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Acoma Pottery

Acoma Pottery and Acoma Pueblo (Pueblo English Pronunciation: "Akk-uh-muh" Traditional Name: Haaku.) Acoma Pueblo is situated on top of a mesa, hundreds of feet above the surrounding land. It commands a breath-taking view of the countryside, other mesas and the distant mountains - no wonder it is called Sky City. Like the hillside towns of Italy, the location was chosen for protection from marauding enemies, but the incredible beauty of this panoramic view of the world must have had something to do with the decision for the Indian people have an intense visual sensitivity, which anyone familiar with their art can easily attest. Acoma, which means People of the White Rock, has been inhabited since before the twelfth century. Most of the present day people have residences in other parts of the reservation or in several farming villages but at no time is the Pueblo on the mesa without several families living in the old houses and caring for the Franciscan mission church of San Estevan, established in 1629 which, with the entire Pueblo has been proclaimed a National Historical Landmark. The ancient cemetery still stands outside the church, surrounded by an integrating wall surmounted by guardian heads. The thin walled and delicately decorated pottery of Acoma Pottery is among the most prized of Indian crafts. Many fine pieces are on display and for sale in the Visitors Center at the base of the mesa. The Center has a fine museum and features One Thousand Years of Clay, Pottery and History. San Pedro’s day is celebrated in June. St. James and the Corn Dances of Santa Ana’s day is in July.

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Garcia, Shana – Wide Jar with Yucca Designs and Bird Design Rim

Shana Garcia is known for her creative shaped and sculptural rim pottery.   Each piece is coil built and painted with yucca to create the long thin lines.  This large jar has a spiraling yucca or plant design extending up from the shoulder to the rim. The rim is sculpted with additional clay to create the bird wing pattern and additional yucca and rain patterns.  Shana said the shape of the rim is meant to represent the birds over the kivas.  It is striking how she is able to combine such traditional imagery with such a modern appearance!

$ 800.00
Sarracino, Myron – Long Neck Jar with Tularosa Swirl Patterns

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. The imagery on much of his pottery is derived from pre-historic pottery designs. The shape of this jar has a long neck and low shoulder. The design is inspired by the Tularosa black-on-white pottery made from 1150-1325 in the Chaco Canyon and southern Colorado areas. The neck has a lightning pattern painted with very fine lines.  The Tulrosa swirl comes up from the base. The black and white coloration remains inspired by the historic colors.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 475.00
Sarracino, Myron –  “Lightning Over the Mesa” Jar

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. The imagery on this jar is a classic lightning pattern over the mesas. The lightning pattern is painted around the top 3/4 of the ajr and the last section has a red for the earth and a painted mesa pattern.  The use of the red near the base in the design is visually striking.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 325.00
Victorino, Katherine – Jar with Lightning Design

Katherine Victorino is a daughter of accomplished Acoma potter Monroe Victorino.   She began making pottery at nine years old and attributes her pottery education to her step-mother Beverly Garcia.  Katherine says; “I started by filling in the lines for my step-mother, and gradually I learned the traditional methods of hand-coil construction and fine line painting (using only yucca brushes) well enough to make pottery full time at the age of twenty.”  Her pieces are coil built and painted with bee-weed.  This jar is an elegant shape with a high shoulder and a slight neck.  The jar is painted with a classic lightning pattern made famous as a revival design by Lucy Lewis. The intricate designs encompass the entire surface, creating a strong graphic appearance with the contrast of the black and white.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Victorino, Katherine – Jar with Turtle Shell Design

Katherine Victorino is a daughter of accomplished Acoma potter Monroe Victorino.  She began making pottery at nine years old and attributes her pottery education to her step-mother Beverly Garcia.   This jar is a classic water jar or “olla” shape for Acoma with a narrow base, wide shoulder and turned in neck.  The jar is coil built and the pattern is a turtle shell design.  It combines strong black and white graphics with fine-line Acoma painting.  Katherine says, “I started by filling in the lines for my step-mother, and gradually I learned the traditional methods of hand-coil construction and fine line painting (using only yucca brushes) well enough to make pottery full time at the age of twenty.”  The intricate designs encompass the entire surface, creating a strong graphic appearance with the contrast of the black and white.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Garcia, Shana – Jar with Bird Wing & Kiva Designs

Shana Garcia is known for her very thin walled pottery.  Each piece is coil built and painted with yucca to create the long thin lines.  This jar has a series of bird wing patterns as part of the overall design.  They swirl around the jar creating beautiful op-art imagery.  The rim of the jar is sculptured with three pieces of clay and a fineline bird wing pattern.  Shana said that this meant to represent the birds over the kivas.  It is striking how she is able to combine such traditional imagery with such a modern appearance!

