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Torivio, Dorothy – Wide Jar with Yucca Leaf Design

This is a classically shaped jar by Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took traditional Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  The shape of the jar has a wide, sharp shoulder and a very tiny neck.  The design is a yucca leaf which extends from the neck to the shoulder and then to the base.  The open space of the white and the contrasting black give the jar a very modern appearance.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Dorothy Torivio” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 975.00
Lewis, Lucy – Large Jar with Interlocking Fine-Line Star Pattern (1970)

This large jar is by Lucy M. Lewis.  It is one of her classic pieces from 1970.  There was a brief period between 1966 and 1970 when she not only signed but dated her pottery.  Many consider these some of the best of her career.  The jar has a classic Acoma shape with the high shoulder.  The piece is painted with three rows of interlocking stars.  Each star connects to the one beside and below.  It is one of the most complex patterns used by Lucy in her pottery.  The jar was coil built, painted with bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired.   It always amazes me that she was self-taught and was able to create such extraordinary pottery through just examining historic Acoma and then later, Mimbres, pottery.   This jar is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis, 1970”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is certainly one of her classics in shape and design!

$ 3,800.00
Williams, Lorraine – Bowl with Cloud Designs

This is a traditional bowl by Lorriane Williams.  It is flat and wide in shape.  The bowl size step cloud patterns which are incised into the clay.  They are highlighted with red and black slips.  They create an overall star pattern.  The bowl has been traditionally fired.  After the piece is fired it is covered in pine pitch, which is typical of all traditional Navajo pottery harkening back to when it was utilitarian.  Lorraine has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “A Legacy of Generations”.

$ 50.00
Williams, Lorraine – Bowl with Rug Pattern

This is a traditional jar by Lorriane Williams.  It is a round bowl and there are three bands of rug style star patterns.  They are incised into the clay. The top and bottom bands are red awhile the center is black.  The bowl has been traditionally fired.  After the piece is fired it is covered in pine pitch, which is typical of all traditional Navajo pottery harkening back to when it was utilitarian.  Lorraine has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “A Legacy of Generations”.

$ 90.00
Youngblood, Christopher – Lidded Jar with Swirls and Circles

Christopher Youngblood creates intricately carved vessels which reflect a perfect balance of matte and polished surfaces with intricately carved designs.   This lidded jar focuses on his carved and rounded melon swirls. There are eight sections, each swirl in an “s” shape extending vertically on the jar.  Around the top and the base are 16 circles.  Note the precision of the carving to make the perfectly round and the scalloped matte edge on the rim and the base!  The jar is highly polished and it is a striking balance of polished and matte surface.  The piece is from 2011 and it was originally sold by us and it has come back to the gallery again.  It is great to see how his creativity and technical strength has been evident for such a long period!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Chris is a perfectionist with the matte areas of his pottery, as they perfectly balance the highly polished designs.  Chris says that he focuses on each piece, taking the time to work on the shaped and stone polish the surface to a high shine, often polishing a piece several times to get it right. He has won numerous awards for his pottery, including the 2104 “Best of Pottery” at Santa Fe Indian Market.

$ 3,500.00
Folwell, Susan – “Blue Lake” Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series entitled, “Peering through Taos Light”.  The design for the jar comes from a painting by E. Hennings entitled, “Blue Lake” (which can be seen in the last image).  This creative jar is square in shape and rag polished.  The design is a series of riders on horseback under the fall leaves.  It almost seems as if they are such a distant memory that they are fading into the jar itself.  In the same manner, the rim of the jar has been wet and texturized to feel like an older piece of pottery.  Susan does this by wetting down the rim of the jar before it is fired.  Again, as if it was used and like the memory of the riders, forgotten.  What is hard to see in the photos is that the blue int he areas below the riders are all spaces in the clay, which Susan created by adding paper to the clay which, when fired, left these small inclusions.   They create an extraordinary texture.  This seems to be simple but is exceptional in form, texture and design.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

“My newest pieces serve as commentaries and reflections on the classic Taos Society of Artists Work. I specifically want to focus on their portrayal of Native Women”.  Susan Folwell
Native Art Magazine, April 2018

$ 2,300.00
Medicine Flower, Grace & Camillio Tafoya – Red & Black Jar with Figures & Avanyu (1970’s)

This an unusual collaborative piece by Grace Medicine Flower and her father, Camilio Tafoya.  It is from the early 1970’s and it was fired “black-and-red”.  It is a distinctive firing technique where the piece is covered before the manure is put on to turn it black.  The jar was made by Camilio and polished by Grace. She would then etch the designs into the clay before it was fired.  This piece has a lightly etched avanyu on two sides.  Separating them are two red medallions.  One has a Mudhead Clown figure and the other a Rain Dancer.  There is a striking coloration of the red against the black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicne Flower and Camilio Tafoya”.   The jar is in excellent with no chips,cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00
Tafoya, Camilio –  Black & Red Jar with Feathers (1972)

This bowl by Camilio Tafoya is from 1972.  It is fully polished and the design around the shoulder is a stylized feather pattern.  The piece was then fired black-and-red.  This distinctive coloration is one that was only used by Camilio and his children Joseph Lonewolf and Grace Medicine Flower.  It was achieved during the firing, although nobody has been able to replicate the process.  Note the coloration and technique is different from the black-and-sienna colorations on pottery by artists such as Tony Da.  The contrast of the black and red is very striking on this piece.  It is signed on the bottom “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 350.00
Sunn, Mabel – Bowl with Cloud and Rain Designs (1970’s)

This is a classic bowl by Mabel Sunn from the 1970’s. The piece is made using a paddle-and-anvil technique and twice fired.  The black designs are derived from a mixture of mesquite sap and cactus spines.  Today, there are very few Maricopa artists making pottery.  This bowl is painted with a complex cloud and rain design around the shoulder.  It is also polished on the inside.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Mabel Sunn”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 250.00
Sunn, Mabel – Jar with Mountain Designs (1970’s)

This is a small jar by Mabel Sunn from the 1970’s. The piece is made using an paddle-and-anvil technique and twice fired.  The black designs are derived from a mixture of mesquite sap and cactus spines.  Today, there are very few Maricopa artists making pottery.  This jar has a mountain design on the sides and a patined rim.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘M. Sunn”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 100.00
Gutierrez, Margaret & Luther – Jar with Bear Handles (1968)

This is a complex bear effigy bowl by Margaret & Luther Gutierrez.  Margaret would make the pottery.  Her brother Luther would paint the designs using natural clay slips.  This bowl has two bears as the handles.  On the neck of the jar there is an avanyu painted on each side.  The shape and the designs are all very classic for Santa Clara pottery.  This jar won a First Prize at the 1968 Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonials.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Margaret / Luther”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,000.00
Gutierrez, Margaret & Luther – Bowl with Avanyu (1973)

This is a classic polychrome bowl by Margaret & Luther Gutierrez.  Margaret would make the pottery and Luther, her brother,  would paint them.  This bowl is a classic round shape.  It is fully painted with a water serpent (avanyu), which encircles the piece.  Note the complexity of the design as the bowl is turned.  Luther not only used a variety of clay slips but also painted precision and intricacy.  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Margaret / Luther”.  It was originally purchased in 1973 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,100.00
Cling, Alice –  9″ Tall Jar with Square Neck

This tall jar by Alice Cling has her classic shape with the high shoulder.  The neck is square in contrast to the rounded shoulder.  The jar has been vertically polished so you can see the stone marks in the polished surface.  The jar is then traditionally fired to create the coloration.  Note how the fireclouds swirl around the jar creating areas of dark black to deep red.  The jar was covered in pinon-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alice Cling”.  Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 575.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Seedpot with Incised Cloud Design

This seedpot by Preston Duwyenie is made from white Hopi clay found near Third Mesa at Hopi.  The entire piece is fully polished.  The geometric cloud design is etched into the top of the pice.  Note the additional linear areas around design which help to show off the pattern.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom in the clay with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child, which comes from Preston’s Hopi name, which means “carried in beauty”.

