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santa clara potterySanta Clara Pottery

Traditional Name: Kha'p'oo Owinge (Valley of the Wild Roses.) The Pueblo is a member of the Eight Northern Pueblos, and the people are from the Tewa ethnic group of Native Americans who speak the Tewa language.  The Pueblo is on the Rio Grande, between Ohkay Owingeh (formerly San Juan Pueblo) to the north and San Ildefonso Pueblo to the south.  Santa Clara Pottery and its Pueblo are famous for producing hand-crafted pottery, specifically blackware and redware with deep engravings. Thanks to cultural pride and a strong sense of identity, the Santa Clara people have retained many of their ancient traditions while integrating with the best of what the majority culture has to offer. The Pueblo has a high regard for education, both the tribal heritage and modern education.  Santa Clara Pueblo people find employment on the reservation as well as in nearby cities. Some dances and community festivals are open to the public.  In June, St. Anthony’s Feast Day features Comanche Dances.  In August, Harvest Dances and Corn Dances are performed in honor of the patron saint, St. Clare. Regarded as one of the great masters of Pueblo ceramics Margaret Tafoya (1904-2001), a matriarch of Santa Clara Pueblo, is known for her trademark large black polished ceramics.  Margaret decorated with traditional imagery of rain clouds, water serpents, bear paws, and other family symbols.  An award-winning artist, she was the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts and a National Heritage Fellowship.  She had twelve children, eight of whom became potters; Virginia Ebelacker, Lee Tafoya, Toni Roller, LuAnn Tafoya, Mela Youngblood, Jennie Trammel, Mary Ester Archuleta and Shirley Tafoya.  Her grandchildren and today great-grandchildren carry on the traditions of making pottery.  Margaret was a guardian of traditional pottery making methods and techniques.  She created large storage vessels with stone polished surfaces.  Her carving was done before the piece was polished.  She created her amazing work from the 1920's through the 1980's.

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Haungooah, Art Cody – Turtle with Hemis Mana Katsina (1974)

Art Cody Haungooah began making pottery in  1972.  He brought his Kiowa heritage and culture to the pottery of Santa Clara Pueblo.  This clay turtle is from 1974.  It is fully polished and the back is etched with a Hemis Mana katsina.  Note the more deeply incised and rounded lines around the katsina figure.  It is signed on the bottom on the neck, “Haungooah 2-74”. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

 

$ 375.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Large Carved Jar with Avanyu, Butterflies & Lid (1985)

This is an exceptional large lidded bowl by Grace Medicine Flower.  She began her career making miniature pottery with incised designs.  This large piece is from 1985, the beginning period when she was deeply carving her pottery along with utilizing sgraffito designs.  The jar itself is deeply carved with a feathered water serpent (avanyu).  This style of avanyu was used by her father, Camilio Tafoya and also her brother, Joseph Lonewolf.  As the jar is turned there is a small feather medallion with butterflies, There is a second, larger medallion, which also has butterflies and flowers.  The lid of the jar is fully polished and also etched with butterflies. Grace said of her carved pottery:

“Once you pick her (the vessel) up, to start designing, whatever comes to your mind is how it’s going to look. To me, I can envision the carving or the plain polish and what it would look like with just one medallion. I do all the sgraffito before it was fired. You have to be so careful.  Once you put in the designs, she turns out to be beautiful.”  Grace Medicine Flower, Spoken through Clay

One distinctive aspect of this piece is the additional colored clay slips which highlight the design.  There was a very brief period when she used clay slips of various colors for her pottery.  This one has white, green and blue additional colors added to the butterflies.  Grace said that Joseph Lonewolf (her brother) gave her the clay colors and then when she ran out she didn’t get any more.  The jar is highly polished and fired a deep red.  It is certainly a classic and of her few pieces at this size and with a lid!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.  Note for the signature on the base, there is an incised butterfly along with a flower extending up the side.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 8,800.00
Archuleta,  Mary Ester – Red Canteen with Bear Paws (1970’s)

Mary Ester Archuleta is the second youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  She has never prolific and most her pottery was made in the 1970’s and 1980’s.  This canteen is a striking piece and fully polished a deep red. There are bear paws on both sides.  The entire piece is fully polished. The bear paws represent a story of how the Pueblo people were led to water during a drought by a bear.  This particular style of canteen is one which is very reminiscent of the work of her mother, Margaret Tafoya.  The stopper is hand carved and there are leather straps.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mary E. Archuleta”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Garcia, Gloria “Golden Rod” – Seedpot with Prancing Fawn

This seedpot by Gloria Garcia is fully polished and fired black. The top is fully designed with a prancing fawn in the older “two-dimensional” style of Santa Clara paintings.  The fawn is surrounded by flowers.  Gloria’s combination of polishing and etched designs is always striking.  This piece is signed on the bottom with her Tewa name “GoldenRod”.

$ 275.00
Shupla, Helen – Wedding Vase with Mesa and Cloud Designs

Helen Shupla is famous for her carved pottery as well as her exceptional melon jars.  This large wedding vase is coil built and it is carved around the body of the piece.  The style of carving is interesting as most of the work is carved into the negative space as opposed to caring it in a line around the vase.  There is a mesa design along with a cloud, mountain, and bird pattern.  The wedding vase is signed, “Helen Shupla” on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00
Cosen, Reycita – Small Carved Wedding Vase

Reycita Cosen (b. 1927)  is a daughter of potter Pasqualita Baca and a niece of Nestora Silva. While she no longer makes pottery, she was known for the complex carving on her pottery.  Each piece was coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This is one of her classic carved wedding vases. The body of the piece has carved rain and lightning designs.  The spouts have carved eagle feathers and connecting the two spouts is a twisted handle.  The vase is fired a silvery black.  It is signed, “Reycita Cosen”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 150.00
Naranjo, Teresita  – Wedding Vase with Water Serpent (1970’s)

Teresita Naranjo is famous for her deeply carved pottery.  Each piece was coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired outdoors.  She was a daughter of noted potter Christina Naranjo and a sister of Mary Cain.  This wedding vase by Teresita is from the 1970’s.  It is one of her classic shapes with the long necks and rounded spouts.  The body of the vase is deeply carved with a waters serpent (avanyu), which encircles the piece.  As the vase is turned there are additional cloud and rain designs.  The entire piece is beautifully polished and a classic for her work!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita Naranjo” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,250.00
Naranjo, Geri  – Tall Black Jar with Feather Design

This is a taller miniature jar by Geri Naranjo.  She is known for her miniature pottery and intricately etched designs.  Here the entire piece is fully polished and around the shoulder are very tiny etched feathers.  No, I was not able to count them all!  But check out how close they are to each other!  Below the feathers is a water serpent (avanyu), which encircles the piece.  The body of the avanyu has cloud and rain designs.  The remainder of the jar is very highly polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 375.00
Naranjo, Forrest – Bowl with Dragonfly Story

Forrest Naranjo is a grandson of Rose Naranjo and a son of Bernice Naranjo.  He learned to make pottery from his mother.  This bowl is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired brown and then etched with designs.  This bowl has an asymmetric rim and the designs are etched into the clay around the top of the jar.  The design is an interesting story of the birth and various stages of the dragonfly.  The various stages of the larvae and then the dragonfly itself can be seen!  The style of his etching is modern yet pulls from traditional Pueblo designs. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 325.00
Cain, Joy – Bowl with Cloud Design

Joy Cain (bl 1947) is a daughter of Mary Cain and a sister of noted potters Tina Diaz, Linda Cain, and Billy Cain.  She began making pottery in 1965 but makes almost no pottery today.   This bowl is very round in shape and very deeply carved.  It has a cloud and lightning pattern encircling the bowl.  The surface is fully polished and it is a dark black coloration.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Joy Cain”.

$ 200.00
Begay, Jr., Harrison – Canteen with Bear Paws

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This canteen is from 2003.  It is fully polished and carved with a cloud, star and bear paw design on the top.  The handles are also fully polished.  The piece is fired a black-brown coloration.   The polished sections stand out more in contrast to the black matte areas.  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Moquino, Ty – Mask “Buffalo Warrior” (Age 16)

Ty Moquino is a son of noted potter Jennifer Moquino.  At only 16 years old he is making some creative pottery!  This is one of his clay masks.  They are inspired by the science fiction he has read, along with being a commentary on the environment, sustainability and even imagery from Standing Rock.  This mask is “Buffalo Warrior”, which is inspired by the shape of a buffalo skull.  The respirator and horns are fully polished while the remainder of the mask is matte and slipped with mica in areas.  It is an interesting piece reflecting on the connection of the buffalo to Native culture, their extinction, and their future. Also, the inherent symbolism of a warrior in the future wearing a mask representing the buffalo.  It is a creative and thoughtful piece as part of his mask series. It is great to see new work from his young potter.  Ty won the “Best of Youth” award at the Heard Museum Indian Market in 2017 for one of his masks!  It is signed on the back.  The piece will include a metal museum mount for it to be displayed and will take about a week for delivery.

