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Laguna PotteryLaguna Pottery

Laguna Pottery of Laguna Pueblo, English Pronunciation: "Lah-goon-ah " Traditional Name: Ka'waika. It is the largest Keresan speaking Pueblo, with around eight thousand members. They prize thinking above all human attributes, consequently they value intellectual activity and education. A scholarship program is conducted by the Pueblo, thus insuring advanced study for many of the young people, making them among the best educated of all Pueblos. Laguna Pueblo comprises six major villages, Laguna, Paguate, Encinal, Mesita, Seama, Paraje, scattered over many acres with the political center at Laguna. In the 1970's, the traditional craft of pottery making was re-established. Fine work in red, yellow and orange geometric designs, similar to Acoma work, was created by a number of artists. Painters and jewelry makers have begun to work again in the ancient crafts, but they are bringing a modern note in the innovative designs and techniques which set their work apart from many other Indian craftsmen. The feast of St. Joseph, celebrated on March 19th and on September 19th.

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Honyumptewa, Kimberly Riley – Picuris Micaceous Bowl with Braided Handle

Kimberly Riley Honyumptewa is from Laguna Pueblo and married to Aaron Honyumptewa who is Hopi/Picuris. She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law Caroline Simbolo Cine in the traditional Picuris style and using native clay from the area. Each piece is coil built and traditionally fired.  This bowl is thin walled and has a braided handle.     The piece is traditionally fired so there are beautiful blushes across the surface.  It is signed on the bottom.  Will be exciting to see how Kimberly’s work continues to evolve in creating more Picuris pottery!

$ 125.00
Sine, Caroline Simbolo – Picuris Micaceous Bowl

Caroline Simbolo Sine is from Picuris Pueblo.  Simbolo is one of the great names in Picuris pottery.  Caroline is the mother of  Aaron Honyumptewa and taught his wife, Kimberly Riley Honyumptewa to make pottery.  This bowl is made from Picuris micaceous clay.  It is a classic stew bowl shape.  It is fully polished on the inside and outside.  It is traditionally fired outdoors which has created the striking deep colorations on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom.  This is the first piece we have had from Caroline and pleased to have such traditional Picuris pottery in the gallery!

$ 145.00
Honyumptewa, Kimberly Riley – Picuris Micaceous Bowl with Handle

Kimberly Riley Honyumptewa is from Laguna Pueblo and married to Aaron Honyumptewa who is Hopi/Picuris. She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law Caroline Simbolo Cine in the traditional Picuris style and using native clay from the area. Each piece is coil built and traditionally fired.  This bowl is thin walled and has a scalloped rim and a handle.   The piece is traditionally fired so there are beautiful blushes across the surface.  It is signed on the bottom.  Will be exciting to see how her work evolves in creating more Picuris pottery!

$ 125.00
Honyumptewa, Kimberly Riley – Picuris Micaceous Pair Miniature Bowl and Jar

Kimberly Riley Honyumptewa is from Laguna Pueblo and married to Aaron Honyumptewa who is Hopi/Picuris. She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law Caroline Simbolo Cine in the traditional Picuris style and using native clay from the area. Each piece is coil built and traditionally fired.  These two miniature are traditional water jar and bowl shapes.  They are made from Picuris clay and traditionally fired.  There are slight blushes on the surfaces of both pieces.  They are each signed on the bottom.  Kimberly has been making pottery for the past year and we look forward to her continuation of this traditional pottery.

$ 50.00
Sarracino, Myron – Jar with Lightning, Cloud and Plant Designs

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. The imagery on much of his pottery is derived from pre-historic pottery designs. This jar is a more classic Laguna shape with the high shoulder.  The designs, however, are among his more complicated.  The neck has an angular lightning design while the base has a more linear version.  In the center of the jar is a modified style of the Tularosa swirl from the ancient black-and-white Tularosa pottery.  This design has been squared off and has contrasting bold black and fine-line painted designs.  The result is imagery that evokes rain and swirling clouds.  The black and white coloration gives this jar both an ancient and very contemporary appearance.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece.  It is seen on much of the historic Acoma and Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Sarracino, Myron – Jar with Lightning Design

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. The imagery on much of his pottery is derived from pre-historic pottery designs. This jar has a sloping shoulder and a short neck.  It’s a great shape for this dynamic lighting design.  Looking from the bottom of the design upwards, there is a square mesa pattern. The remainder of the jar is painted with a lightning pattern.  Myron reveals his ability to match shape and design with the flow of the pattern.  This is also one of those iconic designs for Acoma pottery which was revived by Lucy M. Lewis.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 280.00
Kasero, Sr., Robert – Seedpot with Swirling Rain Design

