Loading the content... Loading depends on your connection speed!

Scottsdale 480.481.0187 | Santa Fe 480.440.3912
kgs@kinggalleries.com
Shopping Cart - $ 0.00

No products in the cart.

King Galleries of Scottsdale and Santa Fe is pleased to represent Contemporary Native American pottery of many of today's leading potters. Over the years we have taken the time to get to know each of our gallery artists. As each new piece comes into the gallery, we talk with the artist, finding out about the time and thought that goes into their work. It is important with contemporary pottery to understand the designs and motivation of the artist and their work. Over time, we feel as if we not only have a business relationship with most of the potters, but also a friendship. Our collection of contemporary pottery spans a variety of Pueblos and Tribes and Native American Groups.  It ranges from traditionalist work being made today, to the more "edgy" and innovative pottery art that is changing how the next generation will view And collect Naive American Indian art.  Please enjoy!

Showing 1–100 of 442 results

grid
list
Curran, Dolores – Lidded Jar with Painted Feather Design

This is an intricately painted lidded jar by Dolores Curran.  Before she began making her carved pieces, she was well known for her delicately painted buff-on-red pottery.  The jar is fully polished red, as is the lid. The surface is then painted with a cream or buff colored clay which is matte in contrast to the highly polished surface.  It’s the painting which is so complex, as Dolores would paint each piece up to five times to get the color of the matte painted areas deep and consistent enough!  This piece has a feather pattern encircling the shoulder of the piece.  Below the feathers is a water serpent (avanyu) and above are clouds.  Around the neck are kiva step patterns.  The is a wonderful shape which delicately complements the shape of the jar.  The jar is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

$ 975.00
Ortiz, Virgil – Old Style “Monos” Figure

Virgil Ortiz is known for his innovative style of Cochiti pottery, inspired by the Monos figures made at the pueblo in the 1880’s. As I wrote in the book, “Virgil Ortiz: Pueblo Revolt 1680/2180,

“This use of the figures for social commentary is where they derived their name, monos. The word is a colloquial blend of Spanish and Keres, with inexact definitions that range from “mimic,” “mocking,” or “cute” to “monkey.” While “monkey” might have suggested the elongated bodies and arms or the simplified open-mouthed faces of the figures, it was also a subtle racial pejorative aimed at their Cochiti makers.”

This is one of Virgil’s traditional clay figures made from native clay and painted with native clays and wild spinach (black).  The figure has been traditionally fired.  As noted the Monos figures were originally created as objects of social criticism and reflection and Virgil continues on this same path in his contemporary work.  This figure is made in the “old style” and as a reference check out the final image by Ben Wittick from the 1880’s. These figures were made with hollow arms and “open” hands.  The mouths and eyes were also open.  Here Virgil has revived those older technical forms. The designs on the figure a spinach leaf patterns on the vest and pants. The little pocket on the vest and the goatee on the figure are very reminiscent of the early Monos figures, as those were personal identifiers which were incorporated into the design.  Note how deeply the black fired on this piece!  The earrings are also traditional red clay and added after the firing. It is signed on the bottom and is from 2018.

$ 5,900.00
Namingha, Les – Mosaic Design Bowl

This is a more classic Hopi-Tewa bowl by Les Namingha.  The bowl is a wide, but rounded shape.  The design on the top is painted with very small shard or mosaic patterns.  Each of the tiny shards has different designs.  Note as well in various sections how some are all checkerboard, while others are snow patterns and some are traditional Hopi designs.  Each of the sections is separated by asymmetric bands which criss-cross the top of the bowl.  The side of the bowl is painted with five different clay slips which alternate around the piece.  Some are polished and some are matte.  Below the checkerboard pattern is another band of shard designs.  At the base of the bowl, there is a spiraling water design interspersed with Les’s pointillism.  The coloration and the intricacy of the design are spectacular on this piece.  Les is a descendant of Nampeyo and learned to make pottery from his aunt Dextra Quotskuyva.  It is signed on the bottom.  Les said of this style of his work:

“I was studying minimalist and geometric painters. This led to merging contemporary abstract patterns with Hopi mosaic designs. The subtle combination still maintained the design balance while decreasing the use of mosaic elements. It was refreshing to introduce minimalist ideas into the intense painting process.”

 

$ 3,400.00
Whitegeese, Daryl  – Tall Water Jar with Mesa and Rain Designs

I should start off by saying that is one of the tallest pieces we have had by Daryl Whitegeese.  Next, sometimes a photo just doesn’t do a piece justice and this is one of those times.  I realize looking at the photo that the top band looks “wavy” when in fact it is perfectly even.  I had a hard time capturing the size, shine and carving on this large jar.  I went for the polish and shape.  The jar is an elegant form with a tall shoulder which turns in and then rises up to the tall neck.  It is this proportionality which creates such an elegance to this piece.  The center of the jar is fully carved with a design which depicts the mesa and the clouds , along with the rain and lightning designs.  the carving is deep and the edges are VERY sharp. This style of carving has become a ‘signature’ for Daryl’s pottery.  The jar is stone polished and it a glassy black surface. Note as well the edge of the rim of the jar and how he has polished into the rim!  The size, shape and design all work perfectly on this piece. It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Daryl has won numerous awards at Santa Fe Indian Market and other events.  He remains one of the exciting traditional potters working today!  Simply stunning!

 

 

$ 5,700.00
Romero, Susan “Snowflake” – Butterfly Seedpot

Susan “Snowflake” Romero’s pottery is highly polished and intricately etched with detailed imagery.  She learned to make pottery from her father, Joseph Lonewolf. This seedpot has a realistic style of butterfly on the top.  The butterfly is surrounded by flowers. There are various levels of etching on the piece, including some wonderful areas which are just tan.  The polishing has created a high shine.  The seepot is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair and signed on the bottom.

$ 325.00
Moquino, Jennifer & Jason Ebelacker – Double Shoulder Water Jar with Cherry Blossoms

This is a striking collaborative jar by Jennifer Tafoya Moquino and Jason Ebelacker.  Jason is a grandson of Virginia Ebelacker and a great-grandson of Margaret Tafoya.  He continues in the family tradition of making large vessels.  The water jar is one of his striking shapes with a wide shoulder and then is has a sharp, flat curve and a second shoulder as it extends up to the neck! The rim of the jar is slightly turned out and polished on the inside. The jar has two bear paws and it is fired a deep red coloration.  The surface of the jar is etched by Jennifer Tafoya Moquino. She is known for her realistic etched designs.  On this jar Jennifer has etched a series of cherry blossoms around the surface of the jar.  It is a simple but elegant design which leaves open spaces to reveal the polishing. The petals and branches add just a slight detail to the surface of the jar.  It is a striking combination of design and shape.  Jennifer & Jason have collaborated on numerous pieces winning awards for their distinctive collaborations.  This jar won a Second Place ribbon at the 2018 Heard Indian Market.  It is exciting to see potters push beyond their comfort level in size and complexity of design.

$ 4,200.00
Namingha, Les – Large “Thunderbird” Bowl

This larger bowl by Les Namingha is as part of his “Lyrical” series of Nampeyo birds.  Les says of these pieces:

In the Lyrical Series, my goal is to work with various colors.  Sunrise, sunset, dusk, or other types of blending and washing of colors.  In complement to that I use various bird designs by Nampeyo of Hano. The birds are often painted in the style they appear on the pottery so they are more detailed and contrast against the colors behind them.

He is certainly one of those potters who continues to defy expectations in his innovative clay art.  He pulls from his artistic background as well as his Zuni and Hopi heritage.   This dramatic bowl has four “thunderbirds” as the surface design.  Les says he was inspired by a black-and-white on red bowl by Nampeyo of Hano made around 1901 (see last photo).  The birds painted by Nampeyo are stylized and make one think about both Fred Harvey jewelry and Northwest coast designs.  Here the birds are painted black-and-white on a red background. Behind the birds are stylized bird wings and linear graphics. The colors spiral around the bowl much like the Thunderbird designs.  It is always fascinating when an artist is able to look back at a historic vessel and reinterpret it through modern eyes!  It is signed on the bottom.  The ancient and modern are perfectly balanced in this bowl!

$ 3,600.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Black Water Jar with Avanyu & Gourd Ridge Lid

This is a stunning water jar by Russell Sanchez.  He continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched. The shape is a classic San Ildefonso form with the wide round shoulder.  Note how after the shoulder there is almost a flatness to the jar before the neck.  I took some of the photos straight on just to show how perfectly symmetrical the jar is in form!  This proportionality is technically difficult to achieve.  The jar is etched with a water serpent (avanyu) before it is fired.  The rim of the jar has 16 melon ribs carved into the clay.  The matchup with the 16 ribs which are deeply carved into the lid.  The ribs on the lid are slipped with a micaceous clay which when fired is almost metallic in color!  The top of the lid is fully polished to again compliment the polished surface of the jar.  The polishing on this jar is stunning that he is able to achieve such an amazing polish just using a stone!  Check out the neck and the base and the high shine is easily seen.  There are four bands of jet hei-shi beads which are inset into the jar around the neck and shoulder.  They separate bands of checkerboard mica and matt sections. The checkerboard use of the mica is subtle but stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay. The last photos are some of the jar being fired (red before firing, in the fire, out of the fire but now black and surrounded by the manure and finally Russell holding the jar after it is fired).

Russell says of his work:

“I don’t let a pot go until I think it’s ready. I’ve had pots sitting there for months that I don’t think are ready, and then an idea will come, from anywhere, anytime, and it’s like, OK, that’s what this pot needs. That’s what they tell you at home [on the pueblo]: When the time is ready, it will happen. That’s when you finish up and let it go.”