$ 350.00
Victorino, Katherine – Jar with Butterflies & Flowers

Katherine Victorino is a daughter of accomplished Acoma potter Monroe Victorino.  She began making pottery at nine years old and attributes her pottery education to her step-mother Beverly Garcia.  Katherine says; “I started by filling in the lines for my step-mother, and gradually I learned the traditional methods of hand-coil construction and fine line painting (using only yucca brushes) well enough to make pottery full time at the age of twenty.”  This jar has a classic shape with the slope up from the base and the slightly indented shoulder.  The design is a series of flower motif connected with a four-part butterfly design. It encircles the entire surface of the jar creating a strong graphic appearance with the contrast of the black and white.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Victorino, Katherine – Jar with Zig Zag Design

Katherine Victorino is a daughter of accomplished Acoma potter Monroe Victorino.  She began making pottery at nine years old and attributes her pottery education to her step-mother Beverly Garcia.   This jar is a classic water jar or “olla” shape for Acoma with a narrow base, wide shoulder and turned in neck.  The jar is coil built and the pattern is a rain design but painted in a “zig-zag” manner. The resulting triangular patterns are visually striking on the jar!  Katherine says of her pottery,  “I started by filling in the lines for my step-mother, and gradually I learned the traditional methods of hand-coil construction and fine line painting (using only yucca brushes) well enough to make pottery full time at the age of twenty.”  The intricate designs encompass the entire surface, creating a strong graphic appearance with the contrast of the black and white.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Kasero, Sr., Robert – Seedpot with Red & Black Op-Art Spiral Design

This is an intricately painted seedpot by Robert Kasero.  It is very thin walled and painted with an “op-art” style of spiral mountain design.  It starts small at the top then enlarges as the shoulder and small again at the base.  It is dynamic in the flow of the tightly painted designs.  Note how the base of the seedpot is also indented keeping in the style of historic Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom. 

$ 650.00
Kasero, Sr., Robert – Seedpot with Op-Art Rain Design

This is an intricately painted seedpot by Robert Kasero.  It is very thin walled and painted with an “op-art” style of rain design.  It starts small at the top then enlarges as the shoulder and small again at the base.  It is dynamic in the flow of the tightly painted designs.  Note how the base of the seedpot is also indented keeping in the style of historic Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom

$ 550.00
Peters, Franklin – Jar with Star Design

This is a very intricately painted jar by Franklin Peters.  He is known for his thin walled pottery and use of traditional Acoma imagery on his pottery. The jar is coil built with native clay and painted with native slips. The design has a star pattern in each of the central medallions.  There is a cloud band above and below and small plant designs. The fully painted design is inspired by classic Laguna pottery but has a very modern appearance. The base and inside rim are painted red. The jar has an indented base which is reminiscent of historic Acoma pottery when water jars were made to be carried on one’s head!  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 350.00
Chino, Marie Z. – Large Rainbow Water Jar with Heartline Deer and Parrots (1970’s)

This is an exceptional large water jar by Marie Z. Chino.  The piece is from the 1970’s and it is a striking shape and design. The jar has a high shoulder and a straight neck.  The design is a series of alternating Heartline Deer and parrots.  Separating them is a rainbow design.  Note how the parrots are painted in red with no outline, as are the flowers.  The black areas include rain designs and fine-line patterns.  The shape of the jar and the designs are a perfect balance as the imagery flows across the surface of the piece.  It is easy to see with a jar of this quality in form and design why Marie Z. Chino is one of the great names in Acoma pottery!  The jar is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,800.00
Victorino, Katherine – Large Jar with Lightning Pattern

Katherine Victorino is a daughter of accomplished Acoma potter Monroe Victorino/  She began making pottery at nine years old and attributes her pottery education to her step-mother Beverly Garcia.  Katherine says; “I started by filling in the lines for my step-mother, and gradually I learned the traditional methods of hand-coil construction and fine line painting (using only yucca brushes) well enough to make pottery full time at the age of twenty.”  Her pieces are coil built and painted with bee-weed.  This large jar is an elegant shape with a high shoulder.  The jar is painted with a classic lightning pattern. The intricate designs encompass the entire surface, creating a strong graphic appearance with the contrast of the black and white.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,050.00
Lewis, Carmel  – Bowl with Lightning Design

This bowl by Carmel Lewis is certainly inspired by the work of her mother, Lucy Lewis. The bowl has a classic lightning pattern and it is separated by a linear rain design.  The black is painted with bee-weed (a plant).  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Carmel Lewis”.

$ 300.00
Lewis-Garcia, Diane – Seedpot with Polychrome Mimbres Animals

Diane Lewis is known for her tightly painted miniature pottery.  This miniature seedpot is intricately painted with polychrome Mimbres bug, flute player, butterfly and lizard.  OH, and the three headed bird!  Separating all of these Acoma style fineline geometrics.  It is an intricate piece for the size.  All the various colors are from natural clay slips.  It is an exciting modern interpretation of classic Acoma imagery.

