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santa clara potterySanta Clara Pottery

Traditional Name: Kha'p'oo Owinge (Valley of the Wild Roses.) The Pueblo is a member of the Eight Northern Pueblos, and the people are from the Tewa ethnic group of Native Americans who speak the Tewa language.  The Pueblo is on the Rio Grande, between Ohkay Owingeh (formerly San Juan Pueblo) to the north and San Ildefonso Pueblo to the south.  Santa Clara Pottery and its Pueblo are famous for producing hand-crafted pottery, specifically blackware and redware with deep engravings. Thanks to cultural pride and a strong sense of identity, the Santa Clara people have retained many of their ancient traditions while integrating with the best of what the majority culture has to offer. The Pueblo has a high regard for education, both the tribal heritage and modern education.  Santa Clara Pueblo people find employment on the reservation as well as in nearby cities. Some dances and community festivals are open to the public.  In June, St. Anthony’s Feast Day features Comanche Dances.  In August, Harvest Dances and Corn Dances are performed in honor of the patron saint, St. Clare. Regarded as one of the great masters of Pueblo ceramics Margaret Tafoya (1904-2001), a matriarch of Santa Clara Pueblo, is known for her trademark large black polished ceramics.  Margaret decorated with traditional imagery of rain clouds, water serpents, bear paws, and other family symbols.  An award-winning artist, she was the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts and a National Heritage Fellowship.  She had twelve children, eight of whom became potters; Virginia Ebelacker, Lee Tafoya, Toni Roller, LuAnn Tafoya, Mela Youngblood, Jennie Trammel, Mary Ester Archuleta and Shirley Tafoya.  Her grandchildren and today great-grandchildren carry on the traditions of making pottery.  Margaret was a guardian of traditional pottery making methods and techniques.  She created large storage vessels with stone polished surfaces.  Her carving was done before the piece was polished.  She created her amazing work from the 1920's through the 1980's.

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Youngblood, Nancy – Red & Buff Bowl with Avanyu (2003)

This is a classic red and tan bowl by Nancy Youngblood.  The bowl is deeply carved with a water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece. The avanyu tells the story of the village being saved during a flood. The shape of the avanyu is reminiscent of water coursing through a canyon or arroyo and note how the tongue and tail always intersect.  On this piece Nancy has deeply carved the avanyu into the clay.  The body of the avany is carved with swirls and sharp lighting edges.  It is fully polished red and the remainder of the piece is matte tan.  What you can’t see in the photos, but can feel in person is how perfectly Nancy has sanded the tan areas at the top and bottom of the bowl.  They are perfectly smooth and feel like soft leather.  As with all pottery, the tactile side of holding a piece is always important.  On this bowl it is critical as the smooth surfaces and the sharp edge of the carving, in addition to the coloration, are what make it so stunning! The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nancy Youngblood, 2003”.

$ 5,500.00
Garcia, Tammy – Thunderbird Jar (2018)

This new jar by Tammy Garcia is one of her classic shapes with a round body and elongated neck.  The jar is carved with three “thunderbirds” as the design. The birds are inspired by jewelry of the Southwest from the 1940’s and 50’s.  The birds are deeply carved and polished a deep red.  Extending out from them are arrows which are polished tan.  Surrounding them are spiral designs which are simply slipped matte red.  The background she has texturized.  It is interesting to note the various levels of her carving and how she is able to use them to create shadows and emphasize the designs on her work.  Each of the three birds has in set turquoise stone.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  The last two photos are of the piece in process, which is always fascinating!  Tammy has won numerous awards for her pottery and been the recipient of the New Mexico Governor’s award.  It’s not surprising that with the intricate nature of her pottery she makes only about ten pieces of pottery a year.  Yes. Ten!  Yet each piece is unique and expands on her distinctive style and voice in the clay.

We are pleased to be the only gallery in the country to represent her new works in clay!

$ 7,200.00
Tafoya, Margaret -Jar with Swirl Melon Ribs (1970’s)

It is not often that Margaret Tafoya made melon jars during her career. This exceptional pieces is from the 1970’s and it is stunning with the swirl melons. The piece has one of her classic necks and then it is carved with eight melon ribs. They swirl down from the shoulder to the base. The jar is highly polished and fired a shiny black.  It is simply exceptional!  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It’s always great see the expanse of Margaret’s creativity throughout her career.

$ 4,200.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Mini Carved Bowl with Avanyu

This miniature bowl by Grace Medicine Flower is fully carved and polished.  The design is a very complicated water serpent encircling the bowl.  The carving is very complex for the size and the entire piece is fully polished. There is one little etched area on the tongue of the water serpent.  The piece is from around 2002 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace M. F.”.

$ 600.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Jar with Three Deer

This jar by Grace Medicine Flower is fully polished and incised.  The jar has high sides and a short neck. There is a large leaping deer on one side. On the opposite side are two fawns and flowers.  Grace has incorporated additional Pueblo cloud, rain and feather designs.  The jar is from the 1990’s and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.

$ 1,800.00
Folwell, Susan – “Pueblo Woman, Pueblo Clouds” 3 Tile Set

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This tile set is part of her series entitled, “Peering through Taos Light”.  The design for the tile comes from a painting by Taos Society Artist Victor Higgins.  The imagery has a reclining pueblo woman wearing her moccasins.  The next tile has Higgins signature style “puffy” clouds.  The final is a Pueblo design, emulating the room around her.  These tiles are made from native clay and painted with acrylic.  There are open areas which Susan says, “allows the clay to breathe”.  They each have a lucite stand, as Susan noted that they should not necessarily be static, but allowed to move.  The reverse of the two larger tiles are impressed with a shell design.  Each tile is signed on the back.  The numbers (1/3, 2/3, etc) are to denote that there are three tiles in the set.

“My newest pieces serve as commentaries and reflections on the classic Taos Society of Artists Work. I specifically want to focus on their portrayal of Native Women”.  Susan Folwell
Native Art Magazine, April 2018

$ 650.00
Naranjo, Madeline – Jar with Parrots in Flight

Madeline Naranjo creates beautifully carved and polished pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This jar is a more classic form with a high shoulder and slight neck.  Around the shoulder of the piece there are two parrots. Each is deeply carved into the clay.  Madeline has portrayed them in flight!  The bodies are matte while the beaks and tail feathers are polished.  Note as well how her matte areas are sanded and perfectly smooth so that there are no indentations or areas where the matte might make a shadow.  Her designs are always innovative and beautifully executed.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 275.00
Folwell, Susan – Jar with Fish

Susan Folwell is known for her innovative and unique Santa Clara pottery.  This is an earlier piece of her pottery which is fully polished.  There are fish which are matte and etched into the clay.  They are swimming around the bowl.  The neck of the bowl has an etched water design and the polished area is fully designed with a water pattern. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00
Folwell, Susan – Bowl with Hand Designs

Susan Folwell is known for her innovative and unique Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is polished on the top half and matte below the shoulder.  In the polished section it is fully designed with hand designs.  They are additional cloud and star patterns.  Susan has also included the Folwell family “x’s” as part of the design. The piece was traditionally fired which created the coloration on the rim.  The bowl is signed on the bottom.

$ 500.00
Cain, Linda – Jar with Bear Paw

This is a very modernist jar by Linda Cain.  Linda is a daughter of Mary Cain and the mother of Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.  This jar has a square mouth which is stone polished.  From the neck to below the shoulder it is matte and slipped with a mica clay slip.  There is a single carved bear paw as the design, and it is also fully polished. As the jar is turned over, the are below the shoulder is stone polished.  There are interesting variations in texture and reflection. The square mouth and the angular style of the bear paw are striking on this piece. It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 900.00
Garcia, Tammy – “Parrot Box” Bronze, Artist Copy

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is carved in the style she carves in her pottery, with various depths and layers.  The parrot is surrounded by Pueblo designs along with plate motifs.  The imagery is certainly inspired by the parrots seen on Acoma and other Pueblo pottery. The piece is made to be hung on a wall or it can stand on it’s own.  The piece has a striking use of patinas to enhance the coloration of the bird and the berries!  The piece is signed on the side.  It is the “AC” or Artist Copy of the bronze.

$ 3,000.00
Gutierrez, Lois  – Polychrome Water Jar with Hummingbirds

Lois Gutierrez is one of the few Santa Clara potters who continues to create traditional polychrome pottery.  Each of the various colors is derived from natural clay slips.  They are then painted onto the vessel and note that there are more than 3 different clay colors, which makes it “polychrome”. This jar is a classic water jar shape with a low shoulder and a slightly turned out neck.  The neck of the jar is fully painted with two stylized hummingbirds and flowers.  Separating them are two old style birds which have rain cloud and lightning designs.  Below the shoulder are flowers.  The jar is traditionally fired, which adds to the complexity of the overall process!  Note on the bottom you can see a bit of color variation as a result of the heat of the firing!  The jar is signed on the bottom “Lois”.

