yet had her own style in form, imagery, and composition. This bowl was originally purchased in 1978.  It is painted with a cloud pattern around the body of the piece.  Above the clouds and rain is a red clay slip and below are additional colors.  There is a separate band of “stippled” black, which adds another “color” to the bowl.  As with much of Helen’s pottery, the inside is fully polished.  She would try to make the mouth of the vessel large enough so she could get her hand inside to polished the inside.  The bottom has her hallmark “feather”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 625.00
Juan, Mary – Jar with Wind Designs (1960’s)

Mary Juan was a cousin of noted potter Ida Redbird. She was one of the original members of the 1938 Maricopa Pottery Cooperative. She was part of the early Revival Period artists from 1937-41. She continued to create pottery until the 1960’s. Mary Juan was known for the finely polished deep red slip, graceful shapes, and finely painted designs.  This jar has a wind motif painted around the sides.  There is her signature “wave” pattern around the neck and the jar has a slightly turned out neck. This piece is traditionally handcrafted from native clay with the paddle and anvil method, iron oxide red slip is decorated with black mesquite sap paint and pit fired.  This jar is signed on the bottom, “Mary Juan”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 250.00
Sunn, Mabel – Bowl with Indented Sides (1970’s)

This is a classic bowl by Mabel Sunn from the 1970’s. The piece is made using an paddle-and-anvil technique and twice fired.  The black designs are derived from a mixture of mesquite sap and cactus spines.  Today, there are very few Maricopa artists making pottery.  This bowl has 7 indentions on the sides.  There is a black sap painted sun separating the mountains or mesas. It is a wonderful combination of form and design.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘M. Sunn”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 275.00
Redbird, Ida – Bowl with Indented Sides (1960’s)

Ida Redbird is one of the best known of the potters involved in the revival of Maricopa pottery from 1937-40. She was featured in Arizona Highways in 1948. Her pottery is made using a paddle-and-anvil technique and they are twice fired.  The black designs are derived from a mixture of mesquite sap and cactus spines.  This bowl has indented sides to create an undulating appearance.  There is a sun and cloud design on each of the four sides.    It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Ida Redbird” on the bottom.

$ 350.00
Gutierrez, Helen – Red Bowl with Feather Design (1986)

Helen Gutierrez (1935-1993) was a daughter of Isabel Atencio, a sister of Gilbert Atencio and the mother of Geraldine, Carol, and Rose Gutierrez. She was known for her traditional San Ildefonso pottery.  This bowl is highly polished red.  It is painted with a buff colored clay to create the feather pattern which encircles the piece.  The bowl was traditionally fired red.  The design and style are classic for San Ildefonso.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 425.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Large Carved Bowl Feather Design (1960’s)

This is is a large and classic bowl by Camilio “Sunflower” Tafoya.  He was the father of Grace Medicine Flower and Joseph Lonewolf and the brother of Margaret Tafoya.  While he is known for his miniatures this one of his larger carved bowls from the 1960’s.  The bowl is fully polished and carved with a feather pattern.  The spectacular part of this bowl is the coloration from the firing. It ranges from dark black to areas with brown and even a section that is almost silver in appearance. That coloration is very reminiscent of the firings by his mother, Sara Fina Tafoya.  The brown seems to make it’s own designs as it flows with the black and it certainly creates a much stronger and more fascinating bowl.  It is not often we see his larger carved vessels and rarely with such a great polish and surface.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are some light surface scratches.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,000.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Mimbres Cricket” Seedpot (1997)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1997.  The piece is entitled, “Mimbres Cricket”.  It includes a signed version of the card which Joseph made for each of his miniatures.  This piece was actually made for our show at the gallery with Joseph and Grace Medicine Flower in 1998.   Joseph wrote partially of this piece:

“Portrayed from a side view is a cricket representative of the Mimbres Period – 10th to 14th centuries.  The cricket – an insect related to the locust and grasshopper, but usually having long antennae – appears to be leaping in mid-air.  Beneath the Mimbres cricket is highly polished red slipwork (Mother Earth) which encompasses the extreme front, partial sides, back side and a portion of the top.”

The butterfly is symbolic of beauty and the the interlocking rings medallion represents the attachment between friends and was the yearly symbol for 1997.  Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  The piece is signed on the bottom and includes the signed artist card.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Anasazi Potter & Butterflies” Seedpot

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from around 2000.  The piece is one of his few black fired pieces.  It is fully eteched with a potter working on painting a piece of pottery.  They are surrounded by several other pieces of finished pottery.  Above the figure are butterflies.  Each butterfly is detailed and has various clay-colored slips.  There is a small butterfly etched into the black along with the yearly symbol.  It is a more complex design, both in the figure and as well as the colors.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,800.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Mini Seedpot Eagle Feather Pattern (1975)

This miniature seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is from 1975. It is etched with a feather pattern around the neck. The area below the design is fully polished red.  It is signed on the bottom “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Seedpot with Trout, Otter & Skunk (1995)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is from 1995. It is the last series of pieces he made.  It was fully polished and etched with an otter, trout, and skunk.  There is a simplicity and playfulness to the designs.  The various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  It is signed on the bottom “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00
Vigil, Albert & Josephine – Large Jar with Avanyu (1960’s)