$ 125.00
Lewis, Dolores – Lightning Design Seedpot

Dolores Lewis is a daughter of renowned potter Lucy M. Lewis.  Dolores i s known for use of classic designs.  This seedpot has a lightning design.  It is painted with bee-weed (a plant).  Lucy revived this design from historic Chaco Canyon pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 150.00
Lewis-Garcia, Diane – Seedpot with Polychrome Spiral

Diane Lewis is known for her tightly painted miniature pottery.  This miniature seedpot is intricately painted with polychrome checkerboard spiral. The hole for the seedpot is in the center and the red, orange and white sections spiral outward.  The additional colors are all natural clay slips.  It is an exciting modern interpretation of classic Acoma imagery.

$ 125.00
Lewis-Garcia, Diane – Seedpot with Hummingbird

Diane Lewis is known for her tightly painted miniature pottery.  This miniature seedpot is intricately painted with a hummingbird on top. The hummingbird is Mimbres in style and there are additional Acoma style geometric patterns.  The additional colors are all natural clay slips.  It is an exciting modern interpretation of classic Acoma imagery.

$ 125.00
Victorino, Katherine – Large Olla with Starburst Pattern

Katherine Victorino is a daughter of accomplished Acoma potter Monroe Victorino.  She began making pottery at nine years old and attributes her pottery education to her step-mother Beverly Garcia.  Katherine says; “I started by filling in the lines for my step-mother, and gradually I learned the traditional methods of hand-coil construction and fine line painting (using only yucca brushes) well enough to make pottery full time at the age of twenty.” This large jar is the classic Acoma olla shape with a high shoulder.  The jar is fully designed with a starburst pattern on the sides and a feather and geometric pattern at the rim and the base.  It is striking how she painted the design with such a flow across the surface of the entire piece.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,000.00
Victorino, Katherine – Jar with Tularosa Design

Katherine Victorino is a daughter of accomplished Acoma potter Monroe Victorino.  She began making pottery at nine years old and attributes her pottery education to her step-mother Beverly Garcia.  Katherine says; “I started by filling in the lines for my step-mother, and gradually I learned the traditional methods of hand-coil construction and fine line painting (using only yucca brushes) well enough to make pottery full time at the age of twenty.”.  This jar is thin walled and painted with a historic Tularosa Swirl pattern. This design is inspired by ancient pottery from New Mexico.  The swirl here has a stylized appearance and note the mountain design above the swirl. The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Patricio, Robert – Jar with Checkerboard Rain and Earth Design

Robert Patricio is known for his classic forms and use of both traditional and pre-historic imagery.  This jar is coil built and thin walled. It has a classic water jar shape with the high shoulder. The design is a series of squares which are painted with two different colors of red clay and then sections with fine-line designs. The fineline designs are the rain the red is the earth. The color variations and the swirl of the design around the jar from the rim to the base is stunning!   The base and interior rim are also painted with the traditional red clay slip.  Robert is certainly one of the leading traditional Acoma potters working today which is evidenced by his stunning forms and complementary designs.

$ 450.00
Sarracino, Myron – Long Neck Jar with Lightning Design

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. The imagery on much of his pottery is derived from pre-historic pottery designs. The shape of this jar has a long neck and low shoulder. The long neck is painted with a lightning design and there is a step cloud pattern at the rim. The design is a perfect match to the shape!  As well, it is one of the iconic designs for Acoma pottery and a revival by Lucy M. Lewis.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 525.00
Concho, Carolyn – Seedpot with Quail

Carolyn is well known for her beautifully painted pottery using Mimbres style figures.  This seedpot has a Mimbres style quail and the head is in relief from the surface of the piece.  It is surrounded by very tightly painted fineline and geometric patterns. All the different colors are from natural clay slips.

$ 75.00
Lewis-Garcia, Diane – Seedpot with Turtle

Diane Lewis is known for her tightly painted miniature pottery.  This miniature seedpot is intricately painted with a turtle on the top.  The back of the turtle is highlighted with the fine line and checkerboard pattern along with various clay slips.   Diane often combines traditional and contemporary Acoma designs.  All the various colors are natural clay slips.  It is an exciting modern interpretation of classic Acoma imagery.