 

$ 1,100.00
Moquino, Jennifer – Seedpot with Heron and Fish

This miniature is by Jennifer Moquino and her mother, Emily Tafoya.  Emily made the seedpot and polished it green.  Jennifer etched the Heron on one side and the trout on the other side. There is a lot of detail on something so small!  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  The seedpot is is signed on the bottom in the clay by both Jennifer and Emily.

$ 300.00
Garcia, Tina – Red Bowl with Bear Paws

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plain ware Santa Clara pottery. This bowl is very round and has three bear paws impressd into the clay.  The bear paw are part of a story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  The bowl is fully stone polished and fired red.  It is signed on the bottom and  it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00
Tafoya, Emily – Green Seedpot with Corn Dancer Figure

Emily Tafoya was the wife of noted potter Ray Tafoya and is the mother of Jennifer Moquino. This seedpot is fully polished green and etched with a pueblo scene around the sides. The top has a Pueblo Corn Dancer figure wearing a tablita.  In her hands she is holding feathers.  All the various additional clay colors are added after the firing. It is signed on the bottom.

$ 200.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Seedpot with Butterflies (1987)

This miniature seedpot by Grace Medicine Flower is fully polished and incised.  The piece has a central medallion with four butterflies etched into the clay.  They are surrounded by flowers.  The remainder of the piece is fully polished.  The seedpot is from 1987 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.

$ 500.00
Moquino, Jennifer – Black Clay Wolf Figure

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and also her amazing animal figures. This wolf is one of her larger figures and it is fired black and the back is fully polished.  It is realistically etched on the face.  The back of the piece is designed with a wolf track in the center.  Off to the sides are eagle feathers, rain and lighting and traditional Santa Clara mountain patterns.  The face is wonderfully realistic and as well the wolf tracks on the feet!   All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 450.00
Whitegeese, Daryl  – Large Rainbow Ridge Water Jar with Bear Paw

This is a spectacular large water jar by Daryl Whitegeese.  Daryl said he was inspired by the shapes of the water jars made by his grandmother, Margaret Tafoya.  It’s not just the double shoulder, or rainbow ridge, but also the narrow neck which defines this jar. The jar is coil built and the rainbow ridge shoulder is always more complicated to make and keep the jar proportional. However, it is the added shoulder which gives the jar more reflective surfaces. The neck of the jar narrows in and then the lip is turned out. On the neck there is a single bear paw impressed into the clay. The bear paws represent a Tewa story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  This jar is fully stone polished to create the high shine.  It is a striking balance of form and polish.  It was traditionally fired black.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Definitely a classic piece keeping a family history alive!

 

$ 5,800.00
Whitegeese, Daryl  – Red Water Jar with Rain and Cloud Designs

Daryl Whitegeese is known for his use of classic Santa Clara forms and his amazing polished surfaces.  This jar is is a classic water jar with a around shoulder and an elongated neck. The jar is carved around the shoulder with series of designs which represent the clouds, mountains, rain and wind.  It is a striking use of imagery which depicts seasonal changes at the Pueblos.  The jar is very deeply carved and the edges almost feel sharp to the touch! The jar is polished a deep red and has been traditionally fired.  Note as well the rim of the jar, which almost seems to have a sharp edge, which is difficult to achieve with stone polishing the surface.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Daryl Whitegeese remains one of the exciting potter to revive traditional designs and shapes working today at Santa Clara Pueblo.

$ 5,100.00
Whitegeese, Daryl  – Oval Bowl with Avanyu

Daryl Whitegeese is known for his traditional style Santa Clara pottery.  He coil builds amazing shapes which are then carved and stone polished.  This shape is one of his technically most difficult.  This bowl is carved on the outside with an avanyu.  The water serpent (or avanyu) is part of a Pueblo story where the Avanyu saves the village during a flood.  The bowl has an avanyu which encircles the piece.  The rim is also fully polished to a sharp edge.  The oval shape is unusual but adds to the distinctive sense of this piece.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 2,700.00
Whitegeese, Daryl  – Carved Jar with Corn Plant Designs

Daryl Whitegeese is known for his deep carved pottery.  This jar has a low shoulder and a slightly turned out rim.  The body of the piece is carved with a distinctive design.  In one section there are two corn plants.  Above them is a rain (straight line) design and a rainbow.  On the opposite sides are the mountain and rain designs.  The carving on Daryl’s pottery is deep and with a very sharp edge. The jar is stone polished to a high shine and traditionally fired.  It is a great shape which shows of this classic imagery.  Corn is often depicted as a symbol for prosperity.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

 

 

$ 2,100.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Bowl with Painted Avanyu (1960’s)

This is a small bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1960’s.  The bowl is fully polished and painted with an avanyu.  The avanyu, or water serpent, is a classic of her design. Note the shape of the horn as well as the mouth.  A similar style of mouth is painted onto many of her pieces.  As the bowl is turned the body of the water serpent (avanyu) creates cloud and lightning designs.  While Margaret was known for her large vessels, why make something so small?  The reason is that potters of her generation would not ‘throw away” clay that was not used, but also not mix a large portion of it with the new clay.  So, when they were running out of clay, they would often make smaller vessels like this bowl.  It is also during the period of the 1950’s to 1960’s that she made most of her painted or “black-on-black” pieces of pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 650.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Jar with Reverse Carved Avanyu (1960’s)

This tall jar by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1960’s.  The jar is a classic shape with the tall shoulders. The design, however, is quite unusual.  It is a water serpent (or avanyu), which is carved in reverse.  Here, the avanyu is carved into four panels and you can see the the head and horn of each avanyu in reverse.  It is interesting that she would have created such an unusual variation on this classic design. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some wear on the rim.

$ 1,200.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Fully Polished Red and Tan Open Bowl (1980’s)

This is open bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1980’s.  The bowl has high walls and it is fully polished on the inside and carved on the outside.  This is one of the rarest styles of Margaret’s pottery.  The bowl itself has a lower round shoulder and a slightly turned out rim.  What makes it so rare is that she polished the outside red and the inside tan. The tan is created with water, so it is always difficult to polish and create a shine.  Margaret revived this red and tan style in the late 1960’s when she remembered how it was done at Ohkay Owinghe (San Juan Pueblo) from her youth. Today, there are only a few potters who are able to polish tan with such a high shine.  For Margaret, she did very few red and tan pieces, and they are always on very traditional forms.  Traditionally potters would polish the inside of the bowls before firing so that they would be usable.  However, over time this practice decreased as there was a great chance that it would crack in drying or polishing.  The added risk comes from putting all the wet slip on the inside of the bowl and hoping that it doesn’t cause cracks in the exterior.  However, the risk is often worth it as the polished interior of the bowl creates a striking appearance.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,400.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Fully Polished Open Bowl (1980)

This is open bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1980’s.  The bowl has high walls and it is fully polished on the inside and carved on the outside.  Traditionally potters would polish the inside of the bowls before firing so that they would be usable.  However, over time this practice decreased as there was a great chance that it would crack in drying or polishing.  The added risk comes from putting all the wet slip on the inside of the bowl and hoping that it doesn’t cause cracks in the exterior.  However, the risk is often worth it as the polished interior of the bowl creates a striking appearance.  What is interesting in this bowl is the shape, which is hard to capture in the photos.  It is round near the base and then just slightly indented just below the rim. This is so the bowl could be held, but it’s wonderful aspect to this piece.  This bowl is perfectly polished and fired to a deep black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is featured in the book “Born of Fire” The Art and Life of Margaret Tafoya”.

$ 1,950.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Red Bowl with Mountain Design (1980’s)

This deeply carved by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1980’s.  It is a classic shaped bowl with deeply carved mountain design. The design is repeated four times around the shoulder of the bowl.  The background area is slipped with the traditional cream colored clay. The bowl itself is  highly polished and fired a deep red.  Margaret’s work from the 1980’s is always distinctive as the pieces are typically smaller than in earlier years as she was in her 80’s!  However, the carving is often more complicated and the polishing is always exceptional.  This bowl is deeply carved and a great deep, red coloration.  As well, it is great to see her work in red, which is always more difficult to fire.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is also featured in the book, “Born of Fire: The Art and Life of Margaret Tafoya”.

