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San Ildefonso PotterySan Ildefonso Pottery

San Ildefonso Pueblo English Pronunciation: "San Ill-day-fon-so" Traditional Name: Po-woh-ge-oweenge "Where the water cuts through." San Ildefonso pottery is one of the best-known art forms of the New Mexico Pueblos because of the famous black-on-black pottery which originated there and which was revived in the nineteen-twenties. At that time San Ildefonso Pueblo, like many other Pueblos, was suffering a severe economic depression. Long-standing internal conflicts, encroachment upon tribal lands by squatters and illegal cutting of timber all contributed to the low subsistence level to which the Pueblo had fallen. When American Indian crafts began to be popular with collectors, it was fortunate for the San Ildefonso people, because although the Pueblo population was small, there were a number of skilled artisans, makers of pottery and painters, who set to work to improve the economic condition of the Pueblo. Before long, the outstanding quality of San Ildefonso pottery became known. It was then that the famous black pots were revived, primarily because of Maria Martinez. Today, they command the respect of worldwide collectors of fine art. Other artists, potters, and watercolor painters came to the attention of the public and although the Pueblo is one of the smallest in population, it is among the best known. The San Ildefonso people have lived in the present site since before thirteen hundred A.D. They have a strong sense of identity and retain ancient ceremonies and rituals tenaciously, as well as tribal dances. A particularly important festival is the Buffalo Deer Dance, performed in San Ildefonso’s feast day.

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Martinez, Maria – Plainware Black Bowl “Maria Poveka”, 1950

In the 1950’s Maria Martinez created a series of pieces which were simply stone polished with no design.  As she primarily made the pottery and polished it this was fitting with the other pieces of her career.  This bowl is highly polished and fired a very deep black in coloration.  It has that “mirror-like” surface for which Maria was famous.  The bowl is signed in the clay, “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 1,000.00
Tse-Pe, Dora – Black and Sienna Long Neck Jar (1982)

This jar by Dora Tse-Pe is from 1982.  It is a classic shape which was often used by her mother-in-law, Rose Gonzales.  The sharp shoulder and long neck create a delicate form.  Dora was renown not just for the shapes of her pottery, but especially her highly polished surfaces. The jar is fired black and the neck is two-tone making the piece “black and sienna”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dora Tse-Pe ’82”.

$ 675.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Black & Green Asymmetric Jar

This asymmetric jar Russell Sanchez is from around 2001.  It is one of his classic asymmetric forms with a sharp edge and an indented side.  The entire piece is fully polished black. The top half has been “two-toned” black and green.  There is a band of silver leaf which extends around the jar.  It is surrounded by two bands of shell and turquoise hei-shi beads.  The bottom half of the bowl has a series of stylized San Ildefonso flower and leaf designs.  This was a period when Russell was experimenting with these types of designs and giving them a more contemporary flare.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,600.00
Tse-Pe, Dora – Jar with Cloud Pattern (1978)

This jar by Dora Tse-Pe is from 1978.  It is a classic shape which can often be seen in the work of her mother-in-law, Rose Gonzales.  The jar has a sharp shouler and an elongated neck.  It is carved with a swirl cloud or water pattern around the shoulder.  The rim is sienna while the remainder of the jar is a dark black from the firing. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dora Tse-Pe, 1978”.

$ 700.00
Roybal, Tonita – Black-on-Red Bowl with Storm Design (1922-5)

It is very unusual that we come across a black-on-red piece by Tonita Roybal.  This bowl is an early piece from the 1920’s.  Tonita and her mother, Dominguita Pino, were both very well known for their black-on-red pottery before the advent of the black-on-black pottery in 1920.  While numerous potters were making black-on-red pieces before 1920, Tonita was certainly among the best and her signed pieces in this style remain classics.  This bowl is fully designed with some of Tonita’s classic imagery. There are cloud, rain, lightning and other designs.  There are also striking areas of hatchwork patterns.  The black is painted onto the red clay surface.  The bowl is signed, “Tonita” on the bottom.  This is her earliest type of signature, with the very tightly written name.  It is an important and striking piece of her pottery both in terms of coloration and design.

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 3,400.00
Atencio, Isabel & Gilbert Atencio- Buff-on-Red Jar with Rain Designs (1970’s)

Isabel Atencio was a daughter of Nicolasa Montoya (the aunt who taught Maria Martinez to make pottery) and a sister of Rayita Montoya, Santana Montoya and Alfredo Montoya (the first husband of Tonita Roybal). Among her children, Gilbert Atencio is known primarily for his paintings. Her daughters Helen Gutierrez and Angelita Sanchez are both well-known potters.  This is one of her few collaborative pieces with her son, Gilbert.  It is also the largest collaborative piece of their work we have had (ok, we have only had two in over twenty years!).  The jar was made and polished by Isabel and painted by Gilbert.  His is a buff-on-red coloration with rain cloud designs.  It is a striking piece in shape and design.   It is signed, “Belle + Gilbert”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 1,050.00
Tafoya, Donicia – Jar with Plant Design (1960’s)

Donicia Tafoya was the mother of noted potter Juan Tafoya.  This jar is a striking piece of her pottery.  The jar is a classic shape with a low shoulder and a painted seed design.  It is the firing which is so distinctive on this piece. It is fired to a gunmetal appearance on one side and a darker black on the other.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Donicia Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair. 

$ 200.00
Tafoya, Donicia – Bowl with Wind Designs (1950’s)

Donicia Tafoya was the mother of noted potter Juan Tafoya.  This bowl is highly polished and painted with a cloud design around the neck.  It is fired a gunmeatal coloration so it has a silvery appearance.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Donicia Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair. 

$ 150.00
Tafoya, Juan – Plate with Avanyu & Coral (1983)

This is a small plate by Juan Tafoya from 1983.  It is fully polished and etched with a water serpent (avanyu) as the design.   Juan was known for his etched designs and how he would chip away at the polished slip to form a textured background for his design.  This can be seen around the body of the avanyu.  In the center is an inset piece of coral.  The plate is signed on the back, “Juan Tafoya”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Da, Tony – Red Plate with Antelope (1971)

This is an unusual smaller plate by Tony Da.  Most of the smaller plates made by Tony Da between 1969 and 71 were either gunmetal or black-and-sienna in coloration.  He made very few of the smaller plates in red.  This one has an antelope as the design. Tony would etch the designs into the clay before the pieces were fired. The animals were inspired by the Mimbres imagery from the 1100’s. However, as with much of his work, Tony drew inspiration from these ancient works but did not copy them.  His animals became “spirit animals” and note how the feet of the antelope are its tracks. The animal extends backwards from the tracks to create the distinctive animal with a heartline.  Around the rim are painted lines, in contrast to the incised imagery.  Tony had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.   This plate is signed on the back in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The plate has a metal museum mount stand made for it.   This is certainly a rarity and a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

Da, Tony – Lidded Jar with Feather Design and Turquoise (1971)

This is a spectacular jar by Tony Da.  He had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike. This jar was originally purchased in 1971. It is fully polished a deep red and the design consists of three sections with a feather pattern.  The feather design on the plates by his grandmother Maria Martinez were iconic by the 1970’s, so Tony created this design as his own variation.  There are three sections of feather separated by inset pieces of turquoise.  As well, the jar has a lid, which is tightly made and it is one of his earliest styles.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

Martinez, Maria   – Gunmetal Fired Bowl “Maria Popovi 1268”

This gunmetal fired bowl is a classic piece by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the bowl and it was fired by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). Popovi focused on both the painted surfaces of the pottery as well as the firings.  This bowl is a gunmetal coloration with a metallic appearance across much of the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria / Popovi 1268”.  The firing date is when the pottery was made, so this bowl was from Dec, 1969. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Great gunmetal fired pieces by Maria and Popovi with such high polished surface are always stunning and a great addition to any collection!