$ 575.00
Baca, Annie –  Mini Bowl with Avanyu

Annie Baca is a daughter of Cesencia Tafoya and known for her miniature pottery.  This bowl is very highly polished and tightly painted.  Her works are typically three inches or smaller, which is classified as a miniature.  The design on this bowl is a water serpent (avanyu), which encircles the piece.  There are cloud designs above the avanyu.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Annie”.  The glassy shine and tight painting create a beautiful and traditional Santa Clara bowl!

$ 135.00
Baca, Annie –  Mini Oval Bowl with Rain Designs

Annie Baca is a daughter of Cesencia Tafoya and known for her miniature pottery.  This oval shaped bowl is very highly polished.  Typical of her work it is formed with a very sharp shoulder.  The designs are painted onto the polished surface.  Looking at the bowl, there are cloud, rain and lightning patterns.  The glassy shine and tight painting create a beautiful and traditional Santa Clara bowl!

$ 125.00
Suazo, Candelaria – Black & Sienna Seedpot with Figure

Candelaria Suazo is a daughter of potters Joe and Santanita Suazo.  Her sisters include Martha Suazo (the wife of Art Cody Haungooah), Margie Naranjo, Mae Tapia and Shirley Duran.  She learned to make pottery from her mother and has been making pottery for over 20 years.  This miniature bowl is coil built and stone polished.  It is etched with a Yei figure and then two-toned to make it black and sienna in coloration.  Note the high polish and delicate etching on this piece.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 75.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn & Linda Cain  – Elk Skull Jar with Turquoise

This is a extraordinary piece by Autumn Borts-Medlock and her mother, Linda Cain. Over the years they have created some extraordinary collaborative pieces.  This jar has a carved elk skull which is deeply carved, etched and highlighted with a white clay slip on the front of the piece.  The antlers of the elk are also carved and polished red.  In the center of the skull is a large inset piece of turquoise.  As the jar is turned, the antlers extend to the back and there are two crossed arrows with a single inset piece of turquoise.  The area surrounding the carved surfaces has a micaceous clay slip. The use of the mica is a perfect contrast to the polished surfaces.  The top of the jar is carved with a kiva step pattern.  The scale of the jar along with the complexity of the carving make this a exceptional piece of their art.  Autumn is a sister of noted potter Tammy Garcia.  Both Autumn and Linda have won numerous awards for their pottery, recognizing their creative and contemporary style of carving.

$ 5,500.00
Garcia, Tammy – “Red Moth” Bronze, 29/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is carved in the style she carves in her pottery, with various depths and layers.  It is entitled, “Red Moth”.  It has a Sikyatki inspired moth as the design in relief.  Behind the moth are some of her classic Pueblo geometric designs and a leaf and vine pattern around the edge as the “frame”.  The bronze is made to hang on a wall, although it can also stand (or sit in an easel).  The piece has a striking use of patinas to enhance the coloration of the moth’s wings and the leaves in the frame.  The piece is signed on the side.  It is the 29/35 in the edition of the bronze.

$ 2,200.00
Garcia, Tammy – “Green Moth” Bronze, 21/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is carved in the style she carves in her pottery, with various depths and layers.  It is entitled, “Green Moth”.  It has a Sikyatki inspired moth as the design in relief.  Behind the moth are some of her classic Pueblo geometric designs and a butterfly pattern around the edge as the “frame”.  The bronze is made to hang on a wall, although it can also stand (or sit in an easel).  The piece has a striking use of patinas to enhance the coloration of the moth’s wings and the butterflies in the frame.  The piece is signed on the side.  It is the 21/35 in the edition of the bronze.

$ 2,200.00
Garcia, Tammy – “Gold Moth” Bronze, 19/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is carved in the style she carves in her pottery, with various depths and layers.  It is entitled, “Gold Moth”.  It has a Sikyatki inspired moth as the design in relief.  Behind the moth are some of her classic Pueblo geometric designs and a leaf pattern around the edge as the “frame”.  The bronze is made to hang on a wall, although it can also stand (or sit in an easel).  The piece has a striking use of patinas to enhance the coloration of the moth’s wings and the plants in the frame.  The piece is signed on the side.  It is the 19/35 in the edition of the bronze.

$ 2,200.00
Cain, Mary – Bowl with Cloud and Lightning Design (1990’s)

Mary Cain was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and a granddaughter of SaraFina Tafoya.  She was known for her classic style Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is carved with a cloud, lightning and wind pattern which encircles the piece.  There is always a fluidity to her designs as they ebb and flow around the piece.  The bowl is fired a dark black.  It is signed on the bottom, “Mary Cain”.    It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00
Garcia, Tammy – “The Forgotten Prince” Frog Seedpot (2002)

This is very creative effigy seedpot by Tammy Garcia from 2002.  It is featured in the book, “Tammy Garcia: Form without Boundaries” on page 104.  In the book it says of this piece:

“This is the perfect illustration of Garcia’s eager imagination that refuses to linger in staid notions of convention.  In this interpretation, Garcia deftly merges the Pueblo form with the European folktale of the frog prince.  She creates a witty and striking narrative of the classic fairytale by portraying her frog with eyes and prominently puckered lips.”

The piece is very deeply carved with stylized swirls and geometric water patterns, which Tammy has used throughout her career.  It is the face of the frog which is matte and sculpted into the clay.  The piece is signed on the bottom, “The Forgotten Prince, Tammy Garcia”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is always great to see such a creative piece of her work and one of the few which was published in her book!

$ 8,800.00
Garcia, Jason – “Corn Maiden Muse” Tile

This tile by Jason Garcia is part of his Corn Maiden series which feature young Pueblo women in traditional dress for the Corn Dance and placing them in a modern context.  This tile has a young Corn Maiden dancer standing in the center of Santa Clara Pueblo.  Behind her are two of the kivas and their ladders, along with the hills behind the pueblo.  Note the two water towers on the hill and the TV antennae. The antennae is a nod to “St. Claire”, the patron saint of Santa Clara Pueblo, but also televisions.  In the top corner there is a traditional raincloud, which for Jason is a connection to the polychrome pottery of artists such as Lela and Van Gutierrez.  On the back of the tile, it is titled, “Corn Maiden #30, along with hashtags #Muse and #KhaPoOwingeh (the Tewa name for Santa Clara Pueblo).   The piece is made from native clay and painted with native clay slips.  It is signed with his Tewa name, Okuu Pin, which means Turtle Mountain.

$ 1,100.00
Garcia, Jason – “Tewa Tales of Suspense!” Clay Tile

It’s great to have a new tile from Jason Garcia.  Jason has won numerous awards for his works in clay along with his Pueblo Revolt serigraph series.  This piece is made from native clay and painted with native clay slips.  This piece is part of his  “Tewa Tales of Suspense” series.  Each piece is inspired by graphic novels and early comic book art and the Pueblo Revolt of 1680.  This tile has the pueblo warrior standing on the edge of a cliff holding the head of one of the monks killed during the Revolt.  In the background, the church is burning.  This piece is a dramatic interpretation of true events, as when the Pueblo people revolted against the Spanish it was partially in response to a suppression of their native religion.  In response to that and the harshness of many of the priests, they were killed during the Revolt.   Note in the background there is a scene which Jason says was inspired by the famous painting by Hopi artist Fred Kaboti.  I included an image of the Kaboti painting in the description.  The painting and imagery on this piece are striking and intense.  His piece is signed with his Tewa name, Okuu Pin, which means Turtle Mountain.  This tile is hand built from native clay.  All of the colors are derived from Native clay.

$ 1,800.00
Roller, Toni – Wide Bowl with Bear Paws (1989)

Toni Roller is known for her classic shapes and exquisite stone polished pottery.  A daughter of Margaret Tafoya, Toni has developed her own distinctive style and this wide shoulder bowl is one of her original forms.  It is fully polished and has four bear paws incised into the surface.  The bear paws are symbols of a Pueblo story where a bear lead the people to water during a drought.  The bowl was made in 1989 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00
Simpson, Rose – Wall Sculpture with Dancing Figure

Rose Simpson is one of the exciting innovative potters working today.  She is a daughter of noted potter Roxanne Swentzell.  This piece brings together two strong aspects of her clay work. The geometric rectangular shapes create a stylized pueblo appearance. The small opening are much like doors and windows.  The shapes are clay and are all one piece and textured.  However, it is the clay work on her figure which is so dynamic.  Rose has found a creative way to create her figurative work, with overlapping slabs of clay.  The figures are realistic in form yet almost otherworldly or dream-like in their appearance. The various small slabs on the figure give an additional sense of movement as if the dancing figure is in motion.  It is excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Rose continues to expand her style in various museum exhibitions around the US and create new and more dynamic works in clay.  Look for her upcoming exhibition at the Wheelwright Museum in Santa Fe.