$ 4,200.00
Folwell, Susan – “Lizards and Roses” Bowl

Susan Folwell is known for her innovative and unique Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is entitled, “Lizards and Roses”.  For this piece the bowl is a dark brown on one side an there are etched roses and a lizard.  On the opposite side the bowl is fully etched with the Folwell family “x’s” and there are medallions with roses.  The roses are etched into the clay and highlighted.  The roses and the lizards There is a striking contrast of the colorations on the bowl and the various designs.  The bowl is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,900.00
Tafoya-Sanchez, Linda – Long Neck Jar with Feather Pattern and Avanyu

This is a long neck water jar by Linda Tafoya-Sanchez.  The jar is coil built, carved and stone polished. The design around the neck has 17 rounded feathers carved into the clay. Below the feathers is a band with the “walking bear paw” design.  This is a pattern which her grandmother, Margaret Tafoya, utilized in her pottery.  There are two avanyu (water serpents) encircling the piece.   Note the shape of the head of the Avanyu on her pottery with the square mouth.  That is the same shape as her father Lee used on his pottery and hers always remains a tribute to her art and pottery education.  Below the avanyu is a walking bear paw design and then finally a larger rounded feather pattern. The jar is deeply carved and very highly polished.  The complicated designs add to the dynamic appearance of the piece.  Linda is a granddaughter of Margaret Tafoya and the quality and creativity in her carving are readily apparent on this vessel!  It is signed on the base.

$ 3,200.00
Duwyenie, Debra – Seedpot with Hummingbirds

This seedpot was made, polished and incised by Debra Duwyenie.  The design has four hummingbirds, two butterflies and one rabbit.  They are surrounded by flowers and the top has a cloud design.  All the design work is etched into the seedpot before it is fired!  Few potters take the risk to etch their pieces before they are fired.  However, note the background gray area of her design and the vertical lines etched into the clay.  After the piece was fired, Debra “two-toned” it so that it is black and sienna.  The colors vary across the surface of the piece. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Debra”.

$ 675.00
Folwell, Susan – “Feast Day” Long Neck Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series for, “Taos Light”.  This jar combines her love of Pop-Art with Pueblo imagery. Here there are two young women wearing tablitas on their heads for Feast Day  The area behind them has been left the natural color of the clay.  The shoulder of the jar has been indented, almost reminding one of the bread made during Feast Day in the horno ovens.  However, it is the base of the jar which is dynamic.  Susan has etched and carved into the clay with a series of rows which she has then painted to have the appearance of a stone mosaic!  Each band is a different size, as is each of the various squares and rectangles. The imagery here is evocative not only of the hei-shi beads and jewelry worn during Feast Day, but also the beauty of the stones and how when set in this manner almost seem to replicate the horizon.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

“Susan has been experimenting with textured surfaces, creating a “bejeweled” effect that looks like turquoise, coral, silver, and gold.”  “Taos Light”.
Native Art Magazine, April 2018

$ 2,600.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn – “Raincloud Dragonfly”, 10/65

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Raincloud Dragonfly”.  It is made in the style of her clay tiles.  The imagery is deeply carved into the clay before it is turned into a bronze.  This piece has a dragonfly in the center and it is surrounded by cloud patterns. The representation is both to the importance of water as well as the dragonfly being seen a prayer messenger.  The dragonfly on this piece has a red patina and there are blue for the water.  The piece is number 10 of 65 on the side.   It is signed and numbered on the bottom.  The bronze is mounted and framed.

$ 1,300.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn – “Cosmic Dragonfly”, 8/65

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Cosmic Dragonfly”.  It is made in the style of her clay tiles.  The imagery is deeply carved into the clay before it is turned into a bronze.  This piece has a dragonfly int he center with a talking bear paw to the side.  The circles represent the planets and the cosmic connection between the heavens and the earth.  The turquoise colored patina is used on the dragonfly.  The piece is number 8 of 65 on the side.   It is signed and numbered on the bottom.  The bronze is mounted and framed.

$ 1,300.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn – “Pueblo Parrot”, 9/50

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Pueblo Parrot”.  It is stylized in much like the thick billed parrot, which was actually native to the New Mexico area in the past.  It also has connection to the Ancestral Puebloan bird figures created at places such as Chaco Canyon.  The bird is carved with a feather pattern on its back and mountain.  Autumn says she was inspired to create her parrots after a two-day excursion to Chaco Canyon. This piece is number 9 of 50. The colorful patinas give the piece a striking appearance.  It is signed and numbered on the bottom.

$ 1,900.00
Cain, Linda – Jar with Carved Avanyu

This is a tightly carved jar by Linda Cain.  Linda is a daughter of Mary Cain and the mother of Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.  This jar is deeply carved with an avanyu (water serpent) which encircles the piece.  The avanyu is carved in sections and note how at the base of the carving there is the flow of the river.  The jar is fully polished and the background are is matte red. The jar is striking in coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,200.00
Naranjo, Teresita  – Jar with Avanyu (1960’s)

Teresita Naranjo was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and know for her deeply carved pottery.  This jar is a piece of her pottery from the 1960’s.  It has her complex style of carving but not her carving into the negative space.  This was a style which would come later.  The avanyu encircles the jar and it is fully polished.  The background has the traditional cream colored clay slip.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita Naranjo” and it is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 375.00
Cain, Linda – Mini Carved Jar with Feathers

This is a tightly carved miniature jar by Linda Cain.  Linda is a daughter of Mary Cain and the mother of Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.  This miniature jar is deeply carved with eight feathers.  The area behind the feathers is slipped with a micaceous clay. The feathers and the jar are all stone polished.  It is fired a deep black and signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 600.00
Folwell, Susan – “Buffalo Hunters”

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery. Her work in native clay but she is constantly experimenting with techniques and clays.  This jar is rag polished and it is both incised and painted.  Around the neck of the jar are a series of trains, each etched into the clay.  Above the trains are the Folwell family “x’s”, which here are symbolic for stars.  On the remainder of the jar there are horses stamped into the clay with ink and mica. However, the modernist take on this jar is the buffalo hunt itself. The horses take to the background and the buffalo are etched into the clay and then slipped.  The Buffalo Hunters are riding around on mopeds and motorcycles!  Susan has designed it all in a ledger art style.  Susan says the commentary is on the modernization of culture and maybe if the Buffalo hunters of the late 1800’s, shooting from the trains, had not nearly made the buffalo extinct, maybe the hunters of today would be on the mopeds.  The unique shape of the jar adds to the overall impact of the piece with the low shoulder and asymmetrical rim, are part of the innovative clay work in her pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,400.00
Cain, Linda – Jar with Dragonflies and Flowers

This is a charming contemporary jar by Linda Cain. She is a daughter of Mary Cain and the mother of Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.  This detailed jar is carved with dragonflies and flowers. The dragonflies are slipped with mica while the flowers, extending up from the base, are polished.  The leaves of the flowers are also carved and then polished. The background area of the jar is painted with acrylic to create the blue dots of the sky.  They add a wonderfully modern aspect to this jar. The rim is also slipped with mica.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,200.00
Garcia, Tammy – “Seeded Woman II” Bronze.  3/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is taken from a series of clay pieces which she made which were inspired by the paintings of Picasso.  The imagery is a Picasso-esqe woman sitting in a chair.  The piece has multiple layers and textures.  When asked about the name and the imagery, Tammy said:

“I thought about a definition of the word, “seed” which I had read.  It was, ‘A seed is the small, hard part of a plant from which a new plant grows’.  It made me think of women who came to the Southwest when the trains arrived in the 1880’s, or with the Fred Harvey Tours in the 1920’s.  They brought with them their past but became enamored with the Southwest or Native Culture. So on the bronze, the woman is sitting on a chair and the back of the chair is incised with Pueblo designs.  The chair itself is has a turquoise colored patina to represent the areas. The woman on one side has a hei-shi necklace and the other a turquoise colored necklace.  These are representative of how those who journeyed and continue to visit here have the culture become an integral part of their lives.  They have become seeds who spread their affection for the Southwest and Native art around the world.  I called this, “Seeded Woman II”.  It is the second in this series to pay tribute to those how become aware of Native culture, respect it and spread their love of the art and artists to the world.”.

The piece has striking patinas to differentiate the various textures and depths of carving.  Much like her clay work, the piece is distinctive in style and yet very sharply defined.  This piece is 3/35 and it is signed and numbered on the bottom by Tammy Garcia. Simply a striking piece by one of today’s great potters with a lot of thought behind it!