$ 8,800.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Polychrome Mountain Lion Box

This is a very creative box by Russell Sanchez.  The shape is inspired by the historic San Ildefonso boxes from the 1920’s.  Here, Russell has furthered the connection to the historic pieces with his focus on the polychrome coloration.  The red is a very deep coloration and the same deep red as used in the 1920’s. The black areas are a black micaceous clay which he has polished.  When the red or black areas are etched away, they leave exposed clay, which is tan in coloration. That creates the polychrome coloration, which are the same three tonalities used in early San Ildefonso pottery.

The box itself is inspired by the painting of Florentino Montoya form the early 1900’s.  This box has two sides of red and two sides of black. The lid is half black and half red.  The lid can also be set for the black to match up, or for it to be a contrast.  Florentino was famous for his alternating and switching of colors on his painted designs.  Here the lid has very delicately etched fine-line patterns which represent the mountain lions when they are drawn as petroglyphs.  The sides of the box are etched in two sections with cloud and rain designs. The medallions are unique in design.  Russell has etched and textured the mountain lions in each of the medallions. They are much in the style of the animal imagery seen on San Ildefonso pottery before 1900.  The mountain lion design is an equally significant one on this piece as Russell says here that the mountain lions represent the twin war gods who protect the village.  Each of the medallions is surrounded by a band of hei-shi beads.  Again, the medallions are the opposite color of the surrounding clay.  The box was traditionally fired and the result is a striking coloration, especially for the red. The box is signed on the bottom.

$ 3,800.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Melon Jar with Waterfall Rim & Lid

This classic water jar by Russell Sanchez is a modern take on historic San Ildefonso pottery.  This jar is focused on the complexity of form and color and just the simplest addition of etched design.  The shape of the jar is inspired by the historic Pueblo water jar with a round shoulder and turned out rim. The colors on this jar are all from natural clay slips and they are simply stunning. The deep red is the same red clay which was used in the 1920’s.   The black areas are a black micaceous clay which he has polished.  On this piece, the black is an even coloration, which further enhances the red.  The base of the jar has 28  indented gourd or melon rib sections.  They are deeply carved into the clay creating an undulating appearance.  The base then comes up to the shoulder and there is just a slight dip in the jar before extending up to the neck.  The photo of the jar on its side reveals the depth of the indention at the shoulder.  This is technically difficult to create.  The neck of the jar is straight and the rim is flat.  Amazingly, the inside of the rim is carved with melon ribs creating the “waterfall rim”.  The rim is polished red while the melon section is polished with black mica.  There is a single section which is matte and inset with jet stones and surrounded on both sides by turquoise hei-shi beads.  Check out the tiny incised dots on the rim and neck of the jar.  They are a subtle but striking addition.  The jar also has a lid, which is carved with gourd sections and they alternate between matte and black mica.  The top of the lid if fully polished red.  There are inset jet stones on the end of the lid and the top has a piece of turquoise.  The lid is a wonderful addition, as it covers the “waterfall” leaving it as a surprise when the lid is removed.  The deep red on the lid also matches the deep red on the neck of the jar.  The jar is traditionally fired outside and it is signed in the clay on the bottom.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 6,800.00
Roller, Cliff – Bowl with Bear Paws (1995)

Cliff Roller is a son of noted potter Toni Roller. Each piece is coil built and stone polished.  This bowl is carved four bear paws as the designs. The bear paws are symbolic of a Pueblo story where the bear leads the people to water during a drought.  Here the bear paws are each deeply carved into the clay and polished. The remainder of the bowl is fully polished to a very high shine.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Cliff Roller”.  This bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While these days Cliff makes very little pottery, his work remains a statement to his skill as a potter!

$ 400.00
Manymules, Samuel  -Water Jar with Sharp Melon Swirls

This is a low shoulder water jar by Samuel Manymules.  It is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar has a stone polished neck and the ribs extend from the shoulder swirling down to the base.  The swirl is low, giving the jar a striking appearance.  The ribs are pushed out from the inside and very angular. The coloration of the jar is more subtle with red and light black areas.  The color is created by the traditional outdoor firing.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 1,625.00
Cling, Alice –  Jar with Asymmetric Rim

This jar by Alice Cling has a narrow base and has an asymmetrical rim. The idea is that the rim looks like the mountains and mesas in the Southwest.  This jar is fully polished red and then fired outdoors.  The stunning variation in the color are from the smoke and fire.   The colors on this piece vary from tan to black to a deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof. Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 225.00
Swentzell, Roxanne – Original Clay Mask

This is an original clay piece by Roxanne Swentzell.  She is well known for her clay masks and their unique expressiveness.  This mask is a charming smaller piece of her work.  The face has great expression and a lot of detail on the mouth and eyes.  It is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed in the clay, “ROX”.

$ 1,000.00
Cling, Alice – Long Neck Jar with Square Mouth

This is a classic jar by Alice Cling.  It has a high shoulder and a square mouth.  The entire jar is fully polished and then it is outdoor fired and the stunning variation in the color is from the smoke and fire.   The fire clouds on this jar are stunning with areas that range from deep red to black.  The piece was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when the pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof. Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 200.00
Ortiz, Virgil – “Pueblo Revolt: 2180” Tile

This is a classic design on a clay tile by Virgil Ortiz.  The design is taken from his Revolt 1680/2180 series. The figure is one of the Pueblo Warriors from the Venutian Soldier series of his work.  It is a powerful story of the connection between man and the environment.  The figure is intricately painted with an amazing sense of motion.  The tile has a wildflower design on the back.  There is also Virgil’s signature “Turkey track” which looks like an “x”.  The tile uses native clay, native clay slips and wild spinach (the black).  The piece is signed on the back. The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

In the book, “Revolt”, I wrote about these as follows:

In the summer of 2012 Ortiz premiered his “Venutian Soldiers’.   The story of the Pueblo Revolt was becoming more evolved and Ortiz was able to have fun developing more background for his characters and the events before the Revolt 2180. “I have created Native Superheroes in the form of clay, photography, video and film, which allows me the freedom to express my personal interpretation of the REVOLT – The First American Revolution.  The Venutian Soldiers are futurist, herculean superheroes, over eight feet tall, who fight mainly at nighttime and possess extraordinary strength and magical powers”.  Here the Venutian Soldiers reflect the destruction of pueblos by the Spanish during their original conquest. In their future version, it is the Castilians who have destroyed their ‘world’ and the Venutian Soldiers are the embodiment of this devastation. Their environment has been destroyed through nuclear weapons causing the Venutian Soldiers to use oxygen tanks and gas masks to survive. This story is a thoughtful embodiment of a world overrun and the natural order destroyed yet survivable by the sense of “Pueblo community”.  The Venutians are lead by Tahu and Kootz to find a hospitable land and “rebuild their traditions and ways of life on ancestral sacred lands”.

 

$ 650.00
Ortiz, Virgil – “Pueblo Revolt Warrior: 1680/2180” Tile

This is a classic design on a clay tile by Virgil Ortiz.  The design is taken from his Revolt 1680/2180 series. The figure is one of the Pueblo Warriors from the Venutian Soldier series of his work.  It is a powerful story of the connection between man and the environment.  The figure is intricately painted with an amazing sense of motion.  The tile has a wildflower design on the back.  There is also Virgil’s signature “Turkey track” which looks like an “x”.  The tile uses native clay, native clay slips and wild spinach (the black).  The piece is signed on the back. The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

In the book, “Revolt”, I wrote about these as follows:

In the summer of 2012 Ortiz premiered his “Venutian Soldiers’.   The story of the Pueblo Revolt was becoming more evolved and Ortiz was able to have fun developing more background for his characters and the events before the Revolt 2180. “I have created Native Superheroes in the form of clay, photography, video and film, which allows me the freedom to express my personal interpretation of the REVOLT – The First American Revolution.  The Venutian Soldiers are futurist, herculean superheroes, over eight feet tall, who fight mainly at nighttime and possess extraordinary strength and magical powers”.  Here the Venutian Soldiers reflect the destruction of pueblos by the Spanish during their original conquest. In their future version, it is the Castilians who have destroyed their ‘world’ and the Venutian Soldiers are the embodiment of this devastation. Their environment has been destroyed through nuclear weapons causing the Venutian Soldiers to use oxygen tanks and gas masks to survive. This story is a thoughtful embodiment of a world overrun and the natural order destroyed yet survivable by the sense of “Pueblo community”.  The Venutians are lead by Tahu and Kootz to find a hospitable land and “rebuild their traditions and ways of life on ancestral sacred lands”.

 

$ 650.00
Peynetsa, Jamie – Jar with Rain & Lightning Designs

Jamie Peynetsa is the son of noted potters Anderson and Avelia Peynetsa.  Avelia, his mother, coil builds the clay vessel.  Jamie paints the design.  He has a strong attention to the detail of the painting as well as his inspiration from classic Zuni pottery.  This jar is very tightly painted with rain designs above the shoulder.  The thin lines are even and add complexity to the piece.  The sides of the jar are boldly painted with lightning patterns.  Note how well Jamie paints to match design and form.  It is signed by Jamie and his mother on the bottom.  At only 20 years old, he certainly has a great future in pottery!