This is an intricately painted seedpot by Robert Kasero.  It is very thin walled and painted with an “op-art” style of rain design.  The design is small at the top and then enlarges at the shoulder and small again at the base.  It is dynamic in the flow of the tightly painted designs.  The design is a swirling cloud and rain motif.  Note how the base of the seedpot is also indented keeping in the style of historic Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 550.00
Sarracino, Myron – Red Clouds and Mesa Jar

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. This jar has a high shoulder and a more classic “olla” shape. The design has a cloud pattern painted in red.  Below is a mesa pattern in black and below that a river design.  The water pattern has a series of fine-lines painted into the clay.  The jar is a nice balance of form and design.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece and it is also a tribute to the potters who came before.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 325.00
Sarracino, Myron – Four Color Star & Lightning Design Jar

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. This jar has a high shoulder and a more classic “olla” shape. There are are two bands using alternating colors (orange, red, white and black).  The colors are from various clay slips.  Separating them is a band of star patterns.  Below the lower band of color are four bands of lightning designs.  The variations of colored clay slips and black-and-white give the jar a very modern appearance.  It is nice to see Myron continue to add additional clay colors to his pottery.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is symbolically where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece and it is also a tribute to the potters who came before.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 350.00
Early, Max – Large Jar with Rain and Mask Design

Max Early is one of the few traditional potters working today at Laguna Pueblo.  His work combines historic forms with a blend of contemporary and traditional designs.  This is definitely one of the larger jar he has made in a while with the very wide shoulder and sloping neck. It is a beautiful shape and note the sharp edge on the shoulder of the jar where it drops down and then extends up to the neck.  This is always difficult to create when coiling a piece. The designs are painted with strong lines.  One side, Max said it was meant to represent a katsina mask, with the circle being the nose and the eyes on either side.  The area below are pant designs. The bold swirls in red are classic for Laguna pottery.  The remainder of the jar has rain and plant patterns.  Note the variety of angles of the fine-lines, as they are not all vertical or horizontal but extending in different directions.  The complexity of overall design is certainly striking! The rounded bottom harkens back to the traditional Laguna pottery when the water jars were meant to be carried on one’s head.  Note as well his use of the various clays to create a “three color” jar!   The jar is also traditionally fired, which adds to the overall difficulty of the piece.  It is certainly exciting to see a potter who is inspired by traditional shapes and designs and yet has the artistry to create his own distinctive variation!

$ 2,400.00
Kasero, Sr., Robert – Wide Seedpot withOp-Art Spiral Design

This is an intricately painted seedpot by Robert Kasero, Sr..  It is very thin walled and painted with an “op-art” style of spiral lightning and rain design. The triangles are the lightning extending down from the rim to the base.  The “lines” are the rain.  It is dynamic in the flow of the tightly painted designs.  Note how the base of the seedpot is also indented keeping in the style of historic Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom. 

$ 750.00
Kasero, Sr., Robert – Wide Seedpot with Red & Black Op-Art Spiral

This is an intricately painted seedpot by Robert Kasero, Sr..  It is very thin walled and painted with an “op-art” style of spiral triangular mountain design.  It starts small at the top then enlarges as the shoulder and small again at the base.  It is dynamic in the flow of the tightly painted designs. Each of the triangles is either red, white, black or painted with a fine-line pattern.  Note how the base of the seedpot is also indented keeping in the style of historic Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom. 

$ 750.00
Natseway, Thomas – Mini Laguna Jar

Thomas Natseway is one of the most renown miniaturists in Pueblo pottery.  Rarely does he make a piece which is over 1″ tall or wide!  This is an early piece of his pottery from 1981.  It is painted with a classic Laguna Pueblo design with the checkerboard and fine-line patterns.  There are additional rain clouds around the rim and the base.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 150.00
Natseway, Thomas – Clay Storyteller Figure

Thomas Natseway is one of the most renown miniaturists in Pueblo pottery.  Rarely does he make a piece which is over 1″ tall or wide!  This is one of his few larger figurative pieces.  It is woman with a shawl holding a clay bowl  He has painted a lot of detail in the shawl and the plate.  The figure is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 150.00
Early, Max – Jar with Rain & Plant Designs

Max Early is one of the few traditional potters working today at Laguna Pueblo.  His work combines traditional forms with a blend of contemporary and traditional designs.  Max said that this jar was his own variation on classic Laguna designs. The neck has a linear rain pattern.  Around the shoulder are plant designs in classic Laguna style.  The jar is a beautiful shape with a slightly elongated neck and a rounded base. The rounded bottom harkens back to the traditional Laguna pottery when the water jars were meant to be carried on one’s head.  Note as well his use of the various clays to create a “three color” jar!   The jar is also traditionally fired, which adds to the overall difficulty of the piece.  It is certainly exciting to see a potter who is inspired by traditional shapes and designs and yet has the artistry to create his own distinctive variation!

