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Youngblood, Nancy – Red & Buff Bowl with Avanyu (2003)

This is a classic red and tan bowl by Nancy Youngblood.  The bowl is deeply carved with a water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece. The avanyu tells the story of the village being saved during a flood. The shape of the avanyu is reminiscent of water coursing through a canyon or arroyo and note how the tongue and tail always intersect.  On this piece Nancy has deeply carved the avanyu into the clay.  The body of the avany is carved with swirls and sharp lighting edges.  It is fully polished red and the remainder of the piece is matte tan.  What you can’t see in the photos, but can feel in person is how perfectly Nancy has sanded the tan areas at the top and bottom of the bowl.  They are perfectly smooth and feel like soft leather.  As with all pottery, the tactile side of holding a piece is always important.  On this bowl it is critical as the smooth surfaces and the sharp edge of the carving, in addition to the coloration, are what make it so stunning! The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nancy Youngblood, 2003”.

$ 5,500.00
Garcia, Tammy – Thunderbird Jar (2018)

This new jar by Tammy Garcia is one of her classic shapes with a round body and elongated neck.  The jar is carved with three “thunderbirds” as the design. The birds are inspired by jewelry of the Southwest from the 1940’s and 50’s.  The birds are deeply carved and polished a deep red.  Extending out from them are arrows which are polished tan.  Surrounding them are spiral designs which are simply slipped matte red.  The background she has texturized.  It is interesting to note the various levels of her carving and how she is able to use them to create shadows and emphasize the designs on her work.  Each of the three birds has in set turquoise stone.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  The last two photos are of the piece in process, which is always fascinating!  Tammy has won numerous awards for her pottery and been the recipient of the New Mexico Governor’s award.  It’s not surprising that with the intricate nature of her pottery she makes only about ten pieces of pottery a year.  Yes. Ten!  Yet each piece is unique and expands on her distinctive style and voice in the clay.

We are pleased to be the only gallery in the country to represent her new works in clay!

$ 7,200.00
Tafoya, Margaret -Jar with Swirl Melon Ribs (1970’s)

It is not often that Margaret Tafoya made melon jars during her career. This exceptional pieces is from the 1970’s and it is stunning with the swirl melons. The piece has one of her classic necks and then it is carved with eight melon ribs. They swirl down from the shoulder to the base. The jar is highly polished and fired a shiny black.  It is simply exceptional!  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It’s always great see the expanse of Margaret’s creativity throughout her career.

$ 4,200.00
Clashin, Debbie – Double Bird & Dragonfly Open Bowl

This is is a wide open bowl by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. This bowl is polished on the outside and painted on the inside. The design in the center are two Sikyatki birds.  They are surrounded by dragonflies.  The rim of the bowl is painted with rain, lightning and cloud designs.  The bowl is traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 1,200.00
Naha, Rainy – Bowl with Interlocking Birds

The “interlocking” or “tumbling” parrots is a design originated by Rainy Naha. This piece has a taller shape, so that the top and bottom parrots are easily seen. The bowl is fully polished with a white clay slip and then there are five sections of interlocking birds.  Each bird is painted with various Hopi-Tewa designs and then additional clay slips.  Rainy uses bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips for her colors. Each piece is traditionally fired.  The bowl is signed on the bottom with the feather hallmark and “Rainy”.

$ 1,600.00
Naha, Rainy – Solstice Jar

This is an intricately designed jar by Rainy Naha.  She learned to make pottery from her mother, Helen “Featherwoman” Naha.  Rainy continues is a similar style using a white clay slip as the foundation for her work.  This jar  is a classic Sikyatki style with a wide sloping shoulder.  The jar is slipped with a white clay and then painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black).  The design around the jar is a striking use of the solstice pattern.  Around the neck are the four phases of the moon.  Below are various Hopi-Tewa designs representing sun, cloud, rain, and corn. Some of the colors are polished and some are left matte.  The painting on the surface is wonderfully intricate and varied.  The jar is signed on the bottom with her name and father hallmark.

$ 1,800.00
Clashin, Debbie – Polychrome Water Jar with Eagle Tail Design

This is is a wide shoulder water jar by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. This jar has a wide shoulder and a slightly turned out neck.  The body of the piece is painted with a mesa and eagle tail pattern.  In addition to the black (bee weed) she has used a deep red and an orange color of clay.  They provide a visual along with textural aspect to this jar. The rim is stippled with the bee weed.  Note how the design and the colors accentuate the shape fo this jar!  It has been traditionally fired which creates the blushes across the surface of the bowl.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 1,100.00
Toya, Dominique – Micaceous Swirl Meon Seedpot

Dominique Toya is known for her intricately carved pottery with sharp ridged melon swirls.  She has created her distinctive style of pottery using native clay and micaceous clay slips for the surface.  This seedpot has 8 deeply carved ribs, each with a sharp edge. The seedpot has a small opening at the top.  After it is carved it is then slipped with an additional mica clay to create the striking coloration.  Looking down from the top it is possible to see how perfectly the ribs spiral out from the opening!  Dominique has won numerous awards for her pottery and continues to be one of the leading Jemez potters working today!

$ 1,000.00
Williams, Lorraine – Storage Jar with Eight Yei Figures

This is an exceptional large storage jar by Lorraine Williams.  While she no longer makes pieces this size, the shape and scale of this piece is striking!  The jar has  a rounded base and straight sides.  The shoulder is very sharp and comes across flat to the neck. Technically, this is amazing how she was able to achieve just a flat surface!  On the sides are eight Yei figures and each is different in design.  Above them is a rug pattern and a mountain pattern on the flat shoulder.  There is also a flag design.  The jar has been traditionally fired, which creates the variations in color. Interestingly, these large pieces are fired upside down!  After the firing, it is covered in pine pitch, which is typical of all traditional Navajo pottery harkening back to when it was utilitarian.  Lorraine has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “A Legacy of Generations”.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “LW”.   

$ 1,400.00
Sahmie, Ida – Miniature “Night Chant” Bowl

This miniature by Ida Sahmie has incredible detail, as one might expect from a great minature in pottery!   It is the Night Chant Dance with eight male Yei-bi-chi dancers encircling the jar.  The background area is fully painted with bee-weed (a plant) to make it black.  In the background, there are the mesas and a fire in the “center”.  This is her attempt to create a “3D” story on the vessel!  Ida also incises into the clay for the faces and the bodies, leather, and masks.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ida Sahmie”.

$ 250.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Mini Carved Bowl with Avanyu

This miniature bowl by Grace Medicine Flower is fully carved and polished.  The design is a very complicated water serpent encircling the bowl.  The carving is very complex for the size and the entire piece is fully polished. There is one little etched area on the tongue of the water serpent.  The piece is from around 2002 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace M. F.”.

$ 600.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Jar with Three Deer

This jar by Grace Medicine Flower is fully polished and incised.  The jar has high sides and a short neck. There is a large leaping deer on one side. On the opposite side are two fawns and flowers.  Grace has incorporated additional Pueblo cloud, rain and feather designs.  The jar is from the 1990’s and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.