$ 600.00
Ebelacker, Jason – Double Shoulder Water Jar with Bear Paws

This is a classic wide shoulder water jar by Jason Ebelacker.  The jar is an elegant shape with the very wide shoulder and turned out rim. This shape of water jar is one which is often seen in the work of his great-grandmother Margaret Tafoya.  Here Jason has created a jar with a double shoulder or “rainbow rim”.  The key to making a jar of this shape is to accentuate the round shoulder and the curves of the neck.  He has impressed a bear paw as part of the design.   The paws represent the story of the bear who saved the village from a flood and they are represented on vessels which hold water.  The jar is stone polished to a high shine and then traditionally fired. The jar has a high polish and a very deep black coloration.  Jason is a son of noted potter Richard Ebelacker and grandson of Virginia Ebelacker.  He has won numerous awards for his pottery and continues to be one of the important younger potters to watch.  Pottery at this level of creativity and quality are certainly a reflection of both his talent and the future!

$ 3,600.00
Holt, Lisa & Harlan Reano – Dragon Dog Clay Figure

Lisa Holt and Harlan Reano make an amazing team, working to create innovative pottery using traditional techniques.  Lisa makes the pottery and it is painted by Harlan.  This figure is a dragon/dog.  It creatively combines both a pueblo and Asian influence.  The dragon is hollow and the body has a spiraling appearance.  The body is complex and the various spines add an exceptional sense of depth to this piece!  The turned head is just perfect!  The body is painted with bee-weed (black) and a red clay slip. On the back legs is a wild spinach design.  On the sides is a flower pattern. The back and legs has a mosaic lightning pattern which Harlan often uses on his pottery.  The small clay tabs which are added are the natural color of the clay, adding another dimension to the piece.  The materials are all traditional as the red and cream are both native clays while the black is wild spinach (a plant). This figure was also traditionally fired outdoors.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 6,000.00
Medina, Elizabeth – Jar with Birds & Turtle Lid

Elizabeth Medina is known for traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece is coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  Did you know that Zia potters mix volcanic basalt into their clay to give it strength? The surface of this jar is painted with a series of birds and roadrunners, which are often depicted on Zia pottery.  Here there are two large sections with birds, each highly detailed.  Separating them are two smaller bird medallions.  Note the hatchwork designs near the rim and the flower patterns.  There are three different colors used on the jar, a tan, red and a brown clay.  It is always more difficult to work in multiple colors of clay!  The lid of the jar has a turtle and the flat part of the lid is red, while the turtle has a bird on its back!  The jar is signed on the side, “Elizabeth Medina, Zia”.

$ 400.00
Nampeyo, Eiva L. –  Bowl with Bat Wing Design Bowl

Eiva Lalo Nampeyo is a daughter of Elva Tewaguna Namepyo, a granddaughter of Fannie Nampeyo, the great-granddaughter of the Nampeyo of Hano.  She is as sister to potters Adelle,  Miriam Nampeyo, Elton Tweaguna and Neva Namepyo.  She learned to make pottery from her mother and grandmother.  This jar is a striking variation on the classic bat wing design.  Here there is a linear pattern above the shoulder which then extends down to the bat wing patterns.  The red clay slip is used to highlight the bat wings. It is signed on the bottom.

$ 195.00
Nampeyo, Adelle L. –  Wide Shoulder Bat Wing Design Bowl

Adelle Lalo Nampeyo is known for her stylistic use of traditional Hopi designs.  This wide bowl is a classic shape with a wide shoulder.  The design is the classic bat wing pattern, made famous by Nampeyo of Hano.  The opening is slipped red and the remainder is painted with intricate lines.  The bowl is traditionally fired to create the coloration on the surface of the jar.  The coloration works beautifully with this piece with shades from white to orange.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 150.00
Quotskuyva, Dextra – Double Opening Bowl with Hummingbird & Star (1990’s)

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This is a fascinating bowl which has two openings.  On one side there is a flower painted on the clay with a tiny hummingbird.  The other side has a black painted star pattern.  The bowl is signed on the inside.  The bowl sits on a clay tile, which has been traditionally fired and is also signed in the clay.  The fine lines of the painting, along with the blush from the traditional firing make this an exceptional piece of her pottery. It is painted with red clay slips along with bee-weed (black).  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Dextra was the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture, along with a companion book entitled, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 4,000.00
Diaz, Tina – Red & Tan Jar with Birds & Clouds

Tina Diaz has skillfully created her own unique style of carving pottery.  She is one of only a handful of Santa Clara potters who has mastered the technique of polishing her pottery tan.  The tan is the natural color of the clay and the most difficult to polish to achieve a high shine.  This red and tan jar is fully carved.  There is a bird and cloud design on one side in the red.  As the jar is turned the lightning design is carved and polished tan. She uses the negative space of the jar to create additional cloud motifs.  The neck and base of the jar polished red.   Note the various sections which create swirls and various angles for the design.   It is always technically difficult to carve such sharp angles and delicate edges into the clay.  The background has the traditional cream colored slip, which few potters use today because it is difficult to apply.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay. 

$ 950.00
Lonewolf, Rosemary “Apple Blossom” – Seedpot with Birds

This is an exceptional miniature seedpot by Rosemary Lonewolf!  It is fully designed with three birds and a band of flowers around the shoulder.  Spiraling around the top of the seedpot is a feather design and there is a small flower on the very top! Rosemary has added additional white and blue colorations for the clay on this piece.  The various colors are all derived from natural clay slips.  The seedpot is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 800.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Long Neck Jar with Butterfly (1993)

This is a classic miniature long neck jar by Grace Medicine Flower is from 1993.  It is fully polished and the area around the body of the piece is fully designed. There is a butterfly on one side and around the shoulder are cloud and rain designs.  Note the various levels of etched into the clay on the butterfly!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks restoration or repair.

$ 975.00
Folwell, Susan – “Going East” Large Tile

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series for, “Taos Light: Maidens to Mantas”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This tile is inspired by the painting “Water Carriers” by Walter Ufer.  Susan says of this piece:

Tiles are always so difficult to make, but I wanted to challenge myself to do one that is exceptionally large.  In the original painting by Walter Ufer, the coloration of the blue is so intense.  I wanted to soften it so that the clay would have room to breathe. When you have a painting that is powerful, I leave the faces undefined so that it is not a “copy” but it leaves them to the imagination.  The “frame” became one of my very intricate “bejeweled” designs. I want the little squares to look like turquoise, coral, silver, and gold.

The tile is intricately etched around the edge to create a tile or mosaic appearance.  The central design is delicately painted and captures the women and the pottery.  There is a striking sense of movement and the use of the natural clay for the color of the background is perfect!  The til is signed on the front.

$ 2,400.00
Folwell, Susan – “Reclining Woman” Lidded Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series for, “Taos Light: Maidens to Mantas”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This jar is inspired by a painting by Victor Higgins.  Susan says of this jar:

“This painting by Higgins is a powerful piece.  I really wanted to be able to capture the “Higgins Clouds” (last image).  They are the kind of clouds which you only see in Northern New Mexico.  I put the lid on the jar with the tightly basket to create a greater sense of intimacy than it just being an open vessel.

The jar is a tall shape and the white areas are a textured white slip. The figures are painted so that the clay can be seen in the background of the piece.  Again, the texture of the clay plays an important part of the vessel. The lid is wonderful with the tightly painted basket and the handle.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

“Viewing Susan Folwell’s intricately designed pottery is like reading a book, as each piece must be turned, examined and viewed from different angles to understand the whole story.”  American Indian Art Magazine, 2005

$ 2,200.00
Folwell, Susan – “Water Carriers” Tile

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series for, “Taos Light: Maidens to Mantas”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This tile is inspired by the “Water Carriers” painting by Walter Ufer.  Susan says of this piece:

My newest pieces serve as commentaries and reflections on the classic Taos Society of Artists Work. I specifically want to focus on their portrayal of Native Women.  The use of the tile format allows me to create my own “painting”.  Here I added the shelf or “bench” to the tile and made four additional pieces of pottery which are attached to the tile.  I like the idea of the painting becoming 3-D, just like a piece of pottery!

The tile has the women painted carrying water jars on their heads.  In the foreground are four small pieces of pottery which are attached to the tile.  There is a black water jar, a red and tan polished bowl, a tan polished bowl and a tiny black and white bowl.  The back of the tile is also fully designed with a textured pattern with dots.  There is almost the feeling of a shawl or cloth to the texture and coloration.  The tile is signed on the front.

$ 1,450.00
Folwell, Susan – “The Twins” Large Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This large jar is part of her new series for, “Peering through Taos Light”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This jar is inspired by a Hennings painting of two twins who moved to Taos. Susan says of this piece:

 

“What attracted me to this painting was the striking look of the twins.  They were the Baumgartner brothers who relocated to Taos.  I appreciated the painting captured the essence of the time they lived.  I wanted to do a flask as the shape to accentuate the landscape.  I went a bit “free” form on the shape, but it billows behind them, like the clouds.  The back panel are flowers local to Taos and New Mexico and the painted and etched the basket on the bottom. I love how the basket seems to be both holding them and they seem to be floating out of it as well.  It’s all like a dream.”

This large jar is both painted and etched.  Note on the figures how Susan has etched away the figures to create both depth and bring out the natural color of the clay.  The “lid” for the flask is cork.  The shape, design and story all fit together perfectly on this amazing large vessel!  The last photos here are the actual painting for comparison.  The pieces are signed on the bottom.

