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King Galleries is pleased to have a variety of Pueblo and Tribal pottery from the 1920's to the present. We have created this "Signed Historic Pottery"  to identify work by those potters who were early innovators in the 1920's and began to sign their work. It also is used for any artists who have passed away, making their art part of the historical record. The history of Pueblo pottery during this period is one of an exciting change as it has evolved from utilitarian ware to folk art to the fine art of today. We hope you enjoy these amazing pieces!

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Garcia, Sarah – Bowl with Mimbres Lizards (1970’s)

Sarah Garcia (1928-2015) was born at Laguna Pueblo and was a daughter of Maria Trujillo.  However, she spent her adult life at Acoma Pueblo.  She, along with Jessie Garcia, Lucy M. Lewis, and Marie Z. Chino was largely responsible for the revival of Anasazi and Tularosa designs on contemporary Acoma vessels.  Her daughter Goldie Hayah continues making pottery.  This larger bowl is fully painted with three large lizards.  Separating them are very intricately painted rain and cloud patterns. The bowl is thin-walled and traditionally fired.  It is signed on the bottom, “Sarah Garcia”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Tafoya, Margaret, Toni Roller & Charles Lewis – Bowl with Rain and Mountain Designs

This is one of the few triple signature pieces by Margaret Tafoya.  The bowl was made by Margaret Tafoya, designed and carved by her great-grandson Charles Roller Lewis and polished by her daughter Toni Roller.  It was made in the 1990’s.  The bowl is one of Margaret’s classic shapes.  The designs are a mountain, cloud and rain pattern which are deeply carved into the bowl.  It is highly polished and traditionally fired black.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya, Toni Roller, Charles Lewis”.  It is definitely a fascinating piece of history!

$ 2,200.00
Tse-Pe & Dora – Black & Sienna Bowl with Avanyu (1972)

Tse-Pe Gonzales and his wife, Dora, began working together around 1971.  Dora would make the pottery and Tse-Pe would etch the designs. This bowl is an exceptional piece of their pottery.  The piece is a round bowl and the design is an avanyu etched around the shoulder of the piece.  There is an inset piece of coral for the eye of the avanyu.  Above the back of the avanyu are clouds, which are two-tone in sienna.  Below the band of etched design, there is a single band of matte clay slip before the polished base of the bowl.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Tse-Pe and Dora”.    It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Tse-Pe and Dora worked individually from 1980-2000, but their early collaborative work remains innovative, creative and of the highest quality even compared to many of today’s potters.

$ 1,200.00
Tapia, Sue – “Lightning” Design Bowl

Sue Tapia is originally from Laguna Pueblo and was married to Tom Tapia.  Together they made pottery together, along with her individual pieces.  This bowl is coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired.  It is a “Lightning Design” and alternates between polished and mica slipped bands.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Sue Tapia”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 800.00
Navasie, Joy “Frogwoman” -Tall Jar with Bird Designs (1980’s)

This jar by Joy “Frog Woman” Navasie is a distinctive shape with a low shoulder and an elongated neck.  The jar is painted with two panels of designs, each with a Hopi style bird.  The birds are highlighted with a deep red clay.  The neck of the jar is also painted with a bird wing pattern.  The jar is slipped with the white clay and then painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black).  The red clay on this jar is a deeper red clay she began to use in the 1980’s.  It has been traditionally fired so there are some variations in the coloration from white to almost a pinkish color.   The jar is signed on the bottom with her Frog Hallmark.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 1,200.00
Polacca, Thomas – Carved Jar with Rising and Setting Sun (1986)

Thomas Polacca was a son of noted potter Fannie Nampeyo and a grandson of Nampeyo of Hano.  He is considered among the first men to begin making pottery at Hopi in the 1970s.  Interestingly, the men initially did not use the traditional Sikyatki designs but followed other directions in their pottery.  This jar is fully carved and has complex designs.  Around the neck and base, it is carved with two bands of feathers.  Around the center, there is a sun katsina in one of the panels.  As the jar is turned there is the rising and the setting of the sun.  Note the various depths of carving on the jar!  The carving is highlighted with additional clay slips to give the appearance of wood.  The jar may have been traditionally fired as there are some blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Thomas Polacca”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,050.00
Nampeyo, Iris – Tan Bowl with Double Corn Design

Iris Nampeyo was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and well known for her elegant asymmetrical vessels with corn as part of the design in relief.  Iris began using the corn in relief on the surface of her pottery in the early 1980s. The corn is symbolic of being part of the Corn Clan.  The surface of the jar is stone polished and the corn on the front is in applique relief.  The shape of this jar has a round body and an asymmetric rim.  The design of the corn has two detailed ears of corn surrounded by the corn husk.  The husk of the corn is sharp and the matte area extends around to the shoulder of the jar.  The matte areas are in contrast to the remainder of the piece which is polished.  The opening is asymmetrical which is in keeping with the organic style of the form.  There is a simplicity and elegance in her pottery.  Sadly, Iris passed away in September 2018, but her pottery remains a classic.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Tafoya, Shirley – Mini Canteen with Carved Avanyu & Bear Paw

Shirley Tafoya was known for her exceptional miniatures.  Each piece was coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This is one of her classic canteen pieces.  It is very deeply carved on one side with a water serpent.  The other side has an impressed bear paw.  The entire piece is fully polished and fired a deep black.  After the firing, Shirley added the leather straps and wood stopper.  Shirley was so wonderfully talented and her miniatures were always inspired by traditional Santa Clara Pueblo shapes and forms.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 950.00
Youngblood, Mela, Nathan & Nancy – Wide Bowl with Avanyu (1975)

This is a very unusual carved bowl with a triple signature of Mela Youngblood and her two children, Nathan Youngblood and Nancy Youngblood.  The bowl was made in 1975.   I asked Nathan and he thought this might be the only piece that has all three signature!  The bowl was made by Nathan and finished and polished by Nancy and Mela.  It has a very complex avanyu (water serpent) encircling the piece.  The carving is deep and the piece is highly polished.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nathan Youngblood, Finished Nancy + Mela Youngblood, March 19, 1975”.  Definitely a classic and historically important bowl by all three of these significant potters!

$ 3,500.00
Sunn, Mabel – Bowl with Snake Design (1960’s)

This is an iconic bowl by Mabel Sunn from the 1960’s. The piece is made using a paddle-and-anvil technique and twice fired.  The black designs are derived from a mixture of mesquite sap and cactus spines.  Today, there are very few Maricopa artists making pottery.   Mabel was well-known for the relief snakes on her pottery. T his piece has the bowl polished red with the snake in relief and polished tan. It is also polished on the inside.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Mabel Sunn”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 425.00
Redbird, Ida – Jar with Mountain Designs (1960’s)

Ida Redbird is one of the best known of the potters involved in the revival of Maricopa pottery from 1937-40. She was featured in Arizona Highways in 1948. Her pottery is made using a paddle-and-anvil technique and they are twice fired. The black designs are derived from a mixture of mesquite sap and cactus spines.  This jar has a round body and a short neck. There are mountain designs on both the neck and the body of the piece.  It is complex in its patterns and the surface is highly polished.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Ida Redbird” on the bottom.

$ 300.00
Koopee, Marie Nampeyo – Large Bowl with Bird Wing Design (1960’s)

Marie Koopee Nampeyo was a daughter of Nellie Nampeyo and a granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano. Her grandson was Jacob Koopee. She learned to make pottery from her mother and possibly also from Nampeyo.  Over the course of her career, she did not make a lot of pottery.  This large bowl is fully polished and painted with a bird wing pattern, which is a derivative of the famous Migration Pattern.  The bowl was traditionally fired and has blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in bee-weed, “Marie Koopee”. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a rarity in Hopi-Tewa pottery!