$ 125.00
Davis, Titus – Heartline Swirl Bowl

Titus Davis is the son of noted potter Darla Davis and a cousin of Eric Lewis.  He creates coil built pottery that combines the classic fine-line designs with a modern approach.  This jar has a traditional form with a round body.  The fineline patterns encompass the surface of the piece.  There is a negative space “heartline” which extends down from the rim.  Just as the heartline is used in Acoma pottery for the various deer and animals, here it is incorporated to reflect the “heart” of Acoma imagery and the classic fineline designs.  The shape and designs work perfectly together.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 150.00
Davis, Titus – Heartline Swirl Jar

Titus Davis is the son of noted potter Darla Davis and a cousin of Eric Lewis.  He creates coil built pottery that combines the classic fine-line designs with a modern approach.  This jar has a classic shape with a high shoulder and a slight neck.  The fineline patterns encompass the surface of the piece.  There is a negative space “heartline” which extends down from the rim.  Just as the heartline is used in Acoma pottery for the various deer and animals, here it is incorporated to reflect the “heart” of Acoma imagery and the classic fineline designs.  The shape and designs work perfectly together.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 175.00
Lewis, Judy – Jar with Butterfly and Child

This is a charming jar by Judy Lewis.  She is a sister of noted potters Rebecca Lucario, Carolyn Concho and Marylyn Henderson Ray.  She is known for her figurative pottery.  This jar is intricately painted with traditional Acoma cloud patterns.  They are painted in black and red on a while surface. Top of the jar has a fluted rim and there is a small child and a butterfly in relief.  The side of the jar also a small ladybug in relief.   Note as well the little lizard painted on the rim!  It is a charming and highly detailed piece.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 250.00
Lewis, Judy – Jar with Butterflies and Lady Bugs

Judy Lewis is a sister of noted potters Rebecca Lucario, Carolyn Concho and Marylyn Henderson Ray.  She is known for her figurative pottery.  This jar is painted with intricate traditional Acoma rain and cloud patterns.  Interspersed between the designs are ladybugs and butterflies. They are in relief giving the jar added dimension.  The jar is signed on the bottom and there is certainly a charm in the designs and intricacy of Judy’s pottery.

$ 180.00
Chino, Grace – Jar with Rain and Lightning Designs (1970’s)

Grace Chino was a daughter of noted potter Marie Z. Chino and a sister of noted potters Carrie Chino Charlie and Rose Chino. Over the years she won numerous awards for her pottery at Santa Fe Indian Market and her work was featured in the “7 Families in Pueblo Pottery” and in museums around the country.  This small jar has a classic rain and lightning design.  It is painted with bee-weed (black) and a red clay slip.  The jar was traditionally fired and it is signed on the bottom.  It is from the collection of Richard Spivey, known for his books on Maria Martinez.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair but some wear on the rim.

$ 125.00
Torivio, Dorothy – Large Long Neck Jar with Yucca Designs

This is certainly one of the most famous shapes made by Acoma potter Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  She created this particular shape to emphasize the “op-art” painted designs so that the neck would have the smallest designs and the shoulder the largest. The form intensified her intricate painting.  The designs on this jar are yucca leaves, which are used in the painting of the designs. The white slipped clay and the tightly painted designs give the piece a strong visual appearance.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,000.00
Torivio, Dorothy – Tall Jar with Butterfly Designs

This is a distinctive shape jar by Acoma potter Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  This shape creates a large surface area for the butterfly designs.  The neck is painted the traditional red coloration, while the remainder is black on white.  The jar captures her “op-art” style with increasing and diminishing sizes of butterfly designs.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,500.00
Chino, Grace – Miniature Wedding Vase with Heartline Deer (1971)

Grace Chino was a daughter of noted potter Marie Z. Chino and a sister of noted potters Carrie Chino Charlie and Rose Chino. Over the years she won numerous awards for her pottery at Santa Fe Indian Market and her work was featured in the “7 Families in Pueblo Pottery” and in museums around the country.  This is a miniature wedding vase with a heartline deer on both sides.  It is from the collection of Richard Spivey, known for his books on Maria Martinez.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 90.00
Chino, Grace – 4 Mini Animals – Skunks, Chicken, Owl (1974)

Grace Chino was a daughter of noted potter Marie Z. Chino and a sister of noted potters Carrie Chino Charlie and Rose Chino. Over the years she won numerous awards for her pottery at Santa Fe Indian Market and her work was featured in the “7 Families in Pueblo Pottery” and in museums around the country.  This is a group of four mini animals.  There are two skunks, one owl and a chicken! They are all signed, “G. Chino”.  Each is from the collection of Richard Spivey, known for his books on Maria Martinez.  They are each in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 125.00
Lewis, Lucy – Bowl with Bird Wing Design (1970’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the past century. This bowl uses more classic style Acoma imagery. It has the rain (lines), lightning and cloud (black triangular areas) patterns encircling the bowl.  It has been native fired and has a beautiful coloration to the white clay slip.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.  The black for the design is derived from bee-weed, which is a local plant. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 800.00
Garcia, Tema – Seedpot with Plant Design

Tena Garcia is a daughter of Rose Chino  Garcia and a granddaughter of noted potter Marie Z. Chino. This small seedpot has a stylized version of the red and white plant/butterfly design made famous by Marie Z. Chion. The seedpot has a flat for and the design is painted on the top.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The bowl comes to us from the collection of Richard Spivey.