$ 4,500.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Seedpot with Realistic Deer (1995)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is very intricately designed.  It would seem that it most likely was made, polished and the designs were begun by Camilio and then the designs were finished by his son, Joseph Lonewolf.  While it is signed by Camilio, it would suggest that the piece was already polished.  However, there are indicators that it was finished by Joseph, as he finished several of the pieces which Camilio had in process before he passed.  The deer are all very intricately etched and designed than on any of the piece finished by Camilio from 1990-5.  There is is a large buck with antlers extending over the top of the seedpot. On the opposite side there is another deer with smaller antlers and two does.  The deer are very intricately designed and they are much closer in style to those of Joseph.  As well, there is the number on the bottom, which is precision-etched, and the last letters are JL, which are probably Joseph’s initials as the end of the numbering system. The numbering system used by Camilio was typically much shorter and a bit more stylistic in design.  Overall, the piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Bowl with Grasshopper Medallions (1973)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This bowl is very thin walled and has an indented bottom.  It is fully polished red and etched with a single medallion. There is a Mimbres style grasshopper or cricket as the design.  Not the depth and precision of the matte area behind the insect!  There are rectangular green polished areas surrounding it, which represent the grass.  The use of the green clay slip in 1973 was quite new and a extraordinary addition to native clay colorations at the time.   The remainder of the bowl is fully polished red.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,800.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Feathered Water Serpent Seedpot (1990’s)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This seedpot is from the 1990’s.  It has the yearly symbol of a heart with a cross in it on the back.  On the front is the classic Feathered Water Serpent which was used by Joseph Lonewolf and his family.  Note the intricate detail in the head and the feathers.  There is an additional butterfly etched into the back of the piece.   The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,250.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Mini Seedpot with Flute Players (1986)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This is a very small seedpot and yet it is very fully designed!  The seedpot has two Mimbres style flute players as the design.  They are surrounded by plant and rain designs. There is a butterfly on the opposite side.  The heart medallion is the yearly symbol for 1986.  There is an additional green clay slip used to highlight the designs.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Archuleta,  Mary Ester – Red & Tan Jar with Kiva Step Design

Mary Ester Archuleta is a daughter of noted potter Margaret Tafoya.  This water jar has a round body and a slightly turned out neck.  It is fully polished red and carved around the body with a kiva step design.  The carved areas are polished tan in contrast to the red of the remainder of the jar.   The tan is the natural color of the clay and always difficult to achieve this coloration.  There is also the traditional cream-colored slip painted into the carved areas.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mary E. Archuleta.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Mary is the second youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  She married into San Juan Pueblo in the late 1960’s and created most of her pieces in the San Juan inspired style.  While she no longer makes much pottery, her work is creative and distinctive in style and coloration.

$ 1,600.00
Baca, Angela – Large Melon Bowl with 32 Ribs

This is one of the largest pieces we have had by Angela Baca.  She was famous throughout her career for her melon ribbed pottery.  The form is derived from the melon and squash grown in the area and so there is always an organic style to the shape.  This piece is round and has 32 ribs carved into the clay. The entire surface of the bowl is fully polished, including the space between each of the ribs!.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Angela Baca” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,375.00
Medicine Flower, Grace & Camillio Tafoya – Red & Black Jar with Figures & Avanyu (1970’s)

This an unusual collaborative piece by Grace Medicine Flower and her father, Camilio Tafoya.  It is from the early 1970’s and it was fired “black-and-red”.  It is a distinctive firing technique where the piece is covered before the manure is put on to turn it black.  The jar was made by Camilio and polished by Grace. She would then etch the designs into the clay before it was fired.  This piece has a lightly etched avanyu on two sides.  Separating them are two red medallions.  One has a Mudhead Clown figure and the other a Rain Dancer.  There is a striking coloration of the red against the black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicne Flower and Camilio Tafoya”.   The jar is in excellent with no chips,cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 775.00
Tafoya, Camilio –  Black & Red Jar with Feathers (1972)

This bowl by Camilio Tafoya is from 1972.  It is fully polished and the design around the shoulder is a stylized feather pattern.  The piece was then fired black-and-red.  This distinctive coloration is one that was only used by Camilio and his children Joseph Lonewolf and Grace Medicine Flower.  It was achieved during the firing, although nobody has been able to replicate the process.  Note the coloration and technique is different from the black-and-sienna colorations on pottery by artists such as Tony Da.  The contrast of the black and red is very striking on this piece.  It is signed on the bottom “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 350.00
Roller, Cliff – Jar with Square Neck (2002)

Cliff Roller is a son of noted potter Toni Roller. Each piece is coil built and stone polished.  This jar has a round body and an elongated square neck. The designs are carved into the negative space of the jar.  Around the neck are a tablita and wind pattern.  Around the sides are rain and kiva bowl patterns.  The jar is deeply carved and highly polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Cliff Roller”.  This bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While these days Cliff makes very little pottery, his work remains a statement to his skill as a potter!

$ 975.00
Begay, Jr., Harrison – Jar with Raven

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This taller jar is fully designed with ravens.  This is one of the first times we have seen him use ravens as the imagery on his pottery.  One is in flight and the other two are standing.  They are surrounded by lightning and cloud designs.  The jar is highly polished and fired a deep black.  The polished sections stand out more in contrast to the black matte areas.  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,500.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Large Carved Bowl Feather Design (1960’s)

This is is a large and classic bowl by Camilio “Sunflower” Tafoya.  He was the father of Grace Medicine Flower and Joseph Lonewolf and the brother of Margaret Tafoya.  While he is known for his miniatures this one of his larger carved bowls from the 1960’s.  The bowl is fully polished and carved with a feather pattern.  The spectacular part of this bowl is the coloration from the firing. It ranges from dark black to areas with brown and even a section that is almost silver in appearance. That coloration is very reminiscent of the firings by his mother, Sara Fina Tafoya.  The brown seems to make it’s own designs as it flows with the black and it certainly creates a much stronger and more fascinating bowl.  It is not often we see his larger carved vessels and rarely with such a great polish and surface.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are some light surface scratches.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,000.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Mimbres Cricket” Seedpot (1997)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1997.  The piece is entitled, “Mimbres Cricket”.  It includes a signed version of the card which Joseph made for each of his miniatures.  This piece was actually made for our show at the gallery with Joseph and Grace Medicine Flower in 1998.   Joseph wrote partially of this piece:

“Portrayed from a side view is a cricket representative of the Mimbres Period – 10th to 14th centuries.  The cricket – an insect related to the locust and grasshopper, but usually having long antennae – appears to be leaping in mid-air.  Beneath the Mimbres cricket is highly polished red slipwork (Mother Earth) which encompasses the extreme front, partial sides, back side and a portion of the top.”

The butterfly is symbolic of beauty and the the interlocking rings medallion represents the attachment between friends and was the yearly symbol for 1997.  Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  The piece is signed on the bottom and includes the signed artist card.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Anasazi Potter & Butterflies” Seedpot

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from around 2000.  The piece is one of his few black fired pieces.  It is fully eteched with a potter working on painting a piece of pottery.  They are surrounded by several other pieces of finished pottery.  Above the figure are butterflies.  Each butterfly is detailed and has various clay-colored slips.  There is a small butterfly etched into the black along with the yearly symbol.  It is a more complex design, both in the figure and as well as the colors.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,800.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Mini Seedpot Eagle Feather Pattern (1975)

This miniature seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is from 1975. It is etched with a feather pattern around the neck. The area below the design is fully polished red.  It is signed on the bottom “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Speckled Rock, Adam – Jar with Bluebirds

Adam Speckled Rock is the son of noted potters Paul Speckled Rock and Rosemary Lonewolf.  He is a grandson of Joseph Lonewolf and a great-grandson of both Severa Tafoya and Camilio Tafoya.  This tall jar is fully polished below the shoulder and matte above.  The design is a series of bluebirds in the reeds.  The design is etched into the clay and additional clay colors are added to highlight the designs. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 200.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Seedpot with Trout, Otter & Skunk (1995)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is from 1995. It is the last series of pieces he made.  It was fully polished and etched with an otter, trout, and skunk.  There is a simplicity and playfulness to the designs.  The various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  It is signed on the bottom “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00
Folwell, Polly Rose – Jar with Bird and X’s

Polly Rose Folwell is known for use of classic designs on her traditional inspired Santa Clara pottery. This jar has a wide shoulder and an elongated neck.  It is fully polished and fired brown. The rim is carved with a mountain design, which is then replicated in an incised mountain design around the neck.  There is a single bird etched into the clay.  Below the birds are the Folwell family “x’s”, which are often found on their pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 600.00
Ebelacker, Jason – Large Storage Jar with Bear Paws

This storage jar is one of the classic shapes by Jason Ebelacker. He is a son of Richard Ebelacker and grandson of Virginia Ebelacker.  His father and grandmother were both known for their storage jar shapes, as well as his great-grandmother, Magaret Tafoya.  Jason creates a similar form with the high shoulder and the small neck. The distinctive shape gives the jar a feeling of size and width. The jar has two bear paws impressed into the clay and they are fully polished, as is the entire surface of the jar.  The bear paws are symbolic of a Santa Clara story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  This jar is as much historic as it is modern in appearance.  The jar is traditionally fired black.   Jason is certainly one of the younger potters to watch!