$ 1,800.00
Howato, Ramon – Seedpot with Wind Designs

Ramon Howato is a son of noted potter Diana Tahbo.  He learned to make pottery from his uncle, Mark Tahbo.  This seedpot is coil built, painted with bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired.  The piece is fully painted with a variety of cloud, rain and other Sikyatki inspired designs.  The painting seems both traditional in style and yet with a stylistic sense of designs matching the form.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ramon Howato” and a pipe, as he is “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 175.00
Howato, Ramon – Jar with Hummingbirds

Ramon Howato is a son of noted potter Diana Tahbo.  He learned to make pottery from his uncle, Mark Tahbo.  This jar is coil built, painted with bee-weed and native clay slips and traditionally fired.  The jar has four stylized birds painted around the shoulder.  The neck has a checkerboard pattern.  The painting seems both traditional in style and yet with a stylistic sense of designs matching the form.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ramon Howato” and a pipe, as he is “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 375.00
Cling, Alice –  Jar with Low Shoulder and Square Neck

This jar by Alice Cling has a water jar shape with a round shoulder and square neck. The sides of the neck has been squared off so that it is flat on the sides.  The jar is then traditionally fired to create the coloration.  Note how the fireclouds swirl around the jar creating areas of dark black to deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alice Cling”.  Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 165.00
Cling, Alice –  Jar with Elongated Neck

This taller jar by Alice Cling has an elongated shape with a longer neck.  The jar has been vertically polished so you can see the stone marks in the polished surface.  The jar is then traditionally fired to create the coloration.  Note how the fireclouds swirl around the jar creating areas of dark black to deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alice Cling”.  Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 180.00
Folwell, Susan – “Pueblo Woman, Pueblo Clouds” 3 Tile Set

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This tile set is part of her series entitled, “Peering through Taos Light”.  The design for the tile comes from a painting by Taos Society Artist Victor Higgins.  The imagery has a reclining pueblo woman wearing her moccasins.  The next tile has Higgins signature style “puffy” clouds.  The final is a Pueblo design, emulating the room around her.  These tiles are made from native clay and painted with acrylic.  There are open areas which Susan says, “allows the clay to breathe”.  They each have a lucite stand, as Susan noted that they should not necessarily be static, but allowed to move.  The reverse of the two larger tiles are impressed with a shell design.  Each tile is signed on the back.  The numbers (1/3, 2/3, etc) are to denote that there are three tiles in the set.

“My newest pieces serve as commentaries and reflections on the classic Taos Society of Artists Work. I specifically want to focus on their portrayal of Native Women”.  Susan Folwell
Native Art Magazine, April 2018

$ 650.00
Naranjo, Madeline – Jar with Parrots in Flight

Madeline Naranjo creates beautifully carved and polished pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This jar is a more classic form with a high shoulder and slight neck.  Around the shoulder of the piece there are two parrots. Each is deeply carved into the clay.  Madeline has portrayed them in flight!  The bodies are matte while the beaks and tail feathers are polished.  Note as well how her matte areas are sanded and perfectly smooth so that there are no indentations or areas where the matte might make a shadow.  Her designs are always innovative and beautifully executed.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 275.00
Antonio, Frederica – “Four Design” Jar

Frederica Antonio is renown for her nearly precision perfect-painted pottery. Each piece is coil built and then finely painted.  The black is bee-weed (a plant) and the colors are all various clay slips. Her designs are a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines which are then filled in to create larger images in the squares.  This is a smaller jar which utilizes the shape to focus on the design.  The jar has four large sections of design, wit the rain, snow, wind and corn patterns.  Separating them are linear bands of wind patterns.  The neck of the jar is intricately painted with a checkerboard pattern which is then painted with four different colors representing the four directions.  Check out the detail in the painting on this piece!  It is exceptional!  The base of the jar is concave, reminiscent of historic Acoma jars which were carried on the head.  This combination of thin walls, classic shape and tightly painted design create a piece which is visually  stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,100.00
Da, Jarrod – “Nambe Butterfly” Original Pastel

Jarrod Da has created a distinctive style of painting using pastels for his work. Each piece is hand painted and it is amazing how much detail he is able to achieve in each piece!  His new work is a blend of contemporary themes with San Ildefonso and Pueblo imagery.  This piece is entitled, “Nambe Butterfly”.  Jarrod says of this painting:

“This piece was made after a trip to Nambe falls in northern New Mexico. The design work is influenced from San Ildefonso Pueblo Pottery design along with influences from Deco design. You can see this Deco influence within design elements like the rainbow in the center of the piece with its gradating small circle pattern varying in many colors. The various colors of the circles represents spray coming from the falls and shows that water is not clear but has a whole spectrum of color when light hits it. Traditional Pueblo design is represented through the staircase and kiva designs along with the flower motif in each of the butterfly’s wing is indicative of pottery design.   The butterfly represents the fragility of our eco system and its mission to recreate time and time again.”

The painting is subtle in color but complex in design.  It comes in a black frame and matted. It is signed, “DA 17”.  The photo shows the painting unframed and matted. The second photo is the painting framed on the wall for scale.

$ 1,200.00
Folwell, Susan – Jar with Fish

Susan Folwell is known for her innovative and unique Santa Clara pottery.  This is an earlier piece of her pottery which is fully polished.  There are fish which are matte and etched into the clay.  They are swimming around the bowl.  The neck of the bowl has an etched water design and the polished area is fully designed with a water pattern. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00
Da, Jarrod – “Blue Pueblo Bird” Original Pastel

Jarrod Da has created a distinctive style of painting using pastels for his work. Each piece is hand painted and it is amazing how much detail he is able to achieve in each piece!  His new work is a blend of contemporary themes with San Ildefonso and Pueblo imagery.  This piece is entitled, “Blue Pueblo Bird”.  Jarrod says of this painting:

“These bird pieces celebrate San Ildefonso plate design. These bird designs are rediscovered with more contemporary lines and shapes along with nontraditional colors. These nontraditional colors were used to investigate what new color pallets could be used on flat two dimensional designs.”

The painting is subtle in color but complex in design.  It comes in a black frame and matted. It is signed, “DA 17”.  The photo shows the painting unframed and matted. The second photo is the painting framed on the wall for scale.

$ 500.00
Folwell, Susan – Bowl with Hand Designs

Susan Folwell is known for her innovative and unique Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is polished on the top half and matte below the shoulder.  In the polished section it is fully designed with hand designs.  They are additional cloud and star patterns.  Susan has also included the Folwell family “x’s” as part of the design. The piece was traditionally fired which created the coloration on the rim.  The bowl is signed on the bottom.

$ 500.00
Da, Jarrod – “Pueblo Bees” Original Pastel

Jarrod Da has created a distinctive style of painting using pastels for his work. Each piece is hand painted and it is amazing how much detail he is able to achieve in each piece!  His new work is a blend of contemporary themes with San Ildefonso and Pueblo imagery.  This piece is entitled, “Pueblo Bees”.  The painting has two bees painted in blue and yellow with Pueblo designs on the wings . They are flying near pueblo painted flowers and with interspersed geometric shapes.  Jarrod wrote of this piece:

“Pueblo Bees was created pondering the modern effect we have on honeybees. This one of three of a series of mixed media pieces. The design work is influenced through a mix of traditional San Ildefonso Pueblo design and modern art deco influences. The fine detail work is done in India ink. This piece is my ode to saving the honeybee and realizing the crucial role they play in this giant organism we call earth.”

The painting is subtle in color but complex in design.  It comes in a black frame and matted. It is signed, “DA 17”.  The photo shows the painting unframed (to capture the detail) and then framed on the wall with other paintings by Jarrod, for scale.