$ 100.00
Sale!
Antonio, Frederica – Large Jar with Rug Bands and Diamond Design Rim

Frederica Antonio is renown for her intricately painted pottery. Each piece is coil built and then finely painted. Her designs are a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines which are then filled in to create larger images in the squares.  This jar is a classic olla shape with a high shoulder and a sloping neck.  Around the neck the design is a series of diamonds which are painted at an angle.  They are intricate and beautifully painted.  The body of the jar has star patterns above a mesa design.  Separating each of these sections is a band of cloud designs which are highlighted in red clays.  They create a striking visual contrast between the black and white on the remainder of the jar.  The classic Acoma shape also lends itself beautifully to this modern imagery.  The base of the jar is concave, reminiscent of the historic Acoma water jars that were carried on the head.   The combination of the thin walls and the tightly painted designs on her work is simply perfect and visually stunning!  Interestingly, Frederica said that she traditionally fired this jar instead of using an electric kiln.  It doesn’t have much of a different appearance to the white than one that is kiln fired.

$ 2,400.00 $ 1,800.00
Sale!
King, Charles S., “Spoken Through Clay”

Spoken Through Clay

A NEW  RELEASE SPECIAL:  $95.00, including shipping (US)! Check out the new review in the Denver Post!

 Just a few things which make this book unique!
*   The size!  The book is 11.75″ x 14.25″ and weights over 8 pounds!
*  The photography of the pottery is stunning, emphasizing the individual pieces.
*  Each caption is the artist discussing the individual piece on the page.
*  The artist “biographies” are from interviews with the artists and they discuss their art, culture, lives and history.
*  Organization: The book is not organized by pueblo or family, but entails new ways to think about the future of Native pottery.
*  Printing in Italy gives the book very high quality color and paper.
* The photos of the living artists were taken by Will Wilson using a tin-type process. He was a recipient of the 2107 New Mexico Governor’s Award for the Arts in photography!
*  The book features work by more than 30 contemporary potters and more than a dozen important historic potters.
*  There are essays by myself, Peter Held and Eric Dobkin.  They add to the overall understanding of the project a historic perspective.

_____________________________________________

August 18, Pasatiempo Review

“Charles S. King’s new book, Spoken Through Clay: Native Pottery in the Southwest, The Eric S. Dobkin Collection, is spectacularly heavy —which is a problem from a practical standpoint, because once you open it, you won’t want to put it down. With dreamy tintype artist portraits by Diné photographer Will Wilson, dazzlingly crisp images from Addison Doty, and intimate first-person essays written by dozens of artists, the book is a visually delicious, intellectually consuming foray into historic and contemporary Southwestern pottery. In short, prepare to swoon.

If you’re thinking of this as a coffee-table book, you’ll need to imagine a decently sized coffee table. The book is more than a foot tall and, when opened, two feet wide, but its outsize appearance belies the often delicate beauty of its contents: hundreds of individual pieces of pottery from Eric S. Dobkin’s exquisitely curated collection — arguably the largest and most important of its kind. Gallery owner, author, and Pueblo pottery expert King designed Spoken Through Clay to be approachable for those unfamiliar with Native American pottery. “In the age of social media, I wanted to make the book both visually striking and personal,” King said. The book opens with essays by King, Dobkin, and curator Peter Held, who calls clay “the most archival of materials … seductive, sensuous, responsive, geologic, and malleable.”

“I wanted the end result of the book to be that the reader would connect with the artists in a personal way, beyond just the art, and understand the time it takes to become an artist, to achieve success,” King said. Sprawling yet intimate, Spoken Through Clay introduces its readers not just to the beauty of Southwestern pottery but also to the fascinating stories of the people who make it.Iris McLister, Pasatiempo

____________________________________

“It’s one of the things that makes us who we are. It’s what holds our family together. We are a family of potters. It’s our identity. People don’t realize how much work goes into it just processing the clay and making it. You have to do it with your heart.”—Linda Tafoya-Sanchez

 

FEATURED ARTISTS Grace Medicine Flower • Dextra Quotskuyva • Autumn Borts-Medlock • Jody Naranjo • Harrison Begay Jr. • Jordan Roller • Sara Fina Tafoya • Lonnie Vigil • Margaret Tafoya • Steve Lucas • LuAnn Tafoya • Loren Ami • Toni Roller • Popovi Da • Linda Tafoya-Sanchez • Mark Tahbo • James Ebelacker• Yvonne Lucas • Jeff Roller • Lisa Holt • Harlan Reano • Nampeyo • Jacquie Stevens • Nathan Youngblood • Jacob Koopee Jr. • Jennifer Moquino • Christopher Youngblood • Maria Martinez • Tony Da • Tammy Garcia • Virgil Ortiz • Joseph Lonewolf • Johnathan Naranjo • Nancy Youngblood • Les Namingha • Russell Sanchez • Christine McHorse • Richard Zane Smith • Rondina Huma • Susan Folwell • Dominique Toya • Jody Folwell

Spoken Through Clay features the pottery of iconic Native American artists from historic potters Nampeyo and Maria Martinez, to contemporary potters Tammy Garcia, Virgil Ortiz, and many others, are featured in a new book published by the Museum of New Mexico Press. Spoken Through Clay: Native Pottery of the Southwest showcases nearly three hundred pottery vessels from the acclaimed Eric S. Dobkin Collection, covering a wide range of mostly Pueblo artists from the Southwest.