$ 1,200.00
Garcia, Tammy – “Seeded Woman I” Bronze.  Ed. 3/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is taken from a series of clay pieces which she made which were inspired by the paintings of Picasso.  The imagery is a Picasso-esqe woman sitting in a chair.  The piece has multiple layers and textures.  When asked about the name and the imagery, Tammy said:

“I thought about a definition of the word, “seed” which I had read.  It was, ‘A seed is the small, hard part of a plant from which a new plant grows’.  It made me think of women who came to the Southwest when the trains arrived in the 1880’s, or with the Fred Harvey Tours in the 1920’s.  They brought with them their past but became enamored with the Southwest or Native Culture. So on the bronze, the woman is sitting on a chair and the back of the chair is incised with Pueblo designs.  The side has areas which were inlaid hei-shi beads.  These women became the seeds of new interest in the area and culture. They spread this love of the Southwest just like a seed.  I called this, “Seeded Woman I”.  It is the first in this series to pay tribute to those how become aware of Native culture, respect it and spread their love of the art and artists to the world.”.

The piece has striking patinas to differentiate the various textures and depths of carving.  Much like her clay work, the piece is distinctive in style and yet very sharply defined.  This piece is 3/35 and it is signed and numbered on the bottom by Tammy Garcia. Simply a striking piece by one of today’s great potters with a lot of thought behind it!

$ 1,200.00
Sale!
Swentzell, Roxanne – Clay Mask with Hands Design

This is an original clay piece by Roxanne Swentzell.  She is well known for her clay masks and their unique expressiveness.  This mask has two hand prints painted on the sides of the face. There is a very serene appearance.  The mask has a metal museum mount stand made for it.  It is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed in the clay, “ROX”.

$ 2,500.00 $ 2,000.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn  – Seedpot with Fish

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her often fanciful carved pottery. This bowl is carved with two fish as the central design.  Separating the two fish is a clam shell. The fish are polished red while the clam is tan polished and there is a micaceous mauve colored clay.  The top has little round carved circles which are the “air bubbles” and there are also white areas which are the movement of waves.  The piece is a striking use of carving and clay colorations to create a complex design.  The seedpot is from 2002 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,400.00
Duwyenie, Debra – Seedpot with Sunface  & Avanyu

Debra Duwyenie is well known for her wonderful miniatures and incised designs.  Each piece is stone polished and then it is etched before it is fired!  This seedpot has a central polished area and the surrounding surfaces are slipped with a micaceous clay.  The center has a sun face medallion and that is surrounded by a water serpent (avanyu).  There are clouds around the avanyu as well.   Note that the lighter red matte areas are where Debra has only etched away the polished surface but not down as far as the tan color of the clay.  Debra is attentive to the little details, like the background tan area where she tightly etches the vertical lines to accentuate the polished design.  The piece is signed, “Debra” on the bottom.

$ 550.00
Naranjo, Johnathan – Jar with Buffalo Maiden Dancer

This jar by Johnathan Naranjo captures his unique style of sgraffito and etching on his pottery.  The jar is fully polished and has an asymmetrical rim.  The design on one side is the back of a Buffalo Maiden Dancer.  It is an interesting perspective as the bundles she wears on her back has eagle feathers and a Sun Face medallion.  The feathers in her hands are also seen in the etched designs.  There is a simple water design around the neck and the remainder of the piece is simply fully polished to a high shine. The various colors are simply created by the depth of the etching into the clay!   Jonathan continues to amaze with this designs and technique.   The entire piece has been traditionally fired to create a the brown coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Johnathan has won numerous awards for his pottery and  Johnathan is definitely one of the young potters to watch!

$ 600.00
Moquino, Jennifer Tafoya – Jar with Four Pheasants

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and exceptional realistic animals. This jar is coil built and fully polished.  It is a wonderful shape which is square on the sides and flat on the top. Technically that is always difficult to achieve with native clay. The flat area has four pheasants etched into the clay.  Each one is in a different state of standing both male and female.  Note the area behind where she has etched some very intricate plants with grass,w wind and mountain patterns!  This pot has a tall polish neck flowing into the flat carved areas.   The bottom is also fully polished.  All the colors are all from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 1,800.00
Roller, Jordan – “Renewal” Jar

Jordan Roller is innovative in his use of thin carved designs on his pottery.  This jar is fully polished and it is tightly carved around the shoulder.  Jordan titled the jar, “Renewal”.  The carving has clouds, rain, lightning and stars encircling the piece.  Note the precision of the carving!  The bottom of the jar is also fully polished.  It is fired a dark brown coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.   Jordan is certainly a  young potter to watch! 

$ 1,850.00
Garcia, Tina – Kiva Bowl

Tina Garcia was well known for her use of traditional shapes in her pottery.  This is a very traditional shaped bowl with the sharp shoulder and the kiva step design carved on the rim.  The steps represent the steps into the kiva ceremonial space.  The bowl is fully polished and fired a deep black. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tina Garcia”  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00
Naranjo, Teresita  – Bowl with Avanyu (1970’s)

Teresita Naranjo was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and know for her deeply carved pottery.  This bowl has her stylized avanyu as the design.  Note how the negative space around the rim becomes part of the design of the clouds above the avanyu.  The entire piece is fully carved and polished. The avanyu encircles the bowl and the body has cloud and rain designs.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita Naranjo” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 525.00
Shupla, Helen – Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1970’s)

Helen Shupla was famous for her carved pottery as well as her exceptional melon jars.  This bowl is carved with a water serpent (avanyu) as the design.  Helen’s husband Kenneth Shupla, would often help her with the carving on the pottery.  Note the complexity of her designs and how the tail extends up over the head of the avanyu!  The bowl is highly polished and it is signed on the bottom, “Helen Shupla”  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00
Folwell, Susan – Lidded Jar with Carved Birds

Susan Folwell combines classic imagery with her own contemporary style of shape and design. This tall jar has carved birds in the center of the design.  They are polished tan and the bodies of the birds are carved at various levels, giving them a very distinctive appearance.  The color variation on the wings is from the traditional firing.  The jar itself is slipped with a pinkish colored clay and there are additional birds painted onto the surface.  The lid sits on the top of the jar and its shape is meant to evoke the classic Hopi style bird.  The various colors and use of the matte and polished surfaces works perfectly on this piece.  Susan’s pottery is meant to not only connect with us visually, but also with touch and meant to make us think.

$ 3,300.00
Naranjo, Madeline – Water Jar with Bear Paws (1970’s)

Madeline Naranjo (b. 1916) was known for her deep carved pottery.  This smaller water jar has a double shoulder or “rainbow ridge”.  This is always technically a bit more difficult to make but the result creates an additional angle for the light to reflect off the piece.  The entire jar is fully polished, including into the mouth of the jar.  There are four bear paws impressed into the clay before it was polished. The bear paws are symbolic of a Santa Clara story which told of a bear which led the Pueblo people to water during a drought. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Madeline Naranjo” on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While Madeline no longer makes pottery, her work is certainly a classic and her legacy continues in the pottery of her granddaughter, Madeline E. Naranjo.

$ 500.00
Tafoya, LuAnn – Tall Jar with Cloud and Mountain Designs

This is a spectacular new jar by LuAnn Tafoya.  She is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her large, highly polished pottery.  The shape of this jar is one which has become a signature of LuAnn’s pottery over the years.  The wide shoulder has the carved designs.  On this piece the carving is varied around the entire pattern, with cloud, mountain and rain designs.  The carving is very sharp and the area behind is slipped with a cream colored clay slip in the traditional manner.  The jar itself is fully polished and fired a very deep red.  Note as well near the rim there is just a very small rain cloud which is etched into the clay slip!  The highly stone polished surface, the large size and the deep red coloration make this a visually stunning jar! It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  LuAnn continues to keep alive the traditional style of Santa Clara pottery in her techniques and designs.  Just like her mother, Margaret Tafoya, LuAnn won “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market for one of her large wide shoulder jars.

$ 7,000.00
Shupla, Helen – Melon Jar with 16 Ribs (1980’s)

Helen Shupla is certainly most famous for her exceptional melon jars.  Her melon jars are the very traditional form with the ribs pushed out in the clay.  This melon jar is one of her classic shapes with an elongated body showing the full length of each rib.  Each of the 16 ribs is pushed out into the clay.  She would do this by placing her fingers inside the bowl and pushing against the clay from both the inside and outside!  Can you see the slight angle to each section?  This is how she would turn her hand as she was pushing against the clay to create the separate ribs!  The entire piece is fully polished and fired black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Helen Shupla”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,600.00
Gutierrez, Lois  – Turtles & Avanyu Polychrome Water Jar

Lois Gutierrez is one of the few Santa Clara potters who continues to create traditional polychrome pottery.  Each of the various colors is derived from natural clay slips.  They are then painted onto the vessel and note that there are more than 3 different clay colors, which makes it “polychrome”. This jar is a classic water jar shape with a low shoulder and a slightly turned out neck.  The neck of the jar is fully painted with turtles surrounded by an avanyu and a rainbow design.  Check out the detail in the painted designs and I think I can count over six colors!  Separating the two sections with the turtles are elongated rain cloud and rain designs. Below the shoulder is a very traditional style representation of rain and rain clouds.  The jar is traditionally fired, which adds to the complexity of the overall process!  Note near the base it has been slipped with a deep red clay.  Interestingly, the deep red is not polished and so has some texture.  This harkens to early polychrome pottery when a band of red clay slip would be applied below the shoulder wit a textural feel.  The jar is signed on the bottom “Lois”.

