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King Galleries is pleased to have a variety of Pueblo and Tribal pottery from the 1920's to the present. We have created this "Signed Historic Pottery"  to identify work by those potters who were early innovators in the 1920's and began to sign their work. It also is used for any artists who have passed away, making their art part of the historical record. The history of Pueblo pottery during this period is one of an exciting change as it has evolved from utilitarian ware to folk art to the fine art of today. We hope you enjoy these amazing pieces!

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Da, Tony – Turtle with Bear Lid (1975-6)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.   While Tony made turtle shapes for his figurative pottery, he only made only a few turtles with lids.  This turtle is one of his with a fully polished bear lid.  The body of the turtle is fully polished and etched with a water serpent.  For the inside of the turtle when the lid is removed, there is a silver inset.  This was meant to encompass the open space created when he made the round body.  This turtle is signed on the foot in the clay, “DA”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Tony made several types of turtles. His first ones were simple and did not have a lid.  His first lidded turtle was a black one made in 1971.  It is now in a museum collection.  He made 3 or 4 red turtles with bear lids and silver insets between 1972-4.  He made two other major lidded turtles during his career.  One had a turtle lid and the other a lizard lid.  The turtle with the lizard lid was probably his last turtle figure, as it has the most sculptural appearance and detail of any of his other lids.  At this time, we do not know of any other black lidded turtles beyond the one made in 1971.

This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had, and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

Da, Tony – Black and Sienna Turtle with Turquoise (1968)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  Tony began making turtles as early as his first show in 1967 at Gallup Ceremonials.  As they evolved they became more sculptural in form.  This turtle is a very early one which is fired a gunmetal black and the has sienna around the top of the back. the feet and the head.  The back has a single inset piece of turquoise and inset turquoise for the eyes.  The back of the turtle, where it is polished is fired to a gunmetal appearance. There is a halo of black, and then the sienna at the point of inset of the turquoise. This is typical of Tony’s black and sienna pottery.  The turtle was originally made as a pendant, which can be seen on the underside of the piece.  On the bottom of the turtle there is an original number from the collection of Dick Howard.  The turtle is signed on it’s foot, “Da”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  I’ve never seen another piece of his like this, and it is certainly a unique part of his pottery history!

Roybal, Tonita – Black-on-Red Bowl with Mountain & Cloud Designs (1932)

It is very rare that we come across a black-on-red piece by Tonita Roybal.  This bowl is a piece from 1932.  Tonita and her mother, Dominguita Pino, were both very well known for their black-on-red pottery before the advent of the black-on-black pottery in 1920.  This bowl has beautifully painted designs in the band around the shoulder.  There are mountain, cloud and rain patterns.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. This bowl has exceptional provenance.  It was part of the original collection of Dick Howard and featured in the booklet published on her pottery.  It also has the original Indian Market sticker for 1932!  Amazing!  This is definitely a piece of history, as much as piece of art!

$ 5,500.00
Da, Tony – Red Clay Bear with Turquoise (1970-1)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  Tony began making bears as early as his first show in 1967 at Gallup Ceremonials.  As they evolved they became more sculptural in form.  This bear is an earlier one from around 1970-71.  The bear is fully polished and fired red.   The heartline and the inside of the legs is matte. There are two pieces of turquoise on the back and two for the eyes.  The bear has an incised heartline which is symbolic of the strength of the bear.  The bear is signed on the back foot in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Da, Tony – Red Clay Bear with Arrowhead (1969)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  Tony began making bears as early as his first show in 1967 at Gallup Ceremonials.  As they evolved they became more sculptural in form.  This bear is an earlier one from around 1969 which is fully polished red.  The hei-shi beads are from Santo Domingo Pueblo and are shell.  The arrowhead on the back Tony would find or acquire at the right length to match the scale of the bear.  There are turquoise eyes as well.   The bear has an incised heartline which is symbolic of the strength of the bear.  The bear is signed on the back foot in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Tse-Pe & Dora – Black & Sienna Jar with Avanyu (1975)

Tse-Pe Gonzales and his wife, Dora, began working together around 1971.  Dora would make the pottery and Tse-Pe would etch the designs. This jar is an exceptional piece of their pottery.  The jar has a round shoulder which comes to a sharp edge and then up to an elongated neck.  The rim is two-tone black and sienna.  The jar itself is fired to striking gunmetal coloration. The avanyu is etched into the clay around the shoulder and there is a single inset of turquoise for the eye.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Tse-Pe and Dora”.    It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Tse-Pe and Dora worked individually from the 1980-2000, but their early collaborative work remains innovative, creative and of the highest quality even compared to many of today’s potters.

$ 1,500.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Plate with Cloud Designs

This small plate is intricately designed by Blue Corn.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This plate has a cloud and lightning design painted with a green slip and a prayer feather and rain pattern in brown clay.  It is on a white stone polished surface.  While the plate is small, the design is complex.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Blue Corn”.  The bowl is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Carved Bowl with Avanyu

This small bowl is deeply carved by Blue Corn.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This bowl is carved with an avanyu encircling the piece.  The bowl is fully polished a white coloration and then painted with a black mineral slip.  The background is a slipped with a brown clay.  It was traditionally fired.  It is not often we see her carved work on such a small piece in various color.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.  The bowl is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. “.

$ 600.00
Martinez, Maria – Gunmetal Short Neck Jar “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

In the 1950’s Maria Martinez created a series of pieces which were simply stone polished with no design.  As she primarily made the pottery and polished it this was fitting with the other pieces of her career.  This jar is striking in both shape and polish.  It has a wide shoulder with a sharp ridge and a short neck.  It is a form which is readily recognizable as her style.  The jar is fully polished and fired to a gunmetal appearance. The jar was probably fired by her son, Popovi, as the gunmetal encompasses nearly the entire surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay,  “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

https://kinggalleries.com/maria-martinez-signatures/

 

$ 4,800.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Kiva Bowl with Figures (1974)

This is a larger and unusual shaped bowl by Camilio Tafoya.  The shape has two kiva step terraces on each side.  They each have a medallion in the center etched with a human figure.  The sides are etched with a sash design with feathers on the end. The bowl is polished on the outside.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Camilio was a brother to Margaret Tafoya and the father of Joseph Lonewolf and Grace Medicine Flower.

$ 800.00
Sunn, Mabel – Red Wedding Vase with Scorpions (1970’s)

This is a classic wedding vase by Mabel Sunn from the 1970’s. The piece is made using an paddle-and-anvil technique and twice fired.  The black designs are derived from a mixture of mesquite sap and cactus spines.  Today, there are very few Maricopa artists making pottery.  This vase is unusual for the design of the scorpion on both sides.  However, it is wonderfully painted and design which is distinctive to her pottery.  The wedding vase is signed, “M. Sunn” on the bottom.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 350.00
Martinez, Maria  –  Jar with Cloud and Rain Designs “Marie + Santana”

This jar by Maria Martinez is one of her classic pieces.  It was made by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana. It has a very highly polished surface. The design around the rim is a cloud pattern, while the design around the neck of the jar is a thinly painted rain, lightning, and cloud pattern.  Note on this piece how the design is painted so that large areas of polished surface remain revealed.  The sharp shoulder and sloping neck are an excellent example of Maria’s pottery from this time.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Marie + Santana”.  It is in very condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic!  

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,500.00
Martinez, Maria – Feather Bowl “Maria Popovi 168”

This is a classic bowl by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the bowl while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The jar is highly polished and has a feather pattern around the shoulder. The bowl is very highly polished and the bowl is fired a dark black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi 168“. The signature indicates that it was made around in January, 1968.   The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,200.00
Martinez, Maria   – Gunmetal Fired Bowl “Maria Popovi 669”

This gunmetal fired bowl is a striking piece by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the bowl and it was fired by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). Popovi focused on both the painted surfaces of the pottery as well as the firings.  This bowl is a true gunmetal with very strong metallic appearance across most of the surface.  There is even a slight hint of “goldtone” color.  Interestingly, note the photo of the top of the bowl, and you can see from some of the coloration that it was fired upside down!   It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria / Popovi 669”.  The firing date is when the pottery was made, so this bowl was from June, 1969. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Great gunmetal fired pieces by Maria and Popovi with such high polished surface are always stunning and a great addition to any collection!  The very last photo consists of two pieces by Maria and Popovi Da.  The one on the left is a black fired bowl and the other is this piece, which is gunmetal.  I thought it would be helpful to see the difference in coloration.