$ 11,000.00
Folwell, Susan – “Water-Grass” Open Bowl

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series for, “Taos Light: Maidens to Mantas”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This jar is inspired by the painting “Water-Grass” by Bert Phillips.  Davison Koening, the Director of the E.I. Couse Foundation in Taos, NM noted that the early paintings by many of the Taos artists were ethnographic in orientation.  As a result, the title, such as “Water-Grass”, would often simply be the name of the subject in the painting.  Susan says of this piece:

“On this piece, I had created the open bowl and then I saw the Phillips portrait of “Water-Grass”.   As with much of my recent work, I wanted to be able to honor and reflect on the women in these paintings by the Taos Artists.  This image was perfect for the shape, as it almost felt as if I was painting a cameo in a shell.  There was an unexpected intimacy in the hand-held size of the open bowl and the detail for her clothing and jewelry.  I painted the intricately etched detail on her jewlery to have it own lumininescence.  The bowl itself is like a shell that could be held.  The back is textured and painted to look like a turtle shell.   I put her name, “Water-Grass” on the front to honor her and the endurance of Native women.”

The open bowl is painted in the center with the portrait of “Water-Grass”.  Scan in close and you can see how Susan has incised the hair and necklace, so there is an intricacy in the technique and design which is unexpected. The space around the figure reveals the coloration of the clay.  The back is almost the “surprise” as it is highly textured and the coloration is to have the feel of a turtle shell.  It is signed on the back.

$ 1,500.00
Folwell, Susan – “Hennings at Sunset in the Snow” Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series for, “Peering through Taos Light”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This jar is inspired by the painting “Passing By” by Ernest Hennings.  Susan says of this piece,

“In the painting, it is a scene with the two women walking down the lane. When I was working on this jar in Taos, it was the first snow of the season.  I deiced to make it a snow scene instead of an autumn scene.

The color of the jar is the key to this piece.  It captures the mood of the sky after a snow and at sunset.  The piece is mostly matte, with a single band of the Folwell family “x’s” etched into the clay.  The figures are painted but note the use etching around the plants, which gives them just a slight sense of relief.   Sometimes less is more and the strength of the design is powerful enough for the jar.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 4,400.00
Folwell, Susan – “Corn Maidens” Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her continuing series for, “Peering through Taos Light”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This jar is inspired by painting by Bert Phillips.  The jar features Taos Pueblo women with baskets of corn.  The designs are painted and etched into the clay.  The rim of the jar has been wet so that it has a “crackled” appearance. Susan said she wanted it to have a utilitarian feel, much like the baskets the women are holding.  The figures are each intricately painted and etched.  The original Phillips painting is the last image.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 3,600.00
Folwell, Susan – “Feast Day” Long Neck Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series for, “Taos Light”.  This jar combines her love of Pop-Art with Pueblo imagery. Here there are two young women wearing tablitas on their heads for Feast Day  The area behind them has been left the natural color of the clay.  The shoulder of the jar has been indented, almost reminding one of the bread made during Feast Day in the horno ovens.  However, it is the base of the jar which is dynamic.  Susan has etched and carved into the clay with a series of rows which she has then painted to have the appearance of a stone mosaic!  Each band is a different size, as is each of the various squares and rectangles. The imagery here is evocative not only of the hei-shi beads and jewelry worn during Feast Day, but also the beauty of the stones and how when set in this manner almost seem to replicate the horizon.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

“Susan has been experimenting with textured surfaces, creating a “bejeweled” effect that looks like turquoise, coral, silver, and gold.”  “Taos Light”.
Native Art Magazine, April 2018

$ 2,600.00
Folwell, Susan – “Bread Bakers” Large Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series for, “Taos Light: Maidens to Mantas”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This jar is inspired by the painting “The Bakers” by Walter Ufer.  Susan says of this piece,

I made this jar to have a very open and organic appearance.  I wanted to capture the fun and intensity of Pueblo women getting ready for Feast Day.  There is so much movement in the clouds and sky and there was an unexpected translucence when I put on the clay slip.  It made me want to keep the clay showing and create a piece which was more subtle.  The use of the layers of rope around the neck are the passing of the legacy of Feast Day and baking bread from one generation to another.

The jar is a large but organic shape with a wide body and indented neck.  The rim of the jar is fully incised to create the appearance of the rope. The body of the piece is painted with the scenes of Pueblo women baking bread.  The clouds are intricately painted with small dots and note how the background areas has large swaths of white clay slip against the natural color of the clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 4,900.00
Setalla, Stetson – Large Wide Bowl with Mountain and Cloud Patterns

Stetson Setalla is a son of noted potter Pauline Setalla.  This wide bowl is fully painted triangular mountain designs along with cloud patterns. The designs are intricately painted with hatchwork and geometric patterns. The bowl is coil built and painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  Note the various colors he has used on this bowl, which is certainly unusual!  The bowl is traditionally fired with striking fire clouds on the surface.  Interestingly, the first time I met Stetson was through the famous photographer Jerry Jacka, around 1998.  Jerry was photographing Stetson’s pottery for is book on Hopi art and asked Stetson to stay until I arrived so I could see his pottery!  Definitely a talented potter from the very beginning!  This bowl is signed on the bottom.

$ 800.00
Folwell, Kaa – Large Grafiti Style Clouds and Lightning Design Bowl

Kaa Folwell is one of the exciting young potters working today.  In 2018 she is graduating from IAIA, which certainly adds an educational component to a lifetime of making pottery in her renowned family.  This large bowl has a wide shoulder and a slight neck.  The outside of the bowl is etched and then painted. The designs are graffiti style clouds and lightning.  The spiral and flow around the surface of the bowl.  The contrast of the painted surfaces with the texture of the clay body works perfectly for both the feel and the visual.  In various places around the designs are the Folwell family “x” design.  Not only is the bowl painted and etched, but the entire interior is fully painted as well.  The strength of the exterior design continues on the interior.  It is a beautiful balance of color, form, and design.  The bowl is signed on the bottom.  We are excited to see more from this young potter!

$ 1,500.00
Folwell, Kaa – Bowl with Graffiti Design

Kaa Folwell is one of the exciting young potters working today. This jar has an asymmetrical shape around the rim. The coloration is achieved by polishing the top and bottom areas red and the center tan.  The area around the shoulder is fully incised with “graffiti” designs.  There is a striking flow of design and the various levels of design.  It is a beautiful balance of color, form, and design.  We are excited to see more from this young potter!

$ 400.00
Roller, Toni – Large Jar with 32 Feather & Mountain Design

This is an exceptional large carved jar by Toni Roller.  She is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and is known for her classic shapes and exquisite stone polished pottery.   This large jar is a striking shape with a high shoulder and a slight neck.  Around the shoulder are 32 carved feathers as the design.  Toni has a distinctive style of carved feather she uses for her pottery, with a rounded edge at the base.  The lower section of the jar is carved with a kiva step and mountain pattern.  It is a subtle complement to the complex carving of the feathers.  The jar is fully polished and a striking example of her work.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Toni Roller” and dated February 2018.

$ 4,000.00
Cling, Alice – Mountain Step Rim Jar with Green Slip

This jar by Alice Cling has a mountain step design carved shape to the rim.  The remainder of the jar is highly polished red but note that she has added a band of green clay slip around the rim of the jar.  It creates a striking visual contrast after the firing.  The jar is traditionally fired and ranges in color from brown to a deep red to black. The piece was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof. Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 180.00
Cling, Alice – Large Long Neck Water Jar with Fire Clouds

This is one of the larger jars we have had from Alice Cling.  The jar has a high shoulder and an elongated neck.  The entire jar is highly polished red. It is then outdoor fired and the stunning variation in the color are from the smoke and fire.   The fire clouds on this jar are stunning with areas that range from deep red to black to a deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pine pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof. Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 500.00
Estevan, Paula – Op-Art Water Wide Shoulder Jar

Paula Estevan has built a reputation for her highly detailed painted pottery.  This jar is more “trompe l’oile” than “op-art”.  The jar is thin-walled and one of the largest pieces of her pottery we have had in the gallery.  The design, however, does fool the eye as the lighting pattern which extends from the neck to the base give the piece added dimension.  It is spectacular painting on this jar and a reflection of how Paula continues to be one of the leaders of Acoma pottery.

$ 550.00
Ortiz, Virgil – “Pueblo Revolt Warrior: 2180” Canteen

This is a provocative canteen by Virgil Ortiz.  The piece is coil built and painted with native clay slips and wild spinach (a plant) for the black.  The front of the canteen is painted with one of Virgi’s iconic images.  The figure is one of the “Ventuian Soldiers”.  In the book, “Revolt”, I wrote about these as follows:

In the summer of 2012 Ortiz premiered his “Venutian Soldiers’.   The story of the Pueblo Revolt was becoming more evolved and Ortiz was able to have fun developing more background for his characters and the events before the Revolt 2180. “I have created Native Superheroes in the form of clay, photography, video and film, which allows me the freedom to express my personal interpretation of the REVOLT – The First American Revolution.  The Venutian Soldiers are futurist, herculean superheroes, over eight feet tall, who fight mainly at nighttime and possess extraordinary strength and magical powers”.  Here the Venutian Soldiers reflect the destruction of pueblos by the Spanish during their original conquest. In their future version, it is the Castilians who have destroyed their ‘world’ and the Venutian Soldiers are the embodiment of this devastation. Their environment has been destroyed through nuclear weapons causing the Venutian Soldiers to use oxygen tanks and gas masks to survive. This story is a thoughtful embodiment of a world overrun and the natural order destroyed yet survivable by the sense of “Pueblo community”.  The Venutians are lead by Tahu and Kootz to find a hospitable land and “rebuild their traditions and ways of life on ancestral sacred lands”.

The combination of figures reacting to the environment and water issues, and the form being a canteen, was not lost on Virgil in making this piece.  The figure is surrounded by floral designs and wildflower designs on the back.  Note as well the “spirit line” which is a space in the painting on the rim.   Virgil has also incorporated his signature “x”, which is the turkey track, onto the front of the canteen. The piece is signed on the back.  The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay. His work can be found in museums worldwide, including the Fondation Cartier in Paris, the Heard Museum, the Denver Art Museum and more.