$ 1,050.00
Quotskuyva, Dextra – “Lava Bed” Jar (1980’s)

This is one of the more unusual pieces we have had by Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo.  She is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This jar is polished on the neck and the bottom area is textured.  The client who had this piece said that Dextra told them the bottom area was meant to represent a lava bed.  There is definitely a textural feel to the surface that reminds one of volcanic rock.  It is also that volcanic rock which is often used by Native potters as temper for the clay to give it structure. The neck is polished tan and the “lava bed” is slipped with a red clay.   The jar was traditionally fired and there are a few blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in bee-weed, “Dextra” along with a corn plant to represent the Corn Clan.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Dextra was the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Wheelwright Museum in Santa Fe, along with a companion book entitled, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 1,500.00
Naha, Sylvia – Seedpot with Star and Flower Design

This miniature seedpot is an exceptionally intricate piece by Sylvia Naha.  She was a daughter of Helen “Featherwoman” Naha and a sister of Rainy and Burell Naha.  She was known for her distinctive pieces painted with intricate designs on a white polished clay surface.  Throughout the 1980s, Sylvia was considered among the most innovative of the Hopi potters.  Her pieces were classic in form and amazingly intricate in design.  This seedpot has a star pattern on the top and bottom of the piece.  On the sides are four flower patterns.  The center of each flower is very detailed with a fine-line hatchwork pattern.  There is an additional tan clay slip which is painted on the stars.  The black on the painting is from Bee-Weed (a plant) and the other colors are natural clay slips.  The seedpot is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The jar is signed on the bottom with a feather and an “S”. 

$ 325.00
Nampeyo, Iris – Large Wide Jar with Corn Design

Iris Nampeyo was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and well known for her elegant asymmetrical vessels with corn as part of the design in relief.  Iris began using the corn in relief on the surface of her pottery in the early 1980s. The corn is symbolic of being part of the Corn Clan.  The surface of the jar is stone polished and the corn on the front is in applique relief.  The shape of this jar is striking as it is very wide with a low shoulder.  The corn is elongated across the wide surface.  The husk of the corn is sharp and the matte area extends around to the shoulder of the jar.  The matte areas are in contrast to the remainder of the piece which is polished.  The opening is asymmetrical which is in keeping with the organic style of the form.  There is a simplicity and elegance in her pottery.  Sadly, Iris passed away in September 2018, but her pottery remains a classic.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,200.00
Hooee, Daisy Nampeyo – Jar with Bird Wing and Geometric Designs

Daisy Hooee Nampeyo is one of the extraordinary Hopi-Tewa women making pottery in the last century.  She was a daughter of Annie Nampeyo Healing and a granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano.  Her daughter is Shirley Benn and granddaughter Cheryl Naha Nampeyo.  Daisy spent many of her formative years with her grandmother and learned how to make pottery at a very early age.  However, she began to lose her vision and had an operation to remove cataracts due to an infection.  She attended the L’Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris through her benefactor, Anita Bladwin. When she returned to Hopi, she married Ray Naha, then Leo Pablano (from Zuni) and finally Sidney Hooee from Zuni.  Her life story is as fascinating as her pottery. This jar is an unusual shape with a low shoulder and a turned out rim. The body of the piece is fully painted with detailed bird wings and cloud designs. The interior of the jar has a stippled appearance.  The jar was traditionally fired to create the surface coloration.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Daisy H. Nampeyo”.   Definitely a piece of history!

$ 950.00
Hooee, Daisy Nampeyo & Shirley Benn – Bowl with Hopi Birds

This is a collaborative piece by Daisy Hooee Nampeyo and her daughter, Shirley Benn.  Daisy was a daughter of Annie Nampeyo Healing and a granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano.  Her daughter is Shirley Benn and granddaughter Cheryl Naha Nampeyo.  Daisy spent many of her formative years with her grandmother and learned how to make pottery at a very early age.  However, she began to lose her vision and had an operation to remove cataracts due to an infection.  She attended the L’Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris through her benefactor, Anita Bladwin. When she returned to Hopi, she married Ray Naha, then Leo Pablano (from Zuni) and finally Sidney Hooee from Zuni.  Her life story is as fascinating as her pottery. This bowl was made by Daisy and painted by her daughter, Shirley Benn. The bowl is thin-walled and the designs are very delicately painted. They are a series of classic Hopi-Tewa birds which encompass the surface of the piece.  The bowl was traditionally fired to create the surface coloration.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Daisy Hooee Nampeyo, Shirley Benn”.   Definitely a piece of history!

$ 250.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Jar with Awatovi Style Bird and Bird Tail (1995)

Mark Tahbo was renown for his creative pottery shapes, designs, and firings.  He learned to make pottery from his great-grandmother, Grace Chapella.  Each piece reflects the symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter. The designs are painted using native clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  This jar is coil built and has very thin walls.  It was fully polished and then painted. The one side has a stylized bird based on imagery from Awatovi (near Hopi).  Down the sides are two bands of geometric patterns.  The side opposite the bird has a bird tail design.  Below the shoulder is a cloud design.  Interestingly, if you reach inside the jar, you can feel how Mark polished all the way on the inside to the shoulder. I remember he would talk about that as a surprise in his work that you couldn’t see it but could feel the polish inside.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mark Tahbo”.  It was made in 1995.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,100.00
Nampeyo, Rachel – Jar with Bird Design (1970’s)

Rachel Namingha Nampeyo was a granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano and a daughter of Annie Healing. She was the mother of noted potters Priscilla Nampeyo, Dextra Quotskuyva, Eleanor Lucas, Emerson Namingha and Ruth Namingha. She was known for her use of traditional designs on her pottery and continuing the pottery legacy of her grandmother.  This jar is a classic shape with the wide shoulder and short neck.  The design has two birds encircling the jar.  They are larger with polished red heads and tail feathers.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rachel Nampeyo”.

$ 500.00
Nampeyo, Nellie Douma – Small Bowl with Bird Wing Designs (1972)

Nellie Nampeyo Douma was the second daughter of Nampeyo of Hano and a sister of Fannie Nampeyo and Annie Nampeyo.  This small bowl is coil built and painted with bee-weed for the black.  The design is a bird wing pattern, stylized from the classic migration pattern.  There is very intricately painted hatchwork designs below the bird wings.  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Nellie Nampeyo”.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair. This bowl has an interesting provenance.  It was originally purchased in 1972 by a collector who went to Hopi and managed the meet Nellie Nampeyo and her daughter Marie Koopee right after they had fired the pottery.  He bought all the pieces that they had and put the date on them on the bottom in pencil. I left the date and number, as I thought it was a great part of the story of this bowl!”.  It is in good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair. There is a small inclusion on the side, which appears to be pre-firing.

$ 200.00
Quotskuyva, Dextra – Large Jar with Eagle Tail Design (Late 1980’s)

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This large jar is from the late 1980s.  The piece is part of a series she created where she did not polish the surface of her pottery but instead left it matte.  Dextra was always experimental in her approach to pottery and would often push the boundaries of what was “acceptable” in Hopi-Tewa wares.  This large jar is a classic Sikyatki form with a wide shoulder and a short neck.  The top of the jar is very intricately painted with an eagle tail design.  The thin lines and complex pattern are highlighted by polished red areas.  The large red sections accentuate both design and form.  The black is bee-weed and the red is a clay slip.  The jar was traditionally fired and there are a few blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in bee-weed, “Dextra” along with a corn plant to represent the Corn Clan.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Dextra was the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Wheelwright Museum in Santa Fe, along with a companion book entitled, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 7,700.00
Naranjo, Teresita  – Large Jar with Avanyu (1980’s)

This is one of the largest and most extraordinary red carved jars by Teresita Naranjo we have had in the gallery in years.  Teresita was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and know for her deeply carved pottery.   Each piece was coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This jar is very large in size and fully carved with a water serpent encircling the piece.  The body of the avanyu ebbs and swirls around the jar in deeply-carved segments.  Note how the designs extend down from the negative space in areas.  It is easy to see how her great-niece Tammy Garcia was inspired by work at this caliber!  The area behind the carving is slipped with the traditional cream-colored clay slip.  The jar was traditionally fired to a deep red coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita Naranjo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 7,500.00
Montoya, Tomasita – Incised Bowl with Rain Designs (1960’s)

Tomasita Montoya is one of the early revivalists in San Juan pottery.  She was one of the original eight San Juan potters who revived the art form in the 1930s.  The Pueblo was renown for their pottery but by about 1900 there were no potters left. In 1930 Regina Cata organized a pottery study group at San Juan Pueblo with the intent of revitalizing pottery production. The group studied ancient potsherds of wares made at San Juan in earlier times and selected Potsuwi‘i Incised Ware (1450-1500) as a basis for a contemporary pottery type.  This bowl is one of her classic incised pieces.  It is polished red on the top and the base.  The center section is incised with a double row of rain designs.  The recessed area of the incised designs has a mica slip.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tomasita Montoya”.