$ 400.00
Suina, Auerlia Montoya – Storyteller with 8 Children  (1974)

Aurelia Suina (1912-1997) was a daughter of Ioalido Montoya and Victoria Quintana.  She began making pottery in the 1960’s and is known for her storyteller and classic Cochiti pottery.  Her work can be found in the Peabody Museum at Harvard University and the Laboratory of Anthropology of the Museum of New Mexico.  While less prolific than many of the other potters of her time, the work is all traditionally built and painted with native clay slips and wild spinach (black). This storyteller was originally purchased in1974.  It is a traditional style of figure and there are eight children.  Each of the children is in a different position, giving the piece a charming appearance.  Note as well the painting of the squash blossom necklace and the belt.  The figure is signed on the bottom, “Auerlia Suina”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00
Cordero, Helen – Grandfather Storyteller with 12 Kids

Helen Cordero is undoubtedly one of the great names in Cochiti pottery.  It was in 1964 that Cordero said she made her first storyteller.  According to her, “I made some more of my Storytellers with lots of children climbing on him to listen, then I took them up to the Santo Domingo Feast Day” and the rest is history.  Her pieces were all males, to honor her grandfather, whom she would hear telling children stories of Pueblo life and culture.  She received the New Mexico Governor’s award in 1982 and the NEA Heritage Fellowship in 1986.  This storyeller is one of her pieces from the 1970’s.  It is complex in terms of its painting and figurative work.  There are twelve children all around the figure. Each one is dressed differently and they are very interactive with one another.  Note the details on the larger figure, including the sash on the side and the squash blossom necklace!  The piece is signed  on the bottom, “Helen Cordero”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is not often that we see one of her storytellers with so many children and with such intricate designs.  Definitely a classic!

$ 9,800.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Jar with Feather Pattern and Band Design

This polychrome jar by Blue Corn combines her polished and mica clay slips.  The jar is fully polished tan and then painted with a black clay, a red clay and a micaceous clay band below the shoulder.  The jar was traditionally fired and maybe a bit overfired, as the black areas are lighter in areas and a smoke area can be seen below the shoulder.  The feather pattern is tightly painted and the jar is still striking in appearance and reflect the traditional firing techniques.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.

$ 800.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Jar with Feather Pattern

This is striking polychrome jar by Blue Corn.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This water jar is fully polished tan and then it is painted.  The black is a black clay and the is an additional clay slip.  The jar  has a feather pattern painted along the neck.  Blue Corn used a green clay slip at the tips of the feathers and in the cloud design above.  Interestingly, the body of the jar is all one coloration but as it was traditionally fired outside, the area above the shoulder appears to be a lighter coloration than the base, adding one more visually striking dimension to this piece.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There is one small area of black slip loss and a small air bubble along one feather.  Both can be seen in the same photo.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.

$ 1,200.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Jar with Feather Pattern (1976)

This is a classic polychrome jar by Blue Corn.  It was originally purchased in 1976.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This water jar is fully polished tan and then it is painted.  The black is a black clay and there is an additional red or peach colored clay slip.  The jar has a feather pattern painted along the shoulder and neck.  Around the rim of the jar is a checkerboard pattern.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There are some small areas where the black is lighter.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.

$ 950.00
Nampeyo, Iris – Tan Bowl with Corn Relief Design

Iris Nampeyo was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and well known for her elegant asymmetrical vessels with corn as part of the design in relief.  Iris began using the corn in relief on the surface of her pottery in the early 1980’s. The corn is symbolic of being part of the Corn Clan.  The surface of the jar is stone polished and the corn on the front is in applique relief.  The husk of the corn is sharp and the matte area extends around to the shoulder of the jar.  The matte areas are in contrast to the remainder of the piece which is polished.  The opening is asymmetrical which is in keeping with the organic style of the form.  There is a simplicity and elegance in her pottery.  Sadly, Iris passed away in September 2018, but her pottery remains a classic.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 800.00
Gachupin, Candelaria – Jar with Birds (1976)

Candelaria Gachupin was a granddaughter of noted potter Rosalea Toribio and the daughter of Maria Bridgett. She taught both her daughter Dora Tse-Pe and son-in-law Ralph Aragon to make pottery.  This jar was originally purchased in 1976.   Candelaria was known for her stylized birds, which have long legs and are a visual “signature” to her pottery.  This jar has three sections of birds with plants, separated by a polished red lightning band.  Around the neck is a could pattern.  We do not often see a lot of her pottery but there is certainly a striking appearance to her designs. This jar is signed on the side, “Candelaria Gachupin, Zia Pueblo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the side, “Sofia & Lois Medina”.

$ 450.00
Chino, Rose – Jar with 16 Heartline Deer (1971)

Rose Chino was a daughter of noted potter Marie Z. Chino. This jar is a classic Acoma shape with a high shoulder and short neck.  It is painted with two rows of heartline deer.  There are eight deer in each row.  They are painted with bee-weed (black) and the heartline is a red clay slip. The jar was traditionally fired.  It received a third prize at the 1971 Gallup Intertribal Ceremonials.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Rose Chino”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a few small areas of spalling, which is typical for pieces from this period.

$ 850.00
Youvella, Wallace – Seedpot with Butterfly (1976-9)

This is an intricate miniature seedpot by Wallace Youvella, the husband of Hopi-Tewa potter Iris Nampeyo  It is fully polished red and the design is both carved and etched into the surface. There is a single medallion with a carved butterfly in the cetner.  There is a carved flower above the butterfly  The wings of the butterfly are incised with delicate lines.  Surrounding the butterfly is a rounded circle and then a band of incised Hopi-Tewa designs.  The seedpot was made between 1976-9.  Wallace was one of the first three men at Hopi in the mid-1970’s to begin making pottery (the others were Mark Tahbo and Thomas Polacca).  Interestingly, Thomas and Wallace (who were brothers-in-law) both started with traditional Hopi-Tewa designs but met resistance from the women potters, so began making pieces which were either fully polished and etched, or carved.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00
Aragon, Rachel – Water Jar with Parrots and Rainbow

Rachel Aragon is known for her classic Acoma pottery.  This water jar or “olla” is a classic Acoma shape with a high shoulder and a short neck.  Typical of her work it is lightweight and a great form.  The jar has four Acoma parrots as the design.  They are surrounded by a rainbow band which encircles the jar (it is painted with a red clay slip).  There are additional cloud and rain designs painted on the jar.  The delicate lines are inspired by classic Acoma pottery from the late 1800’s.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “R. Aragon”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 850.00
Naha, Helen “Feather Woman – Wide Jar with Bat Wing Design (1970’s)

Helen Naha created distinctive pottery using the white kaolin clay slip throughout her career.  The designs were all painted using bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law, Paqua Naha yet had her own style in form, imagery, and composition. This jar has a wide shoulder and a slight neck.  It is a shape which Helen frequently used on her pottery. The sides are painted with a batwing design which extends down below the shoulder.  Helen would often make the mouth of the vessel large enough so she could get her hand in to polished the inside. The interior of this jar is fully polished.  The bottom has her hallmark “feather”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 975.00
Nampeyo, Gary Polacca – Bowl with Lizard, Butterfly & Hano Katsina (1973)

This is an early piece by Gary Polacca Nampeyo.  He is known for his deeply carved pottery.  His early pottery was polished red and then fully incised with designs.  This piece was originally acquired in 1973.  The top half is fully etched with a lizard, a Hano katsina, a butterfly, a Sikyatki bird, and various other geometric patterns. The bottom of the bowl has a kiva ladder and swirling Hopi birds.  Note as well the background area is very deeply etched and creates its own precise desigsn.  Gary Polacca is a son of Thomas Polacca,  a grandson of Fannie Nampeyo and great-grandson of Nampeyo of Hano. His sisters Carla Claw Nampeyo and Elvira Nampeyo are both potters.  This bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Gary Polacca Nampeyo”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Naha, Helen “Feather Woman – Bowl with Cloud Designs (1978)

Helen Naha created distinctive pottery using the white kaolin clay slip throughout her career.  The designs were all painted using bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law, Paqua Naha yet had her own style in form, imagery, and composition. This bowl was originally purchased in 1978.  It is painted with a cloud pattern around the body of the piece.  Above the clouds and rain is a red clay slip and below are additional colors.  There is a separate band of “stippled” black, which adds another “color” to the bowl.  As with much of Helen’s pottery, the inside is fully polished.  She would try to make the mouth of the vessel large enough so she could get her hand inside to polished the inside.  The bottom has her hallmark “feather”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 625.00
Juan, Mary – Jar with Wind Designs (1960’s)

Mary Juan was a cousin of noted potter Ida Redbird. She was one of the original members of the 1938 Maricopa Pottery Cooperative. She was part of the early Revival Period artists from 1937-41. She continued to create pottery until the 1960’s. Mary Juan was known for the finely polished deep red slip, graceful shapes, and finely painted designs.  This jar has a wind motif painted around the sides.  There is her signature “wave” pattern around the neck and the jar has a slightly turned out neck. This piece is traditionally handcrafted from native clay with the paddle and anvil method, iron oxide red slip is decorated with black mesquite sap paint and pit fired.  This jar is signed on the bottom, “Mary Juan”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 250.00
Sunn, Mabel – Bowl with Indented Sides (1970’s)

This is a classic bowl by Mabel Sunn from the 1970’s. The piece is made using an paddle-and-anvil technique and twice fired.  The black designs are derived from a mixture of mesquite sap and cactus spines.  Today, there are very few Maricopa artists making pottery.  This bowl has 7 indentions on the sides.  There is a black sap painted sun separating the mountains or mesas. It is a wonderful combination of form and design.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘M. Sunn”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 275.00
Redbird, Ida – Bowl with Indented Sides (1960’s)

Ida Redbird is one of the best known of the potters involved in the revival of Maricopa pottery from 1937-40. She was featured in Arizona Highways in 1948. Her pottery is made using a paddle-and-anvil technique and they are twice fired.  The black designs are derived from a mixture of mesquite sap and cactus spines.  This bowl has indented sides to create an undulating appearance.  There is a sun and cloud design on each of the four sides.    It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Ida Redbird” on the bottom.