“The physical scale of the vessels combined with the depth of the contemporary collection [is] breathtaking,” says author Charles S. King. The book is part of a “transitional process of looking to the clay, the vessel, and the potter’s voice and allowing the pieces to stand on the merit of their artistic integrity.”

The book includes portraits and voices of renowned potters speaking about their artistry and technique, families, culture, and traditions. Many of the artists are connected by Pueblos, generations, or family members. Dynamic color photography captures the depth and dimension of the pieces, while the artists provide an illuminating perspective through narrative captions. Artists, academics, collectors, family members, and gallerists add additional insight about the lives, historical context, and importance of these potters and their work.

SPOKEN THROUGH CLAY Native Pottery of the Southwest The Eric S. Dobkin Collection
By Charles S. King Essay by Peter Held

Artist portraits by Will Wilson
ISBN: 978-0-89013-624-9

352 pages, 320 color plates, 40 artist portraits

Publication Date: August 01, 2017
ABOUT THE AUTHOR Charles S. King is the author of Born of Fire: The Life and Pottery of Margaret Tafoya, The Life and Art of Tony Da, Virgil Ortiz: Revolt 1680/2180, and numerous articles on Pueblo pottery. He has served on boards of art associations, judged pottery at prestigious events, and lectures about the art form. His business King Galleries represents many of today’s leading Native potters and important historic works in clay. Charles lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

$ 125.00 $ 95.00
Garcia, Jessie – Very Large Owl Figure (1970’s)

Let’s just start with this owl figure being almost 12″ tall!  Jessie Garcia is one of the great names in Acoma pottery.  Between 1950 and 1970, she along with Lucy Lewis and Marie Z. Chino, led the revival of Acoma pottery.  There is a history of owl figures at Acoma but most are smaller and few are as detailed as the work by Jessie Garica.  This large owl is coil built and hollow.  It is painted with the red clay slip and bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired. The owl is signed under the wing.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is an excellent piece of her figurative pottery.

 

 

$ 1,200.00
Garcia, Sarah – Fineline Bowl (1970’s)

Sarah Garcia (1928-2015) was born at Laguna Pueblo to Maria Trujillo.  However, she spent her adult at Acoma Pueblo.  She, along with Jessie Garcia, Lucy M. Lewis, and Marie Z. Chino, were largely responsible for the revival of Anasazi and Tularosa designs on contemporary Acoma vessels.  Her daughter Goldie Hayah continues making pottery.  This is a classic Acoma jar with very tightly painted fineline patterns.  Note how the fine lines create interlocking patterns.  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Sarah Garcia”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 475.00
Keene, Adrianne – Corrugated Seedpot with Fine Line Star

Adrianne Roy-Keene is known for her intricately painted and carved miniatures. This seedpot is painted on the sides with a black and fine-line star pattern.  This design is derived from classic Acoma pottery.  The top, however, is her hallmark pattern.  It is carved with a series of triangular corrugated patterns which get smaller as they approach the mouth of the piece.  It is amazing how detailed it is for the size!  The piece is signed on the bottom with her name inside a feather hallmark.

$ 375.00
Peters, Franklin – Large Olla with Fineline Star Patterns

This is a visually striking larger jar by Franklin Peters.  He is known for his thin walled pottery and use of traditional Acoma imagery on his pottery. The shape is one of the classic forms of Acoma pottery. The high shoulder and the slight rim create the “olla” form. The jar is fully painted with a fineline interlocking star pattern.  Each star connects to the next. Note how they are all at an angle, which emphasizes the shape of the jar.  The entire piece is coil built and painted with a yucca brush!  The rim of the jar is painted black and has the traditional painted spirit line.  There is also an indented base which is reminiscent of historic Acoma pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,800.00
Sale!
Paquin, Gladys – Large Jar with Triple Rainbow

Gladys Paquin is one of the revivalist potters of Laguna Pueblo.  Each piece is coil built, painted with bee-weed (black) and native clay slips and traditionally fired.  This large jar is one of her most classic designs.  The jar itself is thin walled and an exceptional form.  However, it is the polychrome rainbow pattern which is considered her most complicated and elegant design.  This jar has three interlocking rainbow pattern which encompass the surface of the piece. They are painted with two different clay slips and the brownish red color is polished.  This creates a visual contrast between the polished and matte surfaces.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Gladys Sratyu’we Paquin”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,600.00 $ 2,000.00
Lucario, Rebecca – Seedpot with Lizards

Rebecca Lucario is known for her delicate and intricately painted pottery.  This seedpot is a smaller piece of her pottery, but very creatively designed.  There are lizards on one half of the piece and the opposite side is impressed with dots, to represent the sand.  There is almost a corrugated feel to the surface of the white area of the seedpot.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom.