$ 3,000.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Jar with Avanyu (1971)

Joseph Lonewolf began making pottery in 1970-1.  This is a very early piece of his pottery.  It is a more classic shape with a wide shoulder which slopes upward.  The bottom half of the piece is fully polished. The top is etched with a water serpent (avanyu) with a feather pattern, which is the style used by him and his family.  The matte background area is deeply etched swirls up from the shoulder and over the rim.  It must have been exciting in 1971 to see work that was so new and unique at the time!  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,200.00
Romero, Susan “Snowflake” – Parrot Seedpot

Susan “Snowflake” Romero’s pottery is highly polished and intricately etched with detailed imagery.  Many of her skills are ones that she learned from her father, Joseph Lonewolf. This seedpot has two Mimbres inspired parrots on the top of the piece. They are etched so the surface is both matte and polished. On the side is a hummingbird etched in the Pueblo style. It is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair and signed on the bottom.

$ 600.00
Garcia, Tammy – “Seeded Woman I” Bronze.  Ed. 4/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is taken from a series of clay pieces which she made which were inspired by the paintings of Picasso.  The imagery is a Picasso-esqe woman sitting in a chair.  The piece has multiple layers and textures.  When asked about the name and the imagery, Tammy said:

“I thought about a definition of the word, “seed” which I had read.  It was, ‘A seed is the small, hard part of a plant from which a new plant grows’.  It made me think of women who came to the Southwest when the trains arrived in the 1880’s, or with the Fred Harvey Tours in the 1920’s.  They brought with them their past but became enamored with the Southwest or Native Culture. So on the bronze, the woman is sitting on a chair and the back of the chair is incised with Pueblo designs.  The side has areas which were inlaid hei-shi beads.  These women became the seeds of new interest in the area and culture. They spread this love of the Southwest just like a seed.  I called this, “Seeded Woman I”.  It is the first in this series to pay tribute to those how become aware of Native culture, respect it and spread their love of the art and artists to the world.”.

The piece has striking patinas to differentiate the various textures and depths of carving.  Much like her clay work, the piece is distinctive in style and yet very sharply defined.  This piece is 4/35 and it is signed and numbered on the bottom by Tammy Garcia. Simply a striking piece by one of today’s great potters with a lot of thought behind it!

$ 1,200.00
Archuleta,  Mary Ester – Red Bowl with Bear Paws

Mary Ester Archuleta is the second youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  She has never made a lot of pottery, and most of it was in the 1970’s and 1980’s. A majority of her pottery was inspired by the incised San Juan style of pottery as she married into San Juan and lived there.  This bowl is a classic round shape with bear paws as the design.  It is perfectly polished and a stunning deep red color.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mary Archuleta.”  It is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 950.00
Duwyenie, Debra – Plate with 19 Hummingbirds

This plate was made by Preston Duwyenie and polished and incised by Debra Duwyenie.  The design on the front is fully polished and full of imagery. The design is a flowering plant which extends up from the vase.  Each of the flowers are etched into the clay and the center of each is matte, which is just where the polished slip has been etched away.  For nearly each flower is a hummingbird, each of which are also etched into the clay and with matte bellies.  There are 19 hummingbirds on the plate!  There are also additional butterflies and note near the top is a sunface and extending from the sun are rain and cloud designs.  The back of the plate is fully polished and signed with Debra’s name and Preston’s hallmark.

 

$ 650.00
Garcia, Gloria “Golden Rod” – Bowl with 8 Turtles

This bowl by Gloria Garcia is fully polished and fired black. The design is a series of eight turtles encircling the piece.  Each one has additional designs etched into their shell.  Gloria’s combination of polishing and etched designs is always striking.  This piece is signed on the bottom with her Tewa name “GoldenRod”.

$ 275.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Jar with 32 Feathers, Avanyu & Lid

This is a striking lidded jar by Nancy Youngblood.  The jar is deeply carved with a water serpent around the body of the piece.  Note the delicate swirls and sharp edges carved into the clay to create the body of the avanyu.  Around the neck of the jar are 32 deeply carved feathers.  Each feather and the avanyu are all stone polished to create a stunning shine!  There is a sense of movement in the design as the feathers seems to swirl around the piece. The lid is a loop which is fully polished!  It is reminiscent of some of Nancy’s early work when she would create miniatures with very thin handles!  The lid fits perfectly into the neck of the jar.  The entire piece is traditionally fired to a dark black and it is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 7,500.00
Naranjo, Christina – 13″ Tall Jar with Carved Avanyu (1970’s)

Christina Naranjo was a daughter of SaraFina Tafoya and a sister of Margaret Tafoya and Camilio Tafoya.  She was known for her classic style carved Santa Clara pottery.  This is definitely the largest piece of her pottery we have had in the gallery.  It is a tall water jar with a long neck.  Around the body of the piece, it is fully carved with a water serpent (avanyu), as the design.  The avanyu encircles the jar in a band of design but note the exceptional complexity of the imagery.  The area clouds and rain and lightning in the pattern and they utilize the normal band but also the negative space.  The long neck is also fully polished.  The style of her carving is certainly significantly different than that of her sister, Margaret Tafoya.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Christina Naranjo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Christina has a wonderful legacy in the work of her daughters Mary Cain and Teresita Naranjo, as well as her great-granddaughters Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.

$ 2,800.00
de la Cruz, Juan and Lois Gutierrez  – 15″ “Parrot Girl” Storage Jar

Juan Cruz creates extraordinary painted polychrome pottery.  He is a son of noted potter Lois Gutierrez.  Lois made this massive jar and Juan, who is noted for his illustrations, painted the design using natural clay slips.  This jar is a rather massive storage jar shape with the round side and short neck.   Juan wrote of the scene he painted as follows:

“This piece depicts scenes from the story of the marriage of Tayi P’i; when she meets her new husband while still in parrot form and the presentation of gifts from her father to her new in-laws.  The band arcing forth from the geometric parrot design represents the return journey with her new husband when she conducts him safely back to their new home after he made and kept his promise to keep his eyes closed and to place his trust in her.  Upon their arrival she shakes forth the gifts sent by her father from the folds of her wings and transforms into a beautiful woman, afterwards telling her new husband to open his eyes.”

The jar is truly polychrome (more than three colors of clay).  Note the intricacy of the painted designs and especially the figures.  They are each distinctive in stance or dress.  There is a beautiful combination of imagery on the jar which emphasizes the shape but also tells a wonderful story!   While Juan is new to the pottery world, he recently won “Best of Pottery” at Gallup Ceremonials in 2017 and has been featured in articles in Cowboys & Indians Magazine and Native Art Magazine.

 

$ 7,500.00
de la Cruz, Juan and Lois Gutierrez  – “Eagle Sun and Rabbit Moon” Plate

Juan Cruz creates complex painted polychrome pottery.  He is a son of noted potter Lois Gutierrez.  Lois made the plate and Juan, who is noted for his illustrations, painted the design using natural clay slips.  This is the first time Juan has painted on a plate, giving him a large canvas surface.  The plate is the story of the sun and moon.  Juan wrote of the scene he painted as follows:

“The cycle of Brother Sun and Sister Moon, revolving in an eternal circle.  The sun giving light while the moon give cooling relief in her pale light.  The geometrics of the design on the plate represent the eagle’s association with the sun.  For the Moon’s design, I drew inspiration from a Mimbres design of a rabbit forming in the shadow of a crescent moon.”