$ 350.00
Gutierrez, Helen – Red Bowl with Feather Design (1986)

Helen Gutierrez (1935-1993) was a daughter of Isabel Atencio, a sister of Gilbert Atencio and the mother of Geraldine, Carol, and Rose Gutierrez. She was known for her traditional San Ildefonso pottery.  This bowl is highly polished red.  It is painted with a buff colored clay to create the feather pattern which encircles the piece.  The bowl was traditionally fired red.  The design and style are classic for San Ildefonso.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 425.00
Roller, Cliff – Jar with Square Neck (2002)

Cliff Roller is a son of noted potter Toni Roller. Each piece is coil built and stone polished.  This jar has a round body and an elongated square neck. The designs are carved into the negative space of the jar.  Around the neck are a tablita and wind pattern.  Around the sides are rain and kiva bowl patterns.  The jar is deeply carved and highly polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Cliff Roller”.  This bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While these days Cliff makes very little pottery, his work remains a statement to his skill as a potter!

$ 975.00
Begay, Jr., Harrison – Jar with Raven

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This taller jar is fully designed with ravens.  This is one of the first times we have seen him use ravens as the imagery on his pottery.  One is in flight and the other two are standing.  They are surrounded by lightning and cloud designs.  The jar is highly polished and fired a deep black.  The polished sections stand out more in contrast to the black matte areas.  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,500.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Tall Black Micaceous Jar with 21 Silver Insets

This is a large jar by Preston Duwyenie.  The piece is coil built from micaceous clay.  The shape is a tall, elongated jar with a narrow asymmetric opening.  The jar is slipped in a micaceous clay and then fired black. The mica then gives the piece a very metallic appearance to the surface.  There are 21 inset pieces of silver around the jar.  Each silver piece is cut to look like a pottery shard and the surfaces have the appearance of “shifting sands”, much in a similar style to the pottery where he has carved a shifting sand pattern.  They are cast by Preston against cuttlefish bone, to create the distinctive texture.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay with Preston’s hallmark, which means “carried in beauty”.  There is certainly something both modern and ancient about this striking piece!   Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.  He is married to pottery Debra Duwyenie and now resides in Santa Clara Pueblo.  Preston has won numerous awards for pottery, including “Best of Show” at the Heard Indian Market.

$ 3,800.00
Clashin, Debbie – Storage Jar with Awatovi Birds & Koshari Clowns

This is an extraordinary large storage jar by Debbie Clashin.  She has become one of the exciting leaders in Hopi-Tewa pottery over the past several years.  She is known for her large-sized traditional fired vessels.  This large jar has a wide shoulder but is also taller in height.  The entire piece is stone polished and then it is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  The top half of the jar is painted with two large birds, bird tails and panels with sun and mesa designs. The bottom half has four Koshari clowns as the design.  They are stylized but you it is easy to the see the classic figure in the center.  The design is one which she has modified from the work of her cousin, Mark Tahbo.  Separating the clowns are small dragonflies.  It is exciting to see a Hopi-Tewa potter bringing back this classic shape which few potters make today!  The jar is traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar and a few little darker areas.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 4,400.00
Antonio, Frederica –  Four Color Jar with Rainbow Bands

Frederica Antonio is renown for her intricately painted pottery.  This jar has a striking shape with the high shoulder and small neck.  Each piece is coil built and then finely painted. The background design is a cloud pattern, which is painted with a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines which are then filled in to create larger images in the squares.  This jar has “rainbow bands” which extend down from the neck and are painted with red and tan colored clays. Half way down the jar the color is a brown clay which is the earth.  Check out the very tightly painted squares on this jar!  The base of the jar is concave, reminiscent of historic Acoma jars which were carried on the head.  This combination of thin walls, classic shape, and tightly painted design create a piece which is visually stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,600.00
Tenorio, Robert  – Wide Jar with Feathers & Hummingbirds

This is a complex wide jar by Robert Tenorio.  The jar is painted with wild spinach (black) and red and copper colored clay slips.  Around the sloping neck of the jar is a feather pattern and two sections each with two hummingbirds.  Each birds are painted in an older style and they have red and copper colored clay slips for the bodies.  Separating them are two bands of feather designs.  Note the alternating red and copper colored clay slips.  Below the shoulder is a cloud pattern and the jar has a “spirit line” or a break in the painted line around the rim.  This goes back to historic Kewa pottery when the artist would use the spirit line to release their spirit or connection from the vessel.  The inside is slipped with a mica clay slip and there is an impressed hand print on the inside!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Robert Tenorio, Kewa”.

$ 475.00
Medina, Elizabeth – Jar with Old Style Birds, Flowers and Lid

Elizabeth Medina is known for traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece is coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  The designs on this jar harken back to early Zia pottery with the hatchwork, prayer feathers and circles.  There are two larger birds on the sides of the jar.  They are slipped with a tan clay.  Separating them are two smaller birds, also in tan.  Surrounding the smaller birds are cloud, rain and prayer feather designs.  The deeper red areas are both matte and polished.  The jar is complex with the variations of matte and polished surfaces.  The top of the lid is polished red while the turtle is added and slipped tan.  There is a polished and painted bird and flowers on the top.  The jar is signed on the side “Elizabeth Medina, Zia”.

$ 475.00
Antonio, Frederica – Jar with Swirling Clouds, Corn and Rainbow Bands

Frederica Antonio is renown for her intricately painted pottery. Each piece is coil built and then finely painted. Her designs are a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines which are then filled in to create larger images in the squares.  This jar is a striking shape with the sharp shoulder. The designs painted on the surface swirl down from the neck to the rim.  There are four sections with a classic square shaped corn design, a symbol of prosperity. Separating them are bands of square clouds and two rainbow bands painted with two clay colors. The clay is painted over the surface of the black bee-weed lines.  The result on this jar is a striking piece which emphasizes the shape as it is turned.  The base of the jar is concave, reminiscent of historic Acoma jars which were carried on the head.  This combination of thin walls, classic shape, and tightly painted design create a piece which is visually stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,600.00
Sarracino, Myron – Tall Jar with Plants & Cloud Swirls

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin-walled and tightly painted. The imagery on much of his pottery is derived from pre-historic pottery designs. This jar has an elongated shape.  Around the neck are cloud pattern while around the body of the piece are classic Acoma plant patterns.  Separating the plants are cloud swirls painted with thin lines.  Near the base are mountain step designs.  The black and white coloration gives this jar both an ancient and very contemporary appearance.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece.  It is seen on much of the historic Acoma and Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Lewis, Sharon – Jar with Swirling Feather Design

Sharon Lewis has developed her own very distinctive style of design.  Her pieces are beautifully formed, thin-walled and then tightly painted.  This jar is a more classic Acoma form with the high shoulder.  It is fully painted with a swirling feather pattern which extends up from the base to the neck.  The lines are delicate and encompass the entire surface.   The black is from bee-weed. The jar is signed on the bottom, “Sharon Lewis”.

$ 175.00
Medina, Elizabeth – Jar with Birds, Flowers & Turtle Lid

Elizabeth Medina is known for traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece is coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This jar is painted in a traditional style with a bird or roadrunner on each side.  The birds are each different with variations in the wings and tails.  The bodies are stone polished with clay slips. Around the neck of the jar is a rain and cloud pattern.  Separating the birds are intricately painted flowers with complex hatchwork areas.  The jar is complex with the variations of matte and polished surfaces.  The top of the lid is polished red while the turtle is added and slipped tan.  There is a polished and painted bird and flowers on the top.  The jar is signed on the side “Elizabeth Medina, Zia.

$ 325.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Mimbres Cricket” Seedpot (1997)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1997.  The piece is entitled, “Mimbres Cricket”.  It includes a signed version of the card which Joseph made for each of his miniatures.  This piece was actually made for our show at the gallery with Joseph and Grace Medicine Flower in 1998.   Joseph wrote partially of this piece:

“Portrayed from a side view is a cricket representative of the Mimbres Period – 10th to 14th centuries.  The cricket – an insect related to the locust and grasshopper, but usually having long antennae – appears to be leaping in mid-air.  Beneath the Mimbres cricket is highly polished red slipwork (Mother Earth) which encompasses the extreme front, partial sides, back side and a portion of the top.”