$ 225.00
Natseway, Thomas – Mini 3 Lobe Jar with Bear Handles

Thomas Natseway is one of the most renown miniaturists in Pueblo pottery.  Rarely does he make a piece which is over 1″ tall or wide!  This jar is inspired by the Acoma pottery canteens.  The jar has three round sections and there are tiny bear “handles” on the top!  Both sides are painted with very intricate geometric patterns. One side has cloud patterns and the other water.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 150.00
Torivio, Dorothy – Tall Jar with Star Pattern

Dorothy Torivio was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  This is a very striking design for her pottery.  The imagery is a series of start.  The white slipped clay and the tightly painted designs give the piece a strong visual appearance.  The shape is perfect for her pottery as it shows off all the design!  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is great to see one of her pieces this size again!

$ 1,550.00
Lewis-Garcia, Diane – Jar with Butterfly Design and Handles

Diane Lewis is known for her tightly painted miniature pottery.  This is a larger piece of her pottery with a water jar form.  It is fully painted with a classic op-art butterfly pattern.  The jar has hands on both sides as the “handles”.  It is a striking combination of both form and design.

$ 575.00
Garcia, Jessie – Very Large Owl Figure with Moon Eyes (1970’s)

Jessie Garcia is one of the great Matriarchal revivalist potters of the 1970’s. Between 1950 and 1970, she along with Lucy Lewis and Marie Z. Chino, led the revival of Acoma pottery.  There is a history of owl figures at Acoma but most are smaller and few are as detailed as the work by Jessie Garica.  This large owl is coil built, hollow and very light!  It is painted with the red clay slip and bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired. The entire surface is fully painted to create the feathers and the eyes are painted with the reflection of the moon.  The owl is signed under the wing.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is an excellent piece of her figurative pottery.

 

 

$ 1,200.00
Natseway, Charmae – Lidded Cylinder w/ Bird & 2 Lizards

Charmae Natseway is known for her exceptional painted pottery and use of distinctive forms. This wonderful seedpot is a cylinder form with perfectly formed sides!  The design is a bird and two lizards. The piece is very intricately painted. All the colors are from natural clay slips.  On the top of the piece there is a carved stopper along with painted designs.  The designs are painted with the four different colors she uses on her pottery.  It is a striking balance of traditional and historic imagery on a very modern form.

$ 425.00
Torivio, Katherine – Mini Seedpot with Star Pattern

This is a miniature seedpot by Katherine Torivio.  The seedpot has a star pattern on top and the remainder is fully painted with fine-line star pattern.  Note the delicate lines throughout the entire piece!  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 100.00
Early, Max – Jar with Fine-Line Patterns

Max Early is one of the few traditional potters working today at Laguna Pueblo.  His work combines tradition forms with a blend of contemporary and traditional designs.  This jar is inspired by an older Laguna jar with fine-line patterns.  The center of the jar has  bold geometric forms which are painted with lines.  The lines are both red and black. They are separated by cloud and mountain patterns.  The neck of the jar has cloud and rain forms along with small corn designs.  The jar is a beautiful shape with a slightly elongated neck and a rounded base. The the rounded bottom harkens back to the traditional Laguna pottery when the water jars were meant to be carried on one’s head.  Note as well his use of the various clays to create a “three color” jar!   The jar is also traditionally fired, which adds to the overall difficulty of the piece.  It is certainly exciting to see a potter who is inspired by traditional shapes and designs and yet has the artistry to create his own distinctive variation!

$ 1,800.00
Natseway, Charmae – Seedpot with Rabbits

Charmae Natseway is known for her exceptionally painted pottery and use of distinctive forms. This is one of her few traditional style seedpots.  The piece is a flat shape and very delicately painted.  There are four Mimbres inspired rabbits as the design.  All the different colors are derived from natural clay slips.  They are surrounded by fineline and geometric patterns.  Charmae is both an exceptional potter and also among the best Acoma painters.  The fine lines and precision of her imagery is always a perfect match of form and design.

$ 375.00
Natseway, Charmae –  Seedpot with 4 Birds

Charmae Natseway is known for her exceptionally painted pottery and use of distinctive forms. This is one of her larger traditional seedpots.  The central design is a classic fine-line star pattern.  Surrounding the central star are four different Acoma style  birds.  Each of the birds are classic images seen on historic Acoma pottery.  They are surrounded by plant and flower motifs.  Charmae is both an exceptional potter and also among the best Acoma painters.  The fine lines and precision of her imagery is always a perfect match of form and design.