$ 2,400.00
Martinez, Maria – Water Jar with Gourd Indentions (1920’s)

This is certainly one of the most unique jars we have had by Maria Martinez.  The jar is from the 1920’s and it was made by Maria Martinez and her husband, Julian.  It is the actual form, with the indented sections around the shoulder, which is so unusual!  Maria is known for her traditional shapes and highly polished surfaces.  In the 1920’s, this long neck style of jar was one of her most classic forms.  The last image in this post shows her working on a jar with indented sides!  It is not a style which she made after the 1920’s and this is one of the first I have seen in person.  However, each indention is fully polished, as is the entire jar. The neck was painted by Julian and there is a cloud pattern and a turned out neck.  The jar was traditionally fired and has a nearly gunmetal appearance.  It is a creative piece of her pottery and an extraordinary part of the history of her pottery.  The jar is signed, “Marie” in the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are few small surface scratches, but nothing unexpected with the age of the jar.  It is not just exciting but an honor to have such a historically important jar come back into the gallery!

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 4,200.00
Martinez, Maxamiliana “Anna” – Jar with Avanyu (1920’s)

This is one of the more complex painted jar we have had by Maximiliana “Anna” Martinez, who was a sister of Maria Martinez.   It is fully polished and painted with a water seprent (avanyu), encircling the jar. It is the complexity of the avanyu which makes the piece so distinctive.  Note the fine lines and the clouds above the avanyu.  The jar was fired black and has near-gunmetal appearance.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Anna”.   Why is the work of Anna Martinez important? Interestingly, Maria would often say she was the best painter in the family.  She was married to Cresencio Martinez, who was known for his paintings and was also a brother to Tonita Roybal.  One can begin to see how her talent was easily fostered by those around her making a jar like this simply a classic!

Click here for more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 1,800.00
Roybal, Tonita – Gunmetal Jar with Plant Designs (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This smaller jar has her classic sharp shoulder.  The neck has a painted plant design which encircles the piece.  The jar is highly polished and fired to a great gunmetal coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  A  note on the provenance: The small sticker on the bottom denotes that it was from the collection of Dick Howard, as that was his early numbering system.

 

 

 

 

 

 

$ 600.00
Martinez, Maria – Large Bowl with Feather Pattern (1920’s), “Marie”

It is not often that we come across a large bowl by Maria Martinez in such great condition.  This bowl is from 1920-25 and it was made and polished by Maria Martinez and painted by her husband, Julian.  These early pieces are signed, “Marie”, although Julian was painting the designs.  It was not until around 1925 that they began to sign both names to the pottery.   This bowl has a wide mouth and the painting is on the side around the shoulder.  The design is a very early style of the eagle feather pattern. Note at the top of the feather, the rectangular black matte area, which is in the center of the feather.  As time progress, that moved to one side so that it was easier to paint, as it took more time to paint it in the center of the feather.  However, the result is always visually striking with the older style. This bowl is highly polished and fired with near-gunmetal areas on the surface. The gunmetal color achieved on these early pieces was from the heat of the firing.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie”.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

 

$ 8,500.00
Martinez, Maria – Gunmetal Plainware Bowl “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

In the 1950’s Maria Martinez created a series of pieces which were simply stone polished with no design.  As she primarily made the pottery and polished it this was fitting with the other pieces of her career.  This tall bowl is fully polished and fired to a near gunmetal appearance.  The gunmetal shine was achieved by the heat of the firing.  The bowl is signed in the clay, “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,400.00
Trammel, Jennie –  Red & Tan Canteen with Bear Paw & Avanyu (1980’s)

This is a very unusual canteen by Jennie Trammel.  Over the years we have had several of her canteens which were made in this same style with the flat base and designs on both sides.  This canteen has a carved bear paw on one side.  The unusual part of this canteen is the opposite side, which has carved avanyu with a center medallion in tan.  The carving around the avanyu is very deep, as are the bands around the bear paw.  I looked back and in over 20 years, I’ve never had a piece by her with tan polished designs.  The red is a clay slip while the tan is achieved by using water to create the coloration of the clay.   The carving is very deep and the piece is a very deep red.  The background area is matte and the traditional creame colored clay slip. The canteen is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Jennie Trammel” in the clay on bottom.   Definitely one of her classics!

$ 3,400.00
Tafoya, Shirley – Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1980)

Shirley Tafoya was the youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her miniature pottery.  This bowl is from 1980.  It is very deeply carved with a water serpent encircling the piece.  The entire surface is fully polished.  Shirley etched the eye and the mouth of the avanyu.  The water serpent is a classic Santa Clara design telling the story of how the avanyu saved the village from a flood.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya”. A classic of Tafoya Family pottery!

$ 1,000.00
Trammel, Jennie –  Tall Jar with Sun and Cloud Design (1980’s)

Stunning!  This is an exceptional jar by Jennie Trammel.   She was a daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  Over the years Jennie did not make a lot of pottery as she lived a very private life and was virtually never involved in markets or gallery shows.  However, she created striking pottery with classic shapes and designs which were distinctive to her work.  Each piece was coil built and it was the carving, with the rounded edges, which was a visual key to her work.  This tall jar has a low shoulder, which gives it lots of space for design.  The central areas is fully carved with three rising sun designs.  They are separated by three cloud motifs descending downward.  Jennie continues to fascinate with her designs, as they are images that few other Santa Clara potters use in their work.  As well, as on this piece, her choice to use three designs instead of four, is more difficult and unusual.  The carving is very deep and the piece is a very deep red.  The background area is matte and the traditional creame colored clay slip. The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a couple of areas of slip loss on the edge of some of the carving, which might have happened at the time of firing and are not unusual in her larger pottery.  The jar is signed, “Jennie Trammel” in the clay on bottom.   Definitely one of her classics!

$ 4,000.00
Tafoya, Margaret & Shirley Tafoya – Bowl with Kiva Step Design (BOF . 113)

Shirley Tafoya was the youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya. They each created distinctive styles of carved pottery.  This is one of the only pieces Margaret made with her daughter, Shirley.  Shirley told me when I was writing “Born of Fire” that Margaret had made the bowl and she asked Shirley to carve a kiva step design into the clay.  Shirley then polished the bowl.  The bowl is highly polished and traditionally fired.  The kiva steps were a significant choice:

“The kiva step pattern is a classic design see on much of Margaret Tafoya’s pottery. That particular design has three steps, representing the kiva where religious ceremonies take place on the Pueblo. From the kitchen window of Margaret’s house, their clan kiva could also be seen while they worked.  Again, the tradition of form and design, of passing on knowledge to the next generation, were all a daily presence in Margaret’s pottery and life”.  Born of Fire, p. 100

This bowl is from the 1980’s and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya, Margaret Tafoya”.  It is an amazing piece of history, culture and Pueblo tradition!  The last photos are one from the book, Born of Fire along with a photo of Margaret and Shirley Tafoya.

$ 3,400.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Wide Jar with Cloud and Step Designs (1970’s) (BOF p. 107)

This is a striking fully polished water jar by Margaret Tafoya. It is from the 1960’s.  It is an elegant shape with a long neck and a “double shoulder”.  The double shoulder was also called a “rainbow ridge” by Margaret and her mother, Sarafina Tafoya. It adds to the difficulty of a piece as the second ridge requires the potters to create a rise from the shoulder to a second shoulder to the neck.  The jar is stone polished all at one time and then fired to a deep black.  It is from the 1960’s and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  This shape and size is definitely a classic of her work!