$ 2,500.00
Medina, Elizabeth & Marcellus – Jar with Butterflies, Bird & Turtle Lid

Elizabeth Medina is known for traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece is coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This jar was made by Elizabeth and painted by her husband, Marcellus Medina.  The jar has Zia birds on two of the sides.  It is charming how the birds are painted looking at the butterflies!  Separating the birds are stylized plant designs.  Note all the various colors used on this jar! Some of the colors are polished while others are matte.  The top of the lid is polished red and there is an added turtle. The top of the turtle has flowers and a bird as the design.   The jar is signed on the side “Elizabeth + Marcellus Medina, Zia”.

$ 300.00
Moquino, Jennifer Tafoya – Perch Clay Fish

This is a figurative piece by Jennifer Tafoya Moquino.  It is a perch and fully polished and etched.  Note the details on the sides and the various layers.  The piece is signed on the bottom.  The colors are all derived from natural clay slips.

$ 140.00
Garcia, Greg – Double Shoulder Water Jar (1984)

Greg Garcia was known for his use of classic Santa Clara forms for his pottery.  He learned to make pottery from his grandmother, Severa Tafoya and also worked closely with his sister, Tina Garcia.  This is one of his classic double shoulder water jars. The jar has the “rainbow ridge” or double shoulder, which is always technically difficult to make. The entire piece is fully polished.  The jar was fired a deep black coloration.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Greg Garcia”.

$ 300.00
Nichols, Robert Cleto – Black Bowl with Carved Fish Design

Robert Cleto Nichols is known for his deep carved pottery.  Each piece is coil built, carved and stone polished.  This bowl has a fish as the design which encircles the piece.  As the bowl is turned the body of the fish is divided up into various classic Santa Clara designs. There are melon ribs, kiva steps, and cloud designs.  Note the depth of the carving on this piece!  The bowl is traditionally fired black and signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 400.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Black Micaceous Seedpot with Silver Lid

Preston Duwyenie is renown for his elegant pottery which is often highlighted with silver medallions.  This seedpot is made from micaceous clay and fired black.  The sparkle on the surface comes from the mica clay slip.  The lid is cast from cuttlefish bone (a type of squid) and then Preston makes a silver finial to perfectly fit into the seedpot.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay with Preston’s hallmark.  It is a woman carrying a child on her back, which is also Preston’s Hopi name, which means “carried in beauty”.

$ 500.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Mini Jar with Flute Player, Frogs & Turtles (1998)

This miniature red jar by Grace Medicine Flower is fully polished and incised.  The design is a central medallion with a Mimbres inspired flute player.  Around the shoulder are alternating turtles and frogs.  The jar is from 1998 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.

$ 1,600.00
Youngblood, Nancy –  Red 16 Rib Swirl Melon Bowl with Kiva Step Lid

This is an exceptional miniature by Nancy Youngblood.  It is one of her very deeply carved melon bowls which swirl down from the neck to the base.  There are sixteen ribs and each rib is carved into the clay and fully stone polished.  Consider that each rib has two “sides” to be polished and the surface area of the piece is about double its size! This jar also has a lid which is carved to fit exactly into the rim of the bowl.  Amazingly, the front and the back of the lid are stone polished!  Nancy said of this type of lid:

“The kiva step lid.  I saw that design a lot when I was a young girl both on pottery and on my mom’s embroidery. I wanted to try that pattern with a lid. It’s tough to do because lids are so fragile. You have to make it solid and then cut into it to get the shape. Lids are probably some of the hardest things to do with the pottery.”  Nancy Youngblood, Spoken Through Clay

The coloration on this bowl is a striking deep red.  The deep ribs and the deep color are in perfect to reflect the light at every angle!  Nancy has won numerous awards for her melon bowls, and this is undoubtedly a classic of her style!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 4,800.00
Daubs, Dennis – Jar with Avanyu

Dennis Daubs is known for his intricately incised pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and the imagery is etched into the surface of the clay.  This jar has a water serpent around the shoulder of the piece.  Above and below are eternity belt patterns.  The designs are very intricately etched and note the precision of the lines.

$ 225.00
Natseway, Thomas – Mini 3 Lobe Jar with Bear Handles

Thomas Natseway is one of the most renown miniaturists in Pueblo pottery.  Rarely does he make a piece which is over 1″ tall or wide!  This jar is inspired by the Acoma pottery canteens.  The jar has three round sections and there are tiny bear “handles” on the top!  Both sides are painted with very intricate geometric patterns as one side is series of swirls and the other are geometrics.  The shape and style of this piece is inspired by the three chamber canteens of Juana Leno.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 150.00
Manymules, Samuel  – Jar with Vertical Melon Ribs

This jar by Samuel Manymules has a round shape which is accentuated by the melon ribs.  The jar itself is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar has a stone polished neck which comes to a sharp edge. Below the shoulder the melon ribs are pushed out in the clay and extend to the base of the jar.  The symmetry of each rib adds to the overall appearance of the jar.  It was traditionally fired outdoors and that has created the coloration on the surface.  The jar has areas which range from black to red and brown.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 2,300.00
Peters, Franklin – Jar with Star & Rain Designs

This is detailed water jar by Franklin Peters.  He is known for his thin-walled pottery and use of traditional Acoma imagery on his pottery. The jar is coil built with native clay and painted with native slips. The design has a star pattern repeated four times.  There is a fine line rain pattern around the star and there are small plant designs near the rim. The thin lines are a delicate complement to the thin walls.  The rim of the jar has a painted “spirit line”, which is often seen on Acoma pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 650.00
Moquino, Jennifer Tafoya – Jar with Peony Flowers

This is a striking jar by Jennifer Moquino.  It is fully polished and has a high shoulder and a slight neck. Around the neck is a rain and cloud pattern.  Around the body of the jar are etched peony flowers.  They are delicately designed and etched into the clay.  The very subtle coloration is from the natural clay slips she uses to add color to her work.  Jennifer has used flowers as an accent to many of her pieces, so it is exciting to see her do something with just flowers!  As well, check out the polishing overall, which has a very high shine!  It is signed on the bottom.  It is this creative evolution in her work which keeps  Jennifer as one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 1,875.00
Candelario, Hubert – Jar with Four Dragonflies and Circular Holes (2018)

Hubert Candelario is one of the few potters from San Felipe Pueblo.  He has been known for his micaceous pottery for over thirty years.  This is one of the larger and most creative pieces we have had from him.  This distinctive jar has four dragonflies carved into the clay in the open space.   Each dragonfly is made up of oval and circular shapes.  Dragonflies are often represented as prayer messengers.  The dragonflies here are surrounded by circular holes in various sizes.  Belive it or not, there are almost 100 other holes carving ino the piece!  WOW!  It is a wonderfully complex piece he has created!  The piece is slipped 3 to 4 times with a micaceous clay before they are fired.  It is the multiple layers of mica which give the jar such sparkle and deep coloration.  This is a new piece is from 2018 and an exciting variation on his style and designs. 

$ 2,800.00
Naha-Nampeyo, Cheryl – Small White Bowl with Ants

 

Cheryl Naha Nampeyo is a daughter of Shirley Benn and a granddaughter of Daisy Hooee.  She is also a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano. This is one of her small “ant bowls”.  She says of these:

The story was told to me by my grandmother Daisy Hooee Nampeyo as it was told to her grandmother.  Long ago, the People wanted to get rid of the ants around the house.  They would hunt for the hives in the bushes or trees.  Once a hive was found, they would use honey.  The honey was poured into small pots and place on top of anthills. All the ants would come out because they found that it was sweet.  The people would use a hoe to move the pots of ants away from the home.  That is how they got rid of the ants and that is why we call them “Ant pots”.

This small bowl is made from white clay and it is painted with bee-weed (black).  There are a series of ants encircling the bowl as part of the story of moving the ants.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “C. Naha Nampeyo”.

$ 25.00
Begay, Jr., Harrison – Jar with Eagle Family

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This round jar is fully carved with an eagle family.  There are two eagles in flight and two baby eaglets in a tree.  Surrounding the birds are cloud and wind designs.  Note the complexity of the tree branches, which provided wonderful depth to the overall story of the jar.  The firing on this piece is exceptional with a silvery appearance to the surface which contrasts with the black matte areas.  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 850.00
Folwell, Susan – “From Horse to Train” Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery. Her work in native clay and traditional designs, but she is constantly experimenting with techniques and clays.  This jar is rag polished, so that the surface has a satin sheen.  The design is an incised train which encircles the neck.  Note the detail and the precision in the train!  There are also “x’s” for the stars above the train. On the remainder of the jar there are horses, which she uses a stamp and applies them in ink, clay and mica.  The unique shape of the jar, with the low shoulder and asymmetrical rim, are part of the innovative clay work in her pottery.

$ 975.00
Ebelacker, James – Storage Jar with Carved Cloud Designs

This is an exceptional carved storage jar shaped vessel by James Ebelacker.  He is a son of noted potter Virginia Ebelacker.  He is known for his large vessels and this jar is a striking piece of his pottery.  It is a classic storage jar shape with a round shoulder and slightly turned out rim.  The storage jar from is not just a difficult one to coil build and create a “round” shape, but the resulting vessel has an exceptional amount of space for carving.  The neck of the jar is slipped with a micaceous clay and the body of the jar is very deeply carved. There are cloud, rain and lightning designs.  What’s interesting is not just how he carved them, but also how they are polished. He carved the jar with a lot of open space, which created much more intricate design patterns and sections. The polishing was done so that the edges of the carving has a soft slope instead of the usual edge.  This style of carving is reminiscent of his aunt Jennie Trammel’s carving and polishing.  The jar is fired a striking red in coloration.  The contrast of the complex designs, the matte and polished surfaces and the micaceous rim make for an exceedingly varied and unique jar.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  His work can be found in museums throughout the southwest and most recently in the book, “Spoken Through Clay”.