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 2,200.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Wide Jar with Old Style Birds and Waterfall Lid

This is a distinctive shape jar by Russell Sanchez.  The jar is wide and with a very flat top. The jar is fully polished and the shoulder of the jar is designed with a checkerboard snow pattern using a mica clay slip.  The top is fully stone polished and designed with stylized bird patterns. The birds on this jar certainly have a similarity to those found on Sikyatki pottery, but they are also found on older San Ildefonso pottery as well!  The two birds are different and designed with additional patterns for their bodies.  The tails of the birds are inset with hematite stones while the center of the bodies have a high-grade Kingman turquoise. As old as the designs are, Russell has presented them in a manner that seems very modern!  The lid is highly carved and has “waterfall” ribbed shape with a single piece of turquoise on the top of the lid.  The base of the lid is polished with the ribs are slipped with mica.  The jar is fired a deep black and the mica squares are very metallic in appearance. There are four inset bands of hei-shi beads around the jar.  The bottom of the bowl has the classic indention of traditional San Ildefonso water jars.  Russell uses these historic elements to keep them alive on his contemporary pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 9,200.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Large Checkerboard Bowl with Bear Lid

This is an exceptionally designed bowl by Russell Sanchez.  His recent work is a modern take on historic San Ildefonso pottery.  The sound shape of the bowl is perfect for both the etched designs and the bear lid, with a graceful flow of form. The lower half of the bowl is fully polished with a black micaceous clay slip and then etched with a sun design.  The sun design in one that was a pattern often seen in the work of Tonita Royal. Note how the design is further highlighted with a matte red clay slip, which is applied before the bowl was fired!  However, it is the space from the shoulder to the neck which is the visually dynamic part of this bowl. Russell has etched a series of squares which alternate from a deep polished to matte.  The square spiral in towards the mouth of the bowl and each row is separated by a band of shell hei-shi beads.  The checkerboard pattern is a cornrow design, with the small dots representing the corn kernels.  The bear lid is also polished black and the small dots on the edge of the lid are a visual repetition of the dots on in the design on the bowl.  The shape of the bear is very sculptural and the elongated head seems to perfectly match the wide shape of the jar.  Of course, the final touch is the inside of the bear is slipped red!  Wow!  A lot going on in one piece, that seems simple but there is a dynamic complexity inherent in the piece.  The piece was traditionally fired outside and it is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Simply perfect!

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 8,900.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Waterfall Rim, Gourd Base, Bear Paw Water Jar

This is a classic form of water jar by Russell Sanchez.  The shape is a very traditional form with a wide round shoulder and straight rim.  The edge of the rim is flat, but the inside of the neck is carved and polished with 16 melon ribs creating the “waterfall” effect!  The neck of the jar has four bear paws and the shoulder has a micaceous clay slip which, when fired, is a mettalic coloration.  Above and below the mica band are jet hei-shi beads.  The base of the jar is carved or indented with a “gourd” design. The way the light hits is perfect creating a sort of “shimmer” when the piece is turned!  The entire surface is stone polished and it is always amazing that when Russell polishes the inside of the neck, the jar doesn’t crack.  It is fascinating how Russell has gone back to revive old style and create their modern versions.  Russell continues to creatively revive historic San Ildefonso designs with his innovative style of pottery.  The bottom of the jar has the classic indention of traditional San Ildefonso water jars. Russell uses these historic elements to keep them alive on his contemporary pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 2,900.00
Gonzales, Rayita – Carved Open Bowl with Avanyu (1930’s)

Rayita Gonzales was a sister of Louis  “Wo-Peen” Gonzales and Raymoncita Gonzales.  She did not make much pottery but it was mostly during the 1930’s.  This is the 4th piece of her work that we have come across for the gallery!  It is an open bowl and carved on the inside with a water serpent.  The style of her carving is very distinctive and especially the “horn” on the water serpent.  The back of the bowl is also fully polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rayita”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 400.00
Martinez, Maria  – Bowl with Lightning Design  (Maria + Santana, 1954-6)

This is a classic bowl by Maria Martinez.  It was made by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana Martinez (the wife of Adam Martinez, Maria’s son).  It is very highly polished and has a glassy surface.  The design is a cloud and lightning pattern.  Note the highly polished surface on this bowl around the design!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria + Santana”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic!  

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 1,800.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Carved Swirl Neck Jar with Bird Tail Design

This is a complex long neck jar by Russell Sanchez.  The shape of the jar is inspired by the work of his great-aunt, Rose Gonzales. The long, straight neck is one which she made famous and which Russell has modified in his current work. Here the neck has 16 carve swirling ribs.  The rim of the jar is polished, as is the interior of the neck.  The body of the jar is an exceptional shape which comes up from base and then extends nearly flat to the neck!  That is always a difficult transition in coil built pottery. The body of the jar is fully polished and it is etched with three stylized bird tail designs.  The style of the design is reminiscent of the work of early San Ildefonso innovators such as Tonita Roybal, Rosalie Aguilar and Juan Cruz.  The transition to the long neck has a single band of mica and there are two bands of hematite hei-shi beads along with inset smaller round beads.  The So, why hematite?  Russell has begun to use it on his recent pieces for several reasons. There is a traditional aspect in that women wear hematite bracelets when they do certain traditional dances at the Pueblo.  There is also hematite content in the clay slips use on the pottery.  Russell also notes that when he is able to fire his pieces to a gunmetal appearance, the hematite captures the shine and also gives them a contemporary appearance.  As Russell has said:

“I’m a traditionalist all the way through.  Innovation is part of our tradition. You use the same materials and tools that you have, and the same design elements, and the Clay Mother will come through you for what she wants you to do,” he explains. “Instead of doing the same cloud pattern or serpent pattern, you take that and make it your own. So, in fact, everything I’m doing is old, but new.”  Russell Sanchez, Southwest Art Magazine

The jar is highly fired with a near gunmetal appearance to the surface.  The contrasts of polished, mica and polished mica give the jar a dynamic appearance.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 9,400.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Bowl with Corn and Star Patterns

This is a classic polychrome bowl by Blue Corn.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This bowl is fully polished tan and painted with black and ochre-colored clays.  The design around the rim is a rain and cloud design.  ARound the body of the piece are squares which represent corn while they are separated by star designs.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.

$ 1,500.00
Martinez, Maria – Bowl with Mesa & Prayer Feather Design “Marie + Julian” (1920’s)

This bowl by Maria Martinez is a classic of her early pottery from the late 1920’s.  It was made and polished by Maria and then painted by her husband, Julian Martinez (1897-1943).  The bowl is Maria’s classic rounded shoulder shape and the entire piece is fully stone polished, including the base.  The design around the sides is painted with a mesa and a prayer feather pattern. The prayer feathers are held in the hands of Pueblo dancers and are often depicted as a series of triangles one on top of the other.  The bowl is very highly polished and was fired to a gunmetal appearance. This metallic or “gunmetal” was achieved by the heat of the firing and note how the coloration changes as the bowl is turned!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay,  “Marie + Julian”.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one small rub below the shoulder but very little wear on the polished bottom, which is unusual, as one might expect more wear just from moving the bowl around over the past 100 years!

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 2,200.00
Roybal, Tonita – Jar with Reverse Feather Design (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This jar reflects the exceptional nature of her pottery designs, shapes, and firing.  The jar has a round shoulder and then and a slight indention before extending up to the neck.  The jar itself is very highly polished and beautifully painted.  The design is interesting with a reverse feather pattern which extends up from the base.  What is interesting is the design leaves more open space and draws the eye to the shoulder.  The jar is fired to a gunmetal appearance with areas which even have a gold-tone coloration.  This “goldtone” is a rarity in her work and one which was achieved in the firing. The jar has a very metallic appearance with just the touch of yellow or gold in the light.  The jar is from the 1920’s and it has its original sticker on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Tonita” in the clay on the bottom.  As a provenance, the jar was de-acquisitioned from the American Indian Culture Research Center in Marvin, South Dakota.  It still has the tag for its catalog number of 00251.