 

$ 1,050.00
Naranjo, Johnathan – Wide Jar with Hopi Maidens

This jar by Johnathan Naranjo captures his unique style of sgraffito and etching on his pottery.  The jar is fully polished and the neck is matte in the shape of the kiva steps.  The various colors are simply created by the depth of the etching into the clay!   Jonathan continues to amaze with this designs and technique.  Around the top of the shoulder are bricks, alternating between polished and matte red.  Around the shoulder are a variety of scenes.  One has three Hopi maidens, each very realistically etched into the clay.  As the jar is turned there are rain and cloud designs. There is then a scene with three Hopi girls standing by a kiva with the ladder and there are two pieces of pottery also etched into the clay.  Check out the detail!! These is evocative of the photography of Edward Curtis.  Finally, Johnathan has carved a wood ladder meant to represent the Kiva ladders, which he has placed in the bowl.  It creates a wonderful addition to the overall piece.  The bottom of the bowl is fully polished and the piece has been traditionally fired brown.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Johnathan has won numerous awards for his pottery and  Johnathan is definitely one of the young potters to watch!

$ 2,200.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Large Box with Horses & Melon Rib Lid

It is not often that Nancy Youngblood finishes a box as complicated or as intricate as this piece!  Boxes are inherently difficult to make with chances that they will crack in the drying or firing stages.  As well, making a box at this size is even more difficult. The result, however, is spectacular. This box has four horses, one on each side.  Nancy won a  “Best of Show” award for one of her first large vessels with a horse on it a few years ago.  For this box, she has taken the horse concept and extrapolated it out onto the entire surface. Each horse is carved in a running position with tails and manes flying.  The muscles are rounded out giving each horse a more defined appearance.  Above each horse is a cloud and raindrops are also carved into the clay. It is the lid which actually ties this piece together.  The top is fully carved with melon ribs which create the “clouds” swirling above the horses. The ribs of the clouds connect to the clouds above the horses, adding another dimension to the box.  Finally, the surface has been polished with Nancy’s trademark high shine.  Using a stone, she polishes the surface to a glassy appearance.  Simply.  Stunning.  The interior and rim of the box are slipped with mica, which is a subtle addition to the piece.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  The final photo is of Nancy holding the box, just to give a sense of how big it really is!

 

$ 23,000.00
Duwyenie, Debra – Seedpot with Seven Turtles

Debra Duwyenie is well known for her wonderful miniatures and incised designs. Each piece is stone polished and then it is etched before it is fired! This seedpot has seven turtles encircling the piece.  Each of them has a different design etched onto its back.  The turtles are surrounded by stars and in the center is a flower pattern.  Each of the larger turtles has a different design etched into its shell.  The one with the wavy lines is the “shifting sand” design and it is meant to represent her husband, Preston Duwyenie.  After the piece is fired black it is “two-toned” sienna in areas. Debra also pays close attention to the little details like the gray background area and how evenly she etches the vertical lines.  The seedpot is signed, “Debra” on the bottom in the clay.

$ 700.00
Naranjo, Johnathan – Seedpot with Avanyu

Johnathan Naranjo is on the creative young innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This seedpot is fully polished and etched just into the top layer of the polished surface! That creates the reddish-brown coloration of the design. The design in the negative space is an avanyu (water serpent) which then encircles the seedpot.  The designs surorunding the polished avanyu are etched into the clay.  There are cloud, pueblo, flower and finally corn designs.  While it is a small piece, there is a wonderful creativity of using the negative space for the main design and surrounding it with other classic imagery! The coloration of the bowl is derived from the firing technique.  Johnathan has won numerous awards for his pottery and  Johnathan is definitely one of the young potters to watch!

$ 400.00
Moquino, Jennifer Tafoya – Jar with Nine Quail

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and exceptional realistic animals. This jar is coil built and fully polished.  It is a wonderful shape which is square on the sides and VERY flat on the top. Technically that is always difficult to achieve with native clay. The flat area has nine quail etched into the clay.  Each one is in a different state of standing or flying.  Note the area behind where she has etched some very intricate plants and agave!  Towards the rim is a micaceous clay slip and the designs on the edge are reminiscent of those by her father, Ray Tafoya.  The bottom is also fully polished.  All the colors are all from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 1,500.00
Folwell, Susan – Asymmetrical Jar with Birds & Dragons

This is an exceptional piece by Susan Folwell.  The jar is asymmetrical in form with a section in which the clay is pushed inward. The jar itself is part of a series where Susan broke the piece into sections and reassembled it.  Each section connects to the next and in terms of her designs.  There are interconnected birds and dragons which swirl around the piece.  Susan has long been interested in and influenced by Asian art.  For her, the dragons and “avanyu” are often interchangable images.  The jar is tan polished and the open space has her signature, “x” design.  The various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  The shape and design create a beautiful poetic motion in this jar!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It has been in numerous museum exhibitions, including most recently the “Between Two Worlds” at the Phoenix Airport Museum.

$ 4,500.00
Duwyenie, Debra – Seedpot with Sunface & Hummingbirds

This seedpot was made, polished and incised by Debra Duwyenie.  The design has a sunface on one side.  It is surrounded by hummingbirds, butterflies and flowers.  All the design work is etched into the seedpot before it is fired!  Few potters take the risk to etch their pieces before they are fired.  However, note the background gray area of her design and the vertical lines etched into the clay.  After the piece was fired, Debra “two-toned” it so that it is black and sienna.  The colors vary across the surface of the piece. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Debra”.

$ 800.00
Baca, Angela – Miniature Melon Bowl

This is one of the smallest melon bowl by Angela Baca we have seen!  There are 16 melon ribs, and each is carved into the clay and then individually stone polished.  On this bowl, even the space between the ribs is left matte for a visual contrast to the deeply carved ribs.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Angela Baca” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Baca, Angela – Melon Jar with 24 Ribs

Angela Baca was famous throughout her career for her melon ribbed pottery.  The form is derived from the melon and squash grown in the area and so there is always an organic style to the shape.  This piece is more of a jar, with a slight neck. The jar has 24 carved ribs and the entire surface is fully polished, even between the ribs!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Angela Baca” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 575.00
Gutierrez, Lois  – Water Jar with Hummingbirds

Lois Gutierrez is one of the few potters who continues to create polychrome pottery at Santa Clara.  Polychrome, or more than three different colors of clay slips, are all painted onto the surface of the vessel before it is fired. This water jar is smaller in size and yet very thin walled.  The jar has a sharp shoulder and then it dips down before rising up to the rim.  Around the neck of the jar, there are two hummingbirds and flowers painted onto the surface.  Below the shoulder are cloud and plant designs.  All the colors are derived from natural clay slips.  The base of the jar is indented, which is reminiscent of the historic Santa Clara water jars which were carried on the head.  This jar has over five different natural clay colors utilized.  This is certainly a classic piece of Lois’s pottery which combines a cultural legacy in design with one in clay.

 

ois Gutierrez is one of the few potters who continues to create polychrome pottery at Santa Clara.  Polychrome, or more than three different colors of clay slips, are all painted onto the surface of the vessel before it is fired. This water jar has a wonderful shape with very round body and elongated neck.  The design around the neck is a feather pattern.  Note the use of the three different colors of clay for the tip of the feather in contrast to the white feathers.  The body of the jar has two intertwined water serpents. Note the use of classic rain and seed patterns in the bodies of each avanyu.  Above them is a rain cloud design. What makes them the “old style” avanyu?  Check out the shape of the horn and the shape of the tongue.  They each have the three prong style, and this is similar to the very early historic style of avany painted on the pottery!   The base of the jar is indented, which is reminiscent of the historic Santa Clara water jars which were carried on the head.  This jar has over five different natural clay colors utilized.  This is certainly a classic piece of Lois’s pottery which combines a cultural legacy in design with one in clay.