$ 500.00
Cain, Linda – Jar with Bear Paw

This is a very modernist jar by Linda Cain.  Linda is a daughter of Mary Cain and the mother of Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.  This jar has a square mouth which is stone polished.  From the neck to below the shoulder it is matte and slipped with a mica clay slip.  There is a single carved bear paw as the design, and it is also fully polished. As the jar is turned over, the are below the shoulder is stone polished.  There are interesting variations in texture and reflection. The square mouth and the angular style of the bear paw are striking on this piece. It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 900.00
Sarracino, Myron – Jar with Water Swirls and Avanyu Pattern

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. The imagery on much of his pottery is derived from pre-historic pottery designs. This jar has a more classic form with a high shoulder and elongated neck. The design on the jar is a water swirl, which has been painted with a fineline pattern. Separating the swirls is an avanyu design which extends upward.  Around the neck is a star pattern and a red painted cloud design.  The stars are again repeated near the base of the jar.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 425.00
Garcia, Tammy – “Parrot Box” Bronze, Artist Copy

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is carved in the style she carves in her pottery, with various depths and layers.  The parrot is surrounded by Pueblo designs along with plate motifs.  The imagery is certainly inspired by the parrots seen on Acoma and other Pueblo pottery. The piece is made to be hung on a wall or it can stand on it’s own.  The piece has a striking use of patinas to enhance the coloration of the bird and the berries!  The piece is signed on the side.  It is the “AC” or Artist Copy of the bronze.

$ 3,000.00
Sarracino, Myron – Four Color Star & Lightning Design Jar

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. This jar has a high shoulder and a more classic “olla” shape. There are are two bands using alternating colors (orange, red, white and black).  The colors are from various clay slips.  Separating them is a band of star patterns.  Below the lower band of color are four bands of lightning designs.  The variations of colored clay slips and black-and-white give the jar a very modern appearance.  It is nice to see Myron continue to add additional clay colors to his pottery.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is symbolically where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece and it is also a tribute to the potters who came before.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 350.00
Dunlap, Carmelita – Wide Shoulder Jar with Rain Patterns (1979)

Carmelita Dunlap is one of the San Ildefono potters best known for her large vessels.  This jar is smaller for her work, but highly polished and tightly painted. The design is a series of rain and prayer feathers patterns.  The feather patterns vary as the jar is turned.  The jar itself is highly polished and fired a brown-black coloration.  It is this distinctive coloration for which she was best known. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Carmelita Dunlap”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a smaller classic of her work!

$ 800.00
Gutierrez, Lois  – Polychrome Water Jar with Hummingbirds

Lois Gutierrez is one of the few Santa Clara potters who continues to create traditional polychrome pottery.  Each of the various colors is derived from natural clay slips.  They are then painted onto the vessel and note that there are more than 3 different clay colors, which makes it “polychrome”. This jar is a classic water jar shape with a low shoulder and a slightly turned out neck.  The neck of the jar is fully painted with two stylized hummingbirds and flowers.  Separating them are two old style birds which have rain cloud and lightning designs.  Below the shoulder are flowers.  The jar is traditionally fired, which adds to the complexity of the overall process!  Note on the bottom you can see a bit of color variation as a result of the heat of the firing!  The jar is signed on the bottom “Lois”.

 

$ 1,100.00
Moquino, Jennifer – Seedpot with Heron and Fish

This miniature is by Jennifer Moquino and her mother, Emily Tafoya.  Emily made the seedpot and polished it green.  Jennifer etched the Heron on one side and the trout on the other side. There is a lot of detail on something so small!  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  The seedpot is is signed on the bottom in the clay by both Jennifer and Emily.

$ 300.00
Lewis, Eric & Sharon Lewis – Jar Hummingbird & Dragonfly

This is a creative  jar by Eric Lewis and his mother, Sharon Lewis.  It is an exceptional collaborative piece.  Eric made the jar and painted the outlines of the dragonfly and the hummingbird. They are surrounded by the bold Acoma style lines which Eric paints.  Sharon, his mother, is known for her detailed painting on miniatures. She painted the very fine lines on the dragonfly and hummingbird.  Check out the precision of the painting of the lines and how they create another dimension to the jar!  They work well together!  The jar is signed on the bottom by both Eric and Sharon.   Eric remains one of the young Pueblo potters to watch!

$ 350.00
Lewis, Eric – Jar with Dual Butterflies

This is a creative  jar by Eric Lewis. The jar is coil built and has a lower shoulder and a slight neck.  The design has a butterfly on one side.  The wings of the butterfly and the surrounding area are painted with bold lines in a very graphic manner.  As the jar is turned, the opposite side has a stylized butterfly painted with Eric’s signature bold lines.  Eric has taken classic Acoma linear designs and made them both bolder and more graphic. The result is a striking jar with tightly painted imagery.  Eric remains one of the young Pueblo potters to watch!

$ 200.00
Naha, Tyra – Bowl with Turtles and Star

Tyra Naha is a daughter of Rainy Naha.   She learned to make pottery from her mother and continues to make traditional style Hopi-Tewa pottery in the style her grandmother, Helen “Feather Woman” Naha.  This bowl is coil coil built and painted with native clay slips and bee-weed (black).  The top and bottom have the classic Awatovi star design painted onto the surface.  On the sides are four turtles.  Each turtle has a medallion for its “shell”.  Note that each of the medallions has a different color of clay used for the stripes.  The bowl is traditionally fired and signed on the bottom with a feather and spider (Spider Clan ) and a “3” for being Third Generation of the Naha family.

 

 

 

 

$ 600.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Shifting Sand Jar with Silver Insets

The coloration on this wide shoulder jar by Preston Duwyenie is striking.  It is made from Hopi clay and stone polished on the neck and below the shoulder.   Around the shoulder of the jar it is carved in a natural manner to represent the sand in the desert and its constant movement.  The “sand” sections are matte with  just a bit of mica visible int he clay.  There are three inset pieces of silver, which have an additional “shifting sand” pattern.  The silver is cast against cuttle-fish bone (a type of squid).  This process creates a similar style of shifting sand design to complement the clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child as the hallmark for his name in Hopi.  Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

“Why the shifting sand designs? Preston says he remembers watching a smooth pebble caught in sand being shifted by the wind, “there was beauty in its isolation within the sea of sand. It was like an island.  The endless sands of time, and the fact that people, too are tossed about by the wind. There is always rippling in our lives”.

$ 1,800.00
Garcia, Tina – Red Bowl with Bear Paws

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plain ware Santa Clara pottery. This bowl is very round and has three bear paws impressd into the clay.  The bear paw are part of a story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  The bowl is fully stone polished and fired red.  It is signed on the bottom and  it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00
Zane Smith, Richard – “Ribbon” Corrugated Jar (1998)

This jar by Richard Zane Smith is a striking shape. It is coil built using very thin coils.  The coils are smoothed out on the inside but left exposed on the outside of the vessel.  This distinctive style of pottery  is a revival of the pre-historic concept of corrugated pottery.  The earliest corrugated pieces were often baskets which had clay applied to them and then fired, creating a “corrugated” appearance.  The small coils are used as part of the design and give the piece a textural feel.  On this piece the neck and base are both coiled in a similar wave style.  On the shoulder, there is a ribbon design which is etched into the clay.  The various colors are from clay slips.  The jar is from 1998 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 3,300.00
Tafoya, Emily – Green Seedpot with Corn Dancer Figure

Emily Tafoya was the wife of noted potter Ray Tafoya and is the mother of Jennifer Moquino. This seedpot is fully polished green and etched with a pueblo scene around the sides. The top has a Pueblo Corn Dancer figure wearing a tablita.  In her hands she is holding feathers.  All the various additional clay colors are added after the firing. It is signed on the bottom.

