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Zuni Pueblo. English Pronunciation: "Zoo-nee" Traditional Name: SHE-WE-NA A Zuni Legend tells the story of the parrot and the crow, each of whom presents and egg to the Zuni women to decide which one they will keep. The women choose the egg of the crow because of its wonderful turquoise color. The Zuni love of color is reflected everywhere in the3ir daily lives, as well as in their ceremonies. While comparatively little pottery is made by Zuni craftsmen, they have a tradition of beautiful work in clay and still use their work in ceremonies. The murals of Alex Seowtewa in the Mission Church of Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe in the plaza of the Pueblo are remarkable examples of Indian painting at its best. They depict the history and the culture of the Zuni people and demonstrate once more the Zuni genius in the use of color. The church itself is a good example of traditional Pueblo architecture. One of the most famous of the Kachina dances, Shalako, is held every December in the Zuni Pueblo, to celebrate the end of the old and the beginning of the New Year, and to bless all of the houses of the Pueblo erected during the year.

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Namingha, Les – “Geometric” Layered Design Jar (Pueblo Series)

This jar is part of a new series of pieces by Les Namingha.  This, “Pueblo Series” is focused on universal design similarities among various Pueblo pottery. As Les is both Zuni and Hopi-Tewa, he has a lot of cultural imagery to pull from for this body of work.  Les says of this piece:

“This jar is part of my “Pueblo Jar series” that I started recently. This series interprets or incorporates elements from other Pueblos outside of my Zuni and Tewa-Hopi influenced work.  My focus is on finding similarities in design elements across all Pueblo communities. This jar looks at the Acoma Pueblo style of geometric grid designs.  I have decontructed them and layered them into abstraction to create a minimalist style.”

The jar is a round shape with a slight neck.  The body of the piece is painted with a variety of geometric designs in red on a white surface.  They are separated by bolder black lines.  Layered on top of them are additional geometric patterns which are turned in different directions and painted in a tighter style.  It’s almost as if you could remove the bands of design from the top of the bowl!  The base and neck are painted with bolder lines and the neck has several classic Acoma style triangular designs, which are often seen on their pottery.  It’s a striking balance of shape, design, and color.  It is signed on the bottom.  The last photo is one from the jar in the gallery, which looks exceptional against a red wall!

$ 4,900.00
Namingha, Les – Large Jar with Hopi and Geometric Designs

This large jar by Les Namingha is inspired by Hopi-Tewa shapes and designs.  The band around the shoulder is a series of very classic Hopi-Tewa designs.  They are painted in traditional colorations.  However, it is the top and bottom of the jar which become the overall focus. The top has multi-color ellipses which extend downward from the rim and over the Hopi designs.  They give the jar a dynamic appearance.  When looking down from the top, the color and shape variations almost have a kinetic feel!  Les said he wanted it to look like a “pinwheel” with spinning colors.  The bottom of the jar has more solid geometric shapes and the multi-color forms are more angular. The jar itself is a classic Hopi shape with the wide shoulder and short neck.  It is a complex and striking jar.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 5,000.00
Namingha, Les – Framed Tile with Geometric Designs

This framed tile by Les Namingha is from 2004.  It is painted with acrylic on the clay surface.  The design is a variation of geometric shapes and a connecting white line.  Much like he has used the white line in his other pottery, this one follows a “migration” pattern across the surface.   It is a fascinating piece and great to see how his work has evolved over time.  It is signed on the edge of the tile.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 800.00
Peynetsa, Anderson – Water Jar with 18 Heartline Deer

This is a classic water jar by Anderson Peynetsa. The jar is a beautiful shape with a high, round shoulder and a slight indention before the neck and a slightly turned out rim.  The body of the jar is painted with three rows of heartline deer. Altogether there are 18 of them on this jar!  Each deer is very tightly painted and they are stylized with thin legs.  There is a cloud pattern around the neck of the jar.  The additional design adds to the dynamic appearance of this jar.  The heartline deer is a classic image in Zuni pottery, with the heart representing the strength and spirit of the animal. Anderson has signed the bowl on the bottom.