Click here to read about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators

$ 1,800.00
Martinez, Maria – Large Wide Plainware Bowl “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

In the 1950’s Maria Martinez created a series of pieces which were simply stone polished with no design.  As she primarily made the pottery and polished it this was fitting with the other pieces of her career.  This wide bowl is very highly polished and it is fired a dark black but with areas that are gunmetal.  This shape is one which she made, often saying it was made so that it would fit when being held by two hands.   The bowl is signed in the clay, “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,200.00
Aguilar, Rosalie & Joe – Carved Jar with Storm Designs (1930’s)

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional pottery throughout their time working together.  In the 1930’s they began to make carved pottery.  This large jar is carved with two different designs. There is a rain and lighting design and it is separated by a cloud and lightning design.   The carving is done into the negative space creating a visually strong appearance.  The remainder of the jar is fully polished and fired to a gunmetal coloration. The metallic surface and the matte black areas of the carving are beautiful on this jar.  The jar is in is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Rosalie + Joe” on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 1,000.00
Sanchez, Desideria – Bowl with Cloud & Wind Designs (1920’s)

Desideria Montoya Sanchez was a sister of noted potter Maria Martinez.  She was known for her traditional pottery and use of both classic and innovative designs. This bowl is a round shape and painted with a series of bold line cloud and wind patterns. The thick lines and the style of the imagery give the bowl a very modern appearance and are certainly unusual in the imagery of San Ildefonso.  The firing of the bowl has given it a somewhat gunmetal appearance in areas.  The gunmetal coloration is due to the heat of the firing and note how areas are more black and others are more metallic.   The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Desideria”.

$ 975.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Red and Black Double Sided Mountain Lion and Bear Canteen

It is not often that Russell Sanchez makes a canteen.  They are a traditional form which Russell creates as fine art in clay. This piece has a medallion on each side.  One medallion has an incised mountain lion and the other a bear.  What is difficult to see in the photos is that each of the animals is etched with a hatchwork pattern and then painted with a red and black clay slip.  Russell said that this was how fetishes were often painted at the Pueblo. The result is that each animal has a visual coloration but also a wonderful textural feel. There is also a single inset piece of turquoise in the center of each animal.   The area surrounding them is polished black and then a band of copper-colored mica.  In the micaceous band there are 40 inset pieces of jet on each side!  There are also two bands of jet hei-shi beads.  This traditional stone accents the traditional designs on this piece.  The remainder of the canteen is polished a deep red. The deep red color is a revival by Russell as it is the same red clay slip which was used at San Ildefonso in the 1920’s and 30’s.  The shape is powerful with a slight curve to the neck and note the rounded bottom of the canteen.  It has 16 melon ribs carved into the piece!  So where is it signed? Russell signed it inside the mouth of the canteen!  The canteen has a metal museum mount which stands it securely upright but also allows you to see both sides. Once again Russell harkens to historic San Idlefonso designs and stories and uses them for his own contemporary work.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 6,200.00
Martinez, Maria – Bowl with Feather Pattern (Maria Popovi 665)

This is a rounded neck bowl by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the bowl while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The bowl is highly polished and has the traditional eagle feather pattern painted in matte around the shoulder.  Typical of the work of Popovi Da, the feathers are perfectly painted with each feather nearly the same width as the one next to it. It is remarkable as Popovi painted them free-hand and each feather would be painted over several times. The shape of this bowl is one of Maria’s classics, as the round shoulder accentuated the shape of the feathers.  The firing is a very highly polished black with a mirror-like shine.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi 665“. The signature indicates that it was made around in June 1965.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 4,400.00
Martinez, Maria – Jar with Plant Design “Marie + Julian” (1930’s)

This jar by Maria Martinez is a classic of her early pottery from the late 1930’s.  It was made and polished by Maria and then painted by her husband, Julian Martinez (1897-1943).  The jar has a distinctive form with a sharp shoulder and a sloping neck.  The design is a plant pattern which extends up from the shoulder to the neck.  The bowl is highly polished and fired a deep black.  It is signed, “Marie + Julian” on the bottom.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one small rub below the shoulder and a small pre-firing indention on the shoulder (last photo).

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 1,800.00
Martinez, Maxamiliana “Anna” – Bowl with Avanyu (1920’s)

This is a very traditional style bowl by Maximiliana “Anna” Martinez, who was a sister of Maria Martinez.   It is fully polished and painted with a water serpent (avanyu), encircling bowl.  The avanyu is delicately painted with cloud and rain motifs.  The bowl was fired was fired black and has near-gunmetal appearance.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Anna”.   Why is the work of Anna Martinez important? Interestingly, Maria would often say she was the best painter in the family.  She was married to Cresencio Martinez, who was known for his paintings and was also a brother to Tonita Roybal.  One can begin to see how her talent was easily fostered by those around her making a jar like this simply a classic!

Click here for more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 1,000.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Large Gunmetal Bear with Hemetite, Heartline & Avanyu

This is one of the largest bears we have had from Russell Sanchez.  He continues to use traditional techniques and materials to create his stunning works in clay.  This bear is highly polished and fired to a striking gunmetal coloration.  The bear has a wide body and a sculptural form.  From the mouth of the bear is a heartline, which is a traditional image used to symbolize the heart as the center of power in the animal.  In addition, the bear is a symbol of strength.  On this piece, the heartline extends backward and rises up on the back and turns into an old style avanyu (water serpent).  The style of the avanyu and the fine-line etching are inspired by the painted designs of Tonita Roybal in the 1920s.  The back half of the bear continues the heartline and has two additional avanyu.  Across the back of the bear are eight bands of square hematite hei-shi beads.  So, why hematite?  Russell has begun to use it on his recent pieces for several reasons. There is a traditional aspect in that women wear hematite bracelets when they do certain traditional dances at the Pueblo.  There is also hematite content in the clay slips use on the pottery.  Russell also notes that when he is able to fire his pieces to a gunmetal appearance, the hematite captures the shine and also gives them a contemporary appearance.  As Russell has said

“I’m a traditionalist all the way through.  Innovation is part of our tradition. You use the same materials and tools that you have, and the same design elements, and the Clay Mother will come through you for what she wants you to do,” he explains. “Instead of doing the same cloud pattern or serpent pattern, you take that and make it your own. So, in fact, everything I’m doing is old, but new.”  Russell Sanchez, Southwest Art Magazine

This bear is a stunning example of how the history and culture of San Ildefonso Pueblo is modernized in concept in his hands.  The bear is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Simply stunning!

$ 9,000.00
Martinez, Maria  –  Jar with Rain and Plant Designs “Marie + Santana”, 1940’s

This jar by Maria Martinez is one of her classic pieces.  It was made and polished by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana. It has a very highly polished surface. The design around the shoulder is a rain and plant pattern.  It is tightly painted while allowing the polished surface of the bowl to remain exposed.  The firing has given the bowl a nearly gunmetal appearance.   The rounded shoulder and sloping neck are an excellent example of Maria’s pottery from this time.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Marie + Santana”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic!  

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,000.00
Martinez, Maria – Jar with Avanyu (Maria Popovi 1069)

This is a short neck jar by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the jar while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The jar is highly polished and has the classic water serpent (avanyu) painted around the shoulder. This particular shape, with the round body and the short neck, is one which is easily one of Maria’s most famous forms.  The firing is nearly gunmetal in coloration with a very high shine.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi 1069“. The signature indicates that it was made around in October 1969.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 4,400.00
Gonzales, Rose – Red Carved Long Neck Jar

This carved jar is a classic vessel by San Ildefono potter Rose Gonzales.  She is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career, she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This jar is carved on the sides with lightning and rain patterns.  Rose was famous for her “cameo” style of carving with the use of negative space and rounded edges.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rose”.

$ 600.00
Aguilar, Rosalie & Joe – Carved Red Jar with Rain Designs (1930’s)

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional pottery throughout their time working together.  In the 1930’s they began to make carved pottery.  This jar has a carve rain and lightning pattern separated by a negative space mountain design.  The jar is polished red and the background area is a matte red clay slip.  The style of the carving is known as “cameo carving”, which was typical at San Ildefonso in the 1930’s. The jar is in is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Rosalie + Joe” on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 600.00
Roybal, Tonita – Bowl with Geometric Rain Designs (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This smaller jar has her classic sharp shoulder and sloping neck.  The neck has a geometric rain and cloud pattern.  Note the small design with the three rows of rain. This particular design is one which she often used on her pottery.  Sometimes it was attached to the other designs, sometimes simply floating on the polished surface.  The bowl is highly polished and fired to a great gunmetal coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

$ 625.00
Da, Tony – Red Bowl with Avanyu (1971)

This is a classic smaller red bowl by Tony Da.  He had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike. This bowl was originally purchased in 1971.  It is fully polished a deep red and etched with the classic avanyu (water serpent).  Tony would etch the designs into the clay before the piece was fired so that there was a sharpness to the designs.  Note the precision of the horn and the clouds on this piece!   The avanyu is symbolic of the village being saved from a flood by the water serpent.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had, and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

$ 5,000.00
Gonzales, Rose – Polished Black Jar (1968)

This is a distinctive plainware jar San Ildefono potter Rose Gonzales.  She is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career, she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This jar is fully polished and fired black. There is a slight gunmetal coloration to the surface. The jar won a second place ribbon at the 1968 Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonials.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rose”.