$ 200.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Seedpot with Butterflies (1987)

This miniature seedpot by Grace Medicine Flower is fully polished and incised.  The piece has a central medallion with four butterflies etched into the clay.  They are surrounded by flowers.  The remainder of the piece is fully polished.  The seedpot is from 1987 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.

$ 500.00
Ortiz, Virgil – “Tahu: Blind Archer” Water Jar, 1680/2180 (2007)

This is one of Virgil’s important vessels created within the context of his Pueblo Revolt 1680/2180 series.  The jar features Tahu, the head of the Blind Archers as the primary character.  Tahu is featured twice on the jar and the design separating her are the wild flower patterns. They have an organic style of flow as they encircle the jar.    The jar has the “spirit line” which is a break in the painting on the rim.  It has been traditionally fired and uses native clay, native clay slips and wild spinach (the black).  The piece is signed on the bottom  and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

$ 6,800.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Thunderbird Plate

This is one of the few plates we have had by Russell Sanchez.  The back and rim are polished with mica, as is the center medallion. The remainder of the piece is stone polished. The plate is designed with a Thunderbird, which was a design often used by his great-aunt Rose Gonzales. Russell said that he changed the design to match his style, with the lightning coming out of the mouth, the lightning for the feet and the central checkerboard pattern.  However, each of the designs elements are reminders of the work created at San Ildefonso in the 1920’s to 40’s.  The plate was traditionally fired and the last photo shows the firing process from red to the fire, then covered in manure (you can see the edge of the plate sticking out!), then after it was fired.  It has a wonderful black, nearly gunmetal surface.  Russell added hematite hei-shi beads in two bands along with a single piece for the eye.  It gives the piece a very modernistic appearance.  There are several views of the plate, as it was hard to either capture the design or the shine in photos!  The plate is signed on the back the clay, ‘Russell”.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 5,200.00
Antonio, Frederica – Large “Nine Design” Jar

Frederica Antonio is renown for her intricately painted pottery. Each piece is coil built and then finely painted. Her designs are a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines which are then filled in to create larger images in the squares.  This jar is a classic olla shape with a high shoulder and a sloping neck.  Frederica calls his her “Nine Design” jar.  The patterns are painted vertically and there are square cloud pattern descending from rim to base.  Separating them are various patterns of corn, rain, snow, lighting, stars and other designs.  The result is a piece which is varied as it is turned.  The level of complexity and time involved on the painting of this piece is extraordinary!  The result, however, is stunning with a dynamic appearance and movement to the designs.  The base of the jar is concave, reminiscent of historic Acoma jars which were carried on the head.  This combination of thin walls, classic shape and tightly painted design create a piece which is visually  stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,500.00
Antonio, Frederica – Large Jar with Polychrome Swirl Designs

Frederica Antonio is renown for her intricately painted pottery. Each piece is coil built and then finely painted. Her designs are a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines which are then filled in to create larger images in the squares.  This jar is a classic olla shape with a high shoulder and a sloping neck.  Around the neck the design is a geometric cloud pattern.  Frederica said that she painted it at an angle or swirl, which is always more difficult than just vertical designs.  The neck is black and white while the lower section is then painted with a similar design but highlighted with additional clay slips. Frederica noted that she painted the red first, then the ochre color and then had to go back over all the black lines again one more time!  The level of complexity and time involved on the painting of this piece is extraordinary!  The result, however, is stunning with a dynamic appearance and movement to the designs.  The base of the jar is concave, reminiscent of historic Acoma jars which were carried on the head.  This combination of thin walls, classic shape and tightly painted design create a piece which is visually  stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,500.00
Moquino, Jennifer – Black Clay Wolf Figure

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and also her amazing animal figures. This wolf is one of her larger figures and it is fired black and the back is fully polished.  It is realistically etched on the face.  The back of the piece is designed with a wolf track in the center.  Off to the sides are eagle feathers, rain and lighting and traditional Santa Clara mountain patterns.  The face is wonderfully realistic and as well the wolf tracks on the feet!   All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 450.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Double Melon Rib Indented Design Bowl with Lid

This is a double melon or “gourd” bowl by Russell Sanchez.  The shape is a very traditional form with a round body.  The top of the bowl has 16 melon rib indentions which are rounded out.  They are meant to have an organic appearance.  The bottom of the bowl has 16 more ribs!  The side of the bowl is slipped with mica and incised with a checkerboard pattern. He has inset hematite dots in between the rectangular checkerboard.  This style of design is often seen on historic San Ildefonso pottery from the early 1900’s.  The bowl was fired to a high temperature to create a nearly gunmetal silvery appearance.  The lid is fully polished with another single piece of hematite on the top. He also inlaid two band of hei-shi beads around the sides of the bowl.  The silvery black surface and the hematite create a very modernistic appearance on this traditional style of bowl.  It is fascinating how Russell has gone back to revive old style and create their modern versions.  He continues to creatively revive historic San Ildefonso designs with his innovative style of pottery.  The bottom of the bowl has the classic indention of traditional San Ildefonso water jars.  Russell uses these historic elements to keep them alive on his contemporary pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 5,800.00
Peters, Franklin – Large Bowl with Corrugated Rim

This is a large bowl by Franklin Peters.  He is known for his thin-walled pottery and use of traditional Acoma imagery on his pottery. The bowl is coil built with native clay and painted with native slips. The design is a classic Acoma pattern with rain and cloud designs.  Note the very thinly painted fine-line designs. The rim of the jar has an extra coil which he has then corrugated. Look closely and you can see the three small indentions as the top of each of the semi-circles.  Franklin said that he carved a piece of wood with the three indentions to use for making the rim of the bowl. They are to represent the rain coming down at sunset. It is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,050.00
Peynetsa, Jamie – Seedpot with Flame and Lightning Design

Jamie Peynetsa is the son of noted potters Anderson and Avelia Peynetsa.  Avelia, his mother, coil builds the clay vessel.  Jamie paints the design.  He has a strong attention to the detail of the painting as well as his inspiration from classic Zuni pottery.  This tall seedpot has a flame design around the base and a lightning pattern extending down from the opening.  The painting across the surface is bold and defined.  Note how well Jamie paints to match design and form.  It is signed by Jamie and his mother on the bottom.  At only 20 years old, he certainly has a great future in pottery!

$ 125.00
Gonzales, Cavan  – Black Clay Big Horn Sheep

This large clay Big Horn Sheep is made out of clay by Cavan Gonzales.  Cavan is a descendant of Maria Martinez and the son of Barbara Gonzales.  This piece is polished on the front and then mica slipped on the back.  It has been fired black.  The use of the Big Horn Sheep is a symbolic representation of one’s own self worth.  There are inset bands of hei-shi in turquoise and shell.  It is a striking contrast of matte and polished surfaces.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 800.00
Tenorio, Robert  – Large Jar with Seven Fish

This is a striking contemporary jar by Robert Tenorio.  The jar is painted with wild spinach (black) and red and copper colored clay slips.  The jar has a round shape and short neck. There are seven fish painted encircling the jar.  Each fish is different in design and use of different clays or just black on white.  The rim of the jar has a water motif.  It is a charming and tightly painted piece by his award winning Kewa potter.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Robert Tenorio, Kewa”.