“She [Margaret Tafoya] made water jars sitting outside the adobe house, and they would never crack on her.  There’s a rainbow band on the shoulder. She would sit on the floor with her legs straight out and make the pots that way. Today we stand up and make our pots.”  LuAnn Tafoya and Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

$ 8,800.00
Naranjo, Christna – 13″ Tall Jar with Carved Avanyu (1970’s)

Christina Naranjo was a daughter of SaraFina Tafoya and a sister of Margaret Tafoya and Camilio Tafoya.  She was known for her classic style carved Santa Clara pottery.  This is definitely the largest piece of her pottery we have had in the gallery.  It is a tall water jar with a long neck.  Around the body of the piece, it is fully carved with a water serpent (avanyu), as the design.  The avanyu encircles the jar in a band of design but note the exceptional complexity of the imagery.  The area clouds and rain and lightning in the pattern and they utilize the normal band but also the negative space.  The long neck is also fully polished.  The style of her carving is certainly significantly different than that of her sister, Margaret Tafoya.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Christina Naranjo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Christina has a wonderful legacy in the work of her daughters Mary Cain and Teresita Naranjo, as well as her great-granddaughters Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.

$ 2,800.00
Naranjo, Christina & Teresita Naranjo – Jar with Carved Avanyu (1960’s))

This is a striking but unusual collaborative piece by Christina Naranjo and her daughter, Teresita Naranjo.  The jar was made by Christina and is one of her classic round shapes with the slight neck.  It was carved by Teresita with a very deep style of carving.  The jar has a water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece. Note that there is Teresita’s signature style of negative space carving with the clouds descending from the rim.  The carving on the horn of the avanyu is especially deep, crips and very thin!  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There are some minor scratches on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita + Christina”.  It is interesting that in over 20 years, I have had several pieces which were signed by both Christina and Mary Cain (another daughter) but this is the first one I have had by Christina and Teresita.  It’s nice to see in a collaborative piece that their individuality in shape (Christina) and carving (Terestia) are so distinctive.  Christina Naranjo was a sister of Margaret Tafoya and Camilio Tafoya, as well as the matriarch of the family of potters including Teresita Naranjo and Tammy Garcia.

$ 1,400.00
Cain, Mary – Red Long Neck Jar with Avanyu (1980’s)

Mary Cain was known for her classic style Santa Clara pottery.  A daughter of Christina Naranjo, she was a matriarch of a family of classic style pottery.  This jar has along neck and it is deeply carved with an avanyu which encircles the piece.  As the jar is turned there are cloud and water motifs.  It is highly polished and the background has the traditional cream colored clay slip. It is signed on the bottom, “Mary Cain”.    It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 800.00
Garcia, Jessie – Jar with Plant Designs (1980’s)

Jessie Garcia is one of the great names in Acoma pottery.  Between 1950 and 1970, she along with Lucy Lewis and Marie Z. Chino, led the revival of Acoma pottery.  This jar is a classic Acoma shape with the high shoulder and slight neck. The jar is fully painted with a plant and lightning design.  Note how the plant leaves interconnect across the entire surface!  The jar is painted with bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired.  It is signed on the bottom, “Jessie Garcia” It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

 

$ 675.00
Concho, Lolita – Large Double Spout Jar (1970’s)

Lolita Concho was among those potters helping to revive historic Acoma pottery designs and forms in the 1970’s.  This jar is from the 1970’s.  It is a unique shape with two spouts. The designs are a variation of lighting and rain designs.  There is a striking flow of design on both sides.  Note as well the painting on the side with additional cloud swirls.  It is an exceptional piece in size and design.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “L. Concho”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 800.00
Garcia, Sarah – Bowl with Lightning Designs (1970’s)

Sarah Garcia (1928-2015) was born at Laguna Pueblo to Maria Trujillo.  However, she spent her adult life at Acoma Pueblo.  She, along with Jessie Garcia, Lucy M. Lewis, and Marie Z. Chino, were largely responsible for the revival of Anasazi and Tularosa designs on contemporary Acoma vessels.  Her daughter Goldie Hayah continues making pottery.  This is a classic style Acoma jar with very tightly painted designs.  There are lightning and rain patterns encompassing the surface of the bowl. The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Sarah Garcia”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
White, Elizabeth – Mauve Clay Jar with Double Corn (1974)

Elizabeth White created distinctive pottery using the various colors of Hopi clay. She originated the use of the ear of corn as a design in repousse (pushed out from the inside) on her pottery. Her pottery is all signed in the clay with her Hopi name Polingaysi, which means, “butterfly sitting among the flowers in the breeze”.  This jar is one of her classic pieces with two ears of corn.  The coloration of the clay is the distinctive and much sought after “mauve”.  The entire piece is stone polished to a high shine except for the two ears of corn which are unpolished matte.  The narrow shape is very much like the jars that her nephew Al Qoyawayma makes which he calls “wish pots”.  He tells the story that the name comes from Elizabeth as she said people would look at the pieces and say, “I wish I could have one”.  This jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Interestingly, Polingaysi was a school teacher and taught at Hopi and  Navajo schools for almost 40 years.  On retirement from teaching, she became an artist, a poet, and a philosopher.  Her career as a potter was begun late in life, after her retirement, so there is very little of her work available. It is a classic of her work and an important addition to any collection!

$ 1,200.00
Loloma, Charles -Jar with Corn Maidens (1950’s)

Charles Loloma is a name synonymous with innovative Hopi jewelry. He began his jewelry career with a brief period of time also making pottery in the 1950’s.  The pieces were made form earthenware and were painted and glazed.  By the 1960’s his jewelry was already achieving some fame and he discontinued making pottery.  His clay pieces are relatively rare but fascinating in terms of form, design and glaze. In many ways they mirror the innovative style of his jewelry relative to the other work being created at Hopi at the same time.  This tall jar is fully designed with corn maiden motifs.  They are etched into the clay.  The surface is matte but the rim is glazed.  This is certainly an exceptional piece of his pottery! It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Loloma”.

$ 1,800.00
Lewis, Lucy – Bowl with Heartline Deer (1980’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the past century. This bowl is coil built and painted using bee-weed, a plant.  The design consists of three heartline deer.  This imagery is a classic to both Acoma and Zuni pottery, with the heartline signifying the center or “heart” of the animal.  This bowl is thin walled and delicately painted.  It was traditionally fired so the white has much more of a pearlescent coloration, which creates added depth.  In the 1980’s the surfaces of her pieces were more highly polished, giving them a smoother feel.  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00
Lewis, Lucy – Jar with Rain Designs (1970’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the 1900’s.  She was an important revivalist of Acoma pottery throughout her career. This jar is coil built and painted with a fine-line cloud pattern.  There are rain designs painted on the long end of the triangles.  The three bands of design read not only horizontally but also diagonally.  Lucy would paint her pieces with bee-weed for the black and each piece was traditionally fired outdoors.  This bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.

$ 825.00
Navasie, Joy “Frogwoman” – Water Jar with Hopi Birds (1980’s)

This water jar by Joy “Frog Woman” Navasie is a distinctive shape.  It is a more classic water jar shape with the round shoulder, elongated neck and turned out rim. The jar is fully polished on the inside and outside.  It is slipped with the white clay and then painted with natural clay slips (the red is a deeper red clay she began to use in the 1980’s) and bee-weed (black).   It’s nice to see this period of her work painted with such precision to the lines!  The design is interesting, as there are two consecutive panels with birds.  The other two panels are painted with a bird wing design and a series of rain and cloud motifs.  The neck of the jar is also painted with a band of cloud and rain designs.  Interestingly, the delineation of the panels on the neck are in the center of the panels below!  Joy was always masterful with both the precision of her painting but also the geometry of her designs and the form.  The jar was traditionally fired so there are some very slight variations in the coloration but primarily the white has the classic pearlescent depth of color.  The jar is signed on the bottom with her Frog Hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 1,800.00
Navasie, Joy “Frogwoman” – Jar with Birds (1980’s)