$ 200.00
Chino, Brian – Mini Fine-line Lidded Jar (1990’s)

Brian Chino was a son of noted potter Edna Chino and a brother of Jay Vallo and Corrine Chino. He began making pottery in 1988.  This is one of his classic miniatures.  The jar is fully painted with very thin lines to create an interlocking star pattern.  Along the shoulder are feathers painted over a red clay slip. There is an elongated neck and then a small round lid which is slipped red and then also painted with very thin lines!  His work was always exceptional for the size.  This piece is signed, “B. Chino” on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 250.00
Gutierrez, Margaret Lou – Large Jar with Feather and Hatchwork Designs (1990’s)

Margaret Lou Gutierrez was the only daughter of noted potters Tonita & Juan Roybal.  She began making pottery in the 1970’s and this is one of her pieces from the 1990’s. This is a larger jar which is fully polished and painted around the shoulder.  The painted designs are variations of feather, cloud and hatch-work designs.  It is a very complex pattern which includes the very elongated feathers for which she is famous.  The hatchwork imagery is also very reminiscent of the painting style of her father, Juan Cruz.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Lou Gutierrez”.  It is hard to see the signature in the photo, but it is clear on the piece. 

$ 600.00
Year Flower, Lucy – Jar with Carved Avanyu (1980’s)

Lucy Year Flower was a daughter-in-law of Camilio Tafoya and a sister-in-law of Joseph Lonewolf and Grace Medicine Flower. She began making pottery in the 1970’s and was known for her flowing carved designs.  This jar is fully carved with a feathered water serpent (avanyu) encircling the bowl and additional cloud and rain designs.  Typical of her work, look at the matte area surrounding the polished avanyu and note the deeply incised lines.  She would do this to help accentuate her carving.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Lucy Year Flower” on the bottom.

$ 275.00
Sunn, Mabel – Large Bowl with Wind Designs (1967) with Ribbon

This is a large wide bowl by Mabel Sunn from 1967. The piece is made using a paddle-and-anvil technique and twice fired.  The black designs are derived from a mixture of mesquite sap and cactus spines.  Today, there are very few Maricopa artists making pottery.   Mabel was well-known for pottery style and this large bowl is fully polished on the inside and outside.  It is painted around the shoulder with a wind design.  It received a First Place ribbon from the 1967 Arizona State Fair.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Mabel Sunn”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 550.00
Juan, Mary – Red & Tan Jar with Cloud Designs (1960’s)

Mary Juan was a cousin of noted potter Ida Redbird. She was one of the original members of the 1938 Maricopa Pottery Cooperative. She was part of the early Revival Period artists from 1937-41. She continued to create pottery until the 1960s. Mary Juan was known for the finely polished deep red slip, graceful shapes, and finely painted designs.  This jar is polished red on the top and tan below the neck. The top area is painted with a cloud and lightning design.   This piece is traditionally handcrafted from native clay with the paddle and anvil method, iron oxide red slip is decorated with black mesquite sap paint and pit fired.  This jar is signed on the bottom, “Mary Juan”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 225.00
Redbird, Ida – Long Neck Jar with Handles (1970) With Ribbon

Ida Redbird is one of the best known of the potters involved in the revival of Maricopa pottery from 1937-40. She was featured in Arizona Highways in 1948. Her pottery is made using a paddle-and-anvil technique and they are twice fired. The black designs are derived from a mixture of mesquite sap and cactus spines.  This is an exceptional piece of her pottery.  The jar has a round shoulder and the classic elongated neck. There are two handles extending down from the neck to the shoulder.  The jar is painted with scorpions near the base and cloud designs on the neck.  It received a second place ribbon from the 1970 Gallup Inter-tribal Ceremonials.  It is signed on the bottom, “Ida Redbird”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely an exciting piece of history!

$ 875.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Miniature Bird Tail Seedpot with Stars (1990)

Mark Tahbo was renown for his creative pottery shapes, designs, and firings.  He learned to make pottery from his great-grandmother, Grace Chapella.  Each piece reflects the symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter. The designs are painted using native clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  This is one of his few miniatures. It is from 1990. The piece is painted on the top with bird tail designs along with stars (the “x’s).  There are more stars on the bottom.  It was traditionally fired but with very light blushes.  It is signed on the bottom, “Mark Tahbo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 275.00
Tafoya, Ray  – Jar with Bear, Butterflies and Bear Lid (1990-4)

This is an exceptional lidded jar by Ray Tafoya.  The jar has a medallion on the lower side with a stylized bear.  Surrounding the bear are butterflies.  The neck has a feather pattern. The lid is a bear with a heart line.  There are additional clay colors of red, yellow, and blue, which accentuate the designs.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay with his hallmark, “White Mountain”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Note how many of the geometric designs are similar to ones used today by his daughter, Jennifer Tafoya.  

$ 850.00
Chino, Marie Z. – Long Neck Jar with Bird Wing Design (1970’s)

This is an exceptional long neck jar by Marie Z. Chino.  Marie is famous as one of the revivalists at Acoma Pueblo, along with Lucy M. Lewis, Jessie Garcia, and a few others.  This jar is thin-walled with a round shoulder and elongated neck.  The piece is fully painted with a bird wing design.  It is an interlocking pattern which starts small at the neck and enlarges as it nears the shoulder.  It is a visually striking example of the “op-art” influence in Acoma pottery.  The jar was traditionally fired so there are some very slight color variations to the white.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie Z. Chino”.  It is a classic jar where shape, history, and design are in perfect balance!

$ 2,800.00
Martinez, Maria – Jar with Rain Designs (1920’s), “Marie”

This bowl is an early piece by Maria Martinez.  The bowl was made and polished by Maria and painted by her husband, Julian. The piece is highly polished and the designs are simple with a cloud pattern at the rim and rain and lightning designs extending down to the shoulder. While the designs are simple, the style is one which perfectly shows off the highly polished surface for which Maria was known.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie”. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 1,850.00
Garcia, Jessie – 15″ Corrugated Water Jar (1970’s)

This is an exceptional large jar by Jessie Garcia.  She is one of the great names in Acoma pottery.  Between 1950 and 1970, she along with Lucy Lewis and Marie Z. Chino, led the revival of Acoma pottery.  This is one of the largest pieces of her pottery we have come across.  It is a water jar shape and the entire piece is corrugated in style.  “Corrugated” means that each individual coil is left exposed and she would press them down to create the triangular design.  The result is a striking appearance as it seems as if each row overlaps the one below. The neck is plain.  The entire piece was traditionally fired, so there is some slight color variation from the fire.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Jessie Garcia”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,500.00
Naranjo, Ursulita – Plainware Oval Bowl (1970’s)

Ursulita Naranjo (1924-1988) was the mother of Dolores Curran and Geri Naranjo.  She was known for her painted pottery.  This bowl is highly polished and oval in shape but with no design.  It is polished on the side and the inside.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Ursulita Naranjo”.

$ 175.00
Gutierrez, Margaret – Polychrome Horse and Koshari Figure (1990’s)

This horse figure was made and painted by Margaret Gutierrez.  It is her whimsical style of pottery which is reminiscent of the work she also made with her brother, Luther Gutierrez.  The horse is lying down and there is a koshari clown figure on its back.  The various colors are derived from natural clay slips.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Margaret”.

$ 100.00
Shutiva, Stella – Long Neck Jar with Corrugated Design

Stella Shutiva was renown for her corrugated pottery.  Her style was inspired by pre-historic style corrugated vessels.  This long neck jar is fully polished on the rim and the body.  The neck is corrugated with designs impressed into the clay.  The long rows are the actual coils, while the round sections are where she indented the clay.  She created a striking flow of design on the jar.  The piece is signed, “S. Shutiva” and it is in very good condition.  There are no cracks, restoration or repair. There is a small chip on the rim which can be seen in the second to the last photo. 