The butterfly is symbolic of beauty and the the interlocking rings medallion represents the attachment between friends and was the yearly symbol for 1997.  Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  The piece is signed on the bottom and includes the signed artist card.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Anasazi Potter & Butterflies” Seedpot

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from around 2000.  The piece is one of his few black fired pieces.  It is fully eteched with a potter working on painting a piece of pottery.  They are surrounded by several other pieces of finished pottery.  Above the figure are butterflies.  Each butterfly is detailed and has various clay-colored slips.  There is a small butterfly etched into the black along with the yearly symbol.  It is a more complex design, both in the figure and as well as the colors.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,800.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Mini Seedpot Eagle Feather Pattern (1975)

This miniature seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is from 1975. It is etched with a feather pattern around the neck. The area below the design is fully polished red.  It is signed on the bottom “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 200.00
Speckled Rock, Adam – Jar with Bluebirds

Adam Speckled Rock is the son of noted potters Paul Speckled Rock and Rosemary Lonewolf.  He is a grandson of Joseph Lonewolf and a great-grandson of both Severa Tafoya and Camilio Tafoya.  This tall jar is fully polished below the shoulder and matte above.  The design is a series of bluebirds in the reeds.  The design is etched into the clay and additional clay colors are added to highlight the designs. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 250.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Seedpot with Trout, Otter & Skunk (1995)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is from 1995. It is the last series of pieces he made.  It was fully polished and etched with an otter, trout, and skunk.  There is a simplicity and playfulness to the designs.  The various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  It is signed on the bottom “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00
Namingha, Les – Hopi Sky Birds and Clouds

This wide jar by Les Namingha a creative blend of Hopi-Tewa and modernist designs.  The jar is a wide shape with a short neck.  It is fully painted on top with a complex pattern of Hopi-Tewa style birds.  The birds are painted against a background of triangular clouds. The birds are of various colors and they are each made up of different Hopi designs.  Take a closer look at the top view and the dynamic variations of each layer of readily apparent.  This jar is part of his “Urban Polychrome” series, of which Les says:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”  Les Namingha

$ 3,600.00
Namingha, Les – “Gathering Birds with Approaching Clouds” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Gathering Birds with Approaching Clouds”.   It is acrylic on board. The painting is certainly Les at his very best and most intricate. The design has numerous areas of his pointilism in both larger and smaller areas.  The small dots stand out against the graph-like division of the overall piece.  Why the lines and the placement of the designs, it’s best to let Les explain:

“Gathering Birds with Approaching Clouds” is a playful geometric and line abstraction depicting the flurry of action as birds gather on power lines in an urban setting. The birds are alluded to by triangular and trapezoidal shapes representing tail feathers. Red circular patterns within other geometric shapes create motion symbolizing movement as mentioned in the painting’s title. The grid-like design in the mid portion of the composition represent a “birdseye” view of an urban environment. A larger grid structure encompassing the painting highlights the same idea.  Horizontal lines indicate electricity cables on which birds settle or from which they launch into flight. The “approaching” clouds are depicted as small triangular shapes on the upper right portion of the painting.  The idea to create this painting stemmed from my observations of such activity of birds as I would drive around the city.”

The painting is on board and has a silver leaf wood frame.  It is a creative and striking painting and certainly a reflection of Les’s strength both as a potter and a painter.

$ 2,400.00
Vigil, Albert & Josephine – Large Jar with Avanyu (1960’s)

Albert and Josephine Vigil worked together on their pottery. Albert Vigil (1927-2009) was the son of painter Romando Vigil, one of the members of the San Ildefonso School of watercolor artists.  He as also a nephew of Maria Martinez. His wife was Josephine Cordova Vigil (1927-2001) from Taos Pueblo. She moved to San Ildefonso when she married Albert. Josephine learned pottery making by watching her aunts-in-law Maria Martinez and Clara Montoya. Maria taught her how to shape the clay and Clara taught her how to polish.  They began making pottery in 1945.  This is a larger piece of their pottery with a wide shoulder and a sloping neck.  The jar is painted with a water serpent which encircles the piece.  It is a complex design and note the clouds around the rim of the bowl.  The bottom of the bowl is also painted with a feather pattern.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Albert + Josephine”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 975.00
Gonzales, Cavan  – Polychrome Plate with Old Style Avanyu

This plate by Cavan Gonzales is a beautiful example of both his clay and painting skill.  As a form, many Pueblo potters dislike to create plates, as they break frequently while drying and firing.  Cavan is one of the few who has been making this form most of his career.  This plate is polychrome with the very oldest style of Avanyu design known.  In the center is a single inset piece of turquoise and 6 inset pieces of coral.  The pattern is a series of interlocking avanyu “tongues” which circle around the plate.  It is signed on the back in the clay.

 

$ 275.00
Honyumptewa, Kimberly Riley – Tall Picuris Micaceous Jar with Fluted Rim

Kimberly Riley Honyumptewa is from Laguna Pueblo and married to Aaron Honyumptewa who is Hopi/Picuris. She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law Caroline Simbolo Cine in the traditional Picuris style and using native clay from the area. Each piece is coil built and traditionally fired.  This is one of the largest pieces we have had of her pottery.  It is round near the base and the rim is fluted and sculpted.  The jar is an elegant shape and the firing is striking.  It sets off the black, gold and various hues of the micaceous clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom.  Will be exciting to see how Kimberly’s work continues to evolve in creating more Picuris pottery!

$ 400.00
Aragon, Wanda – Bird Effigy

Wanda Aragon (b. 1948) is a daughter of noted potter Frances Torivio. She is also known by her name in Acoma, Dzinats’ituwits’a.  She is known for her traditional style Acoma pottery.  This is one of her figurative bird effigies. The lower section is painted with classic Acoma rain and lightning designs for the wings and feathers.  The head of the bird extends up over the lip of the bowl.  It is painted with a red clay slip and the beak extends outward.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Folwell, Polly Rose – Jar with Bird and X’s

Polly Rose Folwell is known for use of classic designs on her traditional inspired Santa Clara pottery. This jar has a wide shoulder and an elongated neck.  It is fully polished and fired brown. The rim is carved with a mountain design, which is then replicated in an incised mountain design around the neck.  There is a single bird etched into the clay.  Below the birds are the Folwell family “x’s”, which are often found on their pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 600.00
Westika, Gaylon – Large Duck and Dragonfly Clay Figure

Gaylon Westika is the son of noted potters Anderson and Avelia Peynetsa.  Each piece is coil built and painted with classic Zuni imagery.  This piece is one of his duck figures. The piece is built as a jar and then the wings, tail, and beak are added. The designs below the wings are classic Zuni rainbirds with the rain fine-lines.  There are dragonflies on the neck and tail. There is an additional dragonfly on the top of the duck’s head.  Dragonflies are significant as prayer messengers. The figure is striking both in shape and design.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Gaylon says of his art:

“I work hard to develop pottery that speaks both to me and others about the beauty that exists here in Zuni. With the completion of each piece, I believe the breath of my ancestors live on, reminding us of the Zuni culture, traditional design and lifestyle we strive to preserve.” Gaylon Westika

$ 975.00
Lewis, Eric – Butterfly Seedpot with Geometric Wings

This seedpot by Eric Lewis is slightly domed and has a butterfly painted on the top.  The wings of the butterfly are painted with geometric patterns to create the designs.  Eric has taken classic Acoma linear designs and made them both bolder and more graphic.  Eric remains one of the young Pueblo potters to watch!

$ 80.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Fully Polished Red and Tan Open Bowl (1980’s)

This is open bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1980’s.  The bowl has high walls and it is fully polished on the inside and carved on the outside.  This is one of the rarest styles of Margaret’s pottery.  The bowl itself has a lower round shoulder and a slightly turned out rim.  What makes it so rare is that she polished the outside red and the inside tan. The tan is created with water, so it is always difficult to polish and create a shine.  Margaret revived this red and tan style in the late 1960’s when she remembered how it was done at Ohkay Owinghe (San Juan Pueblo) from her youth. Today, there are only a few potters who are able to polish tan with such a high shine.  For Margaret, she did very few red and tan pieces, and they are always on very traditional forms.  Traditionally potters would polish the inside of the bowls before firing so that they would be usable.  However, over time this practice decreased as there was a great chance that it would crack in drying or polishing.  The added risk comes from putting all the wet slip on the inside of the bowl and hoping that it doesn’t cause cracks in the exterior.  However, the risk is often worth it as the polished interior of the bowl creates a striking appearance.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,500.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Small Storage Jar with Bear Paws (1970’s)

This is a small but perfect version of Margaret Tafoya’s famous storage jars.  The jar is from the 1970’s and it has the round, globular form which she always said was the most difficult to make.  This jar is round and has a short neck.  The jar has four bear paws impressed in the clay and the entire surface is fully polished.  The bear paw design tells the story of how a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  Both the storage jar and the bear paw have become iconic to the work of Margaret Tafoya.  This jar is highly polished and fired a deep black.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.