$ 975.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Waterfall Rim Open Bowl

This is a simple but very elegant open bowl by Russell Sanchez.  The shape of the bowl is a classic one for San Ildefonso for holding water.  The interior of the bowl is fully polished and the rim is carved with 36 melon ribs to create a “water fall” rim.  The symmetry of them give the bowl a unique appearance in terms of how the light reflects off the edge.  There is almost a silvery-gunmetal appearance to the rim which seems heightened by the deep black interior.  The exterior is a highly polished and slipped mica, which has a metallic appearance after the firing. While the bowl may seem simple in form, there is an inherent complexity to having it seem so strong with no design.  It is certianly always the challenge to an artist like Russel to restrain themselves and let the clay, form, polish and firing speak for itself.  That is the voice given to this bowl.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Russell”. Russell uses these historic elements to keep them alive on his contemporary pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 2,700.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Gunmetal Jar with Early San Ildefonso Birds & Lid

This is a complex lidded jar by Russell Sanchez.  The entire piece is fully polished and it has a wide shoulder and a short neck.  The base of the jar has 12 gourd indentions which are fully polished. The shoulder of the jar is exceptional in etched design with three San Ildefonso birds.  The bodies of the birds are etched into the clay and are inspired by the imagery of early San Ildefonso potters from the 1920’s.  Note the use of checkerboard, hatchwork lines and classic sun patterns to create the bodies and bird feathers!  It’s is almost like a “starter course” in the exploration of the use of this imagery by early artists such as Rosalie & Joe Aguilar, Susana Aguilar, Tonita Roybal and Juan Cruz.  There are two sections which are mica clay with small dots and they are surrounded by hematite hei-shi beads. The use of hematite is a traditional stone in San Ildefonso culture.  The lid is carved with an extended star pattern and on top is a single piece of turquoise.  It is almost the “surprise” of the jar.  The jar has a deep black to gunmetal metallic shine.  This is one of those pieces that is not only visually impressive, but there is a tactile aspect.  Where one might expect the mica to have texture, it is so highly burnished it is perfectly smooth!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 7,200.00
Martinez, Maria –  Bowl with Cloud and Lightning Designs (1920’s), “Marie”

This is a classic bowl by Maria Martinez from 1920-25.  It was made and polished by Maria Martinez and painted by her husband, Julian.  These early pieces are signed, “Marie”, although Julian was painting the designs.  It was not until around 1925 that they began to sign both names to the pottery.   This bowl has a slightly rounded shoulder and the design is painted in the area between the shoulder and the neck.  The pattern is a cloud and lightning design.  The bowl was highly fired to create a near gunmetal (metallic) appearance.  The gunmetal color achieved on these early pieces was from the heat of the firing.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie”.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 1,800.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Jar with Feather Pattern and Band Design

This polychrome jar by Blue Corn combines her polished and mica clay slips.  The jar is fully polished tan and then painted with a black clay, a red clay and a micaceous clay band below the shoulder.  The jar was traditionally fired and maybe a bit overfired, as the black areas are lighter in areas and a smoke area can be seen below the shoulder.  The feather pattern is tightly painted and the jar is still striking in appearance and reflect the traditional firing techniques.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.

$ 800.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Jar with Feather Pattern

This is striking polychrome jar by Blue Corn.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This water jar is fully polished tan and then it is painted.  The black is a black clay and the is an additional clay slip.  The jar  has a feather pattern painted along the neck.  Blue Corn used a green clay slip at the tips of the feathers and in the cloud design above.  Interestingly, the body of the jar is all one coloration but as it was traditionally fired outside, the area above the shoulder appears to be a lighter coloration than the base, adding one more visually striking dimension to this piece.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There is one small area of black slip loss and a small air bubble along one feather.  Both can be seen in the same photo.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.

$ 1,200.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Jar with Feather Pattern (1976)

This is a classic polychrome jar by Blue Corn.  It was originally purchased in 1976.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This water jar is fully polished tan and then it is painted.  The black is a black clay and there is an additional red or peach colored clay slip.  The jar has a feather pattern painted along the shoulder and neck.  Around the rim of the jar is a checkerboard pattern.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There are some small areas where the black is lighter.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.

$ 950.00
Aguilar, Rosalie -Bowl with  Cloud and Rain Designs

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional plates during their brief career working together.  This is one of their carved pieces. It has the “cameo” style of carving which was typical at San Ildefonso in the 1930’s.  The design is carved around the neck of the piece.  It is a cloud and rain design.  The remainder of the bowl is fully polished.  It was fired a dark black but with additional small gunmetal colored areas from the firing..  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Rosalie + Joe” on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 475.00
Gutierrez, Helen – Red Bowl with Feather Design (1986)

Helen Gutierrez (1935-1993) was a daughter of Isabel Atencio, a sister of Gilbert Atencio and the mother of Geraldine, Carol, and Rose Gutierrez. She was known for her traditional San Ildefonso pottery.  This bowl is highly polished red.  It is painted with a buff colored clay to create the feather pattern which encircles the piece.  The bowl was traditionally fired red.  The design and style are classic for San Ildefonso.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 425.00
Vigil, Albert & Josephine – Large Jar with Avanyu (1960’s)

Albert and Josephine Vigil worked together on their pottery. Albert Vigil (1927-2009) was the son of painter Romando Vigil, one of the members of the San Ildefonso School of watercolor artists.  He as also a nephew of Maria Martinez. His wife was Josephine Cordova Vigil (1927-2001) from Taos Pueblo. She moved to San Ildefonso when she married Albert. Josephine learned pottery making by watching her aunts-in-law Maria Martinez and Clara Montoya. Maria taught her how to shape the clay and Clara taught her how to polish.  They began making pottery in 1945.  This is a larger piece of their pottery with a wide shoulder and a sloping neck.  The jar is painted with a water serpent which encircles the piece.  It is a complex design and note the clouds around the rim of the bowl.  The bottom of the bowl is also painted with a feather pattern.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Albert + Josephine”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 975.00
Gonzales, Cavan  – Polychrome Plate with Old Style Avanyu

This plate by Cavan Gonzales is a beautiful example of both his clay and painting skill.  As a form, many Pueblo potters dislike to create plates, as they break frequently while drying and firing.  Cavan is one of the few who has been making this form most of his career.  This plate is polychrome with the very oldest style of Avanyu design known.  In the center is a single inset piece of turquoise and 6 inset pieces of coral.  The pattern is a series of interlocking avanyu “tongues” which circle around the plate.  It is signed on the back in the clay.

 

$ 275.00
Da, Tony – Bowl with Feather Design and Turquoise (1972-3)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike. This bowl is from 1972-3.  It is fully polished red and the design is etched into the clay after firing.  This bowl has two series of eagle feathers etched into the clay.  It was Tony’s modernistic interpretation of the classic feather pattern seen on Maria’s pottery.  Connecting the two sections of the feather there is a triangular design and a single inset piece of turquoise on each side.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

$ 8,000.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Avanyu Handle Jar with Lid

Russell Sanchez has found inspiration in the signed historic San Ildefonso pottery for both shapes and designs on his pottery.   This unique jar is inspired by a bowl by his great-great-grandmother, Ramona Sanchez Gonzales.  In the last photo, the red bowl by Ramona can be seen, with the avanyu in relief on the side.  As well, Tony Da made a jar with lizard handles in 1967-8, which is now in the Philbrook Museum (#7095).  The black and sienna of the jar and the etched medallions are certainly a reference for Russell’s latest piece.  This jar has sienna medallions on each side. They are etched with traditional San Ildefonso birds.  Each medallion is surrounded by two bands of hei-shi beads.  The handles are in the shape of the avanyu, much as on Ramona’s bowl.  The neck of the jar has a cloud pattern and the remainder of the piece is a micaceous clay slip.  The lid is fired to a near gunmetal appearance and has a sienna top and a single inset piece of turquoise.  The bottom of the jar has a “foot” which is reminiscent of historic San Ildefonso pottery and it is also indented. The hei-shi beads are all made by the Calabaza family from Santo Domingo Pueblo.  The jar seamlessly blends the old with the new and creates a new vision of how potters can derive inspiration from the past while creating their own new vessels.