This smaller jar by Joy “Frog Woman” Navasie is one of her classic shapes.  The jar has straight sides and it is polished on the inside and the outside.  The jar is slipped with the white clay and then painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black).   The sides of the jar are very tightly painted in four panels.  It’s nice to see a smaller piece with such precision to the lines!  Two panels are birds and the other two are bird tail designs. The black painted with bee-weed (a plant) and the red is a deeper red clay she began to use in the 1980’s.  It has been traditionally fired so there are some variations in the coloration from white to almost a pinkish color.   The jar is signed on the bottom with her Frog Hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 1,400.00
Tapia, Tom – Bowl with Katsina and Sun Medallions

This is a larger bowl by Tom Tapia.  It is highly polished and designed with four medallions.  One is a Sun, while the others are different katsina figures.  Separating the medallions are kivas with ladders.  Around the base is another katsina figure which encircles the piece and has feather and rain designs.  The bowl was fired black and then the reddish clay coloration is added after the firing.  It is this color combination for which Tom achieved recognition.  The bowl is signed, “Tom Tapia”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Medina, Sofia & Lois Medina – Jar with Hummingbirds & Clouds

Sofia Medina and her daughter Lois Medina were known for traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece was coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This is jar is striking in design and a very classic Zia shape with the high shoulder and slight neck.  The jar has an intricate cloud and rain design around the neck.  Around the side of the jar it is very intricately painted with a stylized hummginbird, flower and plant patterns.  This is an unusual bird style for them with the intricately painted wings of the hummingbirds, which are then slipped with clay to create the coloration.  Note as well the use of the hatchwork designs which are very tightly painted.  Did you know that Zia potters use volcanic basalt as their temper for the clay, which gives these pieces their stability but also weight.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the side, “Sofia & Lois Medina”.

$ 900.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Hopi Birds Lidded Bowl (2003)

Mark Tahbo learned to make pottery from his great grandmother, Grace Chapella.  His pieces reflect the wonderful symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter. The designs are painted using native clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black. This is a classic bowl from 2003. On this piece Mark included a variety of styles of Hopi birds.  Each was painted with different clay slips and he wanted to create a sense of motion.  They fly around the bowl and in, under and around the lid.  This is one of the few pieces where Mark made a lid for his pottery.  Note the use of all the various clay colors from mauve to red to burgundy.  It is an exciting and complicated vessel bringing together a all these Hopi birds in a contemporary manner!  Mark has made it an important part of his career to create the blushes in the firing process.  The depth of the coloration gives his vessels such life!  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Large Rainbow Ridge Water Jar with Bear Paws (1960’s), BOF p. 78

This is a striking large water jar by Margaret Tafoya.   This red water jar is featured on p. 78 of the book, “Born of Fire”. The water jar is from the 1960’s and certainly from a period when Margaret was at the peak of her career.  In 1978 and 1979 she won “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is one of the only artists to ever win twice and then to win in two consecutive years.  This water jar is distinctive and important because of the color (she made fewer red pieces than black), the very classic shape and the bottom.   The shape is a double shoulder water jar with a rainbow ridge.  This is the ridge above the shoulder which is actually pushed out in the clay.  The rim of the jar is slightly turned out and there are four bear paws impressed into the clay before it was polished.  As for the bottom, this comes from a time period when she used one of her mother’s (SaraFina Tafoya) pukis to create the indented base.  Nearly of the pieces with this style of base are classic style water jars, almost as if they are made as an homage to her mother and her legacy.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is definitely a historically important and exceptional jar by this important Santa Clara potter and great to have it published in one of the definitive books on her career.  Toni Roller said of the bear paw design.

“The story behind the bear paw, according to my grandmother, she said that our ancestors came from Puye, from the cliffs. One time when the people were living up there, there was a drought so bad they couldn’t grow anything. They were so worried. They wondered why the bear was well fed and not thin like they are. So they tracked the bear, and the bear led them to the Rio Grande. The reason we put the bear paw on the pots is to honor the bear that saved the people, the ancestors that came to Santa Clara from Puye. That’s why now most of the Indian people live along the Rio Grande. The bear saved all our ancestors.”  Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

$ 24,000.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Plate with Four Bear Paws (1950’s)

This is a deep black, fully polished plate by Margaret Tafoya.  The plate is impressed with four bear paws in the clay before it is polished.  It was then fully polished on the front and back and fired a dark black.  The plate is not flat but has just a bit of curvature which helps reflect the light.  I included several photos to show both the condition and the depth of the color.  The bear paw design tells the story of how a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  The plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair and the highly polished surface just seems to glow with the light.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.

 

$ 5,800.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Large Red Carved Open Bowl (1960’s)

Margaret Tafoya made fewer red pieces of pottery than black.  The reason may simply be that the redware is always more difficult to polish and fire than the black pieces.  While in the 1950’s we see very little redware, in the 1960’s she began to make red pieces again.  This is a classic open bowl with designs carved into the shoulder.  The imagery varies from cloud to rain patterns which encircles the piece.  They are deeply carved into the clay and then, as is typical of her red pottery, the recessed areas are slipped with a cream colored clay.  The bowl is from the 1960’s and signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic of her pottery!

$ 5,500.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Large Wedding Vase with Avanyu (1950’s)

This is a large wedding vase by Margaret Tafoya.  It is from the 1950’s.  The design is a water serpent and it is very deeply carved into the clay.  There is an unusual cloud pattern above the head of the water serpent, and another cloud pattern on the reverse of the bowl.  It is this style of carving which is more usually seen on the work of the late 1950’s.  The shape of the vase is rounder with the extended spouts.  The entire surface of the wedding vase is fully polished.  The style and complexity of the carving, also suggest that it was probably designed by Margaret’s husband, Alcario Tafoya.  Toni Roller said of her father’s designs:

“Alcario did help with some of the designs. His are bold designs. My dad’s designs are very outstanding. You can tell the difference between my mother’s and my dad’s designs. He did a lot of designs on my mother’s pots. Sorry to say he was never given very much credit for it.” —Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

The wedding vase is signed, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are surface scratches which are expected on pieces from this period, but no structural issues.

$ 14,500.00
Tafoya, Margaret -Red Jar with Bear Paws (1980’s), BOF p. 111

It is always great to see an important vessel by Margaret Tafoya, with great provenance, come become available.  This  tall red red jar is featured on p. 111 of the book, “Born of Fire”. The jar is from the 1980’s, after he had won “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market in 1978 and 1979.  In her later work, Margaret made smaller pieces than earlier in her career and also more redware.  The classic jar has a tall shape with four impressed bear paws as the design.  They are carved into the clay and then the entire piece is fully polished and it is fired a deep red.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Margaret Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is definitely a historically important and exceptional jar by this important Santa Clara potter and great to have it published in one of the definitive books on her career.

$ 7,500.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Storage Jar with Bear Paws (1970’s), BOF p. 103

This is a stunning version of Margaret Tafoya’s famous storage jars.  The jar is from the 1970’s and her distinctive storage jar form has a high, round shoulder and this one has a bit of an extended neck. The extended neck is certainly reminiscent of the storage jar shapes of her mother, Sarafina Tafoya.  Margaret always said that making them very round in shape was more difficult than making them narrower.  The entire piece is the fully polished after the bear paws are impressed. The bear paw design tells the story of how a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  Both the storage jar and the bear paw have become iconic to the work of Margaret Tafoya.  This jar is highly polished and fired a deep black.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  The jar is featured in the book, Born of Fire, on p. 103.  Definitely a piece of history!

 

$ 24,000.00
Youngblood, Mela  – Tall Water Jar with Carved Avanyu (1972) with Ribbon

This is one of the largest pieces we have seen by Mela Youngblood.  She began making pottery in the late 1960’s and quickly achieved a distinctive style for her work.  Each piece of her work very highly polished and when carved the edges are distinctly rounded.  This jar has a carved avanyu encircling the piece. Mela’s carving is distinctive with rounded edges to her carving.  The avanyu here is deeply carved and the entire jar is fully polished.  It is a stunning piece not just for the size, but also for the polishing and carving.  The jar won a blue ribbon at the 1972 Gallup Intertribal Ceremonials.  Mela’s name is on the ribbon and it is on the last two photos.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mela Youngblood”.  It is certainly a rarity with great provenance and an important piece of Tafoya family history!