$ 550.00
Tafoya, Shirley – Mini Canteen with Double Spout and Gourd Design

Shirley Tafoya was known for her exceptional miniatures.  Each piece was coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This is an unusual shape with a double spout on the canteen.  The one spout is taller than the other, which has a wood cork in it (which is removable).   Around the side of the canteen are the classic “gourd” indentions, which come from the gourd shards used to smooth out the pottery when it is being made.  The piece is highly polished.  There is a leather strap which is interested in the two holes on the side.  Note as well there is a tiny etched cloud design on the side.  Shirley was so wonderfully talented and her miniatures were always inspired by traditional Santa Clara Pueblo shapes and forms.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 950.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Wide Jar with Avanyu and Bear Lid (1972)

Joseph Lonewolf began making pottery in 1970-1.  His bear lidded vessels, which he only created for a few years, may be among his most iconic in style.  This wide jar is fully polished and etched with a feathered water serpent encircling the piece.  The body of the avanyu is very complex in design.  The matte area surrounding the avanyu is incised with swirling lines.  The lid has a bear with a fetish bundle of turquoise and coral.  The base of the bear is also fully etched with similar swirling lines to those on the bowl.  It is an exceptional piece in design and form.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Definitely a classic of Joseph’s early pottery style!

$ 2,600.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Jar with Avanyu and Bear Lid (1973)

Joseph Lonewolf began making pottery in 1970-1.  His bear lidded vessels, which he only created for a few years, may be among his most iconic in style.  This jar is fully polished and etched with a feathered water serpent encircling the piece. The matte area surrounding the avanyu is vertically incised with lines.  The lid has a bear with a fetish bundle of turquoise and coral.  The base of the bear is also fully etched vertically.  It is an exceptional piece in design and form.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Definitely a classic of Joseph’s early pottery style!

$ 2,400.00
Tafoya, Shirley – Jar with Melon Swirl Neck

Shirley Tafoya was the youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her miniature pottery.  This jar is from the late 1990’s.  It is a classic Santa Clara water jar shape. The rim is fluted and the neck is carved with an old-style melon swirl design.  Shirley would often use historic pieces as inspiration for her pottery.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya”. A classic of Tafoya Family pottery!

$ 800.00
Gonzales, Rose – Large Bowl with Feather Design

Rose Gonzales is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career, she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This wide bowl is her classic shape with the sharp shoulder.  It is painted on the shoulder with a feather and storm pattern.  The painting is sharp and the bowl is very highly polished.  It is fired a deep black in coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rose”.  It is in excellent condition with no crack, restoration or repair.

$ 950.00
Gonzales, Rose – Small Bowl with Rain Designs

Rose Gonzales is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career, she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This bowl is one of her classic shapes and designs.  It has a sharp shoulder and the bowl is carved in her “cameo style”.  The design is a series of rain and lightning patterns.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rose”.  It is in excellent condition with no crack, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00
Nampeyo, Fannie – Migration Pattern Jar (1970’s)

This is a classic jar by Fannie Nampeyo. She was the youngest daughter of noted potter Nampeyo of Hano and also the mother of noted potters Iris Nampeyo, Leah Nampeyo, and Thomas Polacca.  She was certainly among the most skilled of her generation for painting designs pottery.  While her mother revived the “migration” or bird wing design, Fannie made is a signature design of her pottery and of the Nampeyo family.  This jar is wide in shape with a round shoulder and a short neck with a turned out rim.  However, it is the migration pattern which dominates the surface of this piece.  The migration pattern, or bird wings, extend around the entire jar in 8 sections.  The jar was traditionally fired so that it has some visually striking blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom, “Fannie Nampeyo” and a corn plant representing the corn clan.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one spot of spalling on the top of the shoulder which can be seen in the photos.  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo said of  the migration pattern:

“This is the one design that was really stressed for us to use, the migration pattern. Nothing but lines, representing the migration of all the people to all the places, including down below and up above. It has seven points at the top and bottom. All the x’s represent life from the bottom and top, telling you the universe is one. The thin lines, I just wanted to paint them real fast and real close to try and include everyone.”  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo, Spoken Through Clay

$ 2,200.00
Quotskuyva, Dextra – Jar with Hummingbird Design (1990’s)

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This is one of her pieces from the 1990s. The jar is very highly polished and painted colorful hummingbird below the shoulder.  Note the red on the head and the wings.  Behind the hummingbird is the bird tail design.  It is very detailed in its design.  Across the shoulder is a stylized bird pattern.  The jar is painted with bee-weed (black) and a red clay slip.   The piece as traditionally fired, which created the striking coloration to this piece.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dextra” along with a corn plant to represent the Corn Clan.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Dextra was the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture, along with a companion book entitled, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 2,200.00
Martinez, Maria – Large Fully Polished Open Bowl, “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

During the 1950’s Maria Martinez made and polished pottery and signed using her Tewa name, “Maria Poveka”.  Poveka means “Water Lilly”.  This is one of her classic open bowls, which is polished on both the inside and outside. Interestingly, today, few potters will attempt to fully polish the inside and outside of a piece, as it adds the possibility of it cracking.  The bowl is very highly polished and it was fired a deep black.  It is certainly the classic style of work by Maria.  The bowl is signed in the clay on the bottom, “Maria Pove’ka”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

 

$ 1,850.00
Blue Corn –  Bowl with Feather Pattern (1980s)

While Blue Corn is one of the innovative San Ildefonso potters of the late 1900’s.  She is often best known for her polychrome pottery but began her career making black pottery.  This bowl is from the 1980’s. It is very highly polished and painted with a feather pattern.  The design encircles the entire bowl.  It is fired a deep black.  It is signed in the clay, “Blue Corn”.   The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Jar with Carved Avanyu (1970’s)

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery and her creative use of various clay slips on her pottery. She learned to make pottery from Maria Martinez at San Ildefonso.  This is one of her few carved pieces which is also polychrome. The jar is carved with a water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece.  The bowl is polished tan and the avanyu and the carved areas are outlined with a black clay.  The background area is slipped with a taupe colored clay.  The result is a striking appearance where the depth of the carving is enhanced by the coloration.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are two small bubbles in the taupe area below the neck of the avanyu, which appear in coloration to have occurred at the time of the firing.

$ 875.00
Naha, Helen “Featherwoman” – Bowl with Bird Migration Design (1970’s)

Helen “Feather Woman” Naha was known for her traditional white-ware pottery.  This bowl is from the 1970s and it has a series of birds in flight as the design.  If the design looks somewhat familiar, it should, as it is her variation on the classic “migration pattern”.  Here, Helen has made the design into birds in flight.  The top has the bird heads while the bottom the bird wing. There are intricate lines connecting the birds together. The piece is also polished on the inside!  The bowl is painted with bee-weed (black) and a red clay slip.  It was traditionally fired and there are slight color variations from the firing.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom with her hallmark feather.

$ 975.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Red & Black Bowl with Nine Birds (1978)

Joseph Lonewolf began making pottery in 1970-1.  This is a classic piece of his pottery in the black and red style. The firing is one where he created a “red and black” coloration at the end of the firing process before the manure was added to turn the piece black.  The bowl is polished, incised and etched before it is fired.  The design on this piece is a series of nine birds.  The top half of the bowl is red and the bottom half is black.  The area behind the birds is more deeply incised with a swirling linear design.   The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,250.00
Youngblood, Mela  – Gourd Bowl (1974)

Mela Youngblood began making pottery in the late 1960’s and quickly achieved a distinctive style for her work.  Each piece of her work very highly polished and when carved the edges are distinctly rounded.  This bowl is a stylized version of the classic “gourd pot”. This style usually has indented areas on the surface of the vessel. On this piece Mela has created indentions on the side of the bowl leaving the top and bottom a fully polished surface.  The bowl was made in 1974 and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is beautifully polished and unique in its form.