 

$ 400.00
Moquino, Ty – Painted Helmet with Carved Visor (Age 15)

Ty Moquino is a son of noted potter Jennifer Moquino.  At only 15 years old he is making some creative pottery!  This is one of his masks.  They are inspired by the science fiction he has read, along with being a commentary on the environment, sustainability and even imagery from Standing Rock.  This is the first time he has made a full helmet instead of a mask. The helmet is fully polished and painted black-on-black on one side. The design is a classic feather and mountain design.  The front of the helmet and the top “fin” are slipped with mica. Ty said it was more of a challenge to create this piece and make it stable than his other work.  The front visor is carved and also slipped with mica. The combination of shape, polish, carved and painted designs is exceptional on this piece.  It is great to see new work from his young potter.  Ty won the “Best of Youth” award at the Heard Museum Indian Market in 2017 for one of his masks!  It is signed on the bottom.  It is set on a metal museum mount stand, which is included.

$ 385.00
Tafoya, LuAnn – Mini Red Bear Paw Bowl

This is one of the few miniatures we have ever had from LuAnn Tafoya.  She is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her large, highly polished pottery.  This jar is a classic shape for Santa Clara pottery with the round body and it is fully polished.  There are four bear paws carved into the clay.  The bear paw design is part of a story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  The bowl is highly polished and traditionally fired.   The coloration is beautiful and even at a small size, it is a wonderful example of her skill, creativity, and commitment to traditional Santa Clara pottery.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  There is a photo of it with the larger vessels here in the gallery for scale.

$ 450.00
Folwell, Susan & Les Namingha – “Corn Maiden: Earth Mother” Jar

Susan Folwell (Santa Clara )and Les Namingha (Hopi-Tewa/Zuni) collaborated together for the first time on a series of vessels in a show entitled “Corn:Maiden:Cultures” in 2015. The concept for the exhibition was that the Corn Maiden in Pueblo culture can also be found as a primal female archetype in cultures throughout the world.  There is play back and forth on these vessels as the multi-cultural figures are placed within a Pueblo context as the “Corn Maiden”, who brings the corn, the harvest and life.  This jar has been in an exhibit at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture since 2016.

This large jar was made by Les.  The designs painted by Susan on two sides show a Hopi maiden and a Pueblo maiden.  Her idea was to leave the faces empty, so that they did not represent just one person, but all women.  The two women represent the Pueblo and Hopi ancestry of Les and Susan. Playing from Susan’s more realistic portrayals, Les painted a more modern version of the women on the other two sides.  The angular shape of this vessel, made from Zuni clay, is unusual but also perfect for this important imagery.  In many ways, this powerful jar brings together the ideas of womanhood, femininity, modernism and the continuing importance of the Corn Maiden concept in Pueblo culture.  The dark brown background works perfectly for this intense jar.  Check out more of their exceptional collaborative pottery in the book, “Spoken Through Clay”.

$ 8,800.00
Tafoya, LuAnn – Mini Red Water Jar with Avanyu

This is one of the few miniatures we have ever had from LuAnn Tafoya.  She is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her large, highly polished pottery.  This jar is a classic shape for Santa Clara pottery with the round body and the elongated neck.  The jar is deeply carved with a water serpent encircling the piece.  The water serpent (avanyu) is part of a story where it saves the village from a flood.  That is why as the jar is turned the body of the avanyu consists of cloud and rain pattern.  However, that also gives the jar a distinctive appearance as it is turned beyond just the one design.  The jar is very highly polished and traditionally fired.  The color is a striking deep red.  The recessed area surrounding the carving is filled in using a white or cream-colored clay.  This creates a striking visual contrast between the tan and red areas.  The coloration is beautiful and the shape of his piece is a great example of her skill, creativity, and commitment to traditional Santa Clara pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  There is a photo of it with the larger vessels here in the gallery for scale.

$ 675.00
Tapia, Belen – Red Carved Jar with Mountain Designs (1970’s)

Belen Tapia was a diverse potter creating everything from painted to carved pottery.  This jar is from the 1970’s and at that time she was making primarily carved pottery.  Belen Tapia was a niece of Sara Fina Tafoya and the mother of Anita Suazo, and Anna Archuleta.  This jar is very deeply carved with a mountain or kiva step pattern on two sides.  Separating the mountains are cloud, wind and rain patterns.  It is unusual as it is a very fluid design across the surface.  The neck of the jar is just slightly turned out. The surface is highly polished and the background area has the traditional cream-colored clay slip.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00
Roller, Jordan – Brown Bowl Lightning Designs

Jordan Roller is innovative in his use of thin carved designs on his pottery.  This bowl is fully polished and a distinctive form with a low, wide shoulder and sloping neck.  The design is a stylized lightning pattern and rain pattern. The complex pattern has an ebb and flow across the surface of the bowl.  Note as well Jordan’s signature style of carving with thin lines and bold open areas.  The bowl is fired a striking brownish red.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.   Jordan is certainly a  young potter to watch! 

$ 1,500.00
Youngblood, Nathan – Tri-Color Serving Plate

Nathan Youngblood is known for his deeply carved and highly polished pottery. This plate shape was inspired by the traditional Santa Clara serving bowls, which had an indention for the thumb to hold them when serving.  Nathan took that shape and added the same indention on the opposite side, creating his own distinctive form. The interior of the plate is fully carved and polished a deep red. The design is a central medallion of clouds, rain, and water, surrounded by cloud motifs above and below. Interestingly, while the rim is polished tan, there are two sections which are carved into the rim of the plate. This is always technically more complicated and adds to the risk of breaking when firing.  While the shape, carving, and designing might seem like enough, Nathan also takes his pottery one step further. After it is fired, he uses small screwdrivers and scrapes the sides of the carved designs and the recessed areas, to create a visually striking contrast.  This style has been called, “the new Santa Clara polychrome”, although I usually called it “tri-color” with the variations of red, matte and buff areas. The plate was traditionally fired.  It is signed on the back in the clay with his name and deer tracks, which represent his name in Tewa.

$ 9,800.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Bowl with Avanyu & Shells

This is an exceptional carved jar by Nancy Youngblood.  It is one of fewer red pieces.  The bowl is carved with eight shells around the neck of the bowl.  Why shells? Nancy began carving them on her pottery after a trip to the Caribbean in the 1980’s.  While it may seem an “exotic” addition to the pottery, shells were frequently traded in pre-contact times and even today are worn by the dancers during traditional Pueblo ceremonies.  When Nancy carves the shells the “ridges” are each rounded, just like on her melon bowl!  They are very time involved and stunning!  Below the shells is a very deeply carved avanyu (water serpent). Note how Nancy carves the avanyu, with swirls of water and angles for lightning!  The lid is delicate and carved in the shape of a shell on both sides.  It is designed to fit perfectly into the bowl.  The piece is from 2010 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Note the color, as the bowl has been traditionally fired and the red has a rich coloration.  Nancy has won numerous awards for her melon bowls, and this is undoubtedly a creative use of her melon rib style!

$ 4,500.00
Whitegeese, Daryl  – Tall Water Jar with Mesa and Rain Designs

I should start off by saying that is one of the tallest pieces we have had by Daryl Whitegeese.  Next, sometimes a photo just doesn’t do a piece justice and this is one of those times.  I realize looking at the photo that the top band looks “wavy” when in fact it is perfectly even.  I had a hard time capturing the size, shine and carving on this large jar.  I went for the polish and shape.  The jar is an elegant form with a tall shoulder which turns in and then rises up to the tall neck.  It is this proportionality which creates such an elegance to this piece.  The center of the jar is fully carved with a design which depicts the mesa and the clouds , along with the rain and lightning designs.  the carving is deep and the edges are VERY sharp. This style of carving has become a ‘signature’ for Daryl’s pottery.  The jar is stone polished and it a glassy black surface. Note as well the edge of the rim of the jar and how he has polished into the rim!  The size, shape and design all work perfectly on this piece. It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Daryl has won numerous awards at Santa Fe Indian Market and other events.  He remains one of the exciting traditional potters working today!  Simply stunning!

 

 

$ 5,700.00
Romero, Susan “Snowflake” – Butterfly Seedpot

Susan “Snowflake” Romero’s pottery is highly polished and intricately etched with detailed imagery.  She learned to make pottery from her father, Joseph Lonewolf. This seedpot has a realistic style of butterfly on the top.  The butterfly is surrounded by flowers. There are various levels of etching on the piece, including some wonderful areas which are just tan.  The polishing has created a high shine.  The seepot is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair and signed on the bottom.