$ 5,500.00
Tafoya, Margaret & Mela Youngblood – Weddding Vase (1976)

Margaret Tafoya and her daughter, Mela Youngblood, made some pottery together in the 1970’s.  Typically, Margaret would make the piece and then it would be carved by either Mela or Alcario Tafoya (Margaret’s husband).  Some of the collaborative pieces I have seen were signed by all three.  This wedding vase is just signed by Mela and Margaret. The wedding vase is definitely Margaret’s shape. The carving has a mesa and lightning on one side and a mountain pattern on the other.  The carving design was done by Mela on this piece, as was the polishing.  It’s a striking piece and an interesting piece of history!  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya, Mela Youngblood”

$ 2,400.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Tall Double Shoulder Water Jar (1960’s)

This is a striking fully polished water jar by Margaret Tafoya. It is from the 1960’s.  It is an elegant shape with a long neck and a “double shoulder”.  The double shoulder was also called a “rainbow ridge” by Margaret and her mother, Sarafina Tafoya. It adds to the difficulty of a piece as the second ridge requires the potters to create a rise from the shoulder to a second shoulder to the neck.  The jar is stone polished all at one time and then fired to a deep black.  It is from the 1960’s and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  This shape and size is definitely a classic of her work!

“She [Margaret Tafoya] made water jars sitting outside the adobe house, and they would never crack on her.  There’s a rainbow band on the shoulder. She would sit on the floor with her legs straight out and make the pots that way. Today we stand up and make our pots.”  LuAnn Tafoya and Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

$ 14,500.00
Tafoya, Shirley – Wide Bowl with Carved Avanyu

Shirley Tafoya was the youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her miniature pottery.  This is a larger bowl but amazing at how deeply it is carved!  The top and bottom band are a matte, while the carved area is an avanyu which is polished.  Note how deep the carving is on this bowl!  Shirley etched the eye and the mouth of the avanyu.  The water serpent is a classic Santa Clara design telling the story of how the avanyu saved the village from a flood.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya.” A classic of Tafoya Family pottery!

$ 1,200.00
Youngblood, Mela  – Kiva Bowl (1970’s)

Mela Youngblood began making pottery in the late 1960’s and quickly achieved a distinctive style for her work.  Each piece of her work very highly polished and when carved the edges are distinctly rounded.  This bowl is a very classic style of Kiva Bowl.  This bowl is fully polished on the inside and outside. The bowl has the “kiva” three-step form on the sides.  The holes in the kiva step areas were traditionally included so that eagle feathers could be placed in them. Mela made few of these during her career. The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The highly stone polished surface is striking!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,500.00
Trammel, Jennie – Tall Jar with Cloud Motifs (1970’s)

This is an elegant tall jar by Jennie Trammel.   She was a daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  Over the years Jennie did not make a lot of pottery as she lived a very private life and was virtually never involved in markets or gallery shows.  However, she created striking pottery with classic shapes and designs which were distinctive to her work.  Each piece was coil built, and it was the carving, with the rounded edges, which was a visual key to her work.  This is a taller jar which is fully polished, even the inside of the neck.  The design is a cloud motif which varies as the jar is turned.  The turned out rim is a nice variation which adds to the overall impact of the highly polished surface.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Jennie Trammel” in the clay on the bottom.

$ 1,800.00
Trammel, Jennie – Wide Red Jar with Cloud Designs (1980’s)

Jennie Trammel was a daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  Over the years Jennie did not make a lot of pottery as she lived a very private life and was virtually never involved in markets or gallery shows.  However, she created stunning pottery with classic shapes and designs which were distinctive to her work.  Each piece was coil built, and it was the carving, with the rounded edges, which was a visual key to her work.  This is one of her very deeply carved pieces.  The jar is an unusual shape with a wide shoulder and a slight neck.  The rounded shoulder, however, is a great space for the deeply carved cloud and lighting design. The position of the carving is interesting and utilizes the form and the extension down from below the neck.  The background area is slipped with the traditional cream-colored clay.  The red clay slip is a deep, rich coloration.  It is signed, “Jennie Trammel” in the clay on the bottom.   This jar is in very good with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 3,500.00
Ebelacker, Richard – Double Shoulder Water Jar with Bear Paws (1970’s)

Richard Ebelacker was a grandson of Margaret Tafoya and a son of Virginia Ebelacker.  He was known for his large vessels and traditional shapes.  This is a very classic double shoulder water jar.  It is fully polished and has four bear paws as the design. The bear paws are part of a Tewa story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  The jar is very highly polished, even on the inside of the neck!  It is fired a deep lack.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Richard Ebelacker”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00
Trammel, Jennie – Small Fully Polished Plate (1970’s)

This is small plainware plate by Jennie Trammel.  The plate has a curved surface and divided into seven sections.  It is fully polished on the front and back.  It was fired a deep black. Over the years Jennie did not make a lot of pottery as she lived a very private life and was virtually never involved in markets or gallery shows.  However, she created striking pottery with classic shapes and designs which were distinctive to her work. The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Jennie Trammel”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 150.00
Lewis, Lucy – Turkey Clay Figure

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the 1900’s.  She was an important revivalist of Acoma pottery throughout her career. This is on one of her clay turkey figures. The piece is hollow and painted with bee-weed and clay slip. The feathers and design are very tightly painted on this turkey!  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.

$ 280.00
Lewis, Lucy – Jar with Double Star Pattern (1970’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the 1900’s.  She was an important revivalist of Acoma pottery throughout her career. This jar is coil built and painted with a fine-line star pattern. There are two different star patterns on the bowl, one with four points and one with eight points.  Lucy would paint her pieces with bee-weed for the black and each piece was traditionally fired outdoors.  This bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.

$ 775.00
Naha, Helen “Feather Woman” – Large Awatovi Star Design Jar

This is a classic wide shoulder jar by Helen Naha, also known as “Feather Woman”.  She created distinctive pottery using the white clay slip throughout her career.  The designs were all painted using bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law, Paqua Naha yet had her own style in form, imagery, and composition.  Helen is known for her revival of the pre-historic Awatovi pottery.   Awatovi is one of the ruins near Hopi where a white slipped style of pottery was made.  It is a fascinating place as it was where Coronado made contact with the Hopi in 1540.  During the excavations in the 1930’s the whiteware pottery was rediscovered.  It was the imagery from his work which inspired much of Helen’s early pottery, as opposed the more classic Sikyatki inspired pottery of Nampeyo.  This jar has the “Awatovi Star” pattern painted on the top and the bottom.  The shape of the jar has a more open mouth, which reveals more of the painted imagery when viewing from the side.  Just above the shoulder is her “eternity band” design.  The inside of the bowl is also polished, which Helen tried to do on most of her pottery when she could reach her hand inside.  The jar has been traditionally fired and there is some variation to the color with the fired cloud, which certainly adds to the beauty of the piece.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom with her hallmark feather.

$ 2,800.00
Year Flower, Lucy – Bowl with Impressed Cloud Designs (1973)

Lucy Year Flower was a daughter-in-law of Camilio Tafoya and a sister-in-law of Joseph Lonewolf and Grace Medicine Flower. She began making pottery in the early 1970’s and was known for her flowing carved designs.  This is an early piece of her pottery from 1973.  It is unusual in design with a wind pattern which is lightly impressed into the clay. The entire surface is fully polished, so the wind design has a very subtle appearance on the surface.  It is an interesting variation on classic Santa Clara carved pottery.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Lucy Year Flower” on the bottom.

$ 250.00
Medina, Sofia & Lois Medina – Jar with Zia Birds

Sofia Medina and her daughter Lois Medina were known for traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece was coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This is jar is striking in design and a very classic Zia shape with the high shoulder and slight neck.  The jar has a rainbow design which is polished and below it on each side is a Zia bird. The birds are polished.  Under the rainbow are cloud and plant designs.  It is a complex pattern of design.  On the sides separating the two birds there is a very intricate butterfly pattern made up of rain and cloud motifs.  It is unusual to see their work with such complicated patterns!  Did you know that Zia potters use basalt as their temper for the clay, which gives these pieces their stability but also weight.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the side, “Sofia & Lois Medina”.

