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King Galleries of Scottsdale and Santa Fe is pleased to represent Contemporary Native American pottery of many of today's leading potters. Over the years we have taken the time to get to know each of our gallery artists. As each new piece comes into the gallery, we talk with the artist, finding out about the time and thought that goes into their work. It is important with contemporary pottery to understand the designs and motivation of the artist and their work. Over time, we feel as if we not only have a business relationship with most of the potters, but also a friendship. Our collection of contemporary pottery spans a variety of Pueblos and Tribes and Native American Groups.  It ranges from traditionalist work being made today, to the more "edgy" and innovative pottery art that is changing how the next generation will view And collect Naive American Indian art.  Please enjoy!

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Ortiz, Virgil – Bird Figure with Plant Designs

Virgil Ortiz is known for his use of traditional and modern design on his Cochiti pottery.  He recently said that he had some clay left over after making some pottery and decided to make some small bird figures.  Virgil said they reminded him of the birds made by his mother, Seferina Ortiz, and his grandmother, Laurencita Herrera.  Each bird is coil built and painted with wild spinach (a plant) for the black. This bird has a complicated plant design on the front and cloud and rain designs for the wings. The beak is painted with a red clay slip.  The bird is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Ortiz, Virgil – Tahu with Red Rose Canteen

This is one of the few canteens that Virgil Ortiz makes each year.  The piece is coil built and painted with native clay slips and wild spinach (a plant) for the black.  The front of the canteen is painted with one of Virgi’s iconic images. It is that of Tahu, the Blind Archer, with a rose in her mouth.  The story for this image is part of the Pueblo Revolt 1680/2180 series.  The lower section of the canteen and the back are fully painted with a complex geometric pattern.  Note as well the “spirit line” which is a space in the painting on the rim.   Virgil has also incorporated his signature “x”, which is the turkey track, onto the front of the canteen. The piece is signed on the back.  The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay. His work can be found in museums worldwide, including the Fondation Cartier in Paris, the Heard Museum, the Denver Art Museum and more.

$ 2,500.00
Ortiz, Virgil – Bird Figure with Rain Design Wings

Virgil Ortiz is known for his use of traditional and modern design on his Cochiti pottery.  He recently said that he had some clay left over after making some pottery and decided to make some small bird figures.  Virgil said they reminded him of the birds made by his mother, Seferina Ortiz, and his grandmother, Laurencita Herrera.  Each bird is coil built and painted with wild spinach (a plant) for the black. This bird has a rain design on the wings.  The back also has a raincloud and the tail is also painted.  The face on this one just looks a bit mischievous!   The front has a sun design.  The bird is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Ortiz, Virgil – Bird Figure with Checkerboard Wings

Virgil Ortiz is known for his use of traditional and modern design on his Cochiti pottery.  He recently said that he had some clay left over after making some pottery and decided to make some small bird figures.  Virgil said they reminded him of the birds made by his mother, Seferina Ortiz, and his grandmother, Laurencita Herrera.  Each bird is coil built and painted with wild spinach (a plant) for the black. This bird has a checkerboard design for the wings.  The front has a plant design.  The bird is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Ortiz, Virgil – Bird Figure with Rain Design Wings and Turned Head

Virgil Ortiz is known for his use of traditional and modern design on his Cochiti pottery.  He recently said that he had some clay left over after making some pottery and decided to make some small bird figures.  Virgil said they reminded him of the birds made by his mother, Seferina Ortiz, and his grandmother, Laurencita Herrera.  Each bird is coil built and painted with wild spinach (a plant) for the black. This bird has a turned head and rain cloud designs for the wings.  The tail is raised up and then painted and there is the wild spinach design on the front. The bird is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Ortiz, Virgil – Bird Figure with Storm Pattern Wings

Virgil Ortiz is known for his use of traditional and modern design on his Cochiti pottery.  He recently said that he had some clay left over after making some pottery and decided to make some small bird figures.  Virgil said they reminded him of the birds made by his mother, Seferina Ortiz, and his grandmother, Laurencita Herrera.  Each bird is coil built and painted with wild spinach (a plant) for the black. This bird has traditional Cochiti rain and storm cloud designs for the wings.  On this one, the tail is raised up and then painted and there is a rain cloud on the front.   The beak is painted with a red clay slip.  The bird is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Ortiz, Virgil – Bird Figure with Raincloud Wings

Virgil Ortiz is known for his use of traditional and modern design on his Cochiti pottery.  He recently said that he had some clay left over after making some pottery and decided to make some small bird figures.  Virgil said they reminded him of the birds made by his mother, Seferina Ortiz, and his grandmother, Laurencita Herrera.  Each bird is coil built and painted with wild spinach (a plant) for the black. This bird has traditional Cochiti rain cloud designs for the wings.  The back has additional rain designs.  The beak is painted with a red clay slip.  The bird is signed on the bottom.