$ 1,800.00
Allison, Marla – “Of the Earth” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Of the Earth“.  The imagery is inspired by pottery designs with a very earth oriented coloration, much like the clay.  The designs range from pottery designs to an avanyu.  All of Marla’s paintings have a “gallery wrap” so the painting continues onto the side.

Marla says of her painting in general:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained a formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.  She was also the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 1,550.00
Allison, Marla – “Hopi Girls” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Hopi Girls“.  The imagery is her take on the classic Curtis photograph.  The piece is painted in her cubist style with a black/gray coloration and just a hint of reds.

Marla says of this painting:

This piece is inspired by photograph by Edward Curtis.  It reminds me of my youth, well, youth in general, and the timid way of becoming an adult.  I didn’t gain my voice until my mid 20’s, when I could really talk to people.  Maybe it’s a Pueblo things where the young girls hide behind others who are more bold.

As for her painting in general, she says:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained a formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.

Ms. Allison was the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 4,400.00
Allison, Marla – “Preparation of Clay: Nampeyo of Hano” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Preparation of Clay: Nampeyo of Hano“.  The imagery is inspired by the photography of Edward Curtis (see the last photo in the series).  This painting is large scale with a dramatic use of color and imagery.

Marla says of this painting:

This painting, ‘Preparation of Clay” comes from a photo of Nampeyo of Hano by Edward Curtis.  I wanted to depict the idea of age becoming perfection, where the hands are the storyteller in the piece.  She makes the clay, taken from the earth, and then hand molds it into a vessel.  I put emphasis on the shape of her hands with a fractal cubism style.  I wanted there to be an additional emphasis on the bowl holding the clay.  Inside the bowl are some very subtle pottery designs.”

Marla says of her painting:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained a formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.  She was also the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 6,650.00
Lucas, Yvonne – Jar with Leaf Designs

Yvonne Lucas learned to make pottery from her husband, Steve Lucas and his aunt, Dextra Qutoskuyva.  She is one of the few Laguna potters who use all traditional materials and traditionally fires their pottery.  The jar is slipped with a white clay and then painted with a red clay slip and bee-weed (for the black). The design has a leaf pattern around the neck and in the central diamond-shaped medallions.  Separating the medallions are rainbow bands which are polished red.  The designs are a striking flow of round and linear patterns.  The contrast of the red and black on the white works perfectly for this size.  The jar is traditionally fired outdoors, so there are blushes on the surface creating the slightly tan areas.  The jar is thin-walled and perfectly shaped.  Yvonne focuses on the black-on-red coloration, as that was a style seen at Laguna Pueblo around 1900.  This is Yvonne’s way of paying tribute to these pieces but also giving it her own modern style.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 4,400.00
Allison, Marla – “Blue Birds in Cedar Brush” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Blue Birds in Cedar Brush“.  The imagery is bound in the designs of Laguna pottery.  The pottery patterns flow across the surface with interspersed bluebirds against the color of the cedar brush.

Marla says of this painting:

This painting is one that came to me after driving home after a Deer dance in Mesita.  All these bluebirds were flying around. I was thinking..there’s a pretty blue bird…and another..and another.  It was a moment of peacefulness away from my studio and it showed what nature can inspire.  I saw inspiration simply fluttering around me.

As for her painting in general, she says:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.  She was also the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 3,100.00
Allison, Marla – “Laguna Strong” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Laguna Strong“.  The imagery is inspired by historic photos of the women of Laguna pueblo. The colors from the pottery and they are combined in Marla’s unique painting style

Marla says of this painting:

The painting is exactly what is in the tile.  There are some very strong women in the pueblo not only now, but especially in the past.  There was the strength to be gained in the old days and this painting is a away for me to pay homage to those who came before us.  If you look closely, you can see that she has a slight smirk, there is an underlying happiness within her strength.

As for her painting in general, she says:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.  She was also the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 2,300.00
Allison, Marla – “Shawls and Pottery” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a member of Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. Marla lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

Marla began her expression through art in her youth and gained formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.