$ 325.00
Moquino, Jennifer & Jason Ebelacker – Double Shoulder Water Jar with Cherry Blossoms

This is a striking collaborative jar by Jennifer Tafoya Moquino and Jason Ebelacker.  Jason is a grandson of Virginia Ebelacker and a great-grandson of Margaret Tafoya.  He continues in the family tradition of making large vessels.  The water jar is one of his striking shapes with a wide shoulder and then is has a sharp, flat curve and a second shoulder as it extends up to the neck! The rim of the jar is slightly turned out and polished on the inside. The jar has two bear paws and it is fired a deep red coloration.  The surface of the jar is etched by Jennifer Tafoya Moquino. She is known for her realistic etched designs.  On this jar Jennifer has etched a series of cherry blossoms around the surface of the jar.  It is a simple but elegant design which leaves open spaces to reveal the polishing. The petals and branches add just a slight detail to the surface of the jar.  It is a striking combination of design and shape.  Jennifer & Jason have collaborated on numerous pieces winning awards for their distinctive collaborations.  This jar won a Second Place ribbon at the 2018 Heard Indian Market.  It is exciting to see potters push beyond their comfort level in size and complexity of design.

$ 4,200.00
Sale!
Tafoya, Camilio – Jar with Eagle Feather Pattern (1975)

his miniature jar by Camilio Tafoya is from  by Camilio is from 1975. It is etched with a feather pattern around the neck.  At the base the piece is polished and there is a single flower also etched into the surface of the clay.  It is signed on the bottom “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair..

$ 500.00 $ 250.00
Roller, Cliff – Bowl with Bear Paws (1995)

Cliff Roller is a son of noted potter Toni Roller. Each piece is coil built and stone polished.  This bowl is carved four bear paws as the designs. The bear paws are symbolic of a Pueblo story where the bear leads the people to water during a drought.  Here the bear paws are each deeply carved into the clay and polished. The remainder of the bowl is fully polished to a very high shine.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Cliff Roller”.  This bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While these days Cliff makes very little pottery, his work remains a statement to his skill as a potter!

$ 400.00
Gutierrez, Margaret Lou Roybal – Large Feather Plate (1970’s)

Margaret Lou Gutierrez was the only daughter of noted potters Tonita & Juan Roybal.  She began making pottery in the 1970’s. This bowl is one of her few plates.  The surface is stone polished and painted with a classic feather design. The back is matte.  Her feathers always had distinctive sharp appearance in their shape.  The plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Margaret Lou Gutierrez”.

$ 900.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Lidded Melon Jar with Hummingbirds (1989)

This lidded jar by Grace Medicine Flower is from 1989 shows the transition of her work from sgraffito designs to a combination of carved and etched imagery. This jar has an elegant shape and the entire piece is fully polished. The bottom half is fully carved and polished with melon ribs.  Note the sharp edge of each rip and how the area between the ribs are also fully polished!  The area around the shoulder is fully polished and etched with hummingbirds.  The lid is unique with a single melon “rib” cutting across the surface.  It perfectly ties the entire piece together!   It is signed on the bottom, “Grace Medicine Flower”. The jar is in excellent condition with no chips,cracks restoration or repair. It is elegant and stunning!  Over her career she made very few black pieces and yet they are always stunning and creative!

$ 2,800.00
Ebelacker, Jason – Double Shoulder Water Jar with Bear Paws

This is a classic wide shoulder water jar by Jason Ebelacker.  The jar is an elegant shape with the very wide shoulder and turned out rim. This shape of water jar is one which is often seen in the work of his great-grandmother Margaret Tafoya.  Here Jason has created a jar with a double shoulder or “rainbow rim”.  The key to making a jar of this shape is to accentuate the round shoulder and the curves of the neck.  He has impressed a bear paw as part of the design.   The paws represent the story of the bear who saved the village from a flood and they are represented on vessels which hold water.  The jar is stone polished to a high shine and then traditionally fired. The jar has a high polish and a very deep black coloration.  Jason is a son of noted potter Richard Ebelacker and grandson of Virginia Ebelacker.  He has won numerous awards for his pottery and continues to be one of the important younger potters to watch.  Pottery at this level of creativity and quality are certainly a reflection of both his talent and the future!

$ 3,600.00
Lonewolf, Rosemary “Apple Blossom” – Seedpot with Birds

This is an exceptional miniature seedpot by Rosemary Lonewolf!  It is fully designed with three birds and a band of flowers around the shoulder.  Spiraling around the top of the seedpot is a feather design and there is a small flower on the very top! Rosemary has added additional white and blue colorations for the clay on this piece.  The various colors are all derived from natural clay slips.  The seedpot is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 800.00
Folwell, Susan – “Reclining Woman” Lidded Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series for, “Taos Light: Maidens to Mantas”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This jar is inspired by a painting by Victor Higgins.  Susan says of this jar:

“This painting by Higgins is a powerful piece.  I really wanted to be able to capture the “Higgins Clouds” (last image).  They are the kind of clouds which you only see in Northern New Mexico.  I put the lid on the jar with the tightly basket to create a greater sense of intimacy than it just being an open vessel.

The jar is a tall shape and the white areas are a textured white slip. The figures are painted so that the clay can be seen in the background of the piece.  Again, the texture of the clay plays an important part of the vessel. The lid is wonderful with the tightly painted basket and the handle.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

“Viewing Susan Folwell’s intricately designed pottery is like reading a book, as each piece must be turned, examined and viewed from different angles to understand the whole story.”  American Indian Art Magazine, 2005

$ 2,200.00
Folwell, Susan – “The Twins” Large Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This large jar is part of her new series for, “Peering through Taos Light”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This jar is inspired by a Hennings painting of two twins who moved to Taos. Susan says of this piece:

 

“What attracted me to this painting was the striking look of the twins.  They were the Baumgartner brothers who relocated to Taos.  I appreciated the painting captured the essence of the time they lived.  I wanted to do a flask as the shape to accentuate the landscape.  I went a bit “free” form on the shape, but it billows behind them, like the clouds.  The back panel are flowers local to Taos and New Mexico and the painted and etched the basket on the bottom. I love how the basket seems to be both holding them and they seem to be floating out of it as well.  It’s all like a dream.”

This large jar is both painted and etched.  Note on the figures how Susan has etched away the figures to create both depth and bring out the natural color of the clay.  The “lid” for the flask is cork.  The shape, design and story all fit together perfectly on this amazing large vessel!  The last photos here are the actual painting for comparison.  The pieces are signed on the bottom.

$ 11,000.00
Folwell, Susan – “Bread Bakers” Large Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series for, “Taos Light: Maidens to Mantas”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This jar is inspired by the painting “The Bakers” by Walter Ufer.  Susan says of this piece,

I made this jar to have a very open and organic appearance.  I wanted to capture the fun and intensity of Pueblo women getting ready for Feast Day.  There is so much movement in the clouds and sky and there was an unexpected translucence when I put on the clay slip.  It made me want to keep the clay showing and create a piece which was more subtle.  The use of the layers of rope around the neck are the passing of the legacy of Feast Day and baking bread from one generation to another.

The jar is a large but organic shape with a wide body and indented neck.  The rim of the jar is fully incised to create the appearance of the rope. The body of the piece is painted with the scenes of Pueblo women baking bread.  The clouds are intricately painted with small dots and note how the background areas has large swaths of white clay slip against the natural color of the clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 4,900.00
Folwell, Kaa – Large Grafiti Style Clouds and Lightning Design Bowl

Kaa Folwell is one of the exciting young potters working today.  In 2018 she is graduating from IAIA, which certainly adds an educational component to a lifetime of making pottery in her renowned family.  This large bowl has a wide shoulder and a slight neck.  The outside of the bowl is etched and then painted. The designs are graffiti style clouds and lightning.  The spiral and flow around the surface of the bowl.  The contrast of the painted surfaces with the texture of the clay body works perfectly for both the feel and the visual.  In various places around the designs are the Folwell family “x” design.  Not only is the bowl painted and etched, but the entire interior is fully painted as well.  The strength of the exterior design continues on the interior.  It is a beautiful balance of color, form, and design.  The bowl is signed on the bottom.  We are excited to see more from this young potter!

$ 1,500.00
Folwell, Kaa – Bowl with Graffiti Design

Kaa Folwell is one of the exciting young potters working today. This jar has an asymmetrical shape around the rim. The coloration is achieved by polishing the top and bottom areas red and the center tan.  The area around the shoulder is fully incised with “graffiti” designs.  There is a striking flow of design and the various levels of design.  It is a beautiful balance of color, form, and design.  We are excited to see more from this young potter!

$ 400.00
Roller, Toni – Large Jar with 32 Feather & Mountain Design

This is an exceptional large carved jar by Toni Roller.  She is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and is known for her classic shapes and exquisite stone polished pottery.   This large jar is a striking shape with a high shoulder and a slight neck.  Around the shoulder are 32 carved feathers as the design.  Toni has a distinctive style of carved feather she uses for her pottery, with a rounded edge at the base.  The lower section of the jar is carved with a kiva step and mountain pattern.  It is a subtle complement to the complex carving of the feathers.  The jar is fully polished and a striking example of her work.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Toni Roller” and dated February 2018.