The plate is truly polychrome (more than three colors of clay).  Note the intricacy of the painted designs and especially the figures.  They are each distinctive instance or dress.  He has captured a beautiful balance of the designs as the sun swirls into the moon.  The crescent moon and the rabbit are opposite the Tewa sun and the eagle.  Exceptional!  The back of the plate is fully polished red. The description is written on the back of a hand-painted graphic of a Brother Sun and Sister Moon.  What a phenomenal addition to this piece and the painting helps to better understand how exceptional Juan is with his art.   While Juan is new to the pottery world, he recently won “Best of Pottery” at Gallup Ceremonials in 2017 and has been featured in articles in Cowboys & Indians Magazine and Native Art Magazine.

$ 2,200.00
Youngblood, Nathan –  Double Tri-Color Tear Drop Plates

This is the first time Nathan Youngblood has created a double set of plates in the teardrop shape.  Has has made a similar style with the floating center medallion using round plates.  However, there is an increased level of difficulty in creating this concept with his signature teardrop form. The plate is made and then the “inner” teardrop plate is cut away.  Nathan then designs both of the plates so that they visually function as one unit. The inner plate has a lightning and rain design.  Note on the upper edge the deer track and the star.  “Deer Path” is his name in Tewa and so he will often use that imagery in his designs.  The outer plate has a rain and walking bear paw design around the base and above are clouds.  The rim of both pieces is polished tan, while the center is carved and polished red.  After the two pieces were fired, we had a stand made so that they would sit together. When looking straight on, it appears to be one piece.  When looking from the side, the inner plate extends forward.  The deep red clay slip on these plates is exceptional and contrasts perfectly with the tan areas.  While the shape, carving, and designing might seem like enough, Nathan also takes his pottery one step further. After it is fired, he uses small screwdrivers and scrapes the sides of the carved designs and the recessed areas, to create a visually striking contrast.  It is signed on the back in the clay with his name and deer tracks, which represent his name in Tewa.

$ 16,500.00
Youngblood, Nathan – Jar with Walking Bear Paw and Key Hole Designs

This jar by Nathan Youngblood has a traditional storage jar shape.  The jar is carved around the center with a walking bear paw design along with a keyhole doorway design. As the jar is turned there are additional cloud designs.  The carved designs are large but striking in appearance. The top and bottom sections are fully polished to Nathan’s glass-like appearance.  Simple. Elegant.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Nathan Youngblood” and the hallmark of his name in Tewa.

$ 6,800.00
Begay, Daniel – Large Jar with Swirling Yei Figures

This is the largest jar we have had by Daniel Begay. He learned to make pottery from his father, Harrison Begay, Jr..  Each piece is coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired.  Daniel has created a distinctive style of carving, similar to that of his father, yet with more angular and graphic designs. This jar has a more distinctive storage jar shape with the rounded sides.  The design has two Yei figures which are intricately carved into the clay.  The bodies of the Yei figures swirl around the sections of the jar and they are separated by cloud, water, earth and rain designs.  There is a striking contrast between the polished and matte surfaces, which adds to the sophistication of the imagery. Note how Daniel’s designs combine both thin and thicker lines to enhance the imagery.  The style of carving has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 2,000.00
Folwell, Susan – “Feast Day” Long Neck Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series for, “Taos Light”.  This jar combines her love of Pop-Art with Pueblo imagery. Here there are two young women wearing tablitas on their heads for Feast Day  The area behind them has been left the natural color of the clay.  The shoulder of the jar has been indented, almost reminding one of the bread made during Feast Day in the horno ovens.  However, it is the base of the jar which is dynamic.  Susan has etched and carved into the clay with a series of rows which she has then painted to have the appearance of a stone mosaic!  Each band is a different size, as is each of the various squares and rectangles. The imagery here is evocative not only of the hei-shi beads and jewelry worn during Feast Day, but also the beauty of the stones and how when set in this manner almost seem to replicate the horizon.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

“Susan has been experimenting with textured surfaces, creating a “bejeweled” effect that looks like turquoise, coral, silver, and gold.”  “Taos Light”.
Native Art Magazine, April 2018

$ 2,000.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn – Red “Pueblo Parrot”, 10/50

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Pueblo Parrot”.  It is stylized in much like the thick-billed parrot, which was actually native to the New Mexico area in the past.  It also has a connection to the Ancestral Puebloan bird figures created at places such as Chaco Canyon.  The bird is carved with a feather pattern and on its back is a cloud and mountain design.  Autumn says she was inspired to create her parrots after a two-day excursion to Chaco Canyon. This piece is number 10 of 50. The colorful patinas give the piece a striking appearance.  It is signed and numbered on the bottom.

$ 1,900.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn – Blue “Pueblo Parrot”, 12/50

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Pueblo Parrot”.  It is stylized in much like the thick-billed parrot, which was actually native to the New Mexico area in the past.  It also has connection to the Ancestral Puebloan bird figures created at places such as Chaco Canyon.  The bird is carved with a feather pattern and on its back is a cloud and mountain design.  Autumn says she was inspired to create her parrots after a two-day excursion to Chaco Canyon. This piece is number 12 of 50. The colorful patinas give the piece a striking appearance.  It is signed and numbered on the bottom.

$ 1,900.00
Cain, Linda – Tall Jar with Carved Jar

This is one of the larger pieces we have had by Linda Cain.  Linda is a daughter of Mary Cain and the mother of Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.  This jar is carved on one side with a jar of a similar shape which has a carved design in the center!  The center carved pattern has a cloud, bird and lightning design.  It is a carved jar on a carved jar.  The sides are deeply carved and sanded smooth. The back of the jar is fully polished red.  It is a striking and interesting piece of her potter.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Linda Cain”.

$ 2,000.00
Gutierrez, Lois  – Storage Jar with Hummingbirds, Birds and Corn Designs

Stunning! Lois Gutierrez is one of the few potters who continues to create large storage jars.  Check out the size of this piece, as it is massive! As well, she is one of the only Pueblo potters who makes a true polychrome vessel (more than 3 clay colors).  This jar has five different natural clay colors utilized.  The neck of the jar has hummingbirds and flowers.  Each bird is separated by a cloud pattern.  Around the body of the jar are swirling birds and flowers.  Separating each of the birds is a rainbow (with 5 colors) and then a stalk of corn.  Each stalk is a different color representing the different directions (red, white, yellow and blue).  The bodies of each of the birds have a detailed cloud pattern in the center.  The jar is a beautiful combination of colors and traditional designs.  Few of her pieces have this level of complexity in the designs!  Lois’s ability to create such beautifully painted scenes with clay is remarkable in addition to her portrayal of a cultural legacy in design in clay.  It is signed on the bottom “Lois 2018”.  The last photo is one of the storage jar in the fire at Lois’s house at Santa Clara Pueblo…a very HUGE fire!!

$ 7,800.00
Shupla, Helen – Sienna Melon Jar with 15 Ribs (1980’s)

Helen Shupla is certainly most famous for her exceptional melon jars.  Her melon jars are the very traditional form with the ribs pushed out in the clay.  This melon jar is one of her classic shapes with the round body and the slight neck.  The neck was a later development in her pottery forms.  Each of the 15 ribs are pushed out into the clay.  She would do this by placing her fingers inside the bowl and pushing against the clay from both the inside and outside!  Can you see the slight angle to each section?  This is how she would turn her hand as she was pushing against the clay to create the separate ribs!  The entire piece is fully polished and fired black and then fired a second time to make it sienna!  This is one of the most difficult techniques to create, but also one of the most striking. The desired coloration is nearly a carmel color and this jar has that amazing coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 3,800.00
Gutierrez, Lois  – Water Jar with Tumbling Eagles

Lois Gutierrez is one of the few potters who continue to create traditional polychrome (more than 3 colors of clay) pottery at Santa Clara Pueblo.  This is a traditional style water jar with the low shoulder and elongated neck and slightly turned out rim.  The jar is painted with natural clay slips and there are over five different colors used. Around the neck there are two eagles in a tumbling or swirling position.  The base has a cloud and rain design in red.  The jar has been traditionally fired outdoor and overall is a striking coloration.  It is signed on the indented bottom of the jar.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Tafoya, Shirley – Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1980)

Shirley Tafoya was the youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her miniature pottery.  This bowl is from 1980.  It is very deeply carved with a water serpent encircling the piece.  The entire surface is fully polished.  Shirley etched the eye and the mouth of the avanyu.  The water serpent is a classic Santa Clara design telling the story of how the avanyu saved the village from a flood.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya”. A classic of Tafoya Family pottery!