She was the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

Marla says of her painting:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Shawls and Pottery (Going to see Charles)“.  Ok, how you can you not LOVE the tile!  The painting utilizes what we love about her work:  a vibrant color scheme and Pueblo graphics.  It is a subtle but striking piece and a reflection of why she has become such an important name in contemporary Native painting!

$ 3,400.00
Sale!
Analla, Calvin – Large Water Jar with Plant Designs

Calvin Analla learned to  make pottery from his sister, Yvonne Lucas and her husband, Steve Lucas.  This large water jar is thin walled and made with the traditional red clay from Laguna Pueblo. The jar is painted with bee-weed, into which he has mixed some mica.  The mica makes reflections in the clay.  Calvin is known for his very delicately painted designs.  This jar has cloud designs above the shoulder and plant designs below.  The thin lines painted with the bee-weed show create a striking contrast with the red clay.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,800.00 $ 1,000.00
Paquin, Gladys – Large Jar with Triple Rainbow

Gladys Paquin is one of the revivalist potters of Laguna Pueblo.  Each piece is coil built, painted with bee-weed (black) and native clay slips and traditionally fired.  This large jar is one of her most classic designs.  The jar itself is thin walled and an exceptional form.  However, it is the polychrome rainbow pattern which is considered her most complicated and elegant design.  This jar has three interlocking rainbow pattern which encompass the surface of the piece. They are painted with two different clay slips and the brownish red color is polished.  This creates a visual contrast between the polished and matte surfaces.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Gladys Sratyu’we Paquin”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,000.00
Early, Max – “Ears of Corn: Listen” Book of Poetry

Congratulations to Max Early for the publication of his first book of poetry.  Max is a well known potter but also quickly become as famous for his poetry!

We currently have signed copies in the gallery!

“In Ears of Com: Listen, Native American potter and poet Max Early gracefully details both the everyday and the extraordinary moments of family and community life, work and art, sadness and celebration at the Laguna Pueblo of New Mexico.With in the four seasons-Ty’ee-Tro, Kushra-Tyee,Heyya-Ts’ee, and Kooka—the beauty of Early’s writing beckons the reader to accompany him on the journey between ancient and modern times.Including an historical Preface by the author,an Introduction by Simon J. Ortiz, and photographs of Early’s family and award-winning art, this debut poetry book is profound in its welcome and its teachings.

 ‘Early’s poems take us into the cultural continuum of a contemporary Laguna Pueblo artist. Each poem is pottery of words, complete with designs to bring rain, to remember and praise the earth and sky path we humans travel. Early’s poems are earthy, real and compelling. I keep hearing them, like songs emerging from the creative earth.”

-Joy Harjo, “Crazy Brave”, Mvskoke poet and musician

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‘We are thankful for these poems that cup us through the seasons,past the drought f a spiritual slumber. Like a weathered olla recalling the hold of cold water,we are replenished and bathed anew.We should heed our want and need to the bounty of their beauty and submit ourselves to the lessons therein. Shhh…the poems are speaking:Listen!”

-Levi Romero, “A Poetry of Remembrance and In the Gathering of Silence”, New Mexico Centennial Poet

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‘Poetry and pottery are art forms simultaneously ancient and yet made for the moment. The words flow like coils of clay to surround the reader and build a vision of the mind and soul of the poet. Potter Max Early’s poetry in ‘Ears of Corn: Listen” reveals much about life in his native Laguna Pueblo. More importantly it gives a modern voice to an ancient culture making it relevant for both a new generation and also those outside the Pueblo. The poems tell his story of how, “Breaking gender taboos didn’t turn me to stone” and the delicate balance he finds between embracing modernity and reveling in the past. The use of native Laguna words adds grace to the poems, much like a perfectly painted vessel; they lyrically draw the eye, create balance and provide a connection to the viewer. Not only is Max’s collection of poems worth a read, but a second read as well. The first time they may just seem pretty, but the second time the novelty is gone and the substance remains. Much like Max’s pottery.’
Charles S. King, Author of “Born of Fire: The Pottery of Margaret Tafoya” and “The Life and Art of Tony Da”

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Max Early was born into a tradition of potters and clay. He creates traditional pottery in order to help save the art of pottery making in Laguna Pueblo.When hbegan to focus on writing, he continued his passion for celebrating his family, culture, language,and the enchanting New Mexico landscape.

Honors and awards for Early in pottery include a Fellowship from the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts;a Native American Community Scholar Appointment: Office of Fellowships and Grants,Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; the Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market judge’s Award in Sculpture; the Gallup Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial-First in Effigies/Special Elkus Memorial Award; and the Santa Fe Indian Market-First in Traditional Pottery/Wedding Vases.

$ 25.00
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