 

$ 3,300.00
Duwyenie, Preston – White Shifting Sands Plate with Silver Inset

This small plate by Preston Duwyenie is made from white Hopi clay found near Third Mesa at Hopi.  The back of the plate is stone polished and the front is carved to have the appearance of “shifting sand”.  The sand design has an organic and natural flow to each ribbon of sand, giving the appearance of them flowing across the surface.  On this plate, each of the bands is very tightly carved against the next, which creates a very striking appearance.  I photographed the plate with a quarter turn, which shows off how each line of sand has a different shadow as the piece is turned.  The center of the plate has a single inset piece of silver which is cast from cuttlefish bone.  The textured surface of the silver is similar to that of the surface of the plate.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child, which comes from Preston’s Hopi name, which means “carried in beauty”.  Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

$ 525.00
Ebelacker, Jason – Large Storage Jar with Bear Paws

This storage jar is one of the classic shapes by Jason Ebelacker. He is a son of Richard Ebelacker and grandson of Virginia Ebelacker.  His father and grandmother were both known for their storage jar shapes, as well as his great-grandmother, Magaret Tafoya.  Jason creates a similar form with the high shoulder and the small neck. The distinctive shape gives the jar a feeling of size and width. The jar has two bear paws impressed into the clay and they are fully polished, as is the entire surface of the jar.  The bear paws are symbolic of a Santa Clara story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  This jar is as much historic as it is modern in appearance.  The jar is traditionally fired black.   Jason is certainly one of the younger potters to watch!

$ 3,000.00
Youngblood, Nancy – 16 Swirl Rim Water Jar

Stunning!  This is an exceptional water jar by Nancy Youngblood. The shape is a classic water jar with a rainbow ridge around the shoulder.  The shape is inspired by the work of her grandmother, Margaret Tafoya, and her great-grandmother, Sara Fina Tafoya. The jar has 16 ribs swirling around the neck and 16 ribs swirling towards the base!  The rim is perfectly carved and polished with the inside of the rim also rounded out!  It is always technically difficult to create a rim of such complexity and not have it break during the polishing!  As well, note the depth of the carving on this piece.  The entire bowl is fully polished which takes an extraordinary amount of time.  Consider that each rib has two “sides”to be polished and the surface area of the piece is about double its size!  Nancy has won numerous awards for her melon bowls and this is undoubtedly a classic of her style, most recently the 2018 “Best of Pottery” at Santa Fe Indian Market.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 7,800.00
Naranjo, Luciano – Large Jar with Deer, Bear, Turkeys and Avanyu

This is a remarkable piece from Luciano Naranjo.  He is the son of noted potter, Paul Naranjo.  This jar is an elegant shape with a wide shoulder and sloping neck. The entire jar is fully polished and the designs are etched into the clay. There are deer, a bear and wild turkey.  Each of these animals is symbolic to Santa Clara Pueblo.  Flowing through the background of the jar is a water serpent (avanyu), which ties the entire piece together.  Note as well the background tan area where he has etched away the polished surface, Luciano then scraped it down to create a striking contrast between the polished and matte surface.  The color from the firing on this jar is stunning as it is deep, rich brown.  It is great to see a younger potter taking chances on such complex shapes and designs.

$ 1,500.00
Romero, Susan “Snowflake” – Parrot Seedpot

Susan “Snowflake” Romero’s pottery is highly polished and intricately etched with detailed imagery.  Many of her skills are ones that she learned from her father, Joseph Lonewolf. This seedpot has two Mimbres inspired parrots on the top of the piece. They are etched so the surface is both matte and polished. On the side is a hummingbird etched in the Pueblo style. It is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair and signed on the bottom.

$ 600.00
Garcia, Tammy – “Seeded Woman I” Bronze.  Ed. 4/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is taken from a series of clay pieces which she made which were inspired by the paintings of Picasso.  The imagery is a Picasso-esqe woman sitting in a chair.  The piece has multiple layers and textures.  When asked about the name and the imagery, Tammy said:

“I thought about a definition of the word, “seed” which I had read.  It was, ‘A seed is the small, hard part of a plant from which a new plant grows’.  It made me think of women who came to the Southwest when the trains arrived in the 1880’s, or with the Fred Harvey Tours in the 1920’s.  They brought with them their past but became enamored with the Southwest or Native Culture. So on the bronze, the woman is sitting on a chair and the back of the chair is incised with Pueblo designs.  The side has areas which were inlaid hei-shi beads.  These women became the seeds of new interest in the area and culture. They spread this love of the Southwest just like a seed.  I called this, “Seeded Woman I”.  It is the first in this series to pay tribute to those how become aware of Native culture, respect it and spread their love of the art and artists to the world.”.

The piece has striking patinas to differentiate the various textures and depths of carving.  Much like her clay work, the piece is distinctive in style and yet very sharply defined.  This piece is 4/35 and it is signed and numbered on the bottom by Tammy Garcia. Simply a striking piece by one of today’s great potters with a lot of thought behind it!

$ 1,200.00
Garcia, Tammy – “Seeded Woman II” Bronze.  4/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is taken from a series of clay pieces which she made which were inspired by the paintings of Picasso.  The imagery is a Picasso-esqe woman sitting in a chair.  The piece has multiple layers and textures.  When asked about the name and the imagery, Tammy said:

“I thought about a definition of the word, “seed” which I had read.  It was, ‘A seed is the small, hard part of a plant from which a new plant grows’.  It made me think of women who came to the Southwest when the trains arrived in the 1880’s, or with the Fred Harvey Tours in the 1920’s.  They brought with them their past but became enamored with the Southwest or Native Culture. So on the bronze, the woman is sitting on a chair and the back of the chair is incised with Pueblo designs.  The chair itself is has a turquoise colored patina to represent the areas. The woman on one side has a hei-shi necklace and the other a turquoise colored necklace.  These are representative of how those who journeyed and continue to visit here have the culture become an integral part of their lives.  They have become seeds who spread their affection for the Southwest and Native art around the world.  I called this, “Seeded Woman II”.  It is the second in this series to pay tribute to those how become aware of Native culture, respect it and spread their love of the art and artists to the world.”.

The piece has striking patinas to differentiate the various textures and depths of carving.  Much like her clay work, the piece is distinctive in style and yet very sharply defined.  This piece is 4/35 and it is signed and numbered on the bottom by Tammy Garcia. Simply a striking piece by one of today’s great potters with a lot of thought behind it!

$ 1,200.00
Antonio, Frederica – Jar with Eight Designs and Rainbow Bands

Frederica Antonio is renown for her intricately painted pottery. Each piece is coil built and then finely painted. Her designs are a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines which are then filled in to create larger images in the squares.  This jar is a classic olla shape with a high shoulder and a long neck.  Frederica has used eight different designs on  this jar.  The patterns are painted vertically and there are square cloud pattern descending from rim to base.  Separating them are various patterns of corn, rain, snow, lighting, stars and other designs.  There are additional bands of clay slip which create the rainbow colors. The result is a piece which is varied as it is turned.  The neck is painted with a classic Acoma triangular mountain designs.  The level of complexity and time involved on the painting of this piece is extraordinary!  The result, however, is stunning with a dynamic appearance and movement to the designs.  The base of the jar is concave, reminiscent of historic Acoma jars which were carried on the head.  This combination of thin walls, classic shape, and tightly painted design create a piece which is visually stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,600.00
Torivio, Dorothy – Tall Jar with Butterfly Designs

This is a distinctive shape jar by Acoma potter Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  This shape creates a large surface area for the butterfly designs.  The neck is painted the traditional red coloration, while the remainder is black on white.  The jar captures her “op-art” style with increasing and diminishing sizes of butterfly designs.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,500.00
Manymules, Samuel  – Large Jar with Vertical Melon Ribs

This large jar by Samuel Manymules has a round shape which is accentuated by the vertical melon ribs.  The jar itself is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar has a stone polished neck which comes to a sharp edge. Below the shoulder the melon ribs are pushed out in the clay and extend to the base of the jar.  The symmetry of each rib adds to the overall appearance of the jar.  It was traditionally fired outdoors and that has created the coloration on the surface.  The jar has areas which range from black to red and brown.  The browner areas are where it was fired to a higher temperature.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 2,800.00
Ortiz, Virgil – “Venutian Soldiers, Pueblo Revolt: 2180” Water Jar