$ 500.00
Namingha, Les – Oval Bowl with Hopi Birds (2004)

This oval bowl by Les Namingha is from 2004.  It is painted with acrylic on both the inside and outside.  On the inside, the central panel is painted with a series of Hopi birds.  They are very highly detailed with Les’s famous pointillism style.  There is a strong variation of color and complementary delicate lines.  The around the inside walls of the bowl are very textured to have the feeling of layers of paint.  The outside of the bowl is painted brown.   It is a fascinating piece and great to see how his work has evolved over time.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Les Namingha”.

$ 1,100.00
Namingha, Les – Jar with Cloud Swirls

This jar by Les Namingha uses traditional Hopi clay, is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips,  and it was traditionally fired. The jar is from the late 1990’s.  The piece is fully polished and it has a free flowing cloud, rain and sun design.  It is interesting to see how early on Les had evolved from traditional Hopi-Tewa designs to more create and innovative imagery.  Today, his work utilizes acrylic as opposed to the traditional clay slips.  The various colors on the surface are the blushes from the firing.  It is signed, “Les Namingha” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00
Namingha, Les – “Polychrome I (Dextra Series)” Acrylic on Canvas

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Polychrome II (Dextra Series)”.  It is one of a series of acrylic paintings on canvas he made which explore both his pottery and that of his aunt, Dextra Quotskuyva.  This piece was made in 2010.  The central panel has a classic Hopi-Tewa design with two hummingbirds.  Note the intricacy of the two birds and the surrounding designs.  The various colors depict both his work and Dextra’s.  The painting is signed on the front and on the back.  It is in excellent condition.

$ 1,800.00
Namingha, Les – Pueblo Bird Wing Jar, “Pueblo Series”

This jar by Les Namingha is inspired by Hopi-Tewa and Pueblo bird wing designs.  Let’s start at the first photo and the bottom of the jar.  The is a classic Hopi-Tewa bird wing design painted in black on the red.  Looking up at the rest of the jar, in black (with tan highlights) there are a series of birds.  There are Hopi, Zuni, and even a San Ildefonso style bird.  The spiraling lines painted on top of the bird wings are more free form geometrics.  The jar utilizes a variety of colorations from the black, red, and brown of the pottery to primary colors.  It is a complex jar.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

““This jar is part of my “Pueblo Jar series” that I started recently. This series interprets or incorporates elements from other Pueblos outside of my Zuni and Tewa-Hopi influenced work.  My focus is on finding similarities in design elements across all Pueblo communities.  Here there are variations in birds and bird wing designs.  There are similar styles of birds seen at Zuni, Acoma, San Idefonso, Laguna and in ancient pottery.”.”  Les Namingha

$ 2,000.00
Namingha, Les – Hopi Moth and Birds Layered Design Jar

This jar by Les Namingha is inspired by Hopi-Tewa moth and bird designs.  The top of the jar has the Hopi style birds.  Around the shoulder are mountain patterns.  On the side of the jar are two sections with Hopi moths. In the areas with the moths and the birds, Les has layered the designs so that areas appear almost translucent!  The black areas with the white twisted lines are “tying” the top and bottom designs together.  The jar brings together numerous ideas and imagery from Hopi-Tewa pottery.  Les says of this style of his work:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing.”  Les Namingha

Around the base are vertical lines of color representing the grass, soil and earth with the birds and hummingbirds above. The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,400.00
Namingha, Les – “Four Seasons Hopi & Zuni Birds” Jar

This is an intricate jar by Les Namingha.  He is one of those potters who continues to defy expectations in his innovative clay art.  He pulls from his artistic background as well as his Zuni and Hopi heritage.  His most recent work has pulled from Hopi imagery yet combined it in a manner which is modern in appearance.   On the surface the jar, there are four seasons and he has portrayed them in an interesting manner.  There are spring, summer, and winter with the three different Hopi birds.  Each bird is painted with various Hopi-Tewa designs. One section with the dark blue at the top is the winter/Fall with the additional bird design made up of Zuni dots behind the Hopi birds.  The large red area with white linear designs is the start of the new year.  The coloration and designs work perfectly on this piece!  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,000.00
Peynetsa, Jamie – Small Clay Duck with Turned Head

This is a charming duck clay figure from Jamie Peynetsa.  He is the son of noted potters Anderson and Avelia Peynetsa.  Avelia, his mother, coil builds the clay vessel.  Jamie paints the design.  He has strong attention to the detail of the painting as well as his inspiration from classic Zuni pottery.  This duck is slipped with white clay and then painted with designs.  The wings are and eyes are intricately painted and the dots on the front of the head are raised. The duck has a turned head and a two feathers extending up from its head.   It is signed by Jamie and his mother on the bottom.