$ 700.00
Gonzales, Cavan  – Red Clay Big Horn Sheep

This large clay Big Horn Sheep is made out of clay by Cavan Gonzales.  Cavan is a descendant of Maria Martinez and the son of Barbara Gonzales.  This piece is polished on the front and then mica slipped on the back.  It has been fired red.  The use of the Big Horn Sheep is a symbolic representation of one’s own self worth.  There are inset bands of hei-shi in turquoise, coral and shell.  there is also an additional inset piece of turquoise near the neck of the Big Horn Sheep.  It is a striking contrast of matte and polished surfaces.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 800.00
Whitegeese, Daryl  – Large Rainbow Ridge Water Jar with Bear Paw

This is a spectacular large water jar by Daryl Whitegeese.  Daryl said he was inspired by the shapes of the water jars made by his grandmother, Margaret Tafoya.  It’s not just the double shoulder, or rainbow ridge, but also the narrow neck which defines this jar. The jar is coil built and the rainbow ridge shoulder is always more complicated to make and keep the jar proportional. However, it is the added shoulder which gives the jar more reflective surfaces. The neck of the jar narrows in and then the lip is turned out. On the neck there is a single bear paw impressed into the clay. The bear paws represent a Tewa story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  This jar is fully stone polished to create the high shine.  It is a striking balance of form and polish.  It was traditionally fired black.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Definitely a classic piece keeping a family history alive!

 

$ 5,800.00
Whitegeese, Daryl  – Red Water Jar with Rain and Cloud Designs

Daryl Whitegeese is known for his use of classic Santa Clara forms and his amazing polished surfaces.  This jar is is a classic water jar with a around shoulder and an elongated neck. The jar is carved around the shoulder with series of designs which represent the clouds, mountains, rain and wind.  It is a striking use of imagery which depicts seasonal changes at the Pueblos.  The jar is very deeply carved and the edges almost feel sharp to the touch! The jar is polished a deep red and has been traditionally fired.  Note as well the rim of the jar, which almost seems to have a sharp edge, which is difficult to achieve with stone polishing the surface.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Daryl Whitegeese remains one of the exciting potter to revive traditional designs and shapes working today at Santa Clara Pueblo.

$ 5,100.00
Whitegeese, Daryl  – Oval Bowl with Avanyu

Daryl Whitegeese is known for his traditional style Santa Clara pottery.  He coil builds amazing shapes which are then carved and stone polished.  This shape is one of his technically most difficult.  This bowl is carved on the outside with an avanyu.  The water serpent (or avanyu) is part of a Pueblo story where the Avanyu saves the village during a flood.  The bowl has an avanyu which encircles the piece.  The rim is also fully polished to a sharp edge.  The oval shape is unusual but adds to the distinctive sense of this piece.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 2,700.00
Whitegeese, Daryl  – Carved Jar with Corn Plant Designs

Daryl Whitegeese is known for his deep carved pottery.  This jar has a low shoulder and a slightly turned out rim.  The body of the piece is carved with a distinctive design.  In one section there are two corn plants.  Above them is a rain (straight line) design and a rainbow.  On the opposite sides are the mountain and rain designs.  The carving on Daryl’s pottery is deep and with a very sharp edge. The jar is stone polished to a high shine and traditionally fired.  It is a great shape which shows of this classic imagery.  Corn is often depicted as a symbol for prosperity.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

 

 

$ 2,100.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Bowl with Painted Avanyu (1960’s)

This is a small bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1960’s.  The bowl is fully polished and painted with an avanyu.  The avanyu, or water serpent, is a classic of her design. Note the shape of the horn as well as the mouth.  A similar style of mouth is painted onto many of her pieces.  As the bowl is turned the body of the water serpent (avanyu) creates cloud and lightning designs.  While Margaret was known for her large vessels, why make something so small?  The reason is that potters of her generation would not ‘throw away” clay that was not used, but also not mix a large portion of it with the new clay.  So, when they were running out of clay, they would often make smaller vessels like this bowl.  It is also during the period of the 1950’s to 1960’s that she made most of her painted or “black-on-black” pieces of pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 650.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Jar with Reverse Carved Avanyu (1960’s)

This tall jar by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1960’s.  The jar is a classic shape with the tall shoulders. The design, however, is quite unusual.  It is a water serpent (or avanyu), which is carved in reverse.  Here, the avanyu is carved into four panels and you can see the the head and horn of each avanyu in reverse.  It is interesting that she would have created such an unusual variation on this classic design. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some wear on the rim.

$ 1,200.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Fully Polished Red and Tan Open Bowl (1980’s)

This is open bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1980’s.  The bowl has high walls and it is fully polished on the inside and carved on the outside.  This is one of the rarest styles of Margaret’s pottery.  The bowl itself has a lower round shoulder and a slightly turned out rim.  What makes it so rare is that she polished the outside red and the inside tan. The tan is created with water, so it is always difficult to polish and create a shine.  Margaret revived this red and tan style in the late 1960’s when she remembered how it was done at Ohkay Owinghe (San Juan Pueblo) from her youth. Today, there are only a few potters who are able to polish tan with such a high shine.  For Margaret, she did very few red and tan pieces, and they are always on very traditional forms.  Traditionally potters would polish the inside of the bowls before firing so that they would be usable.  However, over time this practice decreased as there was a great chance that it would crack in drying or polishing.  The added risk comes from putting all the wet slip on the inside of the bowl and hoping that it doesn’t cause cracks in the exterior.  However, the risk is often worth it as the polished interior of the bowl creates a striking appearance.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,400.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Fully Polished Open Bowl (1980)

This is open bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1980’s.  The bowl has high walls and it is fully polished on the inside and carved on the outside.  Traditionally potters would polish the inside of the bowls before firing so that they would be usable.  However, over time this practice decreased as there was a great chance that it would crack in drying or polishing.  The added risk comes from putting all the wet slip on the inside of the bowl and hoping that it doesn’t cause cracks in the exterior.  However, the risk is often worth it as the polished interior of the bowl creates a striking appearance.  What is interesting in this bowl is the shape, which is hard to capture in the photos.  It is round near the base and then just slightly indented just below the rim. This is so the bowl could be held, but it’s wonderful aspect to this piece.  This bowl is perfectly polished and fired to a deep black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is featured in the book “Born of Fire” The Art and Life of Margaret Tafoya”.

$ 1,950.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Red Bowl with Mountain Design (1980’s)

This deeply carved by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1980’s.  It is a classic shaped bowl with deeply carved mountain design. The design is repeated four times around the shoulder of the bowl.  The background area is slipped with the traditional cream colored clay. The bowl itself is  highly polished and fired a deep red.  Margaret’s work from the 1980’s is always distinctive as the pieces are typically smaller than in earlier years as she was in her 80’s!  However, the carving is often more complicated and the polishing is always exceptional.  This bowl is deeply carved and a great deep, red coloration.  As well, it is great to see her work in red, which is always more difficult to fire.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is also featured in the book, “Born of Fire: The Art and Life of Margaret Tafoya”.

$ 4,200.00
Early, Max – Large Jar with Rain and Mask Design

Max Early is one of the few traditional potters working today at Laguna Pueblo.  His work combines historic forms with a blend of contemporary and traditional designs.  This is definitely one of the larger jar he has made in a while with the very wide shoulder and sloping neck. It is a beautiful shape and note the sharp edge on the shoulder of the jar where it drops down and then extends up to the neck.  This is always difficult to create when coiling a piece. The designs are painted with strong lines.  One side, Max said it was meant to represent a katsina mask, with the circle being the nose and the eyes on either side.  The area below are pant designs. The bold swirls in red are classic for Laguna pottery.  The remainder of the jar has rain and plant patterns.  Note the variety of angles of the fine-lines, as they are not all vertical or horizontal but extending in different directions.  The complexity of overall design is certainly striking! The rounded bottom harkens back to the traditional Laguna pottery when the water jars were meant to be carried on one’s head.  Note as well his use of the various clays to create a “three color” jar!   The jar is also traditionally fired, which adds to the overall difficulty of the piece.  It is certainly exciting to see a potter who is inspired by traditional shapes and designs and yet has the artistry to create his own distinctive variation!