$ 8,000.00
Naha, Rainy – Large Jar with Awatovi Star Design

Rainy Naha is known for her delicately painted Hopi-Tewa pottery.  This is one of the larger pieces we have had from her designed with the Awatovi Star pattern.  As she only makes a few pieces each year this size, we are certainly pleased to have it in the gallery.   The jar is striking shape with a wide shoulder and a sloping neck.  This design, the “Awatovi Star” pattern, which was revived by her mother, Helen “Featherwoman” Naha.  Awatovi is one of the ruins near Hopi where a white slipped style of pottery was made.  It is a fascinating place as it was where Coronado made contact with the Hopi in 1540.  During the excavations in the 1930’s the whiteware pottery was rediscovered.  It was the imagery from his work which inspired much of Helen’s early pottery, as opposed to the more classic Sikyatki inspired pottery of Nampeyo of Hano.  This jar has the “Awatovi Star” pattern painted on the top and the bottom.  Around the shoulder is her “eternity band” design.  The bowl has been traditionally fired and there is some variation to the color with the fired cloud, which certainly adds to the beauty of the piece.  It is tightly painted using bee-weed (black) on a white kaolin clay surface. There is a balance of the design on the surface as the piece is turned which is simply beautiful!  It is signed on the bottom with a feather and her name.

$ 2,600.00
Naha-Black, Tyra – Bowl with Bird Designs

Tyra Naha-Black is a daughter of Rainy Naha.   She learned to make pottery from her mother and continues to make traditional style Hopi-Tewa pottery in the style her grandmother, Helen “Feather Woman” Naha.  This bowl is coil built and painted with native clay slips and bee-weed (black).  It is a classic design with a series of birds encircling the bowl and connected with fineline patterns.  It is a variation on the classic “migration” pattern.  The bowl is traditionally fired and signed on the bottom with a feather and spider (Spider Clan ) and a “3” for being Third Generation of the Naha family.

 

 

 

 

$ 250.00
Begay, Daniel – Square Jar with Yei Figures & Stars

This is a striking square shaped jar by Daniel Begay. He learned to make pottery from his father, Harrison Begay, Jr..  Each piece is coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired.  Daniel has created a distinctive style of carving, similar to that of his father, yet with more angular and graphic designs. This jar is carved with two different stylized Yei figures.  The figures are each carved in a spiral with the mask and feather and blanket.  Separating each of the figures are large and small star patterns.  The stars certainly take ones mind not just to the celestial nature fo the Yei figures, but also their use in Navajo weavings.  There is a striking contrast between the polished and matte surfaces, which adds to the sophistication of the imagery. Note how Daniel’s designs combine both thin and thicker lines to enhance the imagery.  The style of carving has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,400.00
Tafoya, LuAnn – Jar with Lightning and Rain Desings

LuAnn Tafoya is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and learned to make the large vessels from her mother.  This jar is one of her classic shaped smaller pieces with a round body and a sloping neck. The body of the jar is carved with a complex rain, lighting and cloud pattern.  The designs are carved in a series of panels and extend from the top down and the bottom up.  The jar is highly polished to a glassy finish.   The pottery of LuAnn Tafoya is an important continuation of the traditions of her family and the pueblo.  Today, few potters create pieces this size and the skill and beauty in LuAnn’s pottery is always remarkable!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,200.00
Nampeyo, Tonita – Migration Jar

Tonita Nampeyo is a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and a granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano.  She is known for her traditional pottery using natural clay slips and bee-weed for the black.  This jar is a classic shape with a wide shoulder and a slightly turned out neck.  The design is called the, “Migration pattern” and it is one that was revived by Nampeyo of Hano in the late 1800’s from ancient Sikyatki pottery.  The design is meant to tell the story of the migration of people from the third to the fourth world in Hopi legends as well as the migration of people around the world.  This jar is delicately painted and note the exceptional thin lines!  It is traditionally fired for the amazing color.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair but some fugitive slip in the black.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 275.00
Fender, Erik – Long Neck Jar with Feather Pattern

Erik Fender is the son of Martha Appleleaf and the grandson of noted potter Carmelita Dunlap. Erik combines classic San Ildefonso imagery with his own creative style. His pottery is signed, with his Tewa name, “Than Tsideh”.  This is a small longer neck water jar with a sharp shoulder. The shoulder of the jar is painted with a feather pattern. The neck of the jar is two-toned red and black and there are two inset bands of hei-shi beads.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 250.00
Vigil, Ethel – Carved Bowl with Feather & Avanyu

Ethel Vigil is a daughter of noted potter Mida Tafoya and a granddaughter of Christina Naranjo.  She has been making pottery since 1975. This bowl is deeply carved with a feather pattern around the top and a water serpent (avanyu) around the body of the piece.  Note the depth of the carving and the very high stone polished surface!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 175.00
Singer, Mary – Bowl with Carved Feather Design

Mary Singer was known for her intricately carved pottery and figurative work.  This bowl is deeply carved with a reverse feather pattern.  The feathers extend up from the base and inside each feather is a kiva step design.  The carving is deep and the polishing creates a very even coloration.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mary Singer”. While she no longer makes pottery, her work can be found in museums nationwide.  This bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is from the 1990’s.

$ 300.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Polychrome Water Jar with Bear Lid

This is water jar by Russell Sanchez is visually stunning in person!  It is a larger water jar shape with the round body and the fluted rim.  The coloration is part of what is so spectacular. The red is a very deep coloration and the same deep red as used in the 1920’s!  The black areas are a black micaceous clay which he has polished.  When the red or black areas are etched away, they leave exposed clay, which is tan in coloration. That creates the polychrome coloration, which are the same three tonalities used in early San Ildefonso pottery.  On a purely visual level the black mica, deep red clay and the tan are a visually dynamic combination.  For Russell, the shape becomes the canvas for further exploration of San Ildefonso imagery.  The bear lid symbolizes the strength of the bear in the fetishes and the red sides of the jar are then etched with imagery that has stylized birds separated by checkerboard bands. Of course, it is the melon swirl base, neck and lid which are the most impressive!  The ribs are carved at an  angle and fully polished. They seem to flow from the lid to the neck and the base keeping the jar visually in motion with the reflection of the light.  This jar pulls from such a rich context that there become many levels of interpretation and enjoyment.  There are additional bands of shell hei-shi beads which are subtle and don’t overwhelm the rest of the designs.  The jar is traditionally fired outside and it is signed in the clay on the bottom.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 18,000.00
Manymules, Samuel – Large Jar with Round Swirl Melon Ribs

This is an impressive wide shoulder water jar by Samuel Manymules.  It is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar has a stone polished neck and the ribs extend from the shoulder swirling down to the base.  The ribs are pushed out from the inside and rounded.  However, it’s not just the size which is so impressive on this jar, it is the coloration.  The piece is outdoor fired and the colors range from nearly a purple hue to deep black.  The fireclouds flow across the surface in a manner that amplifies the contours of the ribs.  It’s not often that one piece has so much intense color!  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.  The jar is signed on the bottom has a blue ribbon from Santa Fe Indian Market.

$ 2,900.00
Zane Smith, Richard – “Op-Art” Ribbon Pattern Jar (1992)

This is a striking jar by Richard Zane Smith. It is coil built and the ribbon pattern is incised into the clay.  The design is then highlighted with various clay slips. The shape of the jar has a high shoulder and the rim is polished and slightly turned out.  The ribbon pattern works perfectly on this shape as it expands and contracts to create a distinctive sense of movement.  Richard has created this distinctive style of pottery through a revival of the ancient concept of corrugated pottery.  The earliest corrugated pieces were often baskets which had clay applied to them and then fired, creating a “corrugated” appearance.  Richard has created his own style, using small coils which are left exposed.  This jar is from 1992 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom. 

$ 5,500.00
Folwell, Susan – Wolves and Buffalo Bowl

Susan Folwell is known for her innovative and unique Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl has an oval shape and the top half is fully polished and the bottom matte. The bowl has painted wolves on the top, along with a cross and Northwest Coast eye.  The bottom is carved with buffalo  and the Folwell family “x’s”.  The bowl denotes a variety of sacred imagery and the coloration from the firing is striking!  The bowl is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,500.00
Early, Max – Jar with Rain & Plant Designs

Max Early is one of the few traditional potters working today at Laguna Pueblo.  His work combines traditional forms with a blend of contemporary and traditional designs.  Max said that this jar was his own variation on classic Laguna designs. The neck has a linear rain pattern.  Around the shoulder are plant designs in classic Laguna style.  The jar is a beautiful shape with a slightly elongated neck and a rounded base. The rounded bottom harkens back to the traditional Laguna pottery when the water jars were meant to be carried on one’s head.  Note as well his use of the various clays to create a “three color” jar!   The jar is also traditionally fired, which adds to the overall difficulty of the piece.  It is certainly exciting to see a potter who is inspired by traditional shapes and designs and yet has the artistry to create his own distinctive variation!