$ 300.00
Peynetsa, Anderson – Seedpot with Lizard

This is a figurative seedpot by Anderson Peynetsa.  The seedpot has a lizard in relief with its head extending up over the top of the piece. The tail swirls around the piece and the white dots on the back are a white clay and are raised.  There are also painted plant designs by the feet of the lizard.   The seedpot is striking both in shape and design.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 150.00
Laate, Jennie – Kiva Bowl (1970’s)

Jennie Laate was among the most important revival potters at Zuni in the 1970’s.  This is a very traditional style Zuni Kiva bowl. The bowl is shaped with terraced “kiva” steps or cloud shapes.  In the center is a frog with a head in relief. Surrounding the frog are tadpoles.  On the outside are dragonflies with the wings painted with either red or black lines.  The purpose of the kiva bowls was often ceremonial and the inclusion of frogs, tadpoles, and dragonflies are representative of prayers.  The kiva bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 550.00
Peynetsa, Jamie – Small Black and White Clay Duck Figure

This is one of the smallest ducks we have had from Jamie Peynetsa.  He is the son of noted potters Anderson and Avelia Peynetsa.  Avelia, his mother, coil builds the clay vessel.  Jamie paints the design.  He has strong attention to the detail of the painting as well as his inspiration from classic Zuni pottery.  This duck is slipped with white clay and then painted with designs.  The wings are and eyes are intricately painted and the dots on the front of the head are raised.  It is signed by Jamie and his mother on the bottom.

$ 225.00
Namingha, Les – “Untitled” Pastel Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is untitled. It is from a series he has painted using pastel on paper.  The piece is a modernist approach to color.  They are all colors used in his pottery and it is interesting to see how they play against one another in Les’s mind. That playfulness comes out in the lines and colors of the piece.  There are hints of figures and even a dragonfly, but they ask the question of whether they are intentional or simply our minds seeing more in the pastel colors! It is framed in a wood frame with a white matte.  It is signed in the lower right corner, “Les Namingha”.

$ 900.00
Peynetsa, Jamie – White Clay Owl with Rainbird Designs

This is a small owl figure painted by Jamie Peynetsa and made by his mother, Avelia.  The owl is a classically shaped figure for Zuni pottery.  The piece is charming with a round body with extended beak, tail, and wings.  The piece is fully painted with the feathers.  There is a rainbird design on the back of the head.  In Zuni culture, the owl is the protector of the home and the keeper of the night. He is able to see what others cannot see and is thought to be very observant and perceptive. He is thought to have true wisdom and patience.  Jamie has signed the owl on the bottom.

$ 150.00
Namingha, Les – “Pueblo Series” Jar with Zia Birds

This jar is part of a new series of pieces by Les Namingha.  This, “Pueblo Series” is focused on universal design similarities among various Pueblo pottery. As Les is both Zuni and Hopi-Tewa, he has a lot of cultural imagery to pull from for this body of work.  Les says of this piece:

“This jar is part of my “Pueblo Jar series” that I started recently. This series interprets or incorporates elements from other Pueblos outside of my Zuni and Tewa-Hopi influenced work.  My focus is on finding similarities in design elements across all Pueblo communities.  Here there are two Zia style birds.  There are similar styles of birds seen at Zuni, Acoma, Laguna and in ancient pottery.”

The jar has a round body and a short neck.  The jar has striking colorations and there are birds painted on each side in medallions.  They are additionally designed with different imagery on for the bodies.  One the sides and encircling the jar are large yellow ellipses.  These bold geometrics accentuate the detailed designs on the remainder of the jar.  It is signed on the bottom.  The last photo is one of this jar next to a piece by Elizabeth Medina. It seemed interesting to show the style of birds from Zia in comparison to this jar.