$ 2,400.00
Folwell, Susan – “Lizards and Roses” Bowl

Susan Folwell is known for her innovative and unique Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is entitled, “Lizards and Roses”.  For this piece the bowl is a dark brown on one side an there are etched roses and a lizard.  On the opposite side the bowl is fully etched with the Folwell family “x’s” and there are medallions with roses.  The roses are etched into the clay and highlighted.  The roses and the lizards There is a striking contrast of the colorations on the bowl and the various designs.  The bowl is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,900.00
Tafoya-Sanchez, Linda – Long Neck Jar with Feather Pattern and Avanyu

This is a long neck water jar by Linda Tafoya-Sanchez.  The jar is coil built, carved and stone polished. The design around the neck has 17 rounded feathers carved into the clay. Below the feathers is a band with the “walking bear paw” design.  This is a pattern which her grandmother, Margaret Tafoya, utilized in her pottery.  There are two avanyu (water serpents) encircling the piece.   Note the shape of the head of the Avanyu on her pottery with the square mouth.  That is the same shape as her father Lee used on his pottery and hers always remains a tribute to her art and pottery education.  Below the avanyu is a walking bear paw design and then finally a larger rounded feather pattern. The jar is deeply carved and very highly polished.  The complicated designs add to the dynamic appearance of the piece.  Linda is a granddaughter of Margaret Tafoya and the quality and creativity in her carving are readily apparent on this vessel!  It is signed on the base.

$ 3,200.00
Duwyenie, Debra – Seedpot with Hummingbirds

This seedpot was made, polished and incised by Debra Duwyenie.  The design has four hummingbirds, two butterflies and one rabbit.  They are surrounded by flowers and the top has a cloud design.  All the design work is etched into the seedpot before it is fired!  Few potters take the risk to etch their pieces before they are fired.  However, note the background gray area of her design and the vertical lines etched into the clay.  After the piece was fired, Debra “two-toned” it so that it is black and sienna.  The colors vary across the surface of the piece. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Debra”.

$ 675.00
Pacheco, Rose – Jar with Birds & Turtle

Rose Pacheco is the niece of potter Robert Tenorio.  He taught her how to make pottery.  The jar has two birds painted on the outside, along with flowers.  They are painted with wild spinach (black) and red and copper colored clay slips. The use of varied clay slips gives the jar a more dynamic visual appearance.  The inside of the jar has a turtle painted in the clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rose Pacheco, Kewa”.

$ 200.00
Sahmie, Jean – Canteen with Katsina Mask

Jean Sahmie is a daughter of noted potter Priscilla Nampeyo and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano. This canteen has a katsina painted on the front.  The tablita (headdress) is painted with a deep red clay and an orange clay, which is polished. The black is bee-weed, which is a plant. The canteen is traditionally fired to create the blushes.  It is nice to see such a classic Hopi design on the pottery!  The canteen is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one bit of wear on the red at the back of the spout.  It is signed on the back with her hallmark and a corn plant (for Corn Clan).  While Jean no longer makes pottery, there is a wonderful creativity in each of her pieces!

$ 500.00
Nampeyo, Fannie – Bowl with Rain Designs (1960’s)

This bowl by Fannie Nampeyo is a very classic bowl form.  It is from the 1960’s and it is polished on the outside.  The designs are series of rain patterns which encircle the bowl.  It is a simple series of designs but ones which were often used by Fannie’s mother, Nampeyo of Hano.  The bowl was traditionally fired creating the striking color variations on the surface.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom, “Fannie Nampeyo”. 

$ 400.00
Tahbo, Dianna – Jar with Bird Tail Designs (2001)

Diana Tahbo was known for her tightly painted pottery and especially her beautiful miniatures.  This tall jar is vertically polished and then painted.  The design has bird tails in two sections and bird wings in two others.  The jar was traditionally fired, which created the blushes on the surface.  The interesting thing about when she vertically polished her pottery (as well as when Mark did the same thing) is that the lines of the polishing are visible after the firing.  It adds one more layer of depth to the piece.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 575.00
Analla, Calvin – Jar with Stars & Rainclouds

Calvin Analla learned to  make pottery from his sister, Yvonne Lucas and her husband, Steve Lucas.  This unique jar is made from mixing two different types of clay together.  That creates the mottled appearance of the clay.  The jar has high sides and it is painted with a variety of raincloud and star patterns.  Note the very thin lines painted on the rain designs! It is a striking flow of design around the piece with lots of open areas but the mixed clays creates cloud-like swirls.  The jar is amazingly thin walled, which is typical of Calvin’s pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 375.00
Crank, Susie – Jar with Slanting Shoulder

Susie Crank is a daughter of Rose Williams and a sister of Alice Cling.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and amazingly, she says he may burnish a piece over and over as many as 15 times to get a high shine!  This jar has a high shoulder and a rather sloping neck.  The result of this shape is that the light reflects gently off the various surface angles! The jar is highly polished and then traditionally fired to create the fireclouds on the surface.  The colorations on this jar range from black to a deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery water proof.  Today, the pine pitch seals the vessel and gives it the shine.  This jar has a stunning shine and a great feel to the surface!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Susie Crank”.

$ 275.00
Cling, Alice – Large Round Shoulder Jar

This is larger round shoulder jar by Alice Cling.  The shape is elegant with the straight walls leading up to the rounded shoulder and then the opening.  The jar is vertically polished, which adds a dimension to the coloration in the firing.  The jar is polished a deep red and then outdoor fired.  The colors range from a dark black to a deep red and swirls in between. The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pine pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof. Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 475.00
Lewis, Sharon – Seedpot with 2 Raised Lizards and Painted Geometrics

Sharon Lewis has developed her own very distinctive style of design.  Her pieces are beautifully formed, thin-walled and then tightly painted.  This seedpot is complex in its designs. There is one lizard coming out of the top in relief. There is a second lizard coming out below the shoulder, also in relief.  On the top Sharon has painted a variety of Acoma style geometric rain and plant designs.  They are separated by sections with ladybug, ant and caterpillar figures.  All the various colors are from clay slips.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom.

$ 200.00
Folwell, Susan – “Feast Day” Long Neck Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series for, “Taos Light”.  This jar combines her love of Pop-Art with Pueblo imagery. Here there are two young women wearing tablitas on their heads for Feast Day  The area behind them has been left the natural color of the clay.  The shoulder of the jar has been indented, almost reminding one of the bread made during Feast Day in the horno ovens.  However, it is the base of the jar which is dynamic.  Susan has etched and carved into the clay with a series of rows which she has then painted to have the appearance of a stone mosaic!  Each band is a different size, as is each of the various squares and rectangles. The imagery here is evocative not only of the hei-shi beads and jewelry worn during Feast Day, but also the beauty of the stones and how when set in this manner almost seem to replicate the horizon.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

“Susan has been experimenting with textured surfaces, creating a “bejeweled” effect that looks like turquoise, coral, silver, and gold.”  “Taos Light”.
Native Art Magazine, April 2018

$ 2,600.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn – “Raincloud Dragonfly”, 10/65

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Raincloud Dragonfly”.  It is made in the style of her clay tiles.  The imagery is deeply carved into the clay before it is turned into a bronze.  This piece has a dragonfly in the center and it is surrounded by cloud patterns. The representation is both to the importance of water as well as the dragonfly being seen a prayer messenger.  The dragonfly on this piece has a red patina and there are blue for the water.  The piece is number 10 of 65 on the side.   It is signed and numbered on the bottom.  The bronze is mounted and framed.