$ 1,000.00
Trammel, Jennie –  Tall Jar with Sun and Cloud Design (1980’s)

Stunning!  This is an exceptional jar by Jennie Trammel.   She was a daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  Over the years Jennie did not make a lot of pottery as she lived a very private life and was virtually never involved in markets or gallery shows.  However, she created striking pottery with classic shapes and designs which were distinctive to her work.  Each piece was coil built and it was the carving, with the rounded edges, which was a visual key to her work.  This tall jar has a low shoulder, which gives it lots of space for design.  The central areas is fully carved with three rising sun designs.  They are separated by three cloud motifs descending downward.  Jennie continues to fascinate with her designs, as they are images that few other Santa Clara potters use in their work.  As well, as on this piece, her choice to use three designs instead of four, is more difficult and unusual.  The carving is very deep and the piece is a very deep red.  The background area is matte and the traditional creame colored clay slip. The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a couple of areas of slip loss on the edge of some of the carving, which might have happened at the time of firing and are not unusual in her larger pottery.  The jar is signed, “Jennie Trammel” in the clay on bottom.   Definitely one of her classics!

$ 4,000.00
Tafoya, Margaret & Shirley Tafoya – Bowl with Kiva Step Design (BOF . 113)

Shirley Tafoya was the youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya. They each created distinctive styles of carved pottery.  This is one of the only pieces Margaret made with her daughter, Shirley.  Shirley told me when I was writing “Born of Fire” that Margaret had made the bowl and she asked Shirley to carve a kiva step design into the clay.  Shirley then polished the bowl.  The bowl is highly polished and traditionally fired.  The kiva steps were a significant choice:

“The kiva step pattern is a classic design see on much of Margaret Tafoya’s pottery. That particular design has three steps, representing the kiva where religious ceremonies take place on the Pueblo. From the kitchen window of Margaret’s house, their clan kiva could also be seen while they worked.  Again, the tradition of form and design, of passing on knowledge to the next generation, were all a daily presence in Margaret’s pottery and life”.  Born of Fire, p. 100

This bowl is from the 1980’s and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya, Margaret Tafoya”.  It is an amazing piece of history, culture and Pueblo tradition!  The last photos are one from the book, Born of Fire along with a photo of Margaret and Shirley Tafoya.

$ 3,400.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Wide Jar with Cloud and Step Designs (1970’s) (BOF p. 107)

his is a striking wide shoulder jar by Margaret Tafoya. It is from the 1970’s.  It is an unusual shape for Margaret’s pottery with a wide shoulder and a short neck.  The jar is carved around the shoulder with cloud and step designs.  The carving on this jar is very complex with variation as the jar is turned.  In the book, Born of Fire, it says of this jar:

“This jar from the 1970’s shows the perfect balance of form and design typcial of this period.  The intricate and flowing cloud and step pattern was most likely designed and carved by Alcario [Tafoya]”.  Born of Fire, p. 107

Alcario Tafoya, the husband of Margaret Tafoya, was known for his intricately carved designs. The use of negative space with imagery flowing up from the base lower section and down from the top of the band are indicative of his design style.  Toni Roller said of her father:

“Alcario did help with some of the designs. My dad’s designs are very outstanding. You can tell the difference between my mother’s and my dad’s designs. He did a lot of designs on my mother’s pots. Sorry to say he was never given very much credit for it.” —Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

The jar is highly polished and traditionally fired.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is featured in the book Born of Fire, on p. 107.

$ 8,800.00
Naranjo, Christina & Teresita Naranjo – Jar with Carved Avanyu (1960’s))

This is a striking but unusual collaborative piece by Christina Naranjo and her daughter, Teresita Naranjo.  The jar was made by Christina and is one of her classic round shapes with the slight neck.  It was carved by Teresita with a very deep style of carving.  The jar has a water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece. Note that there is Teresita’s signature style of negative space carving with the clouds descending from the rim.  The carving on the horn of the avanyu is especially deep, crips and very thin!  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There are some minor scratches on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita + Christina”.  It is interesting that in over 20 years, I have had several pieces which were signed by both Christina and Mary Cain (another daughter) but this is the first one I have had by Christina and Teresita.  It’s nice to see in a collaborative piece that their individuality in shape (Christina) and carving (Terestia) are so distinctive.  Christina Naranjo was a sister of Margaret Tafoya and Camilio Tafoya, as well as the matriarch of the family of potters including Teresita Naranjo and Tammy Garcia.

$ 1,200.00
Tafoya-Sanchez, Linda – Tall Jar with Hummingbirds and Corn Plants

Linda Tafoya-Sanchez is a granddaughter of noted potter Margaret Tafoya and a daughter of Lee & Betty Tafoya.  She is know for her intricately carved pottery.  The jar is a variations of designs.  Two sections are fully polished with carved corn plants.  The opposite two medallions have hummingbirds as the design.  Linda’s hummingbirds are exceptional with the rounded bodies.  There are also areas where she has added a micaceous clay slip.  Linda was among the first Santa Clara potters to begin using the mica as a design element after she was given some by her San Juan Pueblo in-laws.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Linda Tafoya-Sanchez”.

“The clay is a really important part of making the pottery. Listening to family members talk about how they used to get clay with Grandma and Grandpa [Margaret & Alcario Tafoya] and how they would make it an all-day venture. You feel that family connection when you are digging the clay out of the earth. It ties you to your home. There’s no other place you are going to find that kind of clay. You think about how many years people have dug that clay out of the earth, how many years Mother Earth has provided that clay for us.”  Linda Tafoya-Sanchez, Spoken Through Clay

$ 2,000.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Large Rainbow Ridge Water Jar with Bear Paws (1960’s), BOF p. 78

This is a striking large water jar by Margaret Tafoya.   This red water jar is featured on p. 78 of the book, “Born of Fire”. The water jar is from the 1960’s and certainly from a period when Margaret was at the peak of her career.  In 1978 and 1979 she won “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is one of the only artists to ever win twice and then to win in two consecutive years.  This water jar is distinctive and important because of the color (she made fewer red pieces than black), the very classic shape and the bottom.   The shape is a double shoulder water jar with a rainbow ridge.  This is the ridge above the shoulder which is actually pushed out in the clay.  The rim of the jar is slightly turned out and there are four bear paws impressed into the clay before it was polished.  As for the bottom, this comes from a time period when she used one of her mother’s (SaraFina Tafoya) pukis to create the indented base.  Nearly of the pieces with this style of base are classic style water jars, almost as if they are made as an homage to her mother and her legacy.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is definitely a historically important and exceptional jar by this important Santa Clara potter and great to have it published in one of the definitive books on her career.  Toni Roller said of the bear paw design.

“The story behind the bear paw, according to my grandmother, she said that our ancestors came from Puye, from the cliffs. One time when the people were living up there, there was a drought so bad they couldn’t grow anything. They were so worried. They wondered why the bear was well fed and not thin like they are. So they tracked the bear, and the bear led them to the Rio Grande. The reason we put the bear paw on the pots is to honor the bear that saved the people, the ancestors that came to Santa Clara from Puye. That’s why now most of the Indian people live along the Rio Grande. The bear saved all our ancestors.”  Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

$ 24,000.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Tall Jar with Shells & Shell Lid

Nancy Youngblood creates stunning vessels which combine both matte and polished surfaces. This is an elegant vase with deeply carved sections where she has two different types of shells as the design.   The use of shells in her pottery is reminiscent of the shells worn by the Pueblo Dancers during various ceremonies.  Historically, there are lots of shells found in the Southwest, as they were highly valued and used for trade.  Note how the shells are rounded out like the ribs in her melon bowls!  The surrounding area is matte, which contrast perfectly with the high shine of her stone polished surfaces.  Note how even the matte areas are, as if they are not flat and even they create shadows.  The symmetry of the jar is perfection, with a narrow base and a wide shoulder.  The lid has carved and polished shells on each side and they are fully polished and each section is rounded out.  The lid also fits perfectly into the jar with a line to show exactly where to position it on the vessel.  The jar is from 2006 and it is in perfect condition.

 

$ 17,000.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Large Wedding Vase with Avanyu (1950’s)

This is a large wedding vase by Margaret Tafoya.  It is from the 1950’s.  The design is a water serpent and it is very deeply carved into the clay.  There is an unusual cloud pattern above the head of the water serpent, and another cloud pattern on the reverse of the bowl.  It is this style of carving which is more usually seen on the work of the late 1950’s.  The shape of the vase is rounder with the extended spouts.  The entire surface of the wedding vase is fully polished.  The style and complexity of the carving, also suggest that it was probably designed by Margaret’s husband, Alcario Tafoya.  Toni Roller said of her father’s designs:

“Alcario did help with some of the designs. His are bold designs. My dad’s designs are very outstanding. You can tell the difference between my mother’s and my dad’s designs. He did a lot of designs on my mother’s pots. Sorry to say he was never given very much credit for it.” —Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

The wedding vase is signed, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are surface scratches which are expected on pieces from this period, but no structural issues.