$ 1,200.00
Medina, Sofia & Lois Medina – Four Color Jar with Deer & Birds

Sofia Medina and her daughter Lois Medina were known for traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece was coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This is jar is exception in the form and the painting.  The jar is painted on two sections with a rainbow design and below the rainbow is a deer. The rainbow and the deer are polished with two different colored clays.  Note the leaves over the back of the deer and there are two different colors of clay in each leaf!  The area around the deer has thinly painted lines.  Separating the deer are two sections of large birds.  Each bird is surrounded by plant designs along with cloud patterns. Did you know that Zia potters use basalt as their temper for the clay, which gives these pieces their stability but also weight.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the side, “Sofia & Lois Medina”.  Not just a classic piece of their pottery, but outstanding in size, design and color as well!

$ 2,200.00
Torivio, Dorothy – Wide Long Neck Jar with Mountain Spiral Design

This is wide jar with an elongated neck is by Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  The shape of the jar is one which Dorothy created to emphasize her painted designs.  The long neck has smaller triangular designs which spiral outward to the shoulder and then back to the base.  When looking straight down on it the design is very tightly painted and striking.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Dorothy Torivio” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,850.00
Ortiz, Inez – Owl Storyteller

Inez Ortiz was the sister of Virgil Ortiz and the mother of Lisa Holt.  She was well known for her whimsical figures and her animals storytellers.  This is one of her standing owl, which has four baby owls in its wings.  It is a charming piece and wonderfully painted with detail for the feathers.  The figure is painted with wild spinach (black) and red clay slip.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 850.00
Navasie, Fawn Garcia – Large Jar with Swirling Birds

Fawn Garcia Navasie (b. 1959) is also known as “Little Fawn”.  She is a daughter of Eunice “Fawn” Navasie and a sister of Dawn and Dolly Navasie.  This large jar is coil built and stone polished. The jar has a striking shape with the round body and the elongated neck.  There are three Hopi style birds painted on the shoulder with their tails extending down over the side.  The designs are painted with bee-wee for the black.  The jar is traditionally fired with elegant blushes to the surface.   It is signed on the bottom, “Fawn”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 650.00
Adams, Sadie – Jar with Cloud and Rain Designs

This is a small jar by Sadie Adams. It is fully polished on the inside and outside. The design is a classic Sikyatki inspired rain and cloud pattern.  It is painted with bee-weed  (black) and two sections of polished red.  The jar is signed on the bottom with her hallmark flower.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some fugitive black areas.

$ 225.00
Torivio, Dorothy -Long Neck Jar with Butterfly Design

This is a classic long neck shaped jar by Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  The shape of the jar is one which Dorothy created to emphasize her painted designs.  The long neck has a butterfly pattern which is repeated in smaller and then larger sizes.  The precision and tight painting on the neck is exceptional!  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Dorothy Torivio” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,650.00
Torivio, Dorothy -Large Long Neck Jar with Yucca Design

This is a classic shaped jar by Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  The shape of the jar is one which Dorothy created to emphasize her painted designs.  The long neck has a yucca leaf pattern, which is repeated in smaller and then larger sizes.  The open space of the white and the contrasting black give the jar a very modern appearance.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Dorothy Torivio” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,400.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Tall Seedpot with Coyote, Deer & Rabbits (1980)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is very intricately designed. The entire piece is coil built and then stone polished.  The designs are etched into the clay and then the additional clay colors are added.  There are two coyote on one side.  Note the detail, which is a bit unusual for Camilio’s pottery!  Then as the piece is turned there are rabbits and a fawn.  It is a charming piece!  The top has a butterfly etched into the clay.  It is a complex piece and lots of additional colors are added.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00
Gutierrez, Lela & Luther – Polychrome Thunderbird Open Bowl (1956-66)

Lela Gutierrez began making pottery in the 1930’s with her husband, Van Gutierrez.  After Van passed away in 1956 she continued to make pottery with her son, Luther Gutierrez.  She would make the pieces and Luther would paint the designs.  They worked together for only 10 years from 1956 to 1966.  This open bowl is fully painted on the inside.  There is a thunderbird in the center and a star pattern.  On the inside rim of the bowl are alternating sun and lizard designs.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips and painted onto the piece before it was fired.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lela/Luther”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Gonzales, Rose – Red Canteen with Ribbon (1965)

This canteen is a classic piece by San Ildefono potter Rose Gonzales.  She is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This canteen is her classic shape for this form.  It is fully polished red with no design.  It still has the original leather strap and wood stopper!  The canteen won a second place at the 1965 Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonials.  The piece is signed on the back in the clay, “Rose”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,100.00
Gonzales, Rose – Wide Bowl with Rain and Cloud Designs

Rose Gonzales is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This wide bowl is deeply carved with her classic style of rounded edge carving.  The design is a series of cloud and rain patterns which flow through the negative space of the shoulder of the bowl.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Rose” on the bottom in the clay.

$ 800.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Open Bow with Bird Man and Hummingbirds (2000)

This is a large open bowl which is fully painted by Mark Tahbo.  He learned to make pottery from his great grandmother, Grace Chapella.  His pieces reflect the wonderful symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter. The designs are painted using native clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black. The bowl is shallow and has a slight extended rim.  On the inside is one of his anthropomorphic “bird men”.  He made this figures in place of using katsinas on his pottery.  They were part of the stories he would tell about his work and certainly an influence came from the Awatovi murals. This figure has a bird head and is holding a white bird and a gourd canteen. The rim of the bowl is painted with a checkerboard pattern.  It is the surprise of the back which is so dynamic.  The center is a very tightly painted hatchwork flower.  There are four hummingbirds encircling the flower.  The bodies of each are painted with various colored clay slips.  There is a distinctive rainbow band with four different colors connecting each bird.  Mark would seek out the various colors used on his pottery and the mauve clay (the bottom rainbow band) was always the most difficult to find.  The plate was traditionally fired and has dynamic colored blushes across the surface.  The plate is signed on the rim, “Mark Tahbo 2000”.  It won a “Challenge Award” at the 2000 Santa Fe Indian Market.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,800.00
Nampeyo, Priscilla Namingha – Migration Design Jar (1970’s)

This is an exceptional jar by Priscialla Namingha Nampeyo.  She was a great-granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano and granddaughter of Annie Healing,  She was also a sister of Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo. Priscilla was the matriarch of a family of renown potters, including Rachel, Bonnie, Nyla and Jean Sahmie.  Priscilla began making pottery when she was only seven years old, under the guidance of Nampeyo of Hano. This jar is thin walled and painted with the classic migration pattern.  It is one of those pieces that captures the essence of her pottery skill with very thin lines and a design which matches the shape.  Priscilla was known for her traditional work and this jar is simply one of her best.  It was traditionally fired and so it has blushes across the surface.  It is signed on the bottom “Priscilla Namingha Nampeyo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Tafoya, Camilio – “Turkey Girl” Bronze, 4/16 (1979)

This is one of several different bronzes created by Camilio Tafoya.  The piece is entitled, “Turkey Girl” and it has amazing detail in each of the figures.  There is a Pueblo woman grinding corn and in front of her is another Pueblo woman and a male and female turkey. Take a close look at any of the figures and the detail is exceptional! There is a similar stylistic feel as with his pottery.  For the story of the Turkey Girl I have use the story written by Juan de la Cruz for one of his pieces of pottery.

“Turkey Girl’s tattered and worn raiment was taken and transformed into beautiful garments: a dazzling necklace and intricately woven mantle were draped upon her arms.  The turkeys that she tended to presented these gifts: for they knew her heart’s desire was to participate in the festivities being held in the neighboring village. In exchange for this and the kindness she always bore towards them, they were given freedom and traversed into the narrow mountain pass where they reside to this day”.  Juan de la Cruz

This bronze is an edition of 16 and this is number 4.  It was made in 1979 and signed on the top side.  It is in excellent condition.  One of the last photos is the piece with other pottery by Camilio Tafoya as well as a photo of him!