$ 550.00
Aragon, Dolores – Mini Seedpot with Flower Design

Dolores Aragon is known for her miniature pottery. This small seedpot is painted with a flower pattern on the top. The design extends outward with additional flower petals.  While it is small, it is beautifully painted!  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 150.00
Natseway, Charmae – Canteen with Avanyu & Lizards

Charmae Natseway is known for her exceptionally painted pottery and use of distinctive forms. This canteen is an oval shape and has has added a corn cob for the stopper.  The sides are painted with lizards on one side and an old style Mimbres avanyu (water serpent) on the other.  There are additional colors on the lizards which are derived from natural clay slips.  Charmae is both an exceptional potter and also among the best Acoma painters.  The fine lines and precision of her imagery is always a perfect match of form and design.

$ 400.00
Lewis-Garcia, Diane – Seedpot with Butterflies

Diane Lewis is known for her tightly painted miniature pottery.  This miniature seedpot is intricately painted with swirl design that extends out from the top.  There is one section with intricately painted butterflies.  The  remaining sections combine both fine-line designs and various colors.  Diane often combines traditional and contemporary Acoma designs.  All the various colors are natural clay slips.  It is an exciting modern interpretation of classic Acoma imagery.

$ 95.00
Lewis-Garcia, Diane – Oval Seedpot with Fish

Diane Lewis is known for her tightly painted miniature pottery.  This is one of her distinctive oval seedpots.  The piece is painted on the top with two Mimbres style fish. Each of the fish are painted with fine-line patterns and various colors of clay slips . The two fish are separated by a swirling checkerboard pattern.  For a smaller piece, it is amazingly intricate!  All the various colors are natural clay slips.  It is an exciting modern interpretation of classic Acoma imagery.

$ 135.00
Early, Max – “Ears of Corn: Listen” Book of Poetry

Congratulations to Max Early for the publication of his first book of poetry.  Max is a well known potter but also quickly become as famous for his poetry!

We currently have signed copies in the gallery!

“In Ears of Com: Listen, Native American potter and poet Max Early gracefully details both the everyday and the extraordinary moments of family and community life, work and art, sadness and celebration at the Laguna Pueblo of New Mexico.With in the four seasons-Ty’ee-Tro, Kushra-Tyee,Heyya-Ts’ee, and Kooka—the beauty of Early’s writing beckons the reader to accompany him on the journey between ancient and modern times.Including an historical Preface by the author,an Introduction by Simon J. Ortiz, and photographs of Early’s family and award-winning art, this debut poetry book is profound in its welcome and its teachings.

 ‘Early’s poems take us into the cultural continuum of a contemporary Laguna Pueblo artist. Each poem is pottery of words, complete with designs to bring rain, to remember and praise the earth and sky path we humans travel. Early’s poems are earthy, real and compelling. I keep hearing them, like songs emerging from the creative earth.”

-Joy Harjo, “Crazy Brave”, Mvskoke poet and musician

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‘We are thankful for these poems that cup us through the seasons,past the drought f a spiritual slumber. Like a weathered olla recalling the hold of cold water,we are replenished and bathed anew.We should heed our want and need to the bounty of their beauty and submit ourselves to the lessons therein. Shhh…the poems are speaking:Listen!”

-Levi Romero, “A Poetry of Remembrance and In the Gathering of Silence”, New Mexico Centennial Poet

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‘Poetry and pottery are art forms simultaneously ancient and yet made for the moment. The words flow like coils of clay to surround the reader and build a vision of the mind and soul of the poet. Potter Max Early’s poetry in ‘Ears of Corn: Listen” reveals much about life in his native Laguna Pueblo. More importantly it gives a modern voice to an ancient culture making it relevant for both a new generation and also those outside the Pueblo. The poems tell his story of how, “Breaking gender taboos didn’t turn me to stone” and the delicate balance he finds between embracing modernity and reveling in the past. The use of native Laguna words adds grace to the poems, much like a perfectly painted vessel; they lyrically draw the eye, create balance and provide a connection to the viewer. Not only is Max’s collection of poems worth a read, but a second read as well. The first time they may just seem pretty, but the second time the novelty is gone and the substance remains. Much like Max’s pottery.’
Charles S. King, Author of “Born of Fire: The Pottery of Margaret Tafoya” and “The Life and Art of Tony Da”

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Max Early was born into a tradition of potters and clay. He creates traditional pottery in order to help save the art of pottery making in Laguna Pueblo.When hbegan to focus on writing, he continued his passion for celebrating his family, culture, language,and the enchanting New Mexico landscape.

Honors and awards for Early in pottery include a Fellowship from the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts;a Native American Community Scholar Appointment: Office of Fellowships and Grants,Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; the Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market judge’s Award in Sculpture; the Gallup Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial-First in Effigies/Special Elkus Memorial Award; and the Santa Fe Indian Market-First in Traditional Pottery/Wedding Vases.

$ 25.00
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