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Bronze SculptureBronze Sculpture has been part of Pueblo Pottery innovation created by clay artists, such as Tony Da, Joseph Lonewolf, Tammy Garica, Autumn Borts-Medlock.   We often see various shapes reflecting their original art forms of Clay Pottery.  Bronze sculpture is a natural alternative for a pottery artist as they are accomplished in the art of clay form. The world history of bronze is steeped in the practices of several ancient civilizations including Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, India, Greece, and Rome. China’s Shang Dynasty is known for using the lost-wax casting technique and section molding to create larger statues. In these ancient Asian cultures, bronze was often used to produce small votive statues and ritual vessels, but the ancient Greeks were the first to produce full-sized figures. Western bronze statuary practices receded during medieval times, when most architecture and sculptures were made using stone and wood. The Renaissance sparked an interest in the practice and saw a rise in the technology used to make replicas of works. The Industrial Revolution further advanced these tools, allowing artists to create bronze sculpture in easy-to-produce editions. The most common method for making bronze sculptures is through the lost-wax casting process. Artists start by crafting a model of their sculpture in clay and mold wax on top of it. They add another clay layer before heating. When the wax melts away, they can add molten bronze in between the layers of clay. Once the art cools, the sculptor chisels away the top clay layer and scrapes the initial clay model away from the inside. To produce large bronze sculptures, artists cast the work in pieces before welding it all together. Finishing touches are applied to bronze sculptures after they are polished. Corrosive materials and other metals may be added to the surface to form a patina, while some artists opt for gilding the work. One of the earliest bronze sculpture is believed to be “The Dancing Girl of Mohenjo-Daro,” a piece dating back to 2500 BC. Greek artists including Phidias, Myron, and Polykleitos are credited with producing figurative bronze sculptures, many of which are now lost. Recognized bronze works from the Renaissance include Lorenzo Ghiberti’s “Gates of Paradise” on the door of the Florence Baptistry and Donatello’s infamous “David” (1440). Auguste Rodin is known for bringing an Impressionist touch to the medium, crafting works like “The Thinker” (1902) and “The Three Shades” (1886). Many copies of his works now reside as bronze garden sculptures. Constantin Brancusi is known for his highly polished bronze editions like “Bird in Space” (1928) and “Sleeping Muse” (1910). Other artists who worked with bronze sculpture include Edgar Degas, Umberto Boccioni, Henry Moore, Alberto Giacometti, Henri Matisse, Jasper Johns, Rowan Gillespie, and Jacob Epstein.

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Garcia, Tammy – “Seeded Woman I” Bronze.  Ed. 4/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is taken from a series of clay pieces which she made which were inspired by the paintings of Picasso.  The imagery is a Picasso-esqe woman sitting in a chair.  The piece has multiple layers and textures.  When asked about the name and the imagery, Tammy said:

“I thought about a definition of the word, “seed” which I had read.  It was, ‘A seed is the small, hard part of a plant from which a new plant grows’.  It made me think of women who came to the Southwest when the trains arrived in the 1880’s, or with the Fred Harvey Tours in the 1920’s.  They brought with them their past but became enamored with the Southwest or Native Culture. So on the bronze, the woman is sitting on a chair and the back of the chair is incised with Pueblo designs.  The side has areas which were inlaid hei-shi beads.  These women became the seeds of new interest in the area and culture. They spread this love of the Southwest just like a seed.  I called this, “Seeded Woman I”.  It is the first in this series to pay tribute to those how become aware of Native culture, respect it and spread their love of the art and artists to the world.”.

The piece has striking patinas to differentiate the various textures and depths of carving.  Much like her clay work, the piece is distinctive in style and yet very sharply defined.  This piece is 4/35 and it is signed and numbered on the bottom by Tammy Garcia. Simply a striking piece by one of today’s great potters with a lot of thought behind it!

$ 1,200.00
Garcia, Tammy – “Seeded Woman II” Bronze.  4/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is taken from a series of clay pieces which she made which were inspired by the paintings of Picasso.  The imagery is a Picasso-esqe woman sitting in a chair.  The piece has multiple layers and textures.  When asked about the name and the imagery, Tammy said:

“I thought about a definition of the word, “seed” which I had read.  It was, ‘A seed is the small, hard part of a plant from which a new plant grows’.  It made me think of women who came to the Southwest when the trains arrived in the 1880’s, or with the Fred Harvey Tours in the 1920’s.  They brought with them their past but became enamored with the Southwest or Native Culture. So on the bronze, the woman is sitting on a chair and the back of the chair is incised with Pueblo designs.  The chair itself is has a turquoise colored patina to represent the areas. The woman on one side has a hei-shi necklace and the other a turquoise colored necklace.  These are representative of how those who journeyed and continue to visit here have the culture become an integral part of their lives.  They have become seeds who spread their affection for the Southwest and Native art around the world.  I called this, “Seeded Woman II”.  It is the second in this series to pay tribute to those how become aware of Native culture, respect it and spread their love of the art and artists to the world.”.