$ 1,800.00
Namingha, Les – Wide Jar with Birds and Swirls

This is a traditional Hopi-Tewa jar by Les Namingha.  The jar is a wide shape, which is inspired by the ancient Sikytaki pottery as well as Nampeyo of Hano.  The design is painted on the top with the black bee-weed as well as several different colors of red and tan clay slips. The designs on the jar are a series of birds.  Two of the larger panels have the birds and bird tails.  The other two sections has the swirling birds with a pointilism use of red and black surrounding them.  The side of the jar has an alternating rain and eternity band.  The design around the rim is both angular and one that seems to easily identify the jar as one by Les.   The blushes on the surface are from the firing.  The jar is from 2013 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Les is a descendant of Nampeyo and learned to make pottery from his aunt Dextra Quotskuyva.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,800.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Tall Black Micaceous Jar with Silver Insets

This is a distinctive jar by Preston Duwyenie.  The piece is a tall jar with a narrow opening. The piece is slipped in a micaceous clay and then fired black. The mica then gives the piece a very metallic appearance.  There are two inset pieces of silver on one side of the jar.  Each silver piece has the appearance of “shifting sands”, much in a similar style to the pottery where he has carved a shifting sand pattern.  They are cast by Preston against cuttlefish bone, to create the distinctive texture.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay with Preston’s hallmark, which means “carried in beauty”.  There is certainly something both modern and ancient about this striking piece!   Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.  He is married to pottery Debra Duwyenie and now resides in Santa Clara Pueblo.  Preston has won numerous awards for pottery, including “Best of Show” at the Heard Indian Market.

$ 2,100.00
Whitegeese, Daryl – Wide Shoulder Red Jar with Storm Designs

This is a spectacular wide shoulder jar by Daryl Whitegeese.  He is known for his use of traditional Santa Clara shapes and designs.  This wide shape is one which his mother, LuAnn Tafoya has made famous.  I didn’t think I had seen a piece this shape by Daryl before and when I asked him he said he had made three of them, but the other two didn’t survive the firing!  The jar has a wide shoulder and it is fully polished a very deep red.  The design is a storm pattern, with clouds, rain and lightning designs.  Typically for his work, the edges are very sharp and create a strong contrast to the matte slipped background.  The jar has been traditionally fired to give it a deep, red coloration.  It was a difficult piece to photograph, so some of the lines you see on the rim in white are just reflection.  The shape and polish work perfectly to reflect the light. Daryl has won numerous awards for his pottery including “Best of Pottery” at the 2015 Heard Indian Market.’  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay. aryl Whitegeese is known for his use of traditional Santa Clara shapes and designs.  This water jar is a graceful shape with a round body and a very sharp edged rim. The neck and base are fully polished red.  The design around the center is inspired by an early red bowl by his grandmother, Margaret Tafoya.  The design is cut into the clay and has a strong angular composition as the jar is turned. The background area surrounding the carving has been scraped away to reveal the tan clay coloration.  It’s a striking visual contrast to the highly polished surface.  The smooth matte areas are always difficult to keep smooth. If they are not smooth the shadow of any indentions are readily apparent.  The jar has been traditionally fired to give it a deep, red coloration. The shape and polish work perfectly to reflect the light. Daryl has won numerous awards for his pottery including “Best of Pottery” at the 2015 Heard Indian Market.

 

$ 5,200.00
Gonzales, Barbara – “Swish Pot” with Hummingbird & Spider

Barbara Gonzales is a great-great granddaughter of Maria Martinez.  She is known for her innovative pottery which combines etched designs along with inset stones.  This is one of her “Swish Pots”.  She said that while they are basically a seedpot pot, she has put a small bead inside them.  She says you can “swish” the bead around and make a wish”.  The top of the seedpot is fully polished and etched with a hummingbird.  There is a spider web and a spider on the side.  There are four inset pieces of coral on the top along with areas which are sienna in coloration.  The spider on the side is etched into the clay and has an inset piece of turquoise.  Barbara says she uses spiders as they are good luck symbols and the turquoise is a male spider.  The lower half of the piece has a mica slip. The bottom of the piece is signed in the clay, “Than-Moo-Whe”, which is her name in Tewa.

$ 350.00
Fragua, Glendora – Jar with Double Sunface (1983)

Glendora Fragua is known for her intricately incised pottery.  This piece is from 1983 and has an asymmetric form.  There is an etched sunface on both sides of the piece.  Note the intricacy of the feathers!  There are corn plants and prayer feather patterns on the sides separating the two medallions.  The asymmetrical neck has an additional etched cloud motif.  The red clay has just a slight bit of mica, which gives it a bit of a sparkle.   The piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay with Glendora’s corn hallmark.

$ 200.00
Lewis, Sharon – Seedpot with Raised Lizard

Sharon Lewis has developed her own very distinctive style of design.  Her pieces are beautifully formed, thin-walled and then tightly painted.  This miniature seedpot has a multi-color design with a lizard and it’s head is raised in relief.  All the various colors are from natural clay slips.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom.

$ 80.00
Lucario, Rebecca – Fineline Jar with Mimbres Figures

Rebecca Lucario is known for her delicate and intricately painted pottery.  This jar is very intricately painted with thin lines.  They create a series of interlocking stars.  The rim fo the jar is painted with Mimbres figures, each holding hands.  The bottom of the jar is impressed in the traditional manner.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “R Lucario”.

$ 800.00
Manymules, Samuel  – Wide Faceted Melon Jar

This large jar by Samuel Manymules is an unusual shape for his pottery.  It is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar has a square mouth and four ribs which swirl from the neck to the base.  They are pushed out from the inside to create the sharp “edge” but the area separating them is flat.  This turns out to be a striking form as the flat sections have fired to deep colorations from black to deep red.  The entire jar is fully polished and traditionally fired to create the coloration.  It is how Samuel places the jar in the firing and the smoke which determine how the colors will range from black to red.  The color changes as the jar is turned but in the photos you get a good sense of the color variations.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 2,425.00
Begay, Jr., Harrison – Brown Jar with Bears

While living at Santa Clara Pueblo, Harrison Begay, Jr. learned to make Santa Clara style carved and polished pottery.  This jar is deeply carved with heartline bears on both sides.  They are connected with cloud swirls above them an plant designs below.  The neck of the jar is also fully polished.  The designs are either polished or matte, which Harrison alternates to accentuate his imagery. Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  This jar has been fired brown, so there are some striking color variations as the piece is turned.  The interesting part about the brown firings is that they always feel close in color to the traditional Navajo pottery, which is also brown.  Harrison has won numerous awards for his work and continues to be one of the leading innovators in Native American Indian pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 750.00
Tafoya, Emily – Green Seedpot with Butterflies & Hummingbird

Emily Tafoya was the wife of noted potter Ray Tafoya and is the mother of Jennifer Moquino. This seedpot is fully polished green and etched with a hummingbird, flower and butterflies.  All the various additional clay colors are added after the firing. It is signed on the bottom.

$ 200.00
Duwyenie, Debra & Preston – Tile with 10 Turtles

Debra Duwyenie is well known for her wonderful miniatures and incised designs. Each piece is stone polished and then it is etched before it is fired! This tile is flat with ten turtles.  Each of them has a different design on its back.  Usually, Debra etches one of the turtles to have a “shifting sand” design to represent her husband, Preston Duwyenie.  That one can be seen in the corner.  Surrounding the turtles are lots of dragonflies along with a lizard.  The edge of the tile has a water serpent encircling the piece  and a rain cloud in the corner.  Note that the lighter red matte areas are where Debra has only etched away the polished surface but not down as far as the tan color of the clay. Debra also pays close attention to the little details like the tan background area and how evenly she etches the vertical lines.   The back of the tile is also fully polished.  The piece is signed on the back by both artists.

$ 750.00
Medina, Marcellus – “Eagles” Jar (1984)

Marcellus Medina is known for contemporary painted pottery.  The jar is made by his wife, Elizabeth Medina.  Marcellus has painted on the surface with acrylic. The jar has an Eagle Dancer on each side.  Separating the two Dancers is a raincloud design on each side.  The painting on this piece is very detailed and there is dramatic motion depicted in both of the Eagle Dancers.  The jar is signed by both Marcellus and Elizabeth Medina on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 200.00
Speckled Rock, Adam – Open Bowl with Turtle and Pine Tree Design

Adam Speckled Rock is the son of noted potters Paul Speckled Rock and Rosemary Lonewolf.  He is a grandson of Joseph Lonewolf and a great-grandson of both Severa Tafoya and Camilio Tafoya.  This open bowl is fully polished on the outside.  It is designed like a “kiva bowl” with the step patterns. In each of the step designs is an etched pine tree.  There is also an etched turtle with a sun design on its back.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 200.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Polychrome Box with Bear Lid

This is an exceptional larger box by Russell Sanchez.  The shape is inspired by the historic San Ildefonso boxes from the 1920’s.  Here, Russell has furthered the connection to the historic pieces with his focus on the polychrome coloration.  The red is a very deep coloration and the same deep red as used in the 1920’s!  The black areas are a black micaceous clay which he has polished.  When the red or black areas are etched away, they leave exposed clay, which is tan in coloration. That creates the polychrome coloration, which are the same three tonalities used in early San Ildefonso pottery. The sides of the box have bear medallions etched into the red clay.  Each bear has an inset piece of turquoise.  They are surrounded by a band of hei-shi beads.  On the sides, there are rain clouds in a matte red and each has an inset piece of hematite.  It is the top of the box which a unique variation for Russell. The top is polished red and there is a circular band of matte tan which is painted with the matte black.  Russell shaped the bear on this box so that the beet were closer together, giving the piece a more sculptural appearance.  The back of the bear is inset with turquoise and hei-shi beads.  The black polished mica on this piece turned out perfectly with a deep black/brown coloration.  The interior of the box is slipped with micaceous clay.  The box is traditionally fired outside and the box and lid are both signed in the clay on the bottom.