$ 2,200.00
Peynetsa, Anderson – Large Duck Figure with 6 Deer

Anderson Peynetsa is known for his vessels as well as his figurative pottery.  This duck figure is one of his technically amazing pieces.  The figure is opened at the top and has extended pieces of clay at the head and tail.  It is fully painted but it is the use of the heartline deer around the body of the piece which is so striking.  They are painted in his own style with the elongated necks.  Anderson has an elegant and modern stylization of the heartline deer on his pottery.  It is fascinating how a piece can appear both modern and yet reflect cultural history and charm.  The area above and below the deer painted with a mottled red and black over the white.  The piece is complex in both form and design.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,600.00
Peynetsa, Anderson – Jar with 12 Heartline Deer

This is a striking olla by Anderson Peynetsa. The jar is a beautiful shape with a wide shoulder, a slight indention before the neck and a slightly turned out rim.  The body of the jar is painted with painted with two rows of heartline deer. All together there are 12 of them on this jar!  Each deer is very tightly painted and they are stylized with thin legs. Each deer is surrounded by a prayer feather and cloud pattern.  The additional designs adds to the dynamic appearance of this jar.  The heartline deer is a classic image in Zuni pottery, with the heart representing the strength and spirit of the animal. Anderson has signed the bowl on the bottom.

$ 1,000.00
Peynetsa, Jamie – Jar with Rain & Lightning Designs

Jamie Peynetsa is the son of noted potters Anderson and Avelia Peynetsa.  Avelia, his mother, coil builds the clay vessel.  Jamie paints the design.  He has a strong attention to the detail of the painting as well as his inspiration from classic Zuni pottery.  This jar is very tightly painted with rain designs above the shoulder.  The thin lines are even and add complexity to the piece.  The sides of the jar are boldly painted with lightning patterns.  Note how well Jamie paints to match design and form.  It is signed by Jamie and his mother on the bottom.  At only 20 years old, he certainly has a great future in pottery!

$ 450.00
Pincion, Herbert – Horse & Sitting Foal Carving

This Zuni carving by Herbert Pincion is carved from spotted travertine.  It is a highly detailed carving with a mare and sitting foal.  For the size, it is wonderfully detailed!

$ 40.00
Kaamasee, Derrick – Apple Coral Elk

This is an exceptionally detailed Zuni carving by Derrick Kaamasee.  It is carved from turquoise. There is an elk standing up on a rock.  There is detail in the fur and the movement.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 100.00
Peynetsa, Anderson – Turtle Bowl

This is a charming bowl by Anderson Peynetsa. It is made using the red clay and  the bowl is in the shape of a turtle on its back.  The sides of the piece are fully painted and there is a swirling rainbird design.  Anderson has signed the bowl on the bottom.  Yes, definitely charming.

$ 300.00
Leekya, Freddie – Travertine & Turquoise Bird

This Zuni carving is by Freddie Leekya.  The bird is carved from travertine.  There are turquoise inlay for the eyes and on the wings.  The beak is mother of pearl.

$ 50.00
Lementino, Tim – Bear Family

This Zuni carving by Tim Lementino.  It is a group of five bears carved from pipestone.  They each have turquoise eyes.  There is a bundle holding them together from shell and turquoise.

$ 60.00
Laiwakete, Rodney – Heartline Ram and Bird

This Zuni carving by Rodney Laiwakete is carved from agate. There is a Big Horn Sheep which has an inlaid turquoise and moher -of -pearl heartline.  The bird on the back is also carved from agate.  It is attached as a medicine bundle.

$ 50.00
Laate, Jennie – Clay Zuni Owl (1980’s)

Jennie Laate was among the most important revival potters at Zuni in the 1970’s.  This miniature owl clay figure.  It is coil built and in the style of the classic Zuni owls.  She has painted the feathers onto the surface of the piece.  It signed on the bottom and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The last photo is of the owl next to the large jar which is online relative to scale.

$ 75.00
Folwell, Susan & Les Namingha – “Corn Maiden: Earth Mother” Jar

Susan Folwell (Santa Clara )and Les Namingha (Hopi-Tewa/Zuni) collaborated together for the first time on a series of vessels in a show entitled “Corn:Maiden:Cultures” in 2015. The concept for the exhibition was that the Corn Maiden in Pueblo culture can also be found as a primal female archetype in cultures throughout the world.  There is play back and forth on these vessels as the multi-cultural figures are placed within a Pueblo context as the “Corn Maiden”, who brings the corn, the harvest and life.  This jar has been in an exhibit at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture since 2016.