This water jar includes some of the most iconic images in the work of Virgil Ortiz.  The design is taken from his Revolt 1680/2180 series. Thre are four figures representing the Pueblo Warriors from the Venutian Soldier series of his work.  It is a powerful story of the connection between man and the environment.  The figures are each intricately painted and inspired by photography work he did in 2012.  The last photos are some of his photography for the Venutian Soldier series.  While the figures are intricately painted, the space between them is left nearly blank. However, there is a turkey track which looks like an “x”, next to each of the figures, signifying their travels.  The neck of the jar has a plant and cloud design. The jar shape itself is elegant with the high shoulder and short neck.  The jar is made from native clay, native clay slips and wild spinach (the black).  The piece is signed on the bottom. The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

In the book, “Revolt”, I wrote about these as follows:

In the summer of 2012 Ortiz premiered his “Venutian Soldiers’.   The story of the Pueblo Revolt was becoming more evolved and Ortiz was able to have fun developing more background for his characters and the events before the Revolt 2180. “I have created Native Superheroes in the form of clay, photography, video and film, which allows me the freedom to express my personal interpretation of the REVOLT – The First American Revolution.  The Venutian Soldiers are futurist, herculean superheroes, over eight feet tall, who fight mainly at nighttime and possess extraordinary strength and magical powers”.  Here the Venutian Soldiers reflect the destruction of pueblos by the Spanish during their original conquest. In their future version, it is the Castilians who have destroyed their ‘world’ and the Venutian Soldiers are the embodiment of this devastation. Their environment has been destroyed through nuclear weapons causing the Venutian Soldiers to use oxygen tanks and gas masks to survive. This story is a thoughtful embodiment of a world overrun and the natural order destroyed yet survivable by the sense of “Pueblo community”.  The Venutians are lead by Tahu and Kootz to find a hospitable land and “rebuild their traditions and ways of life on ancestral sacred lands”.

$ 4,400.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Shifting Sand Design Jar with Single Silver Inset

Preston Duwyenie is known for his Hopi pottery which blends modern and traditional aspects of the art. This jar is made from a white clay which he finds near Second Mesa at Hopi.  The shape has a wide shoulder and an asymmetric neck. The entire jar is matte.  There is a band around the shoulder which has the shifting sand design is carved into the clay.  What makes the “sand” area so fascinating is how Preston carves it so that it has a very natural appearance. The entire surface is the sand design, with a single section in which he has inset a piece of silver. The silver inset is cast from cuttle-fish bone (a type of squid).  The casting creates a similar style of ‘shifting sand’ design to complement the clay areas!  The thin walls of the bowl, the organic feel of the shifting sand and the strength of the silver insets are elegant on this piece.  The piece is signed on the bottom with is hallmark signed on the bottom in the clay with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child and his Hopi name, which means “carried in beauty”.   Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

Why the shifting sand designs? Preston says he remembers watching a smooth pebble caught in sand being shifted by the wind, “there was beauty in its isolation within the sea of sand. It was like an island.  The endless sands of time, and the fact that people, too are tossed about by the wind. There is always rippling in our lives”.

$ 1,500.00
Archuleta,  Mary Ester – Red Bowl with Bear Paws

Mary Ester Archuleta is the second youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  She has never made a lot of pottery, and most of it was in the 1970’s and 1980’s. A majority of her pottery was inspired by the incised San Juan style of pottery as she married into San Juan and lived there.  This bowl is a classic round shape with bear paws as the design.  It is perfectly polished and a stunning deep red color.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mary Archuleta.”  It is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 950.00
Romero, Teresita – Jar with Lightning and Cloud Designs (1960’s)

Teresita Romero is one of the great names in the revival of Cochiti pottery in the 1950-60 era.  She was the grandmother or noted potter Diego Romero and painter Mateo Romero.  Throughout her career she was known for her large vessels and use of traditional iconography in her work.  This jar is a complex piece of her pottery.  The jar has a round body and a slightly turned out neck.  The jar is painted with two bands of designs.  The top band is a cloud motif and the bottom is a lightning and water design.   The black areas are painted with wild spinach and the red with clay slips.  The red clay she used was distinctive for her pottery and had an orangish-red coloration.  The jar is signed on the bottom “Teresita Romero”.   The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 775.00
Garcia, Gloria “Golden Rod” – Bowl with Rabbits and Quail

This bowl by Gloria Garcia is fully polished and fired black. The design is a series of five Mimbres style quail and four rabbits.  They are each etched into the clay.  There is an additional red clay slip used to highlight the designs.  The bowl is very highly polished.  Gloria’s combination of polishing and etched designs is always striking.  This piece is signed on the bottom with her Tewa name “GoldenRod”.

$ 525.00
Duwyenie, Debra – Plate with 19 Hummingbirds

This plate was made by Preston Duwyenie and polished and incised by Debra Duwyenie.  The design on the front is fully polished and full of imagery. The design is a flowering plant which extends up from the vase.  Each of the flowers are etched into the clay and the center of each is matte, which is just where the polished slip has been etched away.  For nearly each flower is a hummingbird, each of which are also etched into the clay and with matte bellies.  There are 19 hummingbirds on the plate!  There are also additional butterflies and note near the top is a sunface and extending from the sun are rain and cloud designs.  The back of the plate is fully polished and signed with Debra’s name and Preston’s hallmark.

 

$ 650.00
Naranjo, Jody – Jar with Birds

This jar by Jody Naranjo is from 2002.  It is highly polished around the neck and the remainder is matte.  The polished area is fully etched with her signature “kiva step” design.  The center band is matte and the design is a series of birds encircling the jar.  The brown coloration is derived from the outdoor firing process.  The jar is signed, “Jody Naranjo” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Jody said of her designing:

“As for the design on the top and the bottom, it was the kiva step in the beginning. My family used them but just parts of them, the top half of the design. I started making them just around the top of the pot in one row. Then it became two rows and three rows, and then I started filling in between them.  Now it looks more like a textile, and it’s a signature pattern that I do on everything.” Jody Naranjo, Spoken Through Clay

 

$ 700.00
Garcia, Gloria “Golden Rod” – Seedpot with Mustang

This seedpot by Gloria Garcia is fully polished and fired black. The design is a mustang with lightning and clouds.  There is an additional red clay slip used in the clouds.  The mustang is rearing back from a lightning strike.  The seedpot is very highly polished.  Gloria’s combination of polishing and etched designs is always striking.  This piece is signed on the bottom with her Tewa name “GoldenRod”.

$ 525.00
Naha, Rainy – Wide Solstice Moons Jar

This is a complex designed jar by Rainy Naha.  She learned to make pottery from her mother, Helen “Featherwoman” Naha.  Rainy continues is a similar style using a white clay slip as the foundation for her work.  This jar is a classic Sikyatki style with a wide sloping shoulder.  The jar is slipped with a white clay and then painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black).  The design around the jar is a striking use of the solstice pattern.  Around the neck are the four phases of the moon.  Below are various Hopi-Tewa designs representing sun, cloud, rain, and corn.  Extending downward are two areas which have the classic eternity pattern.  Some of the colors are polished and some are left matte, but there are over six different colors used on this piece!  The painting on the surface is wonderfully intricate and varied.  The jar is signed on the bottom with her name and father hallmark.

$ 1,850.00
Sahmie, Ida – “Mother Earth & Father Sky” Bowl

This is a very traditionally inspired bowl by Ida Sahmie.  It is “Father Sky” on one side and “Mother Earth” on the other.  They are designs which are often seen in sandpaintings.  Here, Ida has painted them on a stone polished bowl using natural clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  Father Sky is in the center with the cosmos painted on the body.  Surrounding the figure is a rainbow design.  Mother Earth is in the center with the four sacred plants and other imagery painted on the polished red surface.  The face is etched and the figure is surrounded by a rainbow pattern.  The designs are all etched and painted onto the clay surface.  The bowl was traditionally fired and it is signed on the bottom, “Ida Sahmie” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.   The story of Father Sky and Mother Earth, and the Dine people is as follows:

“The Navajo people, the Diné, passed through three different worlds before emerging into this world, The Fourth World, or Glittering World. The Diné believe there are two classes of beings: the Earth People and the Holy People. The Holy People are believed to have the power to aid or harm the Earth People. Since Earth People of the Diné are an integral part of the universe, they must do everything they can to maintain harmony or balance on Mother Earth.  It is believed that centuries ago the Holy People taught the Diné how to live the right way and to conduct their many acts of everyday life. They were taught to live in harmony with Mother Earth, Father Sky and the many other elements such as man, animals, plants, and insects.”