$ 14,500.00
Ebelacker, Jason – Red Carved Box with Avanyu & Avanyu Lid

This is an exceptional lidded box by Jason Ebelacker.  He is a son of Richard Ebelacker and grandson of Virginia Ebelacker.  Jason has been focusing on traditional shapes for his pottery.  This box is fully carved around the side with a water serpent (avanyu) design, which encircles the entire piece.  It is difficult to create boxes, especially larger ones, as the flat sides tend to crack in drying and firing.  The design here flows around the surface and yet changes in each panel! It is beautifully designed. The surprise to the piece is the lid, where he has carved in reverse another water serpent! The polishing and clean carved lines are striking on the piece.   Jason is certainly one of the younger potters to watch!

$ 1,500.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Bowl with Antelope Medallions (1973)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This bowl is very thin walled and has an indented bottom.  It is fully polished red and there are three medallions.  Each medallion has an antelope as the design.  The antelope are etched into the clay before firing.  The border of each medallion is polished green.  Joseph was one of the first potters to begin using clays that were not red and this is a very early example of his green clay slip.  The remainder of the bowl is fully polished red.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 2,200.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Large Box with Shell Designs with Shell & Avanyu Lid

This is an exceptional large box by Nancy Youngblood.  It is not often that she makes boxes and this particular piece combines many different techniques used in her pottery.  The box is an elegant shape with a length, width and height proportionality that works for the size. The sides of the box have shells on them, and not how each ridge of the shell is rounded out like her straight melon ribs! The ends of the box have circular shells. The use of shells reflects the shells used on traditional dancers at the Pueblo and that they have been used culturally for centuries.  The top of the box has a carved and polished avanyu encircling the handle, which is a double sided shell.  One visually dynamic aspect of the box is the how she has sanded the matte areas so that they are so smooth. It is a critical part of pieces as any uneven surface is revealed in the light as a small shadow!  The polished surfaces just glow with the reflection of the light.   Consider that each shell edge or swirling shell has two “sides”to be polished and the surface area of the piece is about double its size!  This box is from 2008 and came originally from Nancy to the gallery and now it has come back to us.  It is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Nancy has won numerous awards for her melon bowls and this is undoubtedly a classic and important piece of her pottery.

$ 28,000.00
Youngblood, Mela  – Tall Water Jar with Carved Avanyu (1972) with Ribbon

This is one of the largest pieces we have seen by Mela Youngblood.  She began making pottery in the late 1960’s and quickly achieved a distinctive style for her work.  Each piece of her work very highly polished and when carved the edges are distinctly rounded.  This jar has a carved avanyu encircling the piece. Mela’s carving is distinctive with rounded edges to her carving.  The avanyu here is deeply carved and the entire jar is fully polished.  It is a stunning piece not just for the size, but also for the polishing and carving.  The jar won a blue ribbon at the 1972 Gallup Intertribal Ceremonials.  Mela’s name is on the ribbon and it is on the last two photos.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mela Youngblood”.  It is certainly a rarity with great provenance and an important piece of Tafoya family history!

$ 5,500.00
Tafoya, Margaret & Mela Youngblood – Weddding Vase (1976)

Margaret Tafoya and her daughter, Mela Youngblood, made some pottery together in the 1970’s.  Typically, Margaret would make the piece and then it would be carved by either Mela or Alcario Tafoya (Margaret’s husband).  Some of the collaborative pieces I have seen were signed by all three.  This wedding vase is just signed by Mela and Margaret. The wedding vase is definitely Margaret’s shape. The carving has a mesa and lightning on one side and a mountain pattern on the other.  The carving design was done by Mela on this piece, as was the polishing.  It’s a striking piece and an interesting piece of history!  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya, Mela Youngblood”

$ 2,400.00
Roller, Toni -15″ Tall Jar with Avanyu and Cloud Designs

Toni Roller is known for her classic shapes and exquisite stone polished pottery.  A daughter of Margaret Tafoya, Toni has developed her own distinctive style yet adhering to the traditional methods and techniques of her mother.  This may be one of the tallest pieces of her potter we have seen! The jar is 15″ tall and carved with two bands of design.  There is a central band with a carved avanyu.  Above the avanyu is a carved band with cloud, bird and lightning designs.  It is a very intricately designed piece. As well, the entire surface is fully polished!  It is traditionally fired a deep black.  The jar is from 2006 and signed on the bottom, “Toni Roller”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. Definitely a significant piece by one of Margaret Tafoya’s daughters.

$ 5,000.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Tall Double Shoulder Water Jar (1960’s)

This is a striking fully polished water jar by Margaret Tafoya. It is from the 1960’s.  It is an elegant shape with a long neck and a “double shoulder”.  The double shoulder was also called a “rainbow ridge” by Margaret and her mother, Sarafina Tafoya. It adds to the difficulty of a piece as the second ridge requires the potters to create a rise from the shoulder to a second shoulder to the neck.  The jar is stone polished all at one time and then fired to a deep black.  It is from the 1960’s and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  This shape and size is definitely a classic of her work!

“She [Margaret Tafoya] made water jars sitting outside the adobe house, and they would never crack on her.  There’s a rainbow band on the shoulder. She would sit on the floor with her legs straight out and make the pots that way. Today we stand up and make our pots.”  LuAnn Tafoya and Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

$ 14,500.00
Youngblood, Mela  – Kiva Bowl (1970’s)

Mela Youngblood began making pottery in the late 1960’s and quickly achieved a distinctive style for her work.  Each piece of her work very highly polished and when carved the edges are distinctly rounded.  This bowl is a very classic style of Kiva Bowl.  This bowl is fully polished on the inside and outside. The bowl has the “kiva” three-step form on the sides.  The holes in the kiva step areas were traditionally included so that eagle feathers could be placed in them. Mela made few of these during her career. The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The highly stone polished surface is striking!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,500.00
Folwell, Jody – Large Jar with Buffalo and Wolves

Jody Folwell is known for her creative pottery shapes and designs.  This is a very tall jar and the rim has an asymmetrical form, for which she is known. The jar is polished with a slip which fired a greenish-brown. There are lightning patterns across the surface which are a matte red.  Around the entire jar are a series of etched wolves and buffalo.  Some are etched and some are just painted with a white clay slip.  They are in different directions and different degrees of motion.  The size and coloration with the green, red and white is striking.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Jody”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,400.00
Ebelacker, Virginia – Jar with Carved Mountain Designs (1970’s)

Virginia Ebelacker was the first daughter of noted potter Margaret Tafoya.  She was known for large sized pottery as well as her deeply carved designs.  This jar is a very classic shape with a carved band around the center. The designs are mountain and lightning patterns. The jar is deeply carved and highly polished. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Her sons Richard and James were both known for their distinctive large pottery and today her grandson, Jason, is also creating exceptional pottery.

$ 1,500.00
Roller, Cliff – Bowl with Bear Paws (1995)

Cliff Roller is a son of noted potter Toni Roller. Each piece is coil built and stone polished.  This bowl is carved four bear paws as the designs. The bear paws are symbolic of a Pueblo story where the bear leads the people to water during a drought.  Here the bear paws are each deeply carved into the clay and polished. The remainder of the bowl is fully polished to a very high shine.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Cliff Roller”.  This bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While these days Cliff makes very little pottery, his work remains a statement to his skill as a potter!

$ 400.00
Garcia, Effie – Bowl with Rain, Lightning and Mesa Designs

This  bowl by Effie Garcia is deeply carved and highly polished.  It has a rain, lighting and mesa design which is carved into the clay. The design is then outlined with a clay slip and the remainder of the bowl is highly polished.  It is fired a deep black.  The high polish and angle from the shoulder make her work distinctive. It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

 

$ 400.00
Gutierrez, Lela & Luther – Polychrome Thunderbird Open Bowl (1956-66)

Lela Gutierrez began making pottery in the 1930’s with her husband, Van Gutierrez.  After Van passed away in 1956 she continued to make pottery with her son, Luther Gutierrez.  She would make the pieces and Luther would paint the designs.  They worked together for only 10 years from 1956 to 1966.  This open bowl is fully painted on the inside.  There is a thunderbird in the center and a star pattern.  On the inside rim of the bowl are alternating sun and lizard designs.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips and painted onto the piece before it was fired.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lela/Luther”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn  –  “Dragonflie’s Raindrop” Bronze, 4/26

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Dragonflies Raindrop”.  It is inspired by one of her clay vessels and it is carved with various styles of dragonflies around the surface. The circles surrounding the dragonflies are the raindrops.  The rim of the vessel is carved to have a mountain step pattern.  The base has kiva step designs. The coloration on the jar is from the patina.  The piece is 4 of 26.  It is signed and numbered on the bottom.