$ 1,200.00
Martinez, Adam – Black Clay Bear (1980’s)

This black polishhed bear is by Adam Martinez.  Adam was the youngest son of Maria Martinez, and Santana (his wife) painted Maria’s pottery in the 1940-50’s.  Adam made clay bear figures in the 1980’s and 1990s and they are just signed by him.  They are clay and stone polished.  This bear has a stylized head an body.  It is signed on the bottom “Adam”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic piece!

$ 600.00
Baca, Angela – Red Melon Bowl with 24 Ribs

This is a classic round melon bowl by Angela Baca.  It is very deeply carved and each rib is stone polished.  On this bowl, the space between the ribs is matte so it contrasts to the polished surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Angela Baca” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Bowl with Antelope Medallions (1973)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This bowl is very thin walled and has an indented bottom.  It is fully polished red and there are three medallions.  Each medallion has an antelope as the design.  The antelope are etched into the clay before firing.  The border of each medallion is polished green.  Joseph was one of the first potters to begin using clays that were not red and this is a very early example of his green clay slip.  The remainder of the bowl is fully polished red.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 2,200.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Standing Fawn & Butterflies” Seedpot (1989)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1989.  The piece is coil built and stone polished. The design is etched into the clay.  There is a single standing fawn on one side surrounded by a blue clay slip.  Surrounding the fawn are 20 small butterflies also highlighted in blue. On the back is a doe and her fawn lightly etched into the clay. They are surrounded by more very tiny etched butterflies! Near the base is the 1989 yearly symbol, an ankh, an ancient Egyptian symbol of life.  Each year Joseph would create a new “yearly symbol” and use it to “date” his pieces for that year.  Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  The piece is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,200.00
Naranjo, Teresita  – Small Fully Carved Jar with Feathers and Avanyu (1970’s)

Teresita Naranjo was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and know for her deeply carved pottery.  This jar is fully carved with a feather pattern around the neck and water serpent around the body of the piece.  It is very much like some of her larger pieces with complex designs.  Note how deeply it is carved and the intricate flow of design on the body of the avanyu.  It is traditionally fired black and signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita Naranjo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 650.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Mimbres Insects Seedpot (1982)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1982 and it is highly polished and fired red.  The design has six different Mimbres insects as the design.  There are a bee, butterfly, beetle, mosquito and two others.  Each is etched into the clay and then their bodies consist of additional designs.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  There are three different green clays, blue and white.  Near the base is the yearly symbol for 1982, which is a “+”.   The piece is very highly polished and intricately designed.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Joseph Lonewolf said of his use of Mimbres imagery in his pottery:

“I regard the Mimbres as my ancestors. Though I refine their designs, each design must have meaning for me. In my dreams I see how to use the design, how to make the pot happen. Then when I work the clay, everything flows. Some people wonder why I keep changing styles, colors, forms. But I can’t just sit there and make pots. Like any artist, I must try different things, different techniques. I must meet the challenge with my hands. The patterns and the methods I see in my mind during my dreams.” —Joseph Lonewolf, 1974, Spoken Through Clay

“I regard the Mimbres as my ancestors. Though I refine their designs, each design must have meaning for me. In my dreams I see how to use the design, how to make the pot happen. Then when I work the clay, everything flows. Some people wonder why I keep changing styles, colors, forms. But I can’t just sit there and make pots. Like any artist, I must try different things, different techniques. I must meet the challenge with my hands. The patterns and the methods I see in my mind during my dreams.” —Joseph Lonewolf, 1974, Spoken Through Clay

$ 1,800.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Rabbit and Rabbit Hunters (1987)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1987 and it is highly polished and fired black.  The design has two Mimbres inspired figures who are hunting a rabbit.  One is holding a “rabbit stick” and the other has just thrown his.  The opposite side has a Mimbres rabbit etched into the clay.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Near the base is an incised butterfly.  The 1987 symbol, the Propeller of Life, is also etched into the design.  The piece is very highly polished and intricately designed.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Joseph Lonewolf said of his use of Mimbres imagery in his pottery:

“I regard the Mimbres as my ancestors. Though I refine their designs, each design must have meaning for me. In my dreams I see how to use the design, how to make the pot happen. Then when I work the clay, everything flows. Some people wonder why I keep changing styles, colors, forms. But I can’t just sit there and make pots. Like any artist, I must try different things, different techniques. I must meet the challenge with my hands. The patterns and the methods I see in my mind during my dreams.” —Joseph Lonewolf, 1974, Spoken Through Clay

$ 1,400.00
Suina, Louise E. – Storyteller with 10 Children  (1980’s)

Louise E. Suina (1939-1992) was known for her intricately painted storytellers.  This figure has eight children who are formed and painted with activities from playing ball to playing a drum. Note as well the very intricately painted design for the apron she is wearing.   The figure is signed on the bottom, “Louise E. Suina”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 450.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Seedpot with Antelope (1979)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1979.  It has an incised antelope as the design on the top of the piece.  On the sides of the piece are rain and lightning designs and even a very small dragonfly!  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,100.00
Pino-Martinez, Dominguita – Black-on-Red Jar (ca 1915)

This is a fascinating jar by Dominguita Pino Martinez.  She was the mother of Cresencia Martinez and Tonita Roybal and the grandmother of Alfonso Roybal (Awa Tsireh), Tomasita Montoya Sanchez, JD Robyal and Margaret Lou Gutierrez.  She was well known by the early 1900’s for her black-on-red pottery.  This jar is a classic example of her work and although it was not signed (she did not sign any of her work), it has a great provenance.  The piece was acquired from Dick Howard, who had shown the jar to Maria Martinez in 1965.  Maria identified it as the work of Dominguita Pino from around 1915.  Dick was one of the great early resources for getting pottery identified by Maria.  Dick had written this out on the receipt for the piece when it was acquired in 1999 (see the last photo). However, it is not just the identification from Dick Howard, but the jar itself is one of her classic styles. The shape with the straight style of neck and the high shoulder are certainly associated with her work. The painting style of the open designs is also in her manner.  Some of her later pieces are more detailed and probably painted by Tonita.  The jar was slipped red and then painted with the black to create the coloration.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair. There is a slight lean to one side and a small chip on the inside rim.

In “Spoken Though Clay” Dick Howard had an interesting quote (he had originally said to Richard Spivey) when talking about identifying historic San Ildefonso pottery.

“Because Maria—and I’ve found this to be true of other potters—considers the potter to be the one who does the potting. The painting is aside from that. Only rarely did she even comment on the painting. Once in a while she’d say, ‘Oh, that’s a nice design.’ But almost always she was really examining the potting, and she’d feel the pot or feel the inside. So unless I asked, as a follow-up, if the potter had also decorated it, she usually didn’t tell me one way or another, which I thought was interesting. Because to my eye what I often see first when I look at the decorated pot is the design, but that wasn’t what she saw. She always just sort of looked through the design.” —Richard Howard, 2000

 

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 5,800.00
Quotskuyva, Dextra – Jar with Nampeyo Style Eagle Tail Design (1980’s)

This is a very traditionally inspired jar by Dextra Quotskuyva.  She is certainly one of the great innovators among Hopi-Tewa potters.  Her work began with more classic imagery and then has evolved over the years to more unique and stylized designs. This piece is from the mid-1980’s.  It is inspired by the work of Nampeyo of Hano and the early style of painted red on the pottery.  In the early 1930’s Mary Colton at the Museum of Northern Arizona introduced a new clay slip to Hopi.  Previously the red had a more ‘painterly” appearance (see last photo of a jar by Nampeyo of Hano), which allowed the clay to show through. The new red is the one we see used today which more completely covers the painted area.  This jar looks back at the earlier style of Nampeyo and the red which has a more “painterly” appearance.  This jar is painted with red around the neck and the remainder has a classic eagle tail design.  However, note the very thin lines for the checkerboard pattern on the bird tail. The style of the painting is certainly Dextra’s but there is a wonderful homage to the work of her great-grandmother as well!   The bowl is traditionally fired so that there are blushes and color variations around the surface.  It is signed on the bottom with bee-weed, “Dextra” with an ear of corn representing the Corn Clan.   The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. The piece comes to us from the collection of Georgia Loloma, the wife not noted Hopi jeweler Charles Loloma and it is a piece the acquired directly from Dextra.  Dextra has been the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture called, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 6,500.00
Tafoya, Camilio -“Frogs and Mice” Original Etching (1981)  23/60

This is an original etching by Camilio Tafoya.  It uses similar designs to those in his pottery.  Here it depicts a charming combination of frogs and mice playing in the sun.  There are additional colors added to the etching.  This piece is 23/60 and it was printed by El Cerro Graphics, who printed all of Camilio and Jospeh’s etchings.  It is dated 1981 and signed, “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”.   It is in excellent condition.