$ 650.00
Clashin, Debbie – Large Jar with Dragonflies and Cloud Spirals

This is a large jar by Debbie Clashin.  It is inspired by the classic Sikyatki style pottery with a wide shoulder and a slight neck.  Around the jar are dragonfly designs.  Dragonflies are symbolic prayer messengers.  Note the extension downward of the cloud designs in two sections. They rise up to the painted band around the neck which has more cloud and rain motifs.  The jar is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  It was traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar.  Debbie is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 2,200.00
Naha, Rainy – Jar with Butterfly and Dragonflies

This is an intricately designed jar by Rainy Naha.  She learned to make pottery from her mother, Helen “Featherwoman” Naha.  Rainy continues is a similar style using a white clay slip as the foundation for her work.  This jar has a butterfly with intricately painted wings on one side.  On the opposite side are two old style dragonflies.  Separating them are two large panels of various geometric designs.  There are over six different colors used on this jar!  The designs include rain, cloud, mountain and other patterns.  There is even the Awatovi swirl! The black is bee-weed while the colors are all natural clay slips.  The jar is traditionally fired which gives the white a very pearlescent appearance.  It is signed on the bottom with a feather and “Rainy”.

$ 1,200.00
Clashin, Debbie – Jar with Birds and Dragonflies

This is wide jar by Debbie Clashin is painted with a stylized bird design.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. The jar has a sloping shoulder and there are two sections with swirling birds.  Surrounding the birds are dragonflies and rain patterns.  The jar is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  It was traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 900.00
Garcia, Gloria “Golden Rod” – Bowl with 8 Turtles

This bowl by Gloria Garcia is fully polished and fired black. The design is a series of eight turtles encircling the piece.  Each one has additional designs etched into their shell.  Gloria’s combination of polishing and etched designs is always striking.  This piece is signed on the bottom with her Tewa name “GoldenRod”.

$ 275.00
Begay, Daniel – Tall Brown Jar with Turtles

This is a striking tall jar by Daniel Begay. He learned to make pottery from his father, Harrison Begay, Jr.  Each piece is coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired.  Daniel has created a distinctive style of carving, similar to that of his father, yet with more angular and graphic designs. This jar is fully carved with turtles in one band.  The remainder of the jar has waves and water fall designs.  There is a striking contrast between the polished and matte surfaces, which adds to the sophistication of the imagery. Note how Daniel’s designs combine both thin and thicker lines to enhance the imagery.   The coloration is derived from the firing and brown color is striking on this piece!  The style of carving has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,400.00
Lewis, Sharon – Jar with Star Designs

Sharon Lewis has developed her own very distinctive style of design.  Her pieces are beautifully formed, thin-walled and then tightly painted.  This jar is a more classic Acoma form with the high shoulder.  It is fully painted with two variations of star patterns.  One is fine-line diamond shape and the other a checkerboard pattern.  The lines are delicate and encompass the entire surface.   The black is from bee-weed. The jar is signed on the bottom, “Sharon Lewis”.

$ 200.00
Naha, Rainy – Large Shalako Clouds and Eagle Tail Jar

Rainy Naha took her inspiration for this wide shoulder jar from a Sikyatki polychrome vessel from 1550-1600. The jar was featured in Edwin Wade’s seminal book, “Canvas of Clay”.  Interestingly, Wade spoke with several Hopi educators to identify the designs on the surface.  The triangular designs are the “Shakako” cloud pyramids.  The more complex panels separating the clouds for Rainy are inspired by various designs used by Nampeyo of Hano and her mother, Helen “Feather Woman” Naha.  They are a variation of the classic eagle tail design.  The designs are layered on top of one on top of the other so as to identify the world of the eagle from sky to earth.  The jar itself is painted with natural clay slips to achieve the various colors.  The black is derived from bee-weed (a plant).  The jar has been traditionally fired which results in a very pearlescent coloration to the white.  It is signed on the bottom with a feather and Rainy’s name.  It is exciting how she has used both ancient designs and more modern motifs of the Hopi-Tewa matriarchs as the foundation for this striking jar!

$ 1,900.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Jar with 32 Feathers, Avanyu & Lid

This is a striking lidded jar by Nancy Youngblood.  The jar is deeply carved with a water serpent around the body of the piece.  Note the delicate swirls and sharp edges carved into the clay to create the body of the avanyu.  Around the neck of the jar are 32 deeply carved feathers.  Each feather and the avanyu are all stone polished to create a stunning shine!  There is a sense of movement in the design as the feathers seems to swirl around the piece. The lid is a loop which is fully polished!  It is reminiscent of some of Nancy’s early work when she would create miniatures with very thin handles!  The lid fits perfectly into the neck of the jar.  The entire piece is traditionally fired to a dark black and it is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 7,500.00
Lewis, Eric & Sharon Lewis – Dragonfly and Hummingbird Fineline Jar

This is a creative jar by Eric Lewis and his mother, Sharon Lewis.  Eric made the jar and painted the outlines of the dragonfly and the hummingbird. They are surrounded by the bold Acoma style lines which Eric paints.  Sharon, his mother, is known for her detailed painting on miniatures. She painted the very fine lines on the dragonfly and hummingbird.  Check out the precision of the painting of the lines and how they create another dimension to the jar!  They work well together!  The jar is signed on the bottom by both Eric and Sharon.   Eric remains one of the young Pueblo potters to watch!

$ 400.00
Namingha, Les – Sky Birds Urban Polychrome Jar

This wide jar by Les Namingha a creative blend of Hopi-Tewa and modernist designs.  The jar is a wide shape with a short neck.  It is fully painted on top with a complex pattern of Hopi-Tewa style birds.  The birds are painted in white with brown geometric highlights.  They are surrounded by complex geometric patterns painted with blue and various color colors fo the rising sun and the morning sky.  The colors are dynamic and the birds seem to float between them.  The base of the jar is the hills of the world below the birds in the sky.  This jar is part of his “Urban Polychrome” series, of which Les says:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”  Les Namingha

$ 3,600.00
Moquino, Jennifer Tafoya – Large Flat Shoulder Jar with Fish

This is the largest jar by Jennifer Moquino we have had in a while.  It is fully polished and has a wide shoulder and a small neck.  Check out the shape of the jar as the shoulder is very sharp which gives the jar a striking appearance.  The piece is fully polished and it is thin walled. The design on the top consists of Black Moor Goldfish and Cherry Blossoms.  There are elegant water swirls and surrounding the fish.  Check out their coloration with the red and the contrast with the white and blue waves and the pink blossoms.  As the jar is turned over, the sharp shoulder descends into a sloping base which has additional cherry blossoms. The highly polished surface enhances the delicately etched designs.  Each fish has a distinct appearance of motion and movement!  Not only did she use clay slips, but also mica clays, which give the whole piece a bit of “sparkle”.  This jar has a perfect balance to the intricate designs.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is this creative evolution in her work which keeps  Jennifer as one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 5,800.00
Toya, Maxine – Pueblo Singer with Pueblo Scene

Maxine Toya is well known for her figurative pottery.  This is one of her Pueblo singer figures.  It is made from clay and her cloak is painted and stone polished. The front has a pueblo scene which is carved into various levels of the clay.  Note how the sun in the sky is polished tan!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maxine Toya”.

$ 1,800.00
Begay, Jr., Harrison – Jar with Dragonflies & Stars

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This jar has a round shape and a slight neck. The top area is fully polished.  The design is a series of old style dragonflies on two sides.  They are surrounded by cloud designs. There are additional star patterns carved into the clay.  The highly polished surfaces are a striking contrast to the matte areas.  As the design flows around the surface of the jar, Harrison contrasts angular and circular designs.  Harrison says that he tries to carve his pieces so that the imagery looks to be in motion.  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 850.00
Youngblood, Nathan – Tri-Color Serving Plate

Nathan Youngblood is known for his deeply carved and highly polished pottery. This plate shape was inspired by the traditional Santa Clara serving bowls, which had an indention for the thumb to hold them when serving.  Nathan took that shape and added the same indention on the opposite side, creating his own distinctive form. The interior of the plate is fully carved and polished a deep red. The design is a central medallion of clouds, rain, and water, surrounded by cloud motifs above and below. Interestingly, while the rim is polished tan, there are two sections which are carved into the rim of the plate. This is always technically more complicated and adds to the risk of breaking when firing.  While the shape, carving, and designing might seem like enough, Nathan also takes his pottery one step further. After it is fired, he uses small screwdrivers and scrapes the sides of the carved designs and the recessed areas, to create a visually striking contrast.  This style has been called, “the new Santa Clara polychrome”, although I usually called it “tri-color” with the variations of red, matte and buff areas. The plate was traditionally fired.  It is signed on the back in the clay with his name and deer tracks, which represent his name in Tewa.