$ 1,300.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn – “Cosmic Dragonfly”, 8/65

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Cosmic Dragonfly”.  It is made in the style of her clay tiles.  The imagery is deeply carved into the clay before it is turned into a bronze.  This piece has a dragonfly int he center with a talking bear paw to the side.  The circles represent the planets and the cosmic connection between the heavens and the earth.  The turquoise colored patina is used on the dragonfly.  The piece is number 8 of 65 on the side.   It is signed and numbered on the bottom.  The bronze is mounted and framed.

$ 1,300.00
Blue Corn –  Wide Bowl with Rain and Cloud Designs (1960’s)

Blue Corn is certainly one of the most creative potters of her time with a varied used of clays and firing techniques to create her distinctive pottery.  This is an early bowl which is fired a deep black.  It is painted with a rain and cloud pattern which encircles the piece. The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 450.00
Martinez, Santana & Adam – Plate with Seed Designs (1970’s)

This is a classic designed plate by Santana and Adam Martinez.  Adam was the youngest son of Maria Martinez, and Santana painted Maria’s pottery in the 1940-50’s. The plate is stone polished and it is painted with a mountain and seed design.  It was fired a deep black coloration.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Santana + Adam”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic piece!

$ 500.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn – “Pueblo Parrot”, 9/50

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Pueblo Parrot”.  It is stylized in much like the thick billed parrot, which was actually native to the New Mexico area in the past.  It also has connection to the Ancestral Puebloan bird figures created at places such as Chaco Canyon.  The bird is carved with a feather pattern on its back and mountain.  Autumn says she was inspired to create her parrots after a two-day excursion to Chaco Canyon. This piece is number 9 of 50. The colorful patinas give the piece a striking appearance.  It is signed and numbered on the bottom.

$ 1,900.00
Gonzales, Juanita – Large Jar with Avanyu (1930’s)

This is a classic shaped jar by Juanita and Wo-Peen Gonzales.  The jar is deeply carved with a water serpent encircling the piece. It is carved in the cameo style which Juanita learned from Rose Gonzales.  There are cloud designs extending down from the neck and the horn of the avanyu is stylized.  The jar is highly polished and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.    The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Juanita”.   It is great to find one of their pieces in such wonderful condition!

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 800.00
Namingha, Les – “Segment with Line Break” Acrylic Painting on Board

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Segment with Line Break”.  It is a painting on board using a acrylic. The piece has a texture in the “line break”.  First about the “line break”.  This might be seen as a “spirit line” used in pottery, which is a space in the painted line around the the neck of a jar.  In the pottery of Nampeyo of Hano, using a “line break” is often considered a hallmark of her pottery.  Interestingly on this piece, the line is impressed into the painting, so that it has a recessed feel!  The “segment” part of the painting are the four shapes (two triangles, one half circle and a trapezoid).  They are all shapes seen in the designs on Hopi-Tewa pottery.  Les has both minimalized them and used primary colors for them.  Much as they are the “primary” shapes, they are represented here in the primary colors.  It’s fascinating that such a small painting can have such a depth of context! It is signed on the front and also on the back.

$ 600.00
Namingha, Les – “Spiral” Acrylic Painting on Board

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Spiral”.  It is a painting on board using a acrylic. The piece has a textured background with linear impressed “grid”.  On top is an impressed spiral, which circles out from the center.  It’s a classic Hopi-Tewa design seen in everything from jewelry to pottery.   Les brought in this small painting, which certainly captures his creativity in even the most simplistic of styles.

$ 400.00
Cain, Linda – Jar with Carved Avanyu

This is a tightly carved jar by Linda Cain.  Linda is a daughter of Mary Cain and the mother of Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.  This jar is deeply carved with an avanyu (water serpent) which encircles the piece.  The avanyu is carved in sections and note how at the base of the carving there is the flow of the river.  The jar is fully polished and the background are is matte red. The jar is striking in coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,200.00
Chino, Rose – Jar with Birds (1980’s)

Rose Chino was a daughter of noted potter Marie Z. Chino. This jar is a more classic style of shape with the high shoulder.  It is painted with four birds (maybe quail) encircling the piece.  They are painted with bee-weed and the jar was traditionally fired.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rose Chino”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 450.00
Naranjo, Teresita  – Jar with Avanyu (1960’s)

Teresita Naranjo was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and know for her deeply carved pottery.  This jar is a piece of her pottery from the 1960’s.  It has her complex style of carving but not her carving into the negative space.  This was a style which would come later.  The avanyu encircles the jar and it is fully polished.  The background has the traditional cream colored clay slip.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita Naranjo” and it is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 375.00
Namingha, Les – “Hopi Bowl Design” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Hopi Bowl Design”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series. The painting is on board and it is framed.  The painting has a crackled back layer with a large Hopi bird painted on the surface.  The body of the bird is highlighted with various Hopi-Tewa designs.  The area around the bird is painted with pointilism dots and lines.  The background is striped.  Take a closer look at the second photo and you can see the crackling. It gives a feeling of pottery and clay with the acrylic.  Exceptional! Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 1,600.00
Namingha, Les – Spirit Birds Tall Jar

Les Namingha is one of those potters who continues to defy expectations in his innovative clay art.  This tall jar is an elegant shape with a high shoulder. Around the neck and the base, there are geometric patterns which are then highlighted with pointilism dots.  Around the center of the jar are a series of Sikyatki birds highlighted white.  Again, they each have smaller areas of pointilism dots.  The white and gray shading against the brown background creates the spirit bird concept.   Les continues to be excite us with each new piece and it’s great to see how he has brought such thought to one vessel!  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 3,000.00
Namingha, Les – “Patterns” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Patterns, Black on Bronze”. The painting is acrylic and metallic pigments on canvas.  I think in the photos don’t quite capture the texture of the background.  However, the painting is a series of very delicately painted bird wings which ebb and flow across the canvas.  Stepping back and various new shapes appear.  It is a striking use of a very classic Hopi design in a repetitive style to create a larger and more dynamic painting. I attached a few additional photos of the piece installed in the gallery.