This large jar was made by Les.  The designs painted by Susan on two sides show a Hopi maiden and a Pueblo maiden.  Her idea was to leave the faces empty, so that they did not represent just one person, but all women.  The two women represent the Pueblo and Hopi ancestry of Les and Susan. Playing from Susan’s more realistic portrayals, Les painted a more modern version of the women on the other two sides.  The angular shape of this vessel, made from Zuni clay, is unusual but also perfect for this important imagery.  In many ways, this powerful jar brings together the ideas of womanhood, femininity, modernism and the continuing importance of the Corn Maiden concept in Pueblo culture.  The dark brown background works perfectly for this intense jar.  Check out more of their exceptional collaborative pottery in the book, “Spoken Through Clay”.

$ 7,700.00
Peynetsa, Ian – Jar with Rain Birds (1994)

This jar by Ian Peynetsa is from 1994.  It is a more classic style of Zuni design with the Zuni rainbirds and the fine-line rain deigns.  It is an interesting combination of these classic designs with the vertically polished white slip to enhance the designs.  The jar won a 2nd place at the 1994 Zuni High School Art show. It is signed, “Ian Peynetsa”.  While he no longer makes pottery, it is a striking example of creative student art!  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00
Boone, Lena – Red Glass Mountain Lion Arrowhead Bundle

This Zuni carving by Lena Boone is made from glass.  The mountain lion is traditional in shape and has an arrowhead bundle on its back.  The glass is a deep red coloration.

$ 40.00
Quam, Daphne – Mulit-color Glass Mountain Lion with Arrowhead Bundle

This Zuni carving by Daphne Quam is made from glass.  The mountain lion is traditional in shape and has an arrowhead bundle on its back.  The glass has a green, blue, yellow and clear coloration.

$ 40.00
Quam, Daphne – Mulit-color Glass Beaver with Arrowhead Bundle

This Zuni carving by Daphne Quam is made from glass.  The beaver is traditional in shape and has an arrowhead bundle on its back.  The glass has a green, blue, yellow and clear coloration.

$ 50.00
Quam, Daphne – Sodalite Badger with Arrowhead Bundle

This Zuni carving by Daphne Quam is made from sodalite.  The badger is traditional in shape and has an arrowhead bundle on its back.  The sodalite has a deep blue and white coloration.

$ 40.00
Quam, Daphne – Azurite Eagle with Arrowhead Bundle

This Zuni carving by Daphne Quam is made from azurite.  The eagle is traditional in shape and has an arrowhead bundle on its back.  The azurite has a deep blue coloration with specs of green.

$ 40.00
Quam, Daphne – Light Blue Glass Fox with Arrowhead Bundle

This Zuni carving by Daphne Quam is made from glass.  This fox is traditional in shape and has an arrowhead bundle on its back. The glass is a opaque blue coloration.

$ 20.00
Sale!
King, Charles S., “Spoken Through Clay”

Spoken Through Clay

A NEW  RELEASE SPECIAL:  $95.00, including shipping (US)! Check out the new review in the Denver Post!

 Just a few things which make this book unique!
*   The size!  The book is 11.75″ x 14.25″ and weights over 8 pounds!
*  The photography of the pottery is stunning, emphasizing the individual pieces.
*  Each caption is the artist discussing the individual piece on the page.
*  The artist “biographies” are from interviews with the artists and they discuss their art, culture, lives and history.
*  Organization: The book is not organized by pueblo or family, but entails new ways to think about the future of Native pottery.
*  Printing in Italy gives the book very high quality color and paper.
* The photos of the living artists were taken by Will Wilson using a tin-type process. He was a recipient of the 2107 New Mexico Governor’s Award for the Arts in photography!
*  The book features work by more than 30 contemporary potters and more than a dozen important historic potters.
*  There are essays by myself, Peter Held and Eric Dobkin.  They add to the overall understanding of the project a historic perspective.

_____________________________________________

August 18, Pasatiempo Review

“Charles S. King’s new book, Spoken Through Clay: Native Pottery in the Southwest, The Eric S. Dobkin Collection, is spectacularly heavy —which is a problem from a practical standpoint, because once you open it, you won’t want to put it down. With dreamy tintype artist portraits by Diné photographer Will Wilson, dazzlingly crisp images from Addison Doty, and intimate first-person essays written by dozens of artists, the book is a visually delicious, intellectually consuming foray into historic and contemporary Southwestern pottery. In short, prepare to swoon.