$ 5,800.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Red and Black Jar with Carved Ribs and Lid

This is a Simple but elegant bowl by Russell Sanchez. He continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  The top of this bowl is carved with hard melon ribs. Each rib extends to the mouth of the piece with a narrow edge.  Each rib is stone polished black.  The lower sections of the bowl are polished a deep red.  Around the side is a checkerboard snow design in black and tan.  The deep red color is a revival by Russell as it is the same red clay slip which was used at San Ildefonso in the 1920’s and 30’s.  Separating the various bands on the side of the jar is inset hematite hei-shi beads.  Note how small they are and the shine!  The lid is polished deep red with a single inset band of hei-shi beads.   The shape, creative design and highly polished surface are striking on this piece.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 5,400.00
Da, Tony – Turtle with Bear Lid (1975-6)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.   While Tony made turtle shapes for his figurative pottery, he only made only a few turtles with lids.  This turtle is one of his with a fully polished bear lid.  The body of the turtle is fully polished and etched with a water serpent.  For the inside of the turtle when the lid is removed, there is a silver inset.  This was meant to encompass the open space created when he made the round body.  This turtle is signed on the foot in the clay, “DA”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Tony made several types of turtles. His first ones were simple and did not have a lid.  His first lidded turtle was a black one made in 1971.  It is now in a museum collection.  He made 3 or 4 red turtles with bear lids and silver insets between 1972-4.  He made two other major lidded turtles during his career.  One had a turtle lid and the other a lizard lid.  The turtle with the lizard lid was probably his last turtle figure, as it has the most sculptural appearance and detail of any of his other lids.  At this time, we do not know of any other black lidded turtles beyond the one made in 1971.

This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had, and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

Da, Tony – Red Clay Bear with Turquoise (1970-1)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  Tony began making bears as early as his first show in 1967 at Gallup Ceremonials.  As they evolved they became more sculptural in form.  This bear is an earlier one from around 1970-71.  The bear is fully polished and fired red.   The heartline and the inside of the legs is matte. There are two pieces of turquoise on the back and two for the eyes.  The bear has an incised heartline which is symbolic of the strength of the bear.  The bear is signed on the back foot in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Tse-Pe & Dora – Black & Sienna Jar with Avanyu (1975)

Tse-Pe Gonzales and his wife, Dora, began working together around 1971.  Dora would make the pottery and Tse-Pe would etch the designs. This jar is an exceptional piece of their pottery.  The jar has a round shoulder which comes to a sharp edge and then up to an elongated neck.  The rim is two-tone black and sienna.  The jar itself is fired to striking gunmetal coloration. The avanyu is etched into the clay around the shoulder and there is a single inset of turquoise for the eye.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Tse-Pe and Dora”.    It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Tse-Pe and Dora worked individually from the 1980-2000, but their early collaborative work remains innovative, creative and of the highest quality even compared to many of today’s potters.

$ 1,500.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Plate with Cloud Designs

This small plate is intricately designed by Blue Corn.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This plate has a cloud and lightning design painted with a green slip and a prayer feather and rain pattern in brown clay.  It is on a white stone polished surface.  While the plate is small, the design is complex.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Blue Corn”.  The bowl is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Carved Bowl with Avanyu

This small bowl is deeply carved by Blue Corn.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This bowl is carved with an avanyu encircling the piece.  The bowl is fully polished a white coloration and then painted with a black mineral slip.  The background is a slipped with a brown clay.  It was traditionally fired.  It is not often we see her carved work on such a small piece in various color.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.  The bowl is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. “.

$ 600.00
Da, Tony – Gunmetal Jar with Avanyu & Lid (1969)

While the pottery of Tony Da has been well documented, it is still exciting to have a piece with such an exceptional provenance.  This gunmetal fired jar is an early piece of his pottery from 1969, just two years after he began making pottery!   The jar is first featured in the book, “Maria” by Richard Spivey as a full plate (the correct caption is figure 6.25).  It captures the elegance of the shape and the lid.  The second time it is published is in the book, “The Art and Life of Tony Da”.  The shape of the jar reflects Tony having  learned to make pottery from Maria.  It has a round should and an elongated neck.  It is around the shoulder that the water serpent (avanyu) is etched into the clay before the firing. The lid has a long handle and it is formed on the inside so that it fits perfectly on the jar.  The jar was fired by Popovi Da (who fired most of Tony’s gunmetal pottery) and it has a stunning gunmetal appearance.  It is only near the base of the piece that there is more of a black coloration.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Over the course of a career that spanned from 1967-82, Tony helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.  While he started out as a painter, he made his first pottery in 1967 and it’s first public showing was at Gallup Ceremonials of that year.

Martinez, Maria – Water Jar with Gourd Indentions (1920’s)

This is certainly one of the most unique jars we have had by Maria Martinez.  The jar is from the 1920’s and it was made by Maria Martinez and her husband, Julian.  It is the actual form, with the indented sections around the shoulder, which is so unusual!  Maria is known for her traditional shapes and highly polished surfaces.  In the 1920’s, this long neck style of jar was one of her most classic forms.  The last image in this post shows her working on a jar with indented sides!  It is not a style which she made after the 1920’s and this is one of the first I have seen in person.  However, each indention is fully polished, as is the entire jar. The neck was painted by Julian and there is a cloud pattern and a turned out neck.  The jar was traditionally fired and has a nearly gunmetal appearance.  It is a creative piece of her pottery and an extraordinary part of the history of her pottery.  The jar is signed, “Marie” in the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are few small surface scratches, but nothing unexpected with the age of the jar.  It is not just exciting but an honor to have such a historically important jar come back into the gallery!

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 4,200.00
Martinez, Maxamiliana “Anna” – Jar with Avanyu (1920’s)

This is one of the more complex painted jar we have had by Maximiliana “Anna” Martinez, who was a sister of Maria Martinez.   It is fully polished and painted with a water seprent (avanyu), encircling the jar. It is the complexity of the avanyu which makes the piece so distinctive.  Note the fine lines and the clouds above the avanyu.  The jar was fired black and has near-gunmetal appearance.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Anna”.   Why is the work of Anna Martinez important? Interestingly, Maria would often say she was the best painter in the family.  She was married to Cresencio Martinez, who was known for his paintings and was also a brother to Tonita Roybal.  One can begin to see how her talent was easily fostered by those around her making a jar like this simply a classic!

Click here for more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 1,800.00
Roybal, Tonita – Gunmetal Jar with Plant Designs (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This smaller jar has her classic sharp shoulder.  The neck has a painted plant design which encircles the piece.  The jar is highly polished and fired to a great gunmetal coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  A  note on the provenance: The small sticker on the bottom denotes that it was from the collection of Dick Howard, as that was his early numbering system.

 

 

 

 

 

 

$ 600.00
Aguilar, Rosalie & Joe – Plate with Avanyu Designs (1920’s)

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional pottery during brief career working together.  It is often their plates which are the most visually striking and complex of their work.  This plate is a complicated and fascinating design. There are two avanyu heads on either side where the circle is the eye and each has an elongated tongue. They are connected with a water design and the step pattern is the mountain. The “x” design in the center is the turkey track.  The fineline checkerboard areas area exceptionally well painted.  The piece has a very modern appearance with the placement of the imagery yet it is one from the 1920’s.  This plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or  repair.  There are a few light surface scratches.  It is signed on the back, “Rosalie + Joe”.