Albert and Josephine Vigil worked together on their pottery. Albert Vigil (1927-2009) was the son of painter Romando Vigil, one of the members of the San Ildefonso School of watercolor artists.  He as also a nephew of Maria Martinez. His wife was Josephine Cordova Vigil (1927-2001) from Taos Pueblo. She moved to San Ildefonso when she married Albert. Josephine learned pottery making by watching her aunts-in-law Maria Martinez and Clara Montoya. Maria taught her how to shape the clay and Clara taught her how to polish.  They began making pottery in 1945.  This is a larger piece of their pottery with a wide shoulder and a sloping neck.  The jar is painted with a water serpent which encircles the piece.  It is a complex design and note the clouds around the rim of the bowl.  The bottom of the bowl is also painted with a feather pattern.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Albert + Josephine”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 975.00
Da, Tony – Bowl with Feather Design and Turquoise (1972-3)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike. This bowl is from 1972-3.  It is fully polished red and the design is etched into the clay after firing.  This bowl has two series of eagle feathers etched into the clay.  It was Tony’s modernistic interpretation of the classic feather pattern seen on Maria’s pottery.  Connecting the two sections of the feather there is a triangular design and a single inset piece of turquoise on each side.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

$ 8,000.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Jar with Avanyu (1971)

Joseph Lonewolf began making pottery in 1970-1.  This is a very early piece of his pottery.  It is a more classic shape with a wide shoulder which slopes upward.  The bottom half of the piece is fully polished. The top is etched with a water serpent (avanyu) with a feather pattern, which is the style used by him and his family.  The matte background area is deeply etched swirls up from the shoulder and over the rim.  It must have been exciting in 1971 to see work that was so new and unique at the time!  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,200.00
Torivio, Dorothy – Tall Jar with Butterfly Designs

This is a distinctive shape jar by Acoma potter Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  This shape creates a large surface area for the butterfly designs.  The neck is painted the traditional red coloration, while the remainder is black on white.  The jar captures her “op-art” style with increasing and diminishing sizes of butterfly designs.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,500.00
Romero, Teresita – Jar with Lightning and Cloud Designs (1960’s)

Teresita Romero is one of the great names in the revival of Cochiti pottery in the 1950-60 era.  She was the grandmother or noted potter Diego Romero and painter Mateo Romero.  Throughout her career she was known for her large vessels and use of traditional iconography in her work.  This jar is a complex piece of her pottery.  The jar has a round body and a slightly turned out neck.  The jar is painted with two bands of designs.  The top band is a cloud motif and the bottom is a lightning and water design.   The black areas are painted with wild spinach and the red with clay slips.  The red clay she used was distinctive for her pottery and had an orangish-red coloration.  The jar is signed on the bottom “Teresita Romero”.   The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 700.00
Naranjo, Christina – 13″ Tall Jar with Carved Avanyu (1970’s)

Christina Naranjo was a daughter of SaraFina Tafoya and a sister of Margaret Tafoya and Camilio Tafoya.  She was known for her classic style carved Santa Clara pottery.  This is definitely the largest piece of her pottery we have had in the gallery.  It is a tall water jar with a long neck.  Around the body of the piece, it is fully carved with a water serpent (avanyu), as the design.  The avanyu encircles the jar in a band of design but note the exceptional complexity of the imagery.  The area clouds and rain and lightning in the pattern and they utilize the normal band but also the negative space.  The long neck is also fully polished.  The style of her carving is certainly significantly different than that of her sister, Margaret Tafoya.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Christina Naranjo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Christina has a wonderful legacy in the work of her daughters Mary Cain and Teresita Naranjo, as well as her great-granddaughters Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.

$ 2,800.00
Shupla, Helen – Sienna Melon Jar with 15 Ribs (1980’s)

Helen Shupla is certainly most famous for her exceptional melon jars.  Her melon jars are the very traditional form with the ribs pushed out in the clay.  This melon jar is one of her classic shapes with the round body and the slight neck.  The neck was a later development in her pottery forms.  Each of the 15 ribs are pushed out into the clay.  She would do this by placing her fingers inside the bowl and pushing against the clay from both the inside and outside!  Can you see the slight angle to each section?  This is how she would turn her hand as she was pushing against the clay to create the separate ribs!  The entire piece is fully polished and fired black and then fired a second time to make it sienna!  This is one of the most difficult techniques to create, but also one of the most striking. The desired coloration is nearly a carmel color and this jar has that amazing coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 3,800.00
Da, Tony – Turtle with Bear Lid (1975-6)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.   While Tony made turtle shapes for his figurative pottery, he only made only a few turtles with lids.  This turtle is one of his with a fully polished bear lid.  The body of the turtle is fully polished and etched with a water serpent.  For the inside of the turtle when the lid is removed, there is a silver inset.  This was meant to encompass the open space created when he made the round body.  This turtle is signed on the foot in the clay, “DA”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Tony made several types of turtles. His first ones were simple and did not have a lid.  His first lidded turtle was a black one made in 1971.  It is now in a museum collection.  He made 3 or 4 red turtles with bear lids and silver insets between 1972-4.  He made two other major lidded turtles during his career.  One had a turtle lid and the other a lizard lid.  The turtle with the lizard lid was probably his last turtle figure, as it has the most sculptural appearance and detail of any of his other lids.  At this time, we do not know of any other black lidded turtles beyond the one made in 1971.

This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had, and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

Mobile version: Enabled