 

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 4,000.00
Namingha, Les – Sunrise Birds Jar

This jar by Les Namingha a creative blend of designs by Nampeyo of Hano and his own.  The shape of the jar is round with an asymmetric rim. This shape has become a signature of Les’s pottery.  The birds painted in black and red around the shoulder are inspired by the birds painted by Nampeyo of Hano.  They longer part is the bird tail, the head is below and the wings.  It is interesting how she created almost a “Picasso-esque” style of bird by defining its parts and then putting them back together again.  Behind the birds are circles and lines.  Look closely at the circles and you can almost see other designs painted there, as if you are looking through a clouded window.  The triangular line is the mountains and below that the sunrise colors.  It is a striking piece and part of his “Urban Polychrome” series, of which Les says:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”  Les Namingha

$ 1,600.00
Namingha, Les – “Window in Time” Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Window in Time”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series.  The paining is graphite, ink pencil and wax crayon on paper.  It is a very dramatic painting.  The black lines form the window which presents the viewer looking out into the past.  Hopi-Tewa designs are painted boldly in clay colors while the other designs are simply outlines.  The further back one looks, the more (or maybe less) one sees.  Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 1,200.00
Namingha, Les – “Fancy Colors” Jar

This is a very intricately painted jar by Les Namingha.  He is one of those potters who continues to defy expectations in his innovative clay art.  He pulls from his artistic background as well as his Zuni and Hopi heritage.  His most recent work has pulled from Hopi imagery yet combined it in a manner which is modern in appearance.  Les says of this piece:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

On the surface of the jar there are numerous layers of design.  Pointilism, geometric shapes, bold forms and a variety of colors.  Each is layered one on top of another.  While it is hard to see in the photos, the bowl has some wonderful texture as well!  The final layer are the Hopi birds, painted in various styles across the surface.  One is red with dots and connecting lines, as if describing a constellation.  Another a bright yellow with small Hopi-Tewa designs painted onto the surface.  Suffice it to say, the more you look, the more you see!  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 3,600.00
Namingha, Les – “Raven & Crow” Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Raven & Crow”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series.  The paining is graphite, ink pencil and wax crayon on paper.  It is a very powerful and very dramatic painting.  The raven and crow are the top layer of design in black.  Look a bit further and there is so much painted behind them with other Hopi imagery and coloration.  Stunning!  Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 1,200.00
Namingha, Les – Swirling Hopi Birds Jar

This jar by Les Namingha combines a variety of Hopi style birds swirling around the top of the jar.  The birds are painted in various shades of brown and red.  They are painted against a white background which gives the piece a more classic appearance.  The bodies of each bird are tightly painted with various traditional Hopi-Tewa designs.  The bottom of the bowl is layers of banding as if to symbolize the layers of Hopi designs that are put one on top of another over the years.  The bowl is signed on the bottom.   This piece is part of his “Urban Polychrome” series, of which Les says”

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”  Les Namingha

$ 1,600.00
Namingha, Les – “Existence” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Existence”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series. The painting is on board and it is framed.  The painting is a powerful painting with various Hopi birds, shapes and designs.  Look at the top left and there is even one of his tiles!  The bold bird in yellow on top and the layers underneath require an in depth viewing of this piece.  Simply exceptional! Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 1,800.00
Namingha, Les – “Polychrome Abstraction” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Polychrome Abstraction”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series. The painting is on board and it is framed.  The painting is a dynamic overlay of various Hopi birds and designs.  Look closer and the initial layer of bird wings in turquoise color.  While not a huge painting it captures the strength of Les’s designs and the layering techniques. Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 2,000.00
Namingha, Les – “Hopi Star, Zuni Birds” Jar

This jar by Les Namingha combines both Hopi-Tewa and Zuni imagery. The jar is very intricately painted with a star pattern on the top and the bottom.  Complex variations of rain and checkerboard patterns create the star design. The sides of the jar have a stylized birds which have Zuni heads and bodies.  Again, there is a delicate painting of lines.  Note how the head and wings of the bird are flipped below to become the tail!  A beautifully painted and striking jar!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 3,200.00
Namingha, Les – Tall “Urban Polychrome” Jar

his small jar by Les Namingha continues as part of his “Lyrical” series of Nampeyo birds.  Les says of these pieces:

In the Lyrical Series, my goal is to work with various colors.  Sunrise, sunset, dusk, or other types of blending and washing of colors.  In complement to that I use various bird designs by Nampeyo of Hano. The birds are often painted in the style they appear on the pottery so they are more detailed and contrast against the colors behind them.

He is certainly one of those potters who continues to defy expectations in his innovative clay art.  He pulls from his artistic background as well as his Zuni and Hopi heritage.   This jar has his classic round shape and slight neck.  The background of the jar is painted in sunset or dusk shades of color. On the top are three birds inspired by the work of Nampeyo of Hano.  The birds are intricately designed with detailed Hopi geometrics making up their bodies and wings.  Around the shoulder of the jar is a triangular mountain pattern and below is band of Hopi rain, step and bird designs.  There is a classic style to the imagery on the shoulder of the bowl.  The bottom has a geometric pattern on a night-sky like coloration.  One can almost feel the birds getting in their last flight before the sun sets.  The bottom of the jar is signed.  This jar brings together a striking combination of Hopi imagery and Les’s distinctive painting.

 

$ 7,400.00
Namingha, Les – “Kiva Wall Painting” Jar

This is a very traditionally inspired jar by Les Namingha.  He is one of those potters who continues to defy expectations in his innovative clay art.  He pulls from his artistic background as well as his Zuni and Hopi heritage.  This jar is inspired by the classic Kiva wall paintings from Awatovi and other kiva ruins.  Here, one of the classic figures is the “mosquito man” and he is depicted with stalks of corn. Les has painted variations on each of them.  The designs below are pollen patterns. It is exciting to see how Les reinterprets such pivotal historic designs on his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 4,400.00
Cain, Linda – Mini Carved Jar with Feathers

This is a tightly carved miniature jar by Linda Cain.  Linda is a daughter of Mary Cain and the mother of Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.  This miniature jar is deeply carved with eight feathers.  The area behind the feathers is slipped with a micaceous clay. The feathers and the jar are all stone polished.  It is fired a deep black and signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 600.00
Folwell, Susan – “Buffalo Hunters”

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery. Her work in native clay but she is constantly experimenting with techniques and clays.  This jar is rag polished and it is both incised and painted.  Around the neck of the jar are a series of trains, each etched into the clay.  Above the trains are the Folwell family “x’s”, which here are symbolic for stars.  On the remainder of the jar there are horses stamped into the clay with ink and mica. However, the modernist take on this jar is the buffalo hunt itself. The horses take to the background and the buffalo are etched into the clay and then slipped.  The Buffalo Hunters are riding around on mopeds and motorcycles!  Susan has designed it all in a ledger art style.  Susan says the commentary is on the modernization of culture and maybe if the Buffalo hunters of the late 1800’s, shooting from the trains, had not nearly made the buffalo extinct, maybe the hunters of today would be on the mopeds.  The unique shape of the jar adds to the overall impact of the piece with the low shoulder and asymmetrical rim, are part of the innovative clay work in her pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,400.00
Naha, Tyra – Jar with Tumbling Parrots

Tyra Naha is a daughter of Rainy Naha.   She learned to make pottery from her mother and continues to make traditional style Hopi-Tewa pottery in the style her grandmother, Helen “Feather Woman” Naha.  This jar is coil built and painted with native clay slips and bee-weed (black).  The designs is a series of tumbling parrots. They are each painted with different clay slips to create the striking coloration.  The rim and base are a checkerboard pattern.  The jar is traditionally fired and signed on the bottom with a feather and spider (Spider Clan ) and a “3” for being Third Generation of the Naha family.

 

 

 

 

$ 800.00
Cain, Linda – Jar with Dragonflies and Flowers

This is a charming contemporary jar by Linda Cain. She is a daughter of Mary Cain and the mother of Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.  This detailed jar is carved with dragonflies and flowers. The dragonflies are slipped with mica while the flowers, extending up from the base, are polished.  The leaves of the flowers are also carved and then polished. The background area of the jar is painted with acrylic to create the blue dots of the sky.  They add a wonderfully modern aspect to this jar. The rim is also slipped with mica.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,200.00
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