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 1,400.00
Da, Tony – Red Jar with Avanyu (1972-3)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike. This jar with a slightly elongated neck is from 1972-3.  It is a period when the red clay slip was a bit deeper red in coloration.  This bowl is fully polished and has a water serpent (avanyu) as the design. The avanyu is etched into the clay and note the sharpness of the horn. The avanyu is symbolic of the village being saved from a flood by the water serpent.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had, and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

$ 9,800.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Black Water Jar with Avanyu & Gourd Ridge Lid

This is a stunning water jar by Russell Sanchez.  He continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched. The shape is a classic San Ildefonso form with the wide round shoulder.  Note how after the shoulder there is almost a flatness to the jar before the neck.  I took some of the photos straight on just to show how perfectly symmetrical the jar is in form!  This proportionality is technically difficult to achieve.  The jar is etched with a water serpent (avanyu) before it is fired.  The rim of the jar has 16 melon ribs carved into the clay.  The matchup with the 16 ribs which are deeply carved into the lid.  The ribs on the lid are slipped with a micaceous clay which when fired is almost metallic in color!  The top of the lid is fully polished to again compliment the polished surface of the jar.  The polishing on this jar is stunning that he is able to achieve such an amazing polish just using a stone!  Check out the neck and the base and the high shine is easily seen.  There are four bands of jet hei-shi beads which are inset into the jar around the neck and shoulder.  They separate bands of checkerboard mica and matt sections. The checkerboard use of the mica is subtle but stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay. The last photos are some of the jar being fired (red before firing, in the fire, out of the fire but now black and surrounded by the manure and finally Russell holding the jar after it is fired).

Russell says of his work:

“I don’t let a pot go until I think it’s ready. I’ve had pots sitting there for months that I don’t think are ready, and then an idea will come, from anywhere, anytime, and it’s like, OK, that’s what this pot needs. That’s what they tell you at home [on the pueblo]: When the time is ready, it will happen. That’s when you finish up and let it go.”

$ 8,800.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Red & Black Bear with Checkerboard and Sun Design

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This bear is one of his classic shapes.  This bear is polished with a deep red clay slip.  The front has a sun pattern with a black mica clay line design in the center. The sun pattern is one that is inspired by the early pottery of Tonita Roybal.  The black of the bear has a black matte section along with a traditional San Ildefonso rain design.  The bear has a heartline which is etched into the clay.  The heartline which extends out from the mouth of the bear. The bear is a symbol of strength and the heartline is a traditional image used to symbolize the heart as the center of power in the animal.  The eyes are turquoise.  The bear is hollow as the piece is coil built.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 3,800.00
Gonzales, Rose – Red Canteen with Ribbon (1965)

This canteen is a classic piece by San Ildefono potter Rose Gonzales.  She is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This canteen is her classic shape for this form.  It is fully polished red with no design.  It still has the original leather strap and wood stopper!  The canteen won a second place at the 1965 Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonials.  The piece is signed on the back in the clay, “Rose”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,100.00
Gonzales, Rose – Wide Bowl with Rain and Cloud Designs

Rose Gonzales is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This wide bowl is deeply carved with her classic style of rounded edge carving.  The design is a series of cloud and rain patterns which flow through the negative space of the shoulder of the bowl.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Rose” on the bottom in the clay.

$ 800.00
Sanchez, Desideria – Jar with Feather and Rain Motifs (1960’s)

Desideria Montoya Sanchez was a sister of noted potter Maria Martinez.  She was known for her traditional pottery and use of both classic and innovative designs. This jar is fully polished and painted with a feather and storm pattern.  There are two sections of feather separated by two sections of the rain and lightning designs.  This is a later jar and beautifully painted!  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Desideria”.

$ 650.00
Da, Jarrod – “Nambe Butterfly” Original Pastel

Jarrod Da has created a distinctive style of painting using pastels for his work. Each piece is hand painted and it is amazing how much detail he is able to achieve in each piece!  His new work is a blend of contemporary themes with San Ildefonso and Pueblo imagery.  This piece is entitled, “Nambe Butterfly”.  Jarrod says of this painting:

“This piece was made after a trip to Nambe falls in northern New Mexico. The design work is influenced from San Ildefonso Pueblo Pottery design along with influences from Deco design. You can see this Deco influence within design elements like the rainbow in the center of the piece with its gradating small circle pattern varying in many colors. The various colors of the circles represents spray coming from the falls and shows that water is not clear but has a whole spectrum of color when light hits it. Traditional Pueblo design is represented through the staircase and kiva designs along with the flower motif in each of the butterfly’s wing is indicative of pottery design.   The butterfly represents the fragility of our eco system and its mission to recreate time and time again.”

The painting is subtle in color but complex in design.  It comes in a black frame and matted. It is signed, “DA 17”.  The photo shows the painting unframed and matted. The second photo is the painting framed on the wall for scale.

$ 1,200.00
Dunlap, Carmelita – Wide Shoulder Jar with Rain Patterns (1979)

Carmelita Dunlap is one of the San Ildefono potters best known for her large vessels.  This jar is smaller for her work, but highly polished and tightly painted. The design is a series of rain and prayer feathers patterns.  The feather patterns vary as the jar is turned.  The jar itself is highly polished and fired a brown-black coloration.  It is this distinctive coloration for which she was best known. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Carmelita Dunlap”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a smaller classic of her work!

$ 800.00
Gonzales, Cavan  – Black Clay Big Horn Sheep

This large clay Big Horn Sheep is made out of clay by Cavan Gonzales.  Cavan is a descendant of Maria Martinez and the son of Barbara Gonzales.  This piece is polished on the front and then mica slipped on the back.  It has been fired black.  The use of the Big Horn Sheep is a symbolic representation of one’s own self worth.  There are inset bands of hei-shi in turquoise and shell.  It is a striking contrast of matte and polished surfaces.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 800.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Polychrome Box with Bear Lid

This is an exceptional larger box by Russell Sanchez.  The shape is inspired by the historic San Ildefonso boxes from the 1920’s.  Here, Russell has furthered the connection to the historic pieces with his focus on the polychrome coloration.  The red is a very deep coloration and the same deep red as used in the 1920’s!  The black areas are a black micaceous clay which he has polished.  When the red or black areas are etched away, they leave exposed clay, which is tan in coloration. That creates the polychrome coloration, which are the same three tonalities used in early San Ildefonso pottery. The sides of the box have bear medallions etched into the red clay.  Each bear has an inset piece of turquoise.  They are surrounded by a band of hei-shi beads.  On the sides, there are rain clouds in a matte red and each has an inset piece of hematite.  It is the top of the box which a unique variation for Russell. The top is polished red and there is a circular band of matte tan which is painted with the matte black.  Russell shaped the bear on this box so that the beet were closer together, giving the piece a more sculptural appearance.  The back of the bear is inset with turquoise and hei-shi beads.  The black polished mica on this piece turned out perfectly with a deep black/brown coloration.  The interior of the box is slipped with micaceous clay.  The box is traditionally fired outside and the box and lid are both signed in the clay on the bottom.

$ 6,800.00
Martinez, Santana & Adam – Plate with Seed Designs (1970’s)

This is a classic designed plate by Santana and Adam Martinez.  Adam was the youngest son of Maria Martinez, and Santana painted Maria’s pottery in the 1940-50’s. The plate is stone polished and it is painted with a mountain and seed design.  It was fired a deep black coloration.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Santana + Adam”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic piece!

$ 500.00
Gonzales, Juanita – Large Jar with Avanyu (1930’s)

This is a classic shaped jar by Juanita and Wo-Peen Gonzales.  The jar is deeply carved with a water serpent encircling the piece. It is carved in the cameo style which Juanita learned from Rose Gonzales.  There are cloud designs extending down from the neck and the horn of the avanyu is stylized.  The jar is highly polished and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.    The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Juanita”.   It is great to find one of their pieces in such wonderful condition!