$ 6,800.00
Lonewolf, Greg – Seedpot “Hummingbirds and Bees”

Greg Lonewolf is the son of Joseph Lonewolf and is known for his intricately incised miniatures.  While he no longer makes pottery, his work was both creative and detailed in design.  Different that that of his father, with a focus on telling a story on each piece that encompassed both realistic and Mimbres inspired imagery.  This seedpot has two realistic hummingbirds on the side of the piece.  They are surrounded by flowers.  There is one section with two Mimbres bees, lightly etched into the clay.  On the top is a flower medallion with a feather pattern below.  The piece is entitled, “Hummingbirds and Bees”. It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Begay, Daniel – Tall Jar with Bears and Geometrics

Daniel Begay learned to make pottery from his father, Harrison Begay, Jr..  Each piece is coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired.  Daniel has created a distinctive style of carving, similar to that of his father, yet with more angular and graphic designs. This jar is carved with two bears, one on each side.  Below the bears are a stylized rain cloud design.  Separating them are a triangular “heartline” design on each side.  One section is polished, the other is matte.  The matte areas are always difficult as if they are not sanded enough they appear rough in the shadows.  The style of carving has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay.  The jar is very highly polished so that there is a strong visual distinction between the matte and polished surface.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 700.00
Allison, Marla – “Of the Earth” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Of the Earth“.  The imagery is inspired by pottery designs with a very earth oriented coloration, much like the clay.  The designs range from pottery designs to an avanyu.  All of Marla’s paintings have a “gallery wrap” so the painting continues onto the side.

Marla says of her painting in general:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained a formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.  She was also the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 1,550.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Polychrome Jar with Plant and Rain Designs

This spectacular water jar by Russell Sanchez is a modern take on the very classic style of San Ildeofnso pottery.  The shape of the jar is inspired by the historic Pueblo water jar with a wide shoulder and turned out rim. The colors on this jar are all from natural clay slips and they are simply stunning. The deep red is the same red clay which was used in the 1920’s!  The black areas are a black micaceous clay which he has polished.  On this piece, the black seems an even deep tone, which further enhances the red.  The shoulder of the jar is divided into sections.  The etched designs are inspired by the work of Tonita & Juan Cruz, with the thin lines, the linear rain patterns, the swirling interconnected designs and the mirror imaging.  They are complicated patterns delicately etched into the clay.  Each of the red panels is separated by a diamond-shaped snow design.  Now for the complicated part to this jar!  The base is impressed with sixteen melon ribs, as is the neck. The reflection of these in the light with the deep black, is visually striking. The rim of the jar has sixteen ribs, each rounded out and ending at a small ledge, which he built into the piece to hold the lid!  The lid is polished black mica and the deep red.  The top of the lid is so highly polished it almost seems to be a stone!  The jar has inset hei-shi beads made from shell.  There are four rows inset into the jar and two in the lid.  The new work of Russell’s pulls from such a rich context that there become many levels of interpretation and enjoyment.  The jar is traditionally fired outside and it is signed in the clay on the bottom.

“There is a huge change going on right now. People are rediscovering Pueblo pottery.  History has a lot to do with it. Every time I sell a pot, that’s what I talk about. It says something and it speaks. It’s true. The pots do speak to you, and you can feel the energy and what the pot is saying.” Russell Sanchez in “Spoken Through Clay”.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 7,800.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Shifting Sand Seedpot with Fan Design

Preston Duwyenie is know for his Hopi pottery which blends modern and traditional aspects of the art. This seedpot is made from a red clay which he finds near Second Mesa at Hopi.  The clay fired a tan coloration.  The body of the piece is fully polished.  The top area above the shoulder has the shifting sand design.  What makes the sand area so fascinating is how he carves it so that it has very natural appearance.  It flows around the entire surface, just as if the clay has been swept away. The top view of the piece shows the design nicely and the shadows the design creates.  The lid is made from silver and cast against cuttlefish bone. Preston cut the lid so that it has a stylized fan half-circle or plant shape.  The casting creates a similar style of ‘shifting sand’ design to complement the clay areas!  The the seedpot and the silver lid are signed on the bottom with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child and his Hopi name, which means “carried in beauty”.   Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

Why the shifting sand designs? Preston says he remembers watching a smooth pebble caught in sand being shifted by the wind, “there was beauty in its isolation within the sea of sand. It was like an island.  The endless sands of time, and the fact that people, too are tossed about by the wind. There is always rippling in our lives”.

$ 750.00
Nampeyo, James Garcia – Large Jar with Eagle Tail Design

James Garcia Nampeyo is a son of Leah Garcia Nampeyo, a grandson of Fannie Nampeyo and a great-grandson of Nampeyo of Hano.  This is a large wide shoulder jar by James.  It is fully polished and painted with a very classic eagle tail design. This motif was made famous in the pottery of Nampeyo of Hano when she revived it from historic Sikyatki pottery. The design is painted in four sections and the black is bee-weed and the red, a clay slip.  The jar is traditionally fired with some slight blushes to the surface.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 975.00
Roller, Cliff – Bowl with Feather Pattern (1995)

Cliff Roller is a son of noted potter Toni Roller. Each piece is coil built and stone polished.  This bowl is carved with a feather pattern around the shoulder of the piece.  Note the shape of the feathers, with the slight wave at the bottom, which is a style created by his mother, Toni. The bowl is fully polished and it is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Cliff Roller”.  This bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While these days Cliff makes very little pottery, his work remains a statement to his skill as a potter!

$ 400.00
Curran, Dolores – Mini Storage Jar with Turtles and Dragonflies

Dolores Curran creates intricately incised and painted pottery.  She was inspired to create these red polychrome incised and painted by her husband, Alvin Curran.  He was known for his incised San Juan style pottery in the 1990’s.  This piece is in the shape of a storage jar with the tall round sides and the slight neck.  The top and bottom are fully polished red. The area around the center is incised with turtles and dragonflies. Each is different and they are each surrounded by a step pattern. The jar is amazingly complex in design for its size!

$ 1,000.00
Curran, Dolores – Mini Lidded Round Bowl with Lid

Dolores Curran creates intricately incised and painted pottery.  She was inspired to create these red polychrome incised and painted by her husband, Alvin Curran.  He was known for his incised San Juan style pottery in the 1990’s.  This piece is a round “box” which is incised with a feather pattern.  Each feather is highlighted in white.  As the piece is turned, there are two red sections, one which is a matte red flower.  The other is a polished red figure.  The band on the lid is an incised avanyu.  The lid top is fully polished and the underside has a stylized plant design.  The piece is amazingly complex in design for its size!  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 975.00
Sahmie, Ida – Water Jar with Corn & Wedding Baskets (1996)

Ida Sahmie is known for her modernist Navajo pottery using bee-weed to paint, etching the surface and utilizing native clay from the Navajo Nation.  This water jar has a round shoulder and a slightly turned out neck. The piece is fully polished and painted with bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  Around the rim of the jar are mountain designs along with rain lines.  The shoulder and neck of the jar are incised with corn plants.  Each plant is then painted in four different colors representing the Four Directions.  Separating each of the corn plants is a Navajo wedding basket.  Each basket is also etched into the clay and then painted.  The jar is traditionally fired near her home. There are very light blushes on the surface.   Ida is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 800.00
de la Cruz, Juan and Lois Gutierrez  – “Mountain Lion” Storage Jar

Juan Cruz is creating some beautifully painted polychrome pottery.  He is a son of noted potter Lois Gutierrez.  Lois made the jar and Juan, who is noted for his illustrations, painted the design using natural clay slips..  This is Juan’s second large vessel, which certainly requires different skills to paint something so large.  Juan wrote of the scene he painted as follows:

“Before setting out, the hunters make their offering at the shrine of the Stone Lions.  The lion is the personification of the hunt, for his skill and cunning when stakling his prey is legendary.”

The jar is truly polychrome (more than three colors of clay).  Note the intricacy of the painted designs and especially the figures.  The jar has been traditionally fired outdoor and overall is a striking coloration.  There are some additional images at then end of the jar in process.  It is signed on the indented bottom of the jar by both Juan and Lois.  The description is written on the back of a hand-painted graphic of a cougar and deer.  What a phenomenal addition to this piece and the painting helps to better understand the story behind the art.

$ 7,200.00
de la Cruz, Juan and Lois Gutierrez  – “Hidden Spring” Jar

Juan Cruz is creating some beautifully painted polychrome pottery.  He is a son of noted potter Lois Gutierrez.  Lois made the jar and Juan, who is noted for his illustrations, painted the design using natural clay slips.   Juan wrote of the scene as follows:

“The women were certain they’d heard something liek a song on the breeze.  As they got closer to wehre the sound emanated from, they were able to discern words.  They began to sing the song they heard, mimicking the unusal timbre of the low voice.  Right there before them, water welled up from the gournd and formed a pool from which they joyfully drew; each in turn giving thanks for the gift granted from the Hidden Spring”

The jar is truly polychrome (more than three colors of clay).  Juan has an excellent ability as a storyteller as well as turning those stories into graphically painted art.  The figures on this piece, their pottery and his depiction of the Hidden Springs are exceptional.  The jar has been traditionally fired outdoor and overall is a striking coloration.  It is signed on the indented bottom of the pot by both Juan and Lois.  The description is written on the back of a hand-painted graphic of a Pueblo woman and the Hidden Springs.  What a phenomenal addition to this piece and the painting helps to understand better how exceptional Juan is with his art.  Juan most recently won “Best of Pottery” at Gallup Ceremonials in 2017!

$ 1,200.00
Mobile version: Enabled