The piece has striking patinas to differentiate the various textures and depths of carving.  Much like her clay work, the piece is distinctive in style and yet very sharply defined.  This piece is 4/35 and it is signed and numbered on the bottom by Tammy Garcia. Simply a striking piece by one of today’s great potters with a lot of thought behind it!

$ 1,200.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn – Red “Pueblo Parrot”, 10/50

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Pueblo Parrot”.  It is stylized in much like the thick-billed parrot, which was actually native to the New Mexico area in the past.  It also has a connection to the Ancestral Puebloan bird figures created at places such as Chaco Canyon.  The bird is carved with a feather pattern and on its back is a cloud and mountain design.  Autumn says she was inspired to create her parrots after a two-day excursion to Chaco Canyon. This piece is number 10 of 50. The colorful patinas give the piece a striking appearance.  It is signed and numbered on the bottom.

$ 1,900.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn – Blue “Pueblo Parrot”, 12/50

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Pueblo Parrot”.  It is stylized in much like the thick-billed parrot, which was actually native to the New Mexico area in the past.  It also has connection to the Ancestral Puebloan bird figures created at places such as Chaco Canyon.  The bird is carved with a feather pattern and on its back is a cloud and mountain design.  Autumn says she was inspired to create her parrots after a two-day excursion to Chaco Canyon. This piece is number 12 of 50. The colorful patinas give the piece a striking appearance.  It is signed and numbered on the bottom.

$ 1,900.00
Garcia, Tammy – “How the West was One”, Bronze, 1/9

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes.  What happens when one of her major pieces cracks before it is finished?  Tammy decided she would use the massive jar to create an equally massive bronze of her pottery.  The shape and design on this piece are striking!  The rim is carved and around the neck there is a feather pattern.  Around the body of the jar are carved bears with heartlines and avanyu. Mixed with these various designs are her classic stylized geometric patterns. The bronze has a silvery pewter-like metallic patina which gives the piece a classic look and yet still ties it to being metal.  Sorry about the “spinner” under the jar in the photos, but as you can imagine it weighs quite a bit and that made it easier to turn!  The piece is 1/9.  The final photo is one of Tammy at the gallery in Santa Fe last summer with the jar in its clay form before it cracked!

$ 16,000.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn  –  “Dragonflie’s Raindrop” Bronze, 4/26

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Dragonflies Raindrop”.  It is inspired by one of her clay vessels and it is carved with various styles of dragonflies around the surface. The circles surrounding the dragonflies are the raindrops.  The rim of the vessel is carved to have a mountain step pattern.  The base has kiva step designs. The coloration on the jar is from the patina.  The piece is 4 of 26.  It is signed and numbered on the bottom.

$ 4,150.00
Garcia, Tammy – “Parrot Box” Bronze, Artist Copy

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is carved in the style she carves in her pottery, with various depths and layers.  The parrot is surrounded by Pueblo designs along with plate motifs.  The imagery is certainly inspired by the parrots seen on Acoma and other Pueblo pottery. The piece is made to be hung on a wall or it can stand on it’s own.  The piece has a striking use of patinas to enhance the coloration of the bird and the berries!  The piece is signed on the side.  It is the “AC” or Artist Copy of the bronze.

$ 3,000.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn – “Raincloud Dragonfly”, 10/65

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Raincloud Dragonfly”.  It is made in the style of her clay tiles.  The imagery is deeply carved into the clay before it is turned into a bronze.  This piece has a dragonfly in the center and it is surrounded by cloud patterns. The representation is both to the importance of water as well as the dragonfly being seen a prayer messenger.  The dragonfly on this piece has a red patina and there are blue for the water.  The piece is number 10 of 65 on the side.   It is signed and numbered on the bottom.  The bronze is mounted and framed.

$ 1,300.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn – “Cosmic Dragonfly”, 8/65

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Cosmic Dragonfly”.  It is made in the style of her clay tiles.  The imagery is deeply carved into the clay before it is turned into a bronze.  This piece has a dragonfly int he center with a talking bear paw to the side.  The circles represent the planets and the cosmic connection between the heavens and the earth.  The turquoise colored patina is used on the dragonfly.  The piece is number 8 of 65 on the side.   It is signed and numbered on the bottom.  The bronze is mounted and framed.

$ 1,300.00
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