$ 4,150.00
Tafoya, Camilio – “Wild Turkeys” Seedpot (1989)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya reflects the interesting connection of the wild turkey and Pueblo culture. There are turkey clans and most importantly, the turkey feathers are used in numerous Pueblo dances.  They are a critical part of the cultural and spiritual activities in most pueblos.  Interestingly, they have been important for quite a while in Pueblo life.

“The ancient Pueblo people shifted from making blankets of rabbit fur to using turkey feathers. One blanket could require 12,000 feathers, which could be taken as the birds molted.  The blankets helped ward off the high-altitude chill of Mesa Verde, but the turkeys also “must have had some symbolic importance,” said Lipe. “That continues all the way through to the present. Turkey feathers are still ritually quite important among Pueblo people.”   Eric Sorensen

You might also check out the “Turkey Girl” story as presented by Juan de la Cruz on the Camilio Tafoya bronze listing.  This seedpot has a male and female turkey on either side of the seedpot. They are etched into the clay and highlighted with colored clays.  The top of the seedpot has a cloud pattern and a rain pattern. The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Camilio”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00
Sale!
Naranjo, Dusty – Jar with Hand Designs

Dusty Naranjo is known for her delicately etched pottery which is fired brown.  This jar has an asymmetric form and it is fully polished. The top has classic Santa Clara designs and the sides are are fully etched with lines and hands.  Note the precision of the lines, which is always amazing to see when they are etched into a polished and rounded surface!  The shape, color and design give the jar a very modern appearance.  It is signed on the bottom, “Dusty”.

$ 300.00 $ 175.00
Roller, Jordan – Brown Water Jar with Etched Mountain Design

Jordan Roller is innovative in his use of thin carved designs on his pottery.  This jar is a classic water jar shape with a round body and turned out neck. The jar is highly polished and traditionally fired brown. The firing creates the distinctive color variations on the surface. The neck of the jar is etched with a mountain pattern which appears as red in color.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.   Jordan is certainly a  young potter to watch!

$ 975.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Standing Fawn & Butterflies” Seedpot (1989)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1989.  The piece is coil built and stone polished. The design is etched into the clay.  There is a single standing fawn on one side surrounded by a blue clay slip.  Surrounding the fawn are 20 small butterflies also highlighted in blue. On the back is a doe and her fawn lightly etched into the clay. They are surrounded by more very tiny etched butterflies! Near the base is the 1989 yearly symbol, an ankh, an ancient Egyptian symbol of life.  Each year Joseph would create a new “yearly symbol” and use it to “date” his pieces for that year.  Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  The piece is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,200.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Carved Jar with Feather Design (1960’s)

This jar by Grace Medicine Flower is fully carved and polished.  It is an early piece of her pottery before she began doing the sgraffito work in the late 1960’s.  The jar has 20 carved feathers encircling the piece.  They are deeply carved and it is fully polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 350.00
Tafoya, Agapita – Jar with Carved Cloud and Feather Designs (1950’s)

Agapita Tafoya was the wife of noted potter Camilio Tafoya and the mother of Grace Medicine Flower and Joseph Lonewolf. Agapita created most of her pottery from the 1930’s to the early 1950’s. This jar is from the 1950’s and it is deeply carved and stone polished. The design is a cloud pattern extending down from the neck and a prayer feather pattern extending up from the base.  The piece is fully polished and fired red.  The recessed area has a cream colored slip which was used for contrast with the red clay slip.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Agapita Tafoya”.

$ 350.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Jar with Three Deer

This jar by Grace Medicine Flower is fully polished and incised.  The jar has high sides and a short neck. There is a large leaping deer on one side. On the opposite side are two fawns and flowers.  Grace has incorporated additional Pueblo cloud, rain and feather designs.  The jar is from the 1990’s and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.

$ 1,800.00
Curran, Dolores – Polychrome Jar with Butterflies and Carved Lid

This is a stunning and complex polychrome jar from Dolores Curran.  She continues to create intricately incised and painted pottery.  She was inspired to create these red polychrome incised and painted by her husband, Alvin Curran.  He was known for his incised San Juan style pottery in the 1990’s.  This jar has incised butterfly and flower designs around the neck.   As the design gets closer to the shoulder, there are incised clouds and rain designs.  What is incised mean? Incised is just a bit deeper carving than the sgraffito or etched designs, but not as deep as carved designs.  There is a tightness and precision required of incised designs and it a skill with which Dolores excels.  Around the shoulder is a carved avanyu and below that are stylized bowls with prayer feathers.  Near the base are cloud and rain designs painted on the polished red surface.  Note even the little red-on-red dragonflies!  The design on the lid is a plant pattern and there are painted dragonfly and cloud designs on the lid.  When the lid is turned over there is an incised turtle underneath!  The entire jar combines polished, matte and micaceous surfaces.  All the colorations are from natural clay slips.  It is an extraordinary amount of time to create pieces this intricate both in design and in the various clay additions.   The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Simply perfect!

$ 3,600.00
Folwell, Susan – Bowl with Hand Designs

Susan Folwell is known for her innovative and unique Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is polished on the top half and matte below the shoulder.  In the polished section it is fully designed with hand designs.  They are additional cloud and star patterns.  Susan has also included the Folwell family “x’s” as part of the design. The piece was traditionally fired which created the coloration on the rim.  The bowl is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Garcia, Tammy – “Parrot Box” Bronze, Artist Copy

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is carved in the style she carves in her pottery, with various depths and layers.  The parrot is surrounded by Pueblo designs along with plate motifs.  The imagery is certainly inspired by the parrots seen on Acoma and other Pueblo pottery. The piece is made to be hung on a wall or it can stand on it’s own.  The piece has a striking use of patinas to enhance the coloration of the bird and the berries!  The piece is signed on the side.  It is the “AC” or Artist Copy of the bronze.

$ 3,000.00
Gutierrez, Lois  – Polychrome Water Jar with Hummingbirds

Lois Gutierrez is one of the few Santa Clara potters who continues to create traditional polychrome pottery.  Each of the various colors is derived from natural clay slips.  They are then painted onto the vessel and note that there are more than 3 different clay colors, which makes it “polychrome”. This jar is a classic water jar shape with a low shoulder and a slightly turned out neck.  The neck of the jar is fully painted with two stylized hummingbirds and flowers.  Separating them are two old style birds which have rain cloud and lightning designs.  Below the shoulder are flowers.  The jar is traditionally fired, which adds to the complexity of the overall process!  Note on the bottom you can see a bit of color variation as a result of the heat of the firing!  The jar is signed on the bottom “Lois”.

 

$ 1,100.00
Whitegeese, Daryl  – Red Water Jar with Rain and Cloud Designs

Daryl Whitegeese is known for his use of classic Santa Clara forms and his amazing polished surfaces.  This jar is is a classic water jar with a around shoulder and an elongated neck. The jar is carved around the shoulder with series of designs which represent the clouds, mountains, rain and wind.  It is a striking use of imagery which depicts seasonal changes at the Pueblos.  The jar is very deeply carved and the edges almost feel sharp to the touch! The jar is polished a deep red and has been traditionally fired.  Note as well the rim of the jar, which almost seems to have a sharp edge, which is difficult to achieve with stone polishing the surface.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Daryl Whitegeese remains one of the exciting potter to revive traditional designs and shapes working today at Santa Clara Pueblo.

$ 5,100.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Grizzly Cubs & Butterflies Seedpot (1984)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This seedpot is from 1984.  It has two grizzly bear cubs, each etched into the clay in great detail.  Each of the cubs is entranced with the butterflies.  What is so exceptional on this piece is not just the bears and the interaction with the butterflies, but the filigree style etching work surrounding them.  The plants and the feather patterns flow around the piece in a delicate stylistic manner.  It’s always difficult with his work to imagine that Joseph etched the designs into the clay!  There is an additional white clay slip used along with a red clay slip.   The back of the piece has a medallion with a rainbow, which is the yearly symbol for 1984.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,800.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn – “Raincloud Dragonfly”, 10/65

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Raincloud Dragonfly”.  It is made in the style of her clay tiles.  The imagery is deeply carved into the clay before it is turned into a bronze.  This piece has a dragonfly in the center and it is surrounded by cloud patterns. The representation is both to the importance of water as well as the dragonfly being seen a prayer messenger.  The dragonfly on this piece has a red patina and there are blue for the water.  The piece is number 10 of 65 on the side.   It is signed and numbered on the bottom.  The bronze is mounted and framed.

$ 1,300.00
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