$ 150.00
Haungooah, Art Cody- Seedpot with Sun, Lizard and Frog (1981)

This seedpot by Art Cody Haungooah is from 1981.  It is fully polished and has etched designs. There is a sunface in one medallion.  The other medallion ahs a lizard and frog. This medallion is “two-toned” to make it black-and sienna.  The contrast of the highly polished surfaces and the color from the sienna is striking.  Art was Kiowa and married to Martha Suazo from Santa Clara and that is where he began to make pottery. The bowl is signed, “Haungooah” and a flute player.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 250.00
Haungooah, Art Cody- Seedpot with Mosquite Man (1977)

This seedpot by Art Cody Haungooah is from 1977.  It is fully polished and has a single etched medallion. The design is the “Mosquito Man”.  It is a design which is found on the kiva murals at Pottery Mound, NM.  The last photo is the Mosquito Man from the actual murals.  On this piece, Art depicted the figure with a striking similarity to the actual mural figure.  The remainder of the piece is highly polished.  It is signed, “Haungooah” and a flute player.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 200.00
Tafoya, SaraFina – Plate with Avanyu and Wild Boar (1930’s)

SaraFina Tafoya was the matriarch of a family of renowned potters,  including her children Margaret Tafoya, Camilio Tafoya, and Christina Naranjo. While she is known for her large vessels, in the 1930’s she created a series of smaller painted and plainware vessels which were signed.  They are unusual and scarce pieces, yet a fascinating part of the history of Santa Clara pottery.  This is an exceptional polychrome plate.  The design in the center is a boar and it is surrounded by an avanu (water serpent).  They are both painted with a red clay slip and accented with white and gray.  The design of the boar is unusual in Santa Clara designs from this period.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Serafina Santa Clara Pueblo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Signed, “Serafina”: The Signed Pottery of SaraFina Tafoya

To learn more about the SaraFina’s signatures, check out the new article by Charles S. King, “Signed SaraFina”.

$ 4,000.00
Tafoya, SaraFina – Bowl with Lightning Designs (1933)

SaraFina Tafoya was the matriarch of a family of renowned potters,  including her children Margaret Tafoya, Camilio Tafoya, and Christina Naranjo. While she is known for her large vessels, in the 1930’s she created a series of smaller painted and plainware vessels which were signed.  They are unusual and scarce pieces, yet a fascinating part of the history of Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is a classic piece of painted pottery and has a fascinating provenance.  The bowl was originally acquired in 1933 by the Denver Art Museum.  It was included in the book “Margaret Tafoya” by Mary Ellen and Lawrence Blair on p. 53 (fig. 2-19).  The bowl was later deaccessioned by the DAM and ended up in a private collection.  The bowl is fully polished and painted red-on-red with a lightning design.  The designs are highlighted with a white clay slip.  It is a complex and varied design which relies as much on the matte painted areas as the negative polished space.  The bowl is signed in the clay on the bottom, “Sarafina Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Interestingly, it still has the original catalog number for the museum as well as the museum card.  Definitely a great piece of history!

 

Signed, “Serafina”: The Signed Pottery of SaraFina Tafoya

To learn more about the SaraFina’s signatures, check out the new article by Charles S. King, “Signed SaraFina”.

$ 1,800.00
Koopee, Jacob -19″ Wide Bowl with Migration Pattern & Hopi Cradle Doll Designs

This is an amazing large open bowl by Jacob Koopee.  Jake was known for his large pieces and his variations on traditional Hopi-Tewa designs.  This large open bowl is coil built and it is painted on the outside and the inside. On the outside there is the classic migration pattern.  Jake had an ability to paint the fine lines of the pattern thin and even. The inside of the bowl is also fully painted with hand prints and cradle dolls.  Each of the cradle dolls is a different katsina, including a Qooqule, Grandmother, Runner and other figures.  The small hand prints were meant to represent the children given the cradle dolls as gifts.  The bowl is signed on the bottom with a flute player, which was one of Jake’s signatures.  This immense bowl is a striking example of his skill as both potter and painter.  It is traditionally fired and painted with bee weed (black) and natural clay slips. Jake won numerous awards during his career including “Best of Show” in 2005 at both Santa Fe Indian Market and the Heard Museum Market.  I was lucky to have been a pottery judge both years at both events, and it was exciting to see an artist create such dynamic work.  Our consignor has asked us to lower the price, which makes this large bowl an exceptional value.

$ 9,200.00
Martinez, Maria – Jar with Rain and Lightning Designs (1930’s)

This is a classic round jar by Maria Martinez and her husband, Julian.  Maria would make the pottery and Julian would paint the design.  This jar has a very round shape and a slight neck.  The design painted on the shoulder is a cloud, rain, and lightning pattern.  It has a striking stylistic pattern using extended lines, half-circles and open space imagery.  The jar has a highly polished surface and a slight gunmetal appearance.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie + Julian”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   It’s always great to see early work by Maria and Julian in such good condition.

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 3,500.00
Martinez, Maria – Jar with Cloud Designs (Maria Popovi 769)

This is a short neck jar by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the jar while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The jar is highly polished and has the classic cloud, wind and rain pattern which is painted around the shoulder.  The shape is iconic for Maria with the high shoulder and short neck.  While the painting and shape are beautiful, it is the firing which is striking.  The jar has a very gunmetal in coloration to the surface with a very high shine.  The jar is signed on thhttps://kinggalleries.com/maria-martinez-pottery-signatures/e bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi 769“. The signature indicates that it was made around in July 1969.  The jar is in excellent shape with no condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

 

$ 4,000.00
Aguilar, Rosalie & Joe – Carved Plate with Ram Dancer (1930’s)

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional pottery throughout their time working together.  In the 1930’s they began to make carved pottery.  This plate is one of their most complex designs.  The design is a Ram Dancer, which is seen at San Ildefonso Pueblo during Feast Day in January.  The Ram Dancer is carved into the clay and there are incised designs on the kilt and legs along with painted designs on the neck and ram’s horn.  Surrounding the figure are cloud, rain and lightning designs.  The background area is matte against the polished surfaces of the design.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Rosalie & Joe”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a few light scratches on the rim and back and a bit of wear along the back of the dancer.  However, nothing unexpected which is not age-related.  This is certainly a unique piece both culturally and artistically. 

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

$ 1,400.00
Sanchez, Desideria – Large Jar with Bird Wing Designs (1920’s)

Desideria Montoya Sanchez was a sister of noted potter Maria Martinez.  She was known for her traditional pottery and use of both classic and innovative designs. This jar is from the 1920’s and has a wide shoulder and sloping sides.  There are three sections of design, each with a stylized bird wing pattern.  There are cloud patterns above the wings and below is a checkerboard design.  Separating each of the sections are a series of small dots.  The jar is highly polished and fired a slivery black coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Desideria”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It’s great to see a piece of her pottery with such complex designs.

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

$ 1,600.00
Navasie, Joy “Frogwoman” – Jar with Birds (1980’s)

This smaller jar by Joy “Frog Woman” Navasie is one of her classic shapes.  The jar has straight sides and it is polished on the inside and the outside.  The jar is slipped with the white clay and then painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black).   The sides of the jar are very tightly painted in four panels.  It’s nice to see a smaller piece with such precision to the lines!  Two panels are birds and the other two are bird tail designs. The black painted with bee-weed (a plant) and the red is a deeper red clay she began to use in the 1980’s.  It has been traditionally fired so there are some variations in the coloration from white to almost a pinkish color.   The jar is signed on the bottom with her Frog Hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 1,100.00
Martinez, Maria  – Plate with Cloud Designs “Marie + Santana”, 1940’s

This plate by Maria Martinez is one of her classic designs.  It was made and polished by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana. It is painted around the rim with a cloud design.  It is a style which Santana often used for her larger plates.  It’s nice to see it on a smaller piece!  The plate is signed on the back, “Marie + Santana”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair but some minor surface scratches.  Definitely a classic!  