$ 1,200.00
Tafoya, Camilio – “Wild Turkeys” Seedpot (1989)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya reflects the interesting connection of the wild turkey and Pueblo culture. There are turkey clans and most importantly, the turkey feathers are used in numerous Pueblo dances.  They are a critical part of the cultural and spiritual activities in most pueblos.  Interestingly, they have been important for quite a while in Pueblo life.

“The ancient Pueblo people shifted from making blankets of rabbit fur to using turkey feathers. One blanket could require 12,000 feathers, which could be taken as the birds molted.  The blankets helped ward off the high-altitude chill of Mesa Verde, but the turkeys also “must have had some symbolic importance,” said Lipe. “That continues all the way through to the present. Turkey feathers are still ritually quite important among Pueblo people.”   Eric Sorensen

You might also check out the “Turkey Girl” story as presented by Juan de la Cruz on the Camilio Tafoya bronze listing.  This seedpot has a male and female turkey on either side of the seedpot. They are etched into the clay and highlighted with colored clays.  The top of the seedpot has a cloud pattern and a rain pattern. The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Camilio”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00
Garcia, Tina – Black Water Jar with Stones & Ribbon (1975)

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plainware Santa Clara pottery.  This may well be one of the earliest pieces of her work I have come across.  She would have been 18! The jar is an exceptional shape with a round shoulder and a turned out rim.  It feels just a big thicker (heavier) than her later work, but certainly not unexpected.  The surface is highly polished.  There are insets on the shoulder of turquoise and coral.  Again, something I had never seen on later work.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tina Garcia”.  It received a second place ribbon from the 1975 New Mexico State Fair.  It also has the original entry tag with her name on it. The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a great piece of history!

$ 600.00
Cain, Mary – Large Double Shoulder Water Jar with Bear Paws

Mary Cain was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and a granddaughter of SaraFina Tafoya.  She was known for her classic style Santa Clara pottery.  I’m not sure if we have ever had one of her pieces this size come back into the gallery.  It is a very large double shoulder water jar.  The entire piece is fully polished. The double shoulders are always more difficult to create with coil built pottery.  However, they create more angles for the light to hit on the surface, adding to the overall dynamic appearance of the piece.  The bear paws are symbolic of a story where the bears led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  On this piece the paws are carved into the clay and then polished, along with the rest of the jar. The entire piece is fired a deep black.  It is signed on the bottom, “Mary Cain”.    It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   The last photo is one of the jar next to a contemporary piece by her daughter, Linda Cain.  It was interesting to contrast two pieces with bear paws and the difference in size and style.

$ 1,600.00
Sanchez, Desideria – Jar with Feather and Rain Motifs (1960’s)

Desideria Montoya Sanchez was a sister of noted potter Maria Martinez.  She was known for her traditional pottery and use of both classic and innovative designs. This jar is fully polished and painted with a feather and storm pattern.  There are two sections of feather separated by two sections of the rain and lightning designs.  This is a later jar and beautifully painted!  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Desideria”.

$ 650.00
Sanchez, Desideria – Small Jar with Rain Designs

This is one of the few miniatures we have seen by Desideria Montoya Sanchez!  She was a sister of famed potter Maria Martinez. This jar  is fully polished and has a sharp shoulder. It is painted with a cloud, rain and lightning designs.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Desideria”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Garcia, Tina – Black Water Jar with Fluted Rim

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plainware Santa Clara pottery. This water jar is one of her classic pieces.  It is an elegant shape with the sharp shoulder, the indented rise to the neck and the fluted or “pie crust” rim. The entire jar is fully polished and fired a deep black.  Tina was always focused on form and polish and this created some exceptional vessels.  It is signed on the bottom and  it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 850.00
Martinez, Clara – Bowl with Cloud Design (1970’s)

Clara Martinez was a daughter-in-law of Maria Martinez and the wife of John Martinez (1915-66).  While she did not make a lot of pottery, the pieces were more traditional in style with painted black-on-black designs. This bowl is fully polished and has a cloud pattern painted around the rim. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Clara Martinez”.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Tafoya, Ray  – Mimbres Rabbits Seedpot (1980)

This is a very  intricate miniature seedpot by Ray Tafoya.  The design has three Mimbres rabbits etched into the clay.  They are surrounded by Ray’s signature geometric designs. There are cloud, grass and water designs.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  The seedpot is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay with his hallmark.

$ 400.00
Tapia, Mae – Black and Sienna Mini Seedpot with Lizard & Antelope

Mae Tapia was known for her intricately etched miniature pottery.  This is one of her amazing miniatures.  It is fully polished and there are two sienna medallions on the top. One has a lizard, the other an antelope.  Surrounding them are additional feather, cloud and rain designs.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 100.00
Tafoya, Myra Little Snow – Mini Carved Avanyu Bowl

Myra Little Snow Tafoya was known for her creative deep carved pottery.  Each piece is coil built, carved and stone polished.  This miniature bowl has a carved avanyu for the design.  Note how the design changes as the bowl is turned.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay “Myra Little Snow”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 100.00
Tafoya, Shirley – Large Plainware Water Jar (1970’s)

Shirley Tafoya was the youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her miniature pottery.  I couldn’t help but say that this was a “large” water jar, but for Shirley, it definitely was a large piece as much of her work was under 2″ tall!  This water jar is an elegant shape with a round body and a slight neck.  The entire piece is fully polished and fired a deep black.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya”.  Simple but a classic of Tafoya Family pottery!

$ 1,500.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Safe Territory” Seedpot (1988)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This seedpot is from 1988.  Joseph wrote of this piece:

“Representing the Mimbres Period of the 10th to the 14th centuries, is a male quail about to fall prey to a nearby fox.  Alerted to the danger the quail moves quickly to the brush growing in its natural habitat.

Encircling the base of the seedpot is Mother Earth [the red clay slip] with several quail tracks…To the left of the tracks is a bear print.  Perhaps the frightened quail, aware of the bear’s presence, sought refuge in the bear’s range of territory.  To the left is the 1988 yearly symbol of a “bear paw” representing strength and good medicine.  The tiny butterfly, also atop Mother Earth represents beauty in life”.

The style of this seepdot is similar to a series he made throughout 1988.  The have a combination of cartoon and Mimbres style, with the fox having more of a “cartoon” appearance.  What makes that interesting is that Joseph was a big fan of cartoons and loved to watch them. It’s great to see that he found a way to design some pieces that are almost a reflection of his love for the style.  All the additional colors are natural clay slips.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,200.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Bald Eagle” Seedpot (2001)

This is a very detailed realistic seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 2001.  The piece is one from the period when he began to create  exceptionally detailed and realistic animals on his pottery surfaces.  The seedpot is flat with the bald eagle head carved into the clay.  It is hard to see in the photos but the area round the eye and beak are recessed.  The feathers are then etched into the clay and highlighted with additional clay slips.  The use of the carved areas creates a more dramatic appearance to the surface of the piece and gives it a more realistic style.  On the side there is a single white feather and two macaw parrot feathers.  It would be interesting to know the significance of both feathers, but certainly there is the importance of both parrot and eagle feathers in Pueblo culture and ceremonies.  The side has an incised and polished feather design.  Lower on the seedpot are are the two “yearly” medallions on this piece, which signify 2001 and are symbolic for his mother (Agapita, a daisy) and father (Camilio, a sunflower).  The two symbols are reflective of their names in Tewa. There is also a small butterfly which Joseph would almost always include as a symbol for beauty.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is certainly a classic in this realistic period of Joseph’s pottery.

$ 4,200.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Standing Fawn & Butterflies” Seedpot (1989)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1998.  The piece is entitled, “Secreted Fawn”.  It includes a signed version of the card which Joseph made for each of his miniatures.  This piece was actually made for our show at the gallery with Joseph and Grace Medicine Flower in 1998.   Joseph wrote partially of this piece,

“Portrayed against a blue sky background is a single realistically designed Mule Deer fawn, most of which are born in June or July.  Nestled, side view, in an abundance of sheltered valley grasses, remote to other members of the heard, the fawn is partially encircled by eight yellow disked, red tipped daisy blossoms, which denote all that is sweet, or pleasant, in life.