$ 4,000.00
Garcia, Greg – Double Shoulder Water Jar (1984)

Greg Garcia was known for his use of classic Santa Clara forms for his pottery.  He learned to make pottery from his grandmother, Severa Tafoya and also worked closely with his sister, Tina Garcia.  This is one of his classic double shoulder water jars. The jar has the “rainbow ridge” or double shoulder, which is always technically difficult to make. The entire piece is fully polished.  The jar was fired a deep black coloration.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Greg Garcia”.

$ 300.00
Garcia, Tina – Long Neck Jar with Fluted Rim

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plainware Santa Clara pottery. This jar is a classic shape with a long neck and a sharp shoulder.  The rim is fluted and it is also fully polished on the inside.  Typical of her pottery is an elegant shape and the stone polished surface is stunning.  It is signed on the bottom and  it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,000.00
Nichols, Robert Cleto – Black Bowl with Carved Fish Design

Robert Cleto Nichols is known for his deep carved pottery.  Each piece is coil built, carved and stone polished.  This bowl has a fish as the design which encircles the piece.  As the bowl is turned the body of the fish is divided up into various classic Santa Clara designs. There are melon ribs, kiva steps, and cloud designs.  Note the depth of the carving on this piece!  The bowl is traditionally fired black and signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 400.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Mini Jar with Flute Player, Frogs & Turtles (1998)

This miniature red jar by Grace Medicine Flower is fully polished and incised.  The design is a central medallion with a Mimbres inspired flute player.  Around the shoulder are alternating turtles and frogs.  The jar is from 1998 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.

$ 1,600.00
Youngblood, Nancy –  Red 16 Rib Swirl Melon Bowl with Kiva Step Lid

This is an exceptional miniature by Nancy Youngblood.  It is one of her very deeply carved melon bowls which swirl down from the neck to the base.  There are sixteen ribs and each rib is carved into the clay and fully stone polished.  Consider that each rib has two “sides” to be polished and the surface area of the piece is about double its size! This jar also has a lid which is carved to fit exactly into the rim of the bowl.  Amazingly, the front and the back of the lid are stone polished!  Nancy said of this type of lid:

“The kiva step lid.  I saw that design a lot when I was a young girl both on pottery and on my mom’s embroidery. I wanted to try that pattern with a lid. It’s tough to do because lids are so fragile. You have to make it solid and then cut into it to get the shape. Lids are probably some of the hardest things to do with the pottery.”  Nancy Youngblood, Spoken Through Clay

The coloration on this bowl is a striking deep red.  The deep ribs and the deep color are in perfect to reflect the light at every angle!  Nancy has won numerous awards for her melon bowls, and this is undoubtedly a classic of her style!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 4,800.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Leaping Grasshoppers” Seedpot (1997)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1997.  The piece is entitled, “Leaping Grasshoppers”.  It includes a signed version of the card which Joseph made for each of his miniatures.  There is also a photo of Joseph holding the piece! Joseph wrote partially of this piece,

“Portrayed side view are two geometrically designed and color-toned grasshoppers.  Representative of the Mimbres Period – 10th to 14th centuries. Both grasshoppers appear to be leaping.  Beneath the plant-eating insects is a higly polished red slipwork symbolic of Mother Earth.  Swirled and jagged to denote “Her” terrain, MOther Earth’s surface is only sparsely vegetated.”

The butterfly etched on the back is symbolic of beauty and the the interlocking rings medallion represents the attachment between friends and was the yearly symbol for 1997.   This piece was actually purchased at our gallery show for Joseph Lonewolf and Grace Medicine Flower in 1998! Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  The piece is signed on the bottom and includes the signed artist card.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,600.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Lone Chipmunk” (1986)

This is a charming miniature by Joseph Lonewolf  Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This seedpot is entitled, “Lone Chipmunk”.  Joseph wrote of this piece:

“Comprising the front side of this minature is a cheerful, alert, sun-loving little animal, a lone chipmunk.  Below the handsome hoarder, at the base, is the symbol of beauty, a tiny butterfly.  Encircling the chipmunk and comprising the back side are designs symbolic of sun rays and the natural habitat (of the chipmunk).

The surface is fully polished red and there are additional black, white, green and blue clay slips added to create the colorations.  The yearly symbol for 1986 is a “heart” which represents love and Lonewolf says, “in particular a deep devotion for the ancestors and Mother Earth”.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,600.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Call to The Creatures” (1984)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This seedpot is entitled, “Call to the Creatures”.  Joseph wrote of this piece:

“The time has come…the People must stock up on food and clothing once again.  Standing upon the design symbolic of his pathway, the flute player lifts his flute and calls the creatures on the back side of this creation.  Encircled by the musical story coming from his flute, the flute player, symbolic of leadership, tells the rabbit, antelope, ram, and fish to come forth and provide the people all they require”.

This seedpot is very intricately designed with a fourish of the flute player on the piece. There is an additional green clay slip used to highlight the piece. The yearly symbol for 1984 is near the base and it is a rainbow, symbolising a bright future.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It includes the original card with the information on the piece.

$ 2,000.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Secreted Fawn” Seedpot (1998)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1998.  The piece is entitled, “Secreted Fawn”.  It includes a signed version of the card which Joseph made for each of his miniatures.  This piece was actually made for our show at the gallery with Joseph and Grace Medicine Flower in 1998.   Joseph wrote partially of this piece,

“Portrayed against a blue sky background is a single realistically designed Mule Deer fawn, most of which are born in June or July.  Nestled, side view, in an abundance of sheltered valley grasses, remote to other members of the heard, the fawn is partially encircled by eight yellow disked, red tipped daisy blossoms, which denote all that is sweet, or pleasant, in life.

Three small realistically designed cabbage white  butterflies, symbolic of beauty in life, are portrayed with the fawn.  two wings about the new born in a delicate, unhurried flight and one alight on the tip of the newborn’s right ear.”

On the back of the seedpot in the red is a Mule Deer buck, doe and fawn sketched into the clay.  They are inspired by the Mimbres pottery designs of the 11th century.  The interlocking rings medallion represents the attachment between friends and was the yearly symbol for 1997.  Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  The piece is signed on the bottom and includes the signed artist card.  There is also a photo of Joseph holding the piece! It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,000.00
Haungooah, Art Cody – Seedpot with Frogs (1981)

This is a classic stylized seedpot by Art Cody Haungooah.  It is fully polished and etched in his signature “asymmetrical’ manner, meaning there are two medallions but they are not on opposite side, and there is a section which is just plain.  In one of the medallions, there are four frogs and a central lily pad.  They are surrounded by a feather pattern.  The second medallion also has a circle of feathers and in the center is a stylized bird.  Separating the two is a design with three prayer feathers.  The piece is from 1981 when he signed his work with his name and a flute player.  The piece is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.r repair.

To learn more about Art Cody Haungooah, click below:

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

 

$ 600.00
Haungooah, Art Cody -Jar with Feather (1972)

This is a very early piece by Art Cody Haungooah.  It is a tall jar which is fully polished and carved around the shoulder. The carved design is a single feather, which he has etched into to the clay.  The remainder of the jar is plain.  It was only in 1972 that Art began to make pottery and this piece is signed with his earlies signature, “Haungooah”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Art Cody Haungooah, click below:

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

 

$ 100.00
Haungooah, Art Cody – Bowl with Pueblo Bird (1972)

This is a very early piece by Art Cody Haungooah.  It is an open bowl and it is fully polished. The design is etched into one side of the piece. There is a single Pueblo style bird with deep etching around the design.  The remainder of the bowl is plain.  It was only in 1972 that Art began to make pottery and this piece is signed with his earlies signature, “Haungooah”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Art Cody Haungooah, click below:

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

 

$ 250.00
Haungooah, Art Cody -Red and Brown Bowl with Feather Pattern (1977)

This is bowl by Art Cody Haungooah is from 1975.  The style of this bowl was some of the favorite work that Art made during his career.  Here, the top of the bowl is slipped with a brown clay, while the bottom half is red.  The bowl is etched around the center with a stylized feather pattern.  The area around the design is more deeply etched to reveal the tan clay. The bowl was made by Martha, while Art did the polishing and designs.  The bowl is indented on the bottom and also fully polished.  It is signed, “Art & Martha Haungooah, Santa Clara Pueblo, 1977”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Art Cody Haungooah, click the link below:

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 575.00
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