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 800.00
Martinez, Maria – Small “Fish” Plate (Maria + Popovi,1956-9)

This is a classic black plate by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the plate while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The plate is highly polished and is one of his few pieces which has an animal motif.  This plate has a fish as the central design.  Fish were among the most common animal designs used by Popovi on his plates.  Popovi Da was an accomplished painter in the San Ildefonso two-dimensional style and this plate captures that style of his art.  The fish is beautifully painted to capture a sense of motion and fill the entire space.  It was only from 1956-9  that Popovi painted these pieces, which are among the most sought after and best of his career!   It is  signed on the back in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was made around 1956-9.   The plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 5,800.00
Sale!
Martinez, Maria – Large Plate with San Ildefonso Birds (1920’s)

This is an extraordinary large plate by Maria Martinez and her husband, Julian.  Maria would make the pottery and Julian would paint the design.  The unique aspects of this piece are the size and the design.  Many of their early plates were under 12″ diameter, as they were less likely to break in the firing.  As well, this design is one which is an early pattern and one which was very rarely used in their pottery.  The design is a series of three San Ildefonso birds.  The heads are near the rim and the wings are extending backwards with the triangle in the center making up their legs.  However, as a whole pattern, it has a beautiful flow and dynamic appearance.  The “wings” on this piece are a design which in Richard Spivey’s book, “The Legacy of Maria Poveka Martinez”, it is identified as an “avanyu” (see last photo).  However, I spoke at length with a San Ildefonso potter about this particular design and he explained how it was a bird and that it is a design often seen around the Pueblo.  To have his input gives an important addition of cultural knowledge about these pieces!  As for the plate, it is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are some light surface scratches which are not unexpected in a piece from this time period.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Marie + Julian”.  In terms of the photos, I tried to take them at different angles and different lighting to reveal both design and condition.  The curve of the plate makes it difficult but I think if you view the various photos it is possible to have a good idea of the overall condition.   This is definitely one of those exciting pieces by Maria & Julian Martinez which rarely come around to the marketplace!

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 11,000.00 $ 8,800.00
Vigil, Albert & Josephine – Jar with Feather Pattern (1970’s)

Albert and Josephine Vigil worked together on their pottery. Albert Vigil (1927-2009) was the son of painter Romando Vigil, one of the members of the San Ildefonso School of watercolor artists.  He as also a nephew of Maria Martinez. His wife was Josephine Cordova Vigil (1927-2001) from Taos Pueblo. She moved to San Ildefonso when she married Albert. Josephine learned pottery making by watching her aunts-in-law Maria Martinez and Clara Montoya. Maria taught her how to shape the clay and Clara taught her how to polish.  They began making pottery in 1945.  This  This is a larger piece of their pottery with a wide shoulder and an elongated neck. The jar is painted with a feather pattern which extends down from the neck to the shoulder.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Albert + Josephine”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair

 

$ 775.00
Gonzales, Ramona Sanchez – Bowl with Cloud Designs (1920’s)

This is a classic bowl by Ramona Gonzales.  Ramona was known for her delicately painted pottery.  This bowl has a cloud and rain pattern painted on the shoulder.  It is a strong graphic image on the bowl.  It was fired a deep black with some areas of gunmetal coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ramona”.    It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is definitely a classic piece of her pottery!

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 800.00
Pena, Juanita – Large Bowl with Rain Designs (1920’s)

This is a striking larger bowl by Juanita Pena. This bowl is an earlier piece of her pottery.  It is fully polished and painted with a rain design. The little “dots” of rain on the design are definitely a signature of her painting style.  The designs are definitely an unusual one with the geometric flow of pattern from one section to the next.  The bowl is highly polished and fired a deep black.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair.  There are some light surface scratches.   It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Juanita”.  

$ 1,200.00
Aguilar, Joe – Plate with Koshari Clown and Dog (1950’s)

This is a charming plate by Joe Aguilar.  He began his career painting pottery for his mother, Susana Aguilar,  He also made pottery with his wife, Rosalie, through the 1940’s.  In the 1950’s, after the passing of Rosalie, he created a fascinating group of polychrome pottery including both plates and vessels.  He was one of the few potters at the time still using traditional techniques for the polychrome or black-on-white pottery. This plate is painted with a stylized koshari clown as the design.  Off to the side is a dog sitting, watching the dancer.  It is an unusual design, as koshari are rarely if ever depicted in Pueblo pottery.  I was told that he was part of the clown group and so that is why he was able to paint the clowns on his pottery.  The plate is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair.   It is signed on the back, “Joe Aguilar”.  It is from the Dick Howard collection and his inventory number is still on the back.

For more information on the

Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 800.00
Aguilar, Joe – Terrace Bowl with Avanyus (1950’s)

This is certainly one of the most exceptional pieces we have seen by Joe Aguilar.  He began his career painting pottery for his mother, Susana Aguilar,  He also made pottery with his wife, Rosalie, through the 1940’s.  In the 1950’s, after the passing of Rosalie, he created a fascinating group of polychrome pottery including both plates and vessels.  He was one of the few potters at the time still using traditional techniques for the polychrome or black-on-white pottery. This unique piece is a terraced bowl. The mountain steps are on one side and the center of the bowl is meant to represent the lake below the mountains. There are two avanyu painted along the interior sides of the bowl.  The bowl was traditionally fired and there is a slight dark cast to the cream colored clay due to the smoke in the firing. The interesting part of the firing, however, is that on the bottom you can see fingerprints of where he handled the bowl before it was fired!  The bowl is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair.   It is signed on the bottom, “Joe Aguilar”.

For more information on the

Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 950.00
Aguilar, Joe – Bowl with Rain Cloud Designs (1950’s)

Joe Aguilar began his career painting pottery for his mother, Susana Aguilar,  He also made pottery with his wife, Rosalie, through the 1940’s.  In the 1950’s, after the passing of Rosalie, he created a fascinating group of polychrome pottery including both plates and vessels.  He was one of the few potters at the time still using traditional techniques and designs for his work. This wide bowl is slipped red on the inside and creame on the outside.  It is painted in black with a rain cloud and rain designs. The use of the lines in his design was a signature of his painting.  On this bowl the pattern is repeated four times.  The bowl is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair.   It is signed on the bottom, “Joe Aguilar”.

For more information on the

Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 650.00
Daubs, Dennis – Jar with Avanyu

Dennis Daubs is known for his intricately incised pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and the imagery is etched into the surface of the clay.  This jar has a water serpent around the shoulder of the piece.  Above and below are eternity belt patterns.  The designs are very intricately etched and note the precision of the lines.

$ 225.00
Martinez, Maria  – Jar with Feather Design (Maria + Santana, 1954-6)

This is a classic jar by Maria Martinez.  It was made by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana Martinez (the wife of Adam Martinez, Maria’s son).  It is very highly polished and has a glassy surface.  The design is a feather pattern which encircles the shoulder of the jar.  The shape of the bowl has a wide shoulder and a sloping neck. The feather are painted very tightly from the rim to the neck. The bottom of the jar is indented and signed in the clay.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 1,800.00
Martinez, Santana & Adam – Bowl with Lightning & Mountain Designs (1970’s)

This is a classic bowl by Santana and Adam Martinez.  The piece is very highly polished and perfectly painted with classic mountain and lightning design.  The bowl is traditionally fired with areas of gunmetal coloration to the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Santana + Adam”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic piece!

$ 600.00
Martinez, Maria – Feather and Bird Wing Plate (Maria + Popovi)

This is a variation on the classic eagle feather design plate by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the plate while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The plate is highly polished with a deep black shine.  The design has the eagle feathers and the bird wings.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was an early piece of their pottery from 1956-9).  The plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. I included photos of the plate turned in different directions to show how the shine appears on the piece.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 1,700.00
Sanchez, Kathy “Wan Povi” – Black and Sienna Seedpot with Avanyu Design

Kathy “Wan Povi” Sanchez is a great-great granddaughter of Maria Martinez and a sister of Barbara Gonzales.  This bowl is fully polished and etched with an avanyu and feather pattern on the top of the piece.  The area of the rim and the feather pattern are highlighted in sienna.  The remainder of the bowl is fully polished to a high shine.  The bowl is signed, “Wan Povi” on the bottom.  While Kathy makes little pottery today, the technical expertise of her shape, polish and design are certainly evident.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Da, Tony – Black & Sienna Plate with Antelope (1969)

While the pottery of Tony Da has been well documented, it is still exciting to have a piece with such an exceptional provenance.  This gunmetal fired plate is a significant piece in the history of his pottery.  It is one of approximately 6 pieces which he dated during his career.  In 1969 he created a group of plates, of which each was different.  These plates were all dated.  This is the only black and sienna one without a stone, which has a date. The plate was fired a gunmetal silver and then the rim was two-toned to make it sienna.  The design is an antelope, which was etched into the clay before the firing. The antelope style of the design was inspired by the Mimbres pottery of the 1100’s.  While he made other black and sienna plates, this one has a unique historic legacy.  It is signed and dated on the back in the clay, “DA 6 69”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Over the course of a career that spanned from 1967-82, Tony helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.  While he started out as a painter, he made his first pottery in 1967 and his first public showing was at Gallup Ceremonials of that year.