Three small realistically designed cabbage white  butterflies, symbolic of beauty in life, are portrayed with the fawn.  two wings about the new born in a delicate, unhurried flight and one alight on the tip of the newborn’s right ear.”

On the back of the seedpot in the red is a Mule Deer buck, doe and fawn sketched into the clay.  They are inspired by the Mimbres pottery designs of the 11th century.  The interlocking rings medallion represents the attachment between friends and was the yearly symbol for 1997.  Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  The piece is signed on the bottom and includes the signed artist card.  There is also a photo of Joseph holding the piece! It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,200.00
Tafoya, Agapita – Jar with Carved Cloud and Feather Designs (1950’s)

Agapita Tafoya was the wife of noted potter Camilio Tafoya and the mother of Grace Medicine Flower and Joseph Lonewolf. Agapita created most of her pottery from the 1930’s to the early 1950’s. This jar is from the 1950’s and it is deeply carved and stone polished. The design is a cloud pattern extending down from the neck and a prayer feather pattern extending up from the base.  The piece is fully polished and fired red.  The recessed area has a cream colored slip which was used for contrast with the red clay slip.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Agapita Tafoya”.

$ 350.00
Tafoya, Margaret -Jar with Swirl Melon Ribs (1970’s)

It is not often that Margaret Tafoya made melon jars during her career. This exceptional pieces is from the 1970’s and it is stunning with the swirl melons. The piece has one of her classic necks and then it is carved with eight melon ribs. They swirl down from the shoulder to the base. The jar is highly polished and fired a shiny black.  It is simply exceptional!  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It’s always great see the expanse of Margaret’s creativity throughout her career.

$ 4,200.00
Dunlap, Carmelita – Wide Shoulder Jar with Rain Patterns (1979)

Carmelita Dunlap is one of the San Ildefono potters best known for her large vessels.  This jar is smaller for her work, but highly polished and tightly painted. The design is a series of rain and prayer feathers patterns.  The feather patterns vary as the jar is turned.  The jar itself is highly polished and fired a brown-black coloration.  It is this distinctive coloration for which she was best known. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Carmelita Dunlap”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a smaller classic of her work!

$ 800.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Red Bowl with Clouds over the Mesa Design (1980’s)

This  is a smaller red bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1980’s. The bowl is carved and fully polished.  The design is deeply carved and represents the clouds coming over the mesas and then the rain. The the carved line below represents the path taken around the mesas.  It is a simple but striking piece.  The carving is deep and it is highly polished and fired a deep red.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,500.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Bowl with Painted Avanyu (1960’s)

This is a small bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1960’s.  The bowl is fully polished and painted with an avanyu.  The avanyu, or water serpent, is a classic of her design. Note the shape of the horn as well as the mouth.  A similar style of mouth is painted onto many of her pieces.  As the bowl is turned the body of the water serpent (avanyu) creates cloud and lightning designs.  While Margaret was known for her large vessels, why make something so small?  The reason is that potters of her generation would not ‘throw away” clay that was not used, but also not mix a large portion of it with the new clay.  So, when they were running out of clay, they would often make smaller vessels like this bowl.  It is also during the period of the 1950’s to 1960’s that she made most of her painted or “black-on-black” pieces of pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 650.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Jar with Reverse Carved Avanyu (1960’s)

This tall jar by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1960’s.  The jar is a classic shape with the tall shoulders. The design, however, is quite unusual.  It is a water serpent (or avanyu), which is carved in reverse.  Here, the avanyu is carved into four panels and you can see the the head and horn of each avanyu in reverse.  It is interesting that she would have created such an unusual variation on this classic design. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some wear on the rim.

$ 1,200.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Fully Polished Red and Tan Open Bowl (1980’s)

This is open bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1980’s.  The bowl has high walls and it is fully polished on the inside and carved on the outside.  This is one of the rarest styles of Margaret’s pottery.  The bowl itself has a lower round shoulder and a slightly turned out rim.  What makes it so rare is that she polished the outside red and the inside tan. The tan is created with water, so it is always difficult to polish and create a shine.  Margaret revived this red and tan style in the late 1960’s when she remembered how it was done at Ohkay Owinghe (San Juan Pueblo) from her youth. Today, there are only a few potters who are able to polish tan with such a high shine.  For Margaret, she did very few red and tan pieces, and they are always on very traditional forms.  Traditionally potters would polish the inside of the bowls before firing so that they would be usable.  However, over time this practice decreased as there was a great chance that it would crack in drying or polishing.  The added risk comes from putting all the wet slip on the inside of the bowl and hoping that it doesn’t cause cracks in the exterior.  However, the risk is often worth it as the polished interior of the bowl creates a striking appearance.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,500.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Fully Polished Open Bowl (1980)

This is open bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1980’s.  The bowl has high walls and it is fully polished on the inside and carved on the outside.  Traditionally potters would polish the inside of the bowls before firing so that they would be usable.  However, over time this practice decreased as there was a great chance that it would crack in drying or polishing.  The added risk comes from putting all the wet slip on the inside of the bowl and hoping that it doesn’t cause cracks in the exterior.  However, the risk is often worth it as the polished interior of the bowl creates a striking appearance.  What is interesting in this bowl is the shape, which is hard to capture in the photos.  It is round near the base and then just slightly indented just below the rim. This is so the bowl could be held, but it’s wonderful aspect to this piece.  This bowl is perfectly polished and fired to a deep black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is featured in the book “Born of Fire” The Art and Life of Margaret Tafoya”.

$ 1,950.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Red Bowl with Mountain Design (1980’s)

This deeply carved by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1980’s.  It is a classic shaped bowl with deeply carved mountain design. The design is repeated four times around the shoulder of the bowl.  The background area is slipped with the traditional cream colored clay. The bowl itself is  highly polished and fired a deep red.  Margaret’s work from the 1980’s is always distinctive as the pieces are typically smaller than in earlier years as she was in her 80’s!  However, the carving is often more complicated and the polishing is always exceptional.  This bowl is deeply carved and a great deep, red coloration.  As well, it is great to see her work in red, which is always more difficult to fire.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is also featured in the book, “Born of Fire: The Art and Life of Margaret Tafoya”.

$ 4,200.00
Tahbo, Dianna – Jar with Bird Tail Designs (2001)

Diana Tahbo was known for her tightly painted pottery and especially her beautiful miniatures.  This tall jar is vertically polished and then painted.  The design has bird tails in two sections and bird wings in two others.  The jar was traditionally fired, which created the blushes on the surface.  The interesting thing about when she vertically polished her pottery (as well as when Mark did the same thing) is that the lines of the polishing are visible after the firing.  It adds one more layer of depth to the piece.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 575.00
Martinez, Santana & Adam – Plate with Seed Designs (1970’s)

This is a classic designed plate by Santana and Adam Martinez.  Adam was the youngest son of Maria Martinez, and Santana painted Maria’s pottery in the 1940-50’s. The plate is stone polished and it is painted with a mountain and seed design.  It was fired a deep black coloration.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Santana + Adam”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic piece!

$ 500.00
Gonzales, Juanita – Large Jar with Avanyu (1930’s)

This is a classic shaped jar by Juanita and Wo-Peen Gonzales.  The jar is deeply carved with a water serpent encircling the piece. It is carved in the cameo style which Juanita learned from Rose Gonzales.  There are cloud designs extending down from the neck and the horn of the avanyu is stylized.  The jar is highly polished and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.    The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Juanita”.   It is great to find one of their pieces in such wonderful condition!

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 800.00
Chino, Rose – Jar with Birds (1980’s)

Rose Chino was a daughter of noted potter Marie Z. Chino. This jar is a more classic style of shape with the high shoulder.  It is painted with four birds (maybe quail) encircling the piece.  They are painted with bee-weed and the jar was traditionally fired.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rose Chino”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 450.00
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