$ 9,800.00
Begay, Jr., Harrison – Jar with Two Eagles

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This round jar is fully carved with two eagles.  One eagle is in flight. The other eagle is perched and overlooking a sunrise.  The eagle is flight is depicted over water with cloud designs.  The jar is perfectly polished to a silvery appearance to the surface which contrasts with the black matte areas.  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,600.00
Naranjo, Christina – 13″ Tall Jar with Carved Avanyu (1970’s)

Christina Naranjo was a daughter of SaraFina Tafoya and a sister of Margaret Tafoya and Camilio Tafoya.  She was known for her classic style carved Santa Clara pottery.  This is definitely the largest piece of her pottery we have had in the gallery.  It is a tall water jar with a long neck.  Around the body of the piece, it is fully carved with a water serpent (avanyu), as the design.  The avanyu encircles the jar in a band of design but note the exceptional complexity of the imagery.  The area clouds and rain and lightning in the pattern and they utilize the normal band but also the negative space.  The long neck is also fully polished.  The style of her carving is certainly significantly different than that of her sister, Margaret Tafoya.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Christina Naranjo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Christina has a wonderful legacy in the work of her daughters Mary Cain and Teresita Naranjo, as well as her great-granddaughters Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.

$ 2,800.00
de la Cruz, Juan and Lois Gutierrez  – 15″ “Parrot Girl” Storage Jar

Juan Cruz creates extraordinary painted polychrome pottery.  He is a son of noted potter Lois Gutierrez.  Lois made this massive jar and Juan, who is noted for his illustrations, painted the design using natural clay slips.  This jar is a rather massive storage jar shape with the round side and short neck.   Juan wrote of the scene he painted as follows:

“This piece depicts scenes from the story of the marriage of Tayi P’i; when she meets her new husband while still in parrot form and the presentation of gifts from her father to her new in-laws.  The band arcing forth from the geometric parrot design represents the return journey with her new husband when she conducts him safely back to their new home after he made and kept his promise to keep his eyes closed and to place his trust in her.  Upon their arrival she shakes forth the gifts sent by her father from the folds of her wings and transforms into a beautiful woman, afterwards telling her new husband to open his eyes.”

The jar is truly polychrome (more than three colors of clay).  Note the intricacy of the painted designs and especially the figures.  They are each distinctive in stance or dress.  There is a beautiful combination of imagery on the jar which emphasizes the shape but also tells a wonderful story!   While Juan is new to the pottery world, he recently won “Best of Pottery” at Gallup Ceremonials in 2017 and has been featured in articles in Cowboys & Indians Magazine and Native Art Magazine.

 

$ 7,500.00
Garcia, Tammy – “The Blue Jewel” Large Carved Jar

This is an exceptional new jar by Tammy Garcia.  The piece has a contemporary shape with a wide shoulder and elongated neck.  The jar has two large medallions on each side.  The medallions are surrounded by elaborately carved “frames” with polished flower motifs.  On one side is a nude, polished in tan, reclining on a rug.  In front of her is a large olla with a carved Pueblo bird. The bird is polished in red.  The opposite side has another medallion which has a jar carved into the clay and a polished Mimbres style deer as the design.  Surrounding the carved imagery are areas of stippled designs. The stippling is a process by which the clay surface is punctured over and over to create a texture.  It is a striking contrast to the polished and matte surfaces.  Separating the two medallions are large areas which are carved deeply into the clay and are surrounded by carved and polished flowers.  Note the extensive carving and use of a variety of textures to enhance the design. On one side, on top of the shoulder, is a single inset piece of turquoise. It is this stone which gives the jar its name, “Blue Jewel”.  The jar speaks to Tammy’s love of Native jewelry, women who come to the Southwest to visit and have Native culture become an integral part of their lives.  She says it is a tribute to those who become aware of Native culture and spread their of the art to the world.  It is the feeling of intimacy between art and collector that finds its voice in this large jar.  Tammy has won numerous awards for her pottery and been the recipient of the New Mexico Governor’s award.  It’s not surprising that with the intricate nature of her pottery she makes only about ten pieces of pottery a year.  Yes. Ten!  Yet each piece is unique and expands on her distinctive style and voice in the clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 24,000.00
de la Cruz, Juan and Lois Gutierrez  – “Eagle Sun and Rabbit Moon” Plate

Juan Cruz creates complex painted polychrome pottery.  He is a son of noted potter Lois Gutierrez.  Lois made the plate and Juan, who is noted for his illustrations, painted the design using natural clay slips.  This is the first time Juan has painted on a plate, giving him a large canvas surface.  The plate is the story of the sun and moon.  Juan wrote of the scene he painted as follows:

“The cycle of Brother Sun and Sister Moon, revolving in an eternal circle.  The sun giving light while the moon give cooling relief in her pale light.  The geometrics of the design on the plate represent the eagle’s association with the sun.  For the Moon’s design, I drew inspiration from a Mimbres design of a rabbit forming in the shadow of a crescent moon.”

The plate is truly polychrome (more than three colors of clay).  Note the intricacy of the painted designs and especially the figures.  They are each distinctive instance or dress.  He has captured a beautiful balance of the designs as the sun swirls into the moon.  The crescent moon and the rabbit are opposite the Tewa sun and the eagle.  Exceptional!  The back of the plate is fully polished red. The description is written on the back of a hand-painted graphic of a Brother Sun and Sister Moon.  What a phenomenal addition to this piece and the painting helps to better understand how exceptional Juan is with his art.   While Juan is new to the pottery world, he recently won “Best of Pottery” at Gallup Ceremonials in 2017 and has been featured in articles in Cowboys & Indians Magazine and Native Art Magazine.

$ 2,200.00
Lucas, Steve – Jar with Flat Sides and Hopi Birds

Steve Lucas is well known for the precisely painted designs on his Hopi-Tewa pottery.  He is one of the leading Hopi-Tewa potters working today.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished, painted with native clay slips and bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired.  Steve has won “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market and his work remains some of the most refined and creative.  This jar is stunning in person with the flat side and the sloping neck. The sides are fully painted and have an alternating bird design.  The top has two large swirling birds and dragonflies.  There are two of the eagle tail designs extending down from the rim.  Note as well all the colors used in the clay slips!  Amazing!  The base of the jar is fully polished red.  The jar was traditionally fired and the last photo shows the jar when it came out of the firing!  The jar has a dynamic coloration from the firing.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “S. Lucas” and a mudhead (koyemsi) and an ear of corn (corn clan).  The open space around the design and the color from the firing make this an exceptional piece of his pottery!

$ 3,000.00
Garcia, Tammy – Large Jar with Fish and Flowers (2018)

Elegant! This new jar by Tammy Garcia is a delicate shape with correspondingly delicate imagery.  The designs encompass the surface of this piece and the shape of the water jar is striking with the sharp shoulder and the raindrop rim.  The jar has 27 fl0wers, each deeply carved with a raised central section.  There are very delicately carved thin lines which separate each petal of each flower.   There are three elaborate medallions, each carved with a trout in the center.  The trout are amazing, as not only are they highly polished, but each has different marking painted onto the clay.  As for the designs around the medallions,  Tammy says she has been creating “frames” for her designs.  Here, each medallion is framed with bear paws and floral designs.  There are additional bear paws across the surface of the jar. The bear paws are symbolic for good luck.  Note the variety of colors on the jar!  There are deep red and tan areas on the surface.  The various colors are from different clay slips. She has also texturized sections of her work and even rounded out surfaces, like the area above each fish!  The entire jar has numerous levels of carving from the raised flowers to the interiors of the bear paws.  Note as well the matte areas of the jar.  This is technically one of the most difficult parts of this piece, as they have to be sanded perfectly smooth so that no raised areas cast shadows.  It’s very time-consuming.  Tammy has won numerous awards for her pottery and been the recipient of the New Mexico Governor’s award.  It’s not surprising that with the intricate nature of her pottery she makes only about ten pieces of pottery a year.  Yes. Ten!  Yet each piece is unique and expands on her distinctive style and voice in the clay.

$ 24,000.00
Lucas, Steve – Large Awatovi Design Jar

This is the first time Steve Lucas has created this dynamic design on his pottery. He is one of the leading Hopi-Tewa potters working today.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished, painted with native clay slips and bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired.  Steve has won “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market and his work remains some of the most refined and creative.  This large jar has an amazing design inspired by the famous “Awatovi” jar by his aunt, Dextra Quotskuyva.  Here the jar has sloping sides and a very intricately painted design.  The geometric, butterfly and moth designs are all interwoven.  Note as well all the colors used in the clay slips!  Amazing!  The jar was traditionally fired and the last photo shows the jar when it came out of the firing!  The jar has a dynamic coloration from the firing.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “S. Lucas” and a mudhead (koyemsi) and an ear of corn (corn clan).  Spectacular!

$ 4,800.00
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