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 1,200.00
Martinez, Maria – Fully Polished Open Bowl, “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

During the 1950’s Maria Martinez made and polished pottery and signed using her Tewa name, “Maria Poveka”.  Poveka means “Water Lilly”.  This is one of her classic open bowls, which are polished on both the inside and outside. Interestingly, today, few potters will attempt to fully polish the inside and outside of a piece, as it adds the possibility of it cracking.  The bowl is very highly polished and there are small areas of gunmetal and coloration in the black from the heat of the firing.  The bowl is signed in the clay on the bottom, “Maria Pove’ka”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

 

$ 1,100.00
Laate, Jennie – Kiva Bowl (1970’s)

Jennie Laate was among the most important revival potters at Zuni in the 1970’s.  This is a very traditional style Zuni Kiva bowl. The bowl is shaped with terraced “kiva” steps or cloud shapes.  In the center is a frog with a head in relief. Surrounding the frog are tadpoles.  On the outside are dragonflies with the wings painted with either red or black lines.  The purpose of the kiva bowls was often ceremonial and the inclusion of frogs, tadpoles, and dragonflies are representative of prayers.  The kiva bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 550.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Mimbres Rabbit Seedpot (1976)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This seedpot is from 1976 and it is fully designed. On the top is a Mimbres inspired rabbit.  The surrounding designs are water, grass and plant imagery.  The piece is highly polished and fired red.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay with the date.   It is in condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,500.00
Navasie, Joy “Frogwoman” – Jar with Birds and Bird Wing Neck (1980’s

This jar by Joy “Frog Woman” Navasie is one of her classic water jar shapes.  The jar has a high shoulder, an elongated neck and a turned out rim.  The body of the jar is painted with four panels of designs.  The jar is slipped with the white clay and then painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black).   It’s nice to see this period of her work painted with such precision to the lines!  Two panels are birds and the other two are bird wings.  Note the very complex hatchwork patterns, which are an unusual addition to her painting.  The red clay on this jar is a deeper red clay she began to use in the 1980’s.  It has been traditionally fired so there are some variations in the coloration from white to almost a pinkish color.   The jar is signed on the bottom with her Frog Hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 1,400.00
Haungooah, Art Cody- Large “Buffalo Hunt” Bowl (1973)

This large bowl by Art Cody Haungooah is from 1973.  It is fully polished and has an etched design on one side. The imagery is a buffalo hunt where the design has been etched into the clay and then “two-toned” to make it black-and sienna.  Note the depth and yet the symmetry of the area surrounding the figure. Interestingly, Art left the buffalo black so that it would be in contrast with the sienna of the horse and rider.  Art was Kiowa and married to Martha Suazo from Santa Clara and that is where he began to make pottery. The bowl is signed, “Art Cody Haungooah” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 1,200.00
Lewis, Lucy – Bowl with Fineline Star and Mountain Designs (1970’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the past century. This bowl is coil built and painted with bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  The bowl has alternating fine-line painted star patterns with triangular mountain patterns. The alternating designs create a dramatic appearance on the bowl.  This piece is from the 1970s.   It has been native fired and has a beautiful coloration to the white clay slip.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,400.00
Da, Popovi-  Feather Plate (1965)

Popovi Da was a son of noted potter, Maria Martinez.  While he worked with her painting designs on her pottery, he also created a few pieces on his own beginning in 1962.  He was planning to continue making pottery on his own after Maria retired but unfortunately passed away before this could occur.  His pottery pieces are definitely a rarity among Pueblo pottery and it is not often that we come across his work.  This is one of his classic feather plates.  It is fully polished and delicately painted and traditionally fired.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Popovi 1165” which is the firing date of November, 1965.  That makes this an early piece of his pottery.  The plate is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair and it is certainly an important addition to any collection!

$ 4,400.00
Bell, Seferina  – Jar with Birds and Clouds (1960’s)

Seferina Bell has long been considered one of the great Zia potters of the 20th century.  This is a classic jar with three large birds.  The birds are painted large and note the lines on the wings.  Separating the birds are large cloud patterns which are polished red.  They extend from the neck to the base.  The bowl was slipped with the white clay and painted with the black and red clay.  There is a beautiful patina to the surface of this large jar.  It is signed on the side with a bell, which was her hallmark.  Overall it is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair but there is a slight lean to the form. It is certainly a classic of her work in design and form.

$ 900.00
Garcia, Tina – Red Bowl with Bear Paws (2000)

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plain ware Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is from around 2000 and it is a classic piece of her pottery.  The bowl is very round in shape and there are two large bear paws impressed in the sides. The entire piece is fully polished and fired a deep red.  The bear paws are part of a story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tina Garcia”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Naranjo, Teresita  – Mini Carved Bowl (1970’s)

Teresita Naranjo was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and know for her deeply carved pottery.  This bowl is one of her few miniatures.  The bowl is very deeply carved with cloud and lightning designs. The designs spiral around the surface of the bowl.  It is traditionally fired black. The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita Naranjo” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Koopee, Jacob – “All Roads Lead to Home” Bowl (2005)

This is very intricately designed bowl by Jacob Koopee.  It is entitled, “All Roads Lead to Home”.   The bowl is made from the red Hopi clay, and not something that he used very often.  The designs are very tightly painted shard patterns.  There is a similar (but larger) piece at the Museum of Northern Arizona with shard designs.  The setup and placement of each of the squares allowed him to use different imagery for each square within a section.  The sections are divided up by vertical bands of polished red and a horizontal band of polished mauve.  Check out the very thin lines around the rim of the bowl!  Of course, these very intricately painted lines were inspired by the work of Rondina Huma.  However, Jake gave the bowl his own touch with the hands at the bottom.  The hand designs were cut from paper and then he would blow the black bee-weed through a straw to get the little dots!  The bowl was traditionally fired so there are blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom with his hallmark Flute Player and Koopee.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Jake won numerous awards during his career including “Best of Show” in 2005 at both Santa Fe Indian Market and the Heard Museum Market.  I was lucky to have been a pottery judge both years at both events, and it was exciting to see an artist create such dynamic work.

$ 1,800.00
Tahbo, Mark  – Lidded Jar with Women and Parrot Men (2001)

Mark Tahbo was renown for his creative pottery shapes, designs, and firings.  He learned to make pottery from his great-grandmother, Grace Chapella.  Each piece reflects the symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter. The designs are painted using native clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  This jar has a refined form with a wide shoulder and slight neck.  Mark hated to make lids for his pottery and made very few.  This is one of the best constructed lids I have seen of his with the clay used to keep it secure on the neck.  While the shape and lid are visually interesting, it’s the design which is the center of this vessel.  The imagery is a series of Hopi-Tewa women and Parrot men.  The women are holding gourds for water while the Parrot men are holding corn pollen.  The idea of the Parrot men was partially inspired by the figures in the Awatovi murals.  However, Mark would often innovate his own creative designs for his pottery.  He said of this:

“For traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery, there are no shortcuts. I feel that the younger people, they aren’t as fortunate as I was. I was born at a time where I was with the elder women who revived Hopi-Tewa pottery and brought it to this level. I learned the old style. From how to get the clay, how to process it, from start to finish. Today, it seems like the storytelling is almost gone. I always tell younger potters that it’s one of the most important foundations we can have as Hopi-Tewa potters. A story. Something to lean back on. If you don’t have that root or that foundation, you have nothing. You are just floating on your own. Soak it all in and listen to all the old stories that you can. There are just no shortcuts. You have to learn the hard way and have patience.” Mark Tahbo, Spoken Through Clay

The eight figures encircle the jar.  They are painted with additional clay slips to give them color and note the little area when he etched designs on the gourds or the hair!  On the bottom of the jar are swirls parrots or birds.  It is almost as if they are the shadow of the figures dancing above.  The jar was traditionally fired which created the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom, “Mark Tahbo”.  There is a pipe to represent the Tobacco Clan.  It is in excellent good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,850.00
Quotskuyva, Dextra – Bowl with Migration Pattern (1977)

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This is an exceptional early bowl from 1977  It is very thin walled and classic bowl shape. The piece is painted with the migration pattern.  Dextra said of this design:

“This is the one design that was really stressed for us to use, the migration pattern. Nothing but lines, representing the migration of all the people to all the places, including down below and up above. It has seven points at the top and bottom. All the x’s represent life from the bottom and top, telling you the universe is one. The thin lines, I just wanted to paint them real fast and real close to try and include everyone.”  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo, Spoken Through Clay

The bowl has deep red clay near the rim and the remainder is painted with bee-weed (black).  The lines are very thin and close, as would be expected from her pottery!  This bowl is signed on the bottom, “Dextra Quotskuyva”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. Simple, elegant and a classic!