Martinez, Adelphia – Seedpot with Feather Design

Adelphia Martinez is a daughter of noted San Ildefonso potter Juanita Gonzales. This seedpot is fully polished and etched with a classic eagle feather pattern on the top.  It is signed on the bottom “Adelphia”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00
Da, Tony – Original Pen & Ink Painting of Maria Martinez

Tony Da is a name synonymous with innovative pottery and paintings.  However, before he became famous for his pottery he began drawing in the 1960’s.  He was the son of noted potter Popovi Da and the grandson of Maria Martinez.  This is one of about five pen and ink drawings that he did early in his career.  Virtually all the other are in public collections.  This piece is one of his grandmother, Maria Martinez.  The other known pen & ink drawings of Maria are in the permanent collection of the Millicent Rogers Museum in Taos.  This piece has an interesting provenance.  It was made in 1966 for the “Three Generations” exhibition in Washington DC.  The exhibition was partially arranged through some collectors in Texas, with whom Maria, Popovi and Tony stayed on their way to DC.  At the end of the exhibition, this drawing of Maria, along with several other pieces, were acquired by their benefactors in Texas.  The painting is signed, “D’a 66”.   It is in excellent condition. What a great piece of history and this piece is certainly an important addition  to any collection of work by Tony Da or San Ildefonso art.

$ 12,500.00
Sale!
Tse-Pe, Irene – Jar with Carved Cloud Designs

Irene Tse-Pe is a daughter of Dora Tse-Pe and Tse-Pe Gonzales and a granddaughter of Rose Gonzales.  This jar is coil built and carved with cloud pattern around the neck. The carving is in the cameo style made famous by Rose. The jar is slipped with mica to the surface which gives it a bit of a sparkle in the light!  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Irene Tse-Pe”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While Irene no longer makes pottery, it is certainly a striking piece of her creative pottery!

$ 300.00 $ 200.00
Da, Popovi-  Feather Plate (1965)

Popovi Da was a son of noted potter, Maria Martinez.  While he worked with her painting designs on her pottery, he also created a few pieces on his own beginning in 1962.  He was planning to continue making pottery on his own after Maria retired but unfortunately passed away before this could occur.  His pottery pieces are definitely a rarity among Pueblo pottery and it is not often that we come across his work.  This is one of his classic feather plates.  It is fully polished and delicately painted and traditionally fired.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Popovi 1165” which is the firing date of November, 1965.  That makes this an early piece of his pottery.  The plate is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair and it is certainly an important addition to any collection!

$ 4,400.00
Martinez, Maria – Wide Black Plainware Bowl “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

In the 1950’s Maria Martinez created a series of pieces which were simply stone polished with no design.  As she primarily made the pottery and polished it this was fitting with the other pieces of her career.  This wide bowl is very highly polished and it is fired a dark black.  The bowl is signed in the clay, “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,800.00
Roybal, Tonita – Long Neck Jar with Avanyu (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This is is one of the larger pieces we have had of her pottery. The jar is one of her early long neck vessels with a slight shoulder.  The design is the classic water serpent (avanyu), which is painted around the shoulder.  The jar is very highly polished and fired with a range of color from black to gunmetal.  Interestingly, when she would fire these long neck jars they would be fired on their side!  This jar has a slight lean to the form.  However, the size and classic design are the dynamic parts of this amazing jar!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

$ 4,200.00
Gonzales, Ramona Sanchez – Plate with Bird Design (1920’s)

This is a striking painted bowl by Ramona Gonzales.  Ramona was known for her delicately painted pottery.  This plate is almost more like an open bowl.  It is fully polished on the front and back. The design has a bird which fills up the entire surface of the plate.  The polished background and matte painted designs work perfectly on this piece.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Ramona”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some wear on the surface. This is definitely an important piece of her pottery.

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 1,550.00
Martinez, Maria  – Wide Bowl with Feather Design (Maria + Santana, 1954-6)

This wide bowl by Maria Martinez is one of her classic pieces in both shape and design.  It was made by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana Martinez (the wife of Adam Martinez, Maria’s son).  It is very highly polished and has a glassy surface.  The design is a feather pattern which encircles the shoulder of the jar.  The shape of the bowl is a very traditional one for Maria.  She would often say that this wide shape was made so the bowl could be easily held in both hands.  The deep black firing and the tightly painted designs using the matte clay work perfectly together.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria + Santana”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one very small rub on the rim, but otherwise the condition is exceptional, which can also be seen from the bottom of the bowl, which has virtually no wear!

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,200.00
Blue Corn – Jar with 39 Feathers (1970’s)

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she also made exquisite black-on-black pottery. She learned to make pottery from Maria Martinez at San Ildefonso. This jar is fully polished and patined with 39 feathers around the shoulder of the piece.  The shape is a classic one for Blue Corn, with the low shoulder and elongated sides.  The contrast of the matte feathers and the highly polished surface works perfectly!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a few light surface scratches seen in the photos.

$ 1,200.00
Gutierrez, Helen – Small Feather Jar (1980’s)

Helen Gutierrez (1935-1993) was a daughter of Isabel Atencio, a sister of Gilbert Atencio and the mother of Geraldine, Carol and Rose Gutierrez. She was known for her traditional San Ildefonso pottery.  This jar is highly polished and painted with a feather pattern.  The design and style are classic for San Ildefonso.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 200.00
Martinez, Santana & Adam – Bowl with Feather Pattern (1970’s)

This is a classic tall bowl by Santana and Adam!  This piece is very highly polished and perfectly painted with a feather pattern around the shoulder of the piece.  Above the feather pattern is a tightly painted cloud design. The highly polished surface is perfect for the classic design.  It was Julian Martinez, the husband of Maria Martinez, who began painting the feather pattern.  It was inspired by the feather pattern on a piece of Mimbres pottery from the 1100’s.  The style of feather painted by Santana is very distinctive in form.   The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Santana + Adam”. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic piece of their pottery.

$ 900.00
Roybal, Tonita – Bowl with Cloud and Water Designs (1930’s)

Tonita Roybal is one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This is classic shape with the sharp shoulder.  The sloping area to the neck was painted by her husband, Juan Cruz.  The design is wonderful in the flowing pattern with a cloud design at the top and a water design at the bottom.  However, they are mirror images and the result is a pattern which has a very modern appearance.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita + Juan”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

 

 

 

 

$ 1,050.00
Blue Corn – Bowl with 53 Feathers (1970’s)

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she also made exquisite black-on-black pottery. She learned to make pottery from Maria Martinez at San Ildefonso. This wide bowl is fully polished and painted with 53 feathers on the top of the bowl. The contrast of the matte feathers and the highly polished surface works perfectly!  The bowl is a great shape for the design as there is just a slight dip from the shoulder to the neck which gives added emphasis to the feather pattern.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  The bowl is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a few light surface scratches seen in the photos.

$ 1,400.00
Roybal, Tonita – Gunmetal Bowl with Mountain & Wind Designs (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal is one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This is one of her “gunmetal” fired bowl.  The metallic coloration is achieve using a very high fire to heat the bowl and create an intense silver appearance on the surface. This bowl is one of her classic shapes with a sharp shoulder.  The designs are mountain, wind and rain patterns.  Note the delicate lines of the painting on the bowl!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

 

 

 

$ 1,200.00
Gonzales, Cavan  – Polychrome Water Jar with Plant Designs

This is a large water jar by Cavan Gonzales. He is a descendant of Maria Martinez, through her son Adam Martinez.  Cavan is one of the few potters today who continues to make traditional polychrome pottery.  This jar is painted black-on-tan above the shoulder with a plant design.  There are cloud and rain patterns also in black.  Below the shoulder the jar is polished to a high shine.  There are etched cloud, rain and plant patterns in the red area.  There are coral insets around the neck of the jar and a band of hei-shi beads around the shoulder.  Below the shoulder in the red polished area there are inset turquoise stones connected with each of the etched designs.  The jar has been traditionally fired and it is signed on the bottom in the clay.

 

$ 3,600.00
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