If you’re thinking of this as a coffee-table book, you’ll need to imagine a decently sized coffee table. The book is more than a foot tall and, when opened, two feet wide, but its outsize appearance belies the often delicate beauty of its contents: hundreds of individual pieces of pottery from Eric S. Dobkin’s exquisitely curated collection — arguably the largest and most important of its kind. Gallery owner, author, and Pueblo pottery expert King designed Spoken Through Clay to be approachable for those unfamiliar with Native American pottery. “In the age of social media, I wanted to make the book both visually striking and personal,” King said. The book opens with essays by King, Dobkin, and curator Peter Held, who calls clay “the most archival of materials … seductive, sensuous, responsive, geologic, and malleable.”

“I wanted the end result of the book to be that the reader would connect with the artists in a personal way, beyond just the art, and understand the time it takes to become an artist, to achieve success,” King said. Sprawling yet intimate, Spoken Through Clay introduces its readers not just to the beauty of Southwestern pottery but also to the fascinating stories of the people who make it.Iris McLister, Pasatiempo

____________________________________

“It’s one of the things that makes us who we are. It’s what holds our family together. We are a family of potters. It’s our identity. People don’t realize how much work goes into it just processing the clay and making it. You have to do it with your heart.”—Linda Tafoya-Sanchez

 

FEATURED ARTISTS Grace Medicine Flower • Dextra Quotskuyva • Autumn Borts-Medlock • Jody Naranjo • Harrison Begay Jr. • Jordan Roller • Sara Fina Tafoya • Lonnie Vigil • Margaret Tafoya • Steve Lucas • LuAnn Tafoya • Loren Ami • Toni Roller • Popovi Da • Linda Tafoya-Sanchez • Mark Tahbo • James Ebelacker• Yvonne Lucas • Jeff Roller • Lisa Holt • Harlan Reano • Nampeyo • Jacquie Stevens • Nathan Youngblood • Jacob Koopee Jr. • Jennifer Moquino • Christopher Youngblood • Maria Martinez • Tony Da • Tammy Garcia • Virgil Ortiz • Joseph Lonewolf • Johnathan Naranjo • Nancy Youngblood • Les Namingha • Russell Sanchez • Christine McHorse • Richard Zane Smith • Rondina Huma • Susan Folwell • Dominique Toya • Jody Folwell

Spoken Through Clay features the pottery of iconic Native American artists from historic potters Nampeyo and Maria Martinez, to contemporary potters Tammy Garcia, Virgil Ortiz, and many others, are featured in a new book published by the Museum of New Mexico Press. Spoken Through Clay: Native Pottery of the Southwest showcases nearly three hundred pottery vessels from the acclaimed Eric S. Dobkin Collection, covering a wide range of mostly Pueblo artists from the Southwest.

“The physical scale of the vessels combined with the depth of the contemporary collection [is] breathtaking,” says author Charles S. King. The book is part of a “transitional process of looking to the clay, the vessel, and the potter’s voice and allowing the pieces to stand on the merit of their artistic integrity.”

The book includes portraits and voices of renowned potters speaking about their artistry and technique, families, culture, and traditions. Many of the artists are connected by Pueblos, generations, or family members. Dynamic color photography captures the depth and dimension of the pieces, while the artists provide an illuminating perspective through narrative captions. Artists, academics, collectors, family members, and gallerists add additional insight about the lives, historical context, and importance of these potters and their work.

SPOKEN THROUGH CLAY Native Pottery of the Southwest The Eric S. Dobkin Collection
By Charles S. King Essay by Peter Held

Artist portraits by Will Wilson
ISBN: 978-0-89013-624-9

352 pages, 320 color plates, 40 artist portraits

Publication Date: August 01, 2017
ABOUT THE AUTHOR Charles S. King is the author of Born of Fire: The Life and Pottery of Margaret Tafoya, The Life and Art of Tony Da, Virgil Ortiz: Revolt 1680/2180, and numerous articles on Pueblo pottery. He has served on boards of art associations, judged pottery at prestigious events, and lectures about the art form. His business King Galleries represents many of today’s leading Native potters and important historic works in clay. Charles lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

$ 125.00 $ 95.00
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