$ 3,600.00
Loloma, Charles – Hummingbird Bowl (1950’s)

Charles Loloma is a name synonymous with innovative Hopi jewelry. He began his jewelry career with a brief period of time also making pottery in the 1950’s.  The pieces were made form earthenware and were painted and glazed.  By the 1960’s his jewelry was already achieving some fame and he discontinued making pottery.  His clay pieces are relatively rare but fascinating in terms of form, design and glaze. In many ways they mirror the innovative style of his jewelry relative to the other work being created at Hopi at the same time.  This bowl is glazed on the outside with a series of hummingbirds.  The rim and the inside are fully glazed to a shiny brown coloration.  This is certainly a striking piece of his pottery! It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom into the clay, “Loloma”.

$ 1,800.00
Shupla, Helen – Melon Jar with 16 Ribs (1980’s)

Helen Shupla is certainly most famous for her exceptional melon jars.  Her melon jars are the very traditional form with the ribs pushed out in the clay.  This melon jar is one of her classic shapes with an elongated body showing the full length of each rib.  Each of the 16 ribs is pushed out into the clay.  She would do this by placing her fingers inside the bowl and pushing against the clay from both the inside and outside!  Can you see the slight angle to each section?  This is how she would turn her hand as she was pushing against the clay to create the separate ribs!  The entire piece is fully polished and fired black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Helen Shupla”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,600.00
Garcia, Tina – Black Water Jar with Rainbow Ridge (1991)

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plainware Santa Clara pottery. This water jar is one of her classic pieces.  It is an elegant shape with a double shoulder or “rainbow ridge”.  The entire piece is fully polished to a high shine and fired a deep black.   Tina was always focused on form and polish and this created some exceptional vessels.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,000.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Seedpot with Turtle & Fish (1984)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1984 and it is highly polished and fired red.  The design is unusual as it has a turtle as the central pattern. The turtle is not unusual but note the shape of the turtle’s head and neck and it is certainly reminiscent of the work of Tony Da in style.  The turtle has a mountain design on its back and note at the lower right there is a tiny dragonfly.  As the seedpot is turned there are two incised Mimbres style fish etch into the clay.  There is also another dragonfly.  There is also the yearly symbol for 1984 which has the shifting sand pattern.  The seedpot is highly polished and the contrast of the matte and polished surfaces works perfectly for this desig.  It is is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Haungooah, Art Cody – “The Ancient Ones” (1977)

This is a complex smaller bowl by Art Cody Haungooah. The bowl is fully polished and fired black.  It is entitled, “The Ancient Ones”.  There is a single medallion which is etched humanized grasshopper along with a stylized grassopper figure.  This is one of those pieces where I wish I knew the story of “The Ancient Ones” as Art was masterful as a story teller.  The bowl has some deeper carving (the circular lines) along with Art’s classic straffito.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Haungooah  “The Ancient Ones”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 500.00
Haungooah, Art Cody & Martha – Bowl with Howling Coyote and Moon (1976)

This is one of the few pieces signed by both Art Cody Haungooah and his wife, Martha.  Martha made the small jar and polished the surface.  Art Cody etched the design.  The central medallion is a howling coyote.  In front of the coyote is a quarter moon.  On the opposite side of the moon is a stylized bird.  There is just a slight lip to the jar.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Art & Martha Haungooah  1976”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 500.00
Martinez, Santana & Adam – Bowl with Feather Designs (1970’s)

This bowl by Santana and Adam Martinez is a smaller but classic piece of their pottery.  Adam was the youngest son of Maria Martinez, and Santana (his wife) painted Maria’s pottery in the 1940-50’s.  The entire surface of this is fully polished.  The design was then painted around the top shoulder of the bowl.  It is a classic feather pattern encircling the piece.  The bowl was traditionally fired to a very dark black appearance.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Santana + Adam”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic piece!

$ 600.00
Martinez, Maria   – Gunmetal Bowl with Cloud Designs “Maria Popovi 569”

This gunmetal fired bowl is a classic piece by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the bowl and it was fired by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). Popovi focused on both the painted surfaces of the pottery as well as the firings.  This bowl is one of Maria’s classic shapes with her low shoulder and sloping sides. The design is a very tightly painted rain and lightning pattern which encircles the piece. The openness of the design elements reveals the gunmetal coloration from the firing.  The piece is about three-quarters gunmetal with one section that is a darker black.  However, the entire bowl is very highly polished with a “mirror-like” surface. The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria / Popovi 569”.  The firing date is when the pottery was made, so this bowl was from May 1969. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Great gunmetal fired pieces by Maria and Popovi with such high polished surface are always stunning and a great addition to any collection!

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 3,300.00
Speckled Rock, Paul – Red Bear with Feathers (1991)

Paul Speckled Rock is a grandson of Severa Tafoya but learned to make pottery from Joseph Lonewolf (his then father-in-law).  Paul’s son Adam Speckled Rock has made pottery, as well as his niece, Jennifer Tafoya.  This is one of his iconic clay bears.  He began making them in the early 1980’s and they remained one of his most famous forms.  The bear is more modernized and this one is polished and fired red.  There is a geometric heartline on the piece which he has highlighted with a blue clay slip.  There is a stone arrowhead on the back and three parrot feathers.  This is the bear’s “medicine bundle”.  The piece is signed on the inside of the back leg, “Paul Speckled Rock, 1991”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 650.00
Speckled Rock, Paul – Plainware Seedpot (1983)

Paul Speckled Rock is a grandson of Severa Tafoya but learned to make pottery from Joseph Lonewolf.  This seedpot is from 1983.  It is a very early piece of his pottery.  When he first started to make pottery, he began making unusual shapes, which were very much like “rocks”.  They were immediately distinctive in form and design.  This piece is highly polished but with not design. It is the shape and angels of the piece and the highly polished surface which make it so striking. The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Paul Speckled Rock, 1983”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 275.00
Ortiz, Seferina – Skunk Clay Figure

Seferina Ortiz is the matriarch of a family of renowned potters, including Virgil Ortiz, Janice Ortiz, and Lisa Holt. This is one of her animal figures.  It is a clay skunk which is slipped with a white clay and the painted with wild spinach (black).  The piece is signed on the bottom.  It was traditionally fired and in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a charming piece by this historically important potter!

$ 650.00
Ortiz, Seferina – Drummer Figure

Seferina Ortiz is the matriarch of a family of renowned potters, including Virgil Ortiz, Janice Ortiz, and Lisa Holt. This is one of her drummer figures.  The drummer is sitting down and the drum is part of the piece.  The drumstick is made from wood and leather and added after firing.  It is more charming as her husband, Guadalupe, also made Cochiti drums.  The piece is slipped with a white clay and then painted with a red clay slip and wild spinach (black).  The piece is signed on the bottom.  It was traditionally fired and in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic figure by this historically important potter!

$ 975.00
Gutierrez, Denny – Bowl with 36 Swirl Faceted Melon Ribs (1992)

Denny Gutierrez was known for his faceted melon bowls.  As opposed to carving them, he would flatten out each rib out to create a “faceted” appearance.  The result was a reflective surface and a very striking piece of pottery.  This bowl is from 1992. It is larger in size and there are 36 faceted ribs swirling around the jar from the rim to the base. The bowl is very highly polished and fired a dark black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Denny Gutierrez”.

$ 550.00
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