$ 400.00
Zane Smith, Richard – Corrugated Lidded Bowl with Carved Figure (2000)

This is a striking bowl by Richard Zane Smith. It is coil built using very thin coils.  The coils are smoothed out on the inside but left exposed on the outside of the vessel.  This distinctive style of pottery  is a revival of the pre-historic concept of corrugated pottery. The small coils are then incised to create the designs and Richard paints them with clay slips before it is fired.  Here the bowl and lid are both fully polished on the inside.  The design is a triangular pattern which extends down from the top and up from the base.  The top has a fetish carved from stone which is attached as the “handle”.  Note how Richard has used a piece of leather on the inside rim of the bowl so that the lid fits perfectly and doesn’t scratch!  The bowl is signed on the bottom and it is from 2000.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

$ 3,000.00
Ebelacker, Jason –  Wide Shoulder Jar With Long Neck

This jar by Jason Ebelacker is very difficult form to create.  The shape of the jar has a very low and flat shoulder.  It is a form which finds its reference in a very historical form. There are classic Santa Clara jars made by Jason’s great-great grandmother SaraFina Tafoya, which had a low shoulder.  Jason has created this form with a very flat and wide base.  The neck rises up vertically and it is just slightly flared out and it is even polished on the inside!  Note as well the exceptionally stone polished surface. The time to polish the various levels of the jar and achieve such a dynamic polish is something few potters are able to achieve today.  Jason is a son of noted potter Richard Ebelacker and grandson of Virginia Ebelacker.  Jason has won numerous awards for his pottery and continues to be one of the important younger potters to watch.  Pottery at this level of creativity and quality are certainly a reflection of both his talent and the future!

$ 1,850.00
Tafoya, LuAnn – Red Water Jar with Avanyu

LuAnn Tafoya is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her large, highly polished pottery.  This jar is a classic shape for Santa Clara pottery with the round body and the elongated neck.  For LuAnn, it is the perfect surface!  The jar is deeply carved with a water serpent encircling the piece.  The water serpent (avanyu) is part of a story where it saves the village from a flood.  That is why as the jar is turned the body of the avanyu consists of cloud and rain pattern.  However, that also gives the jar a distinctive appearance as it is turned beyond just the one design.  The jar is very highly polished and traditionally fired.  The color is a striking deep red.  The recessed area surrounding the carving is filled in using a white or cream colored clay.  This creates a striking visual contrast between the tan and red areas.  The coloration is beautiful and the shape of his piece is a great example of her skill, creativity and commitment to traditional Santa Clara pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 2,900.00
Lucario, Rebecca – Plate with “Op-Art” Spiral Star Design

Rebecca Lucario is known for her delicate and intricately painted pottery.  This plate is very intricately painted.  In the center is a fine-line star design.  Extending outward is a swirl star pattern with triangular shapes.  The triangles are either black, fine-line or white.  They get larger as they get closer to the rim.  Although it is a smaller plate, the design is visually dynamic.  It is signed on the back.

$ 1,200.00
Naha, Rainy – Large Solstice Design Bowl (2000)

This large, wide bowl by Rainy Naha is a beautiful balance of form and design. The shape is a classic Sikyatki style with a very wide and flat shoulder.  It is amazing that she could make a piece which has both the width, but is also so flat!  It’s always a chance that it will crack in drying or firing.  The bowl is slipped white and then painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black).  The design around the mouth is the “eternity belt”. The rest of the bowl is a very complicated version of the “solstice”, with bands representing the phases of the moon.  Between those sections, there are sun, cloud, rain, and corn designs. Some of the colors are polished and some are left matte.  The painting on the surface is wonderfully intricate and varied.  The bowl is signed on the bottom with her name and father hallmark.  It is from 2000 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It has a Second place (red) ribbon from Santa Fe Indian Market. The ribbon is signed by Russell Sanchez and Dick Howard.  Definitely a wonderful piece of history and an unusual large vessel by this exceptional potter!

$ 4,000.00
Navasie, Charles – Red Jar with Parrots (1989)

Charles Navasie is a grandson of noted potter Joy “Frogwoman” Navasie and the son of Loretta Navasie. This jar is an early piece of his pottery from 1989.  It is very classic shape seen in the pottery of Joy Navasie, with the high, rounded shoulder. The jar is painted in four panels with alternating parrot and bird tail designs. The jar is the classic red clay from Hopi and then painted with bee-weed for the black.  It is signed on the bottom “Chas Navasie”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 200.00
Quotskuyva, Dextra – Jar with Swans (1990’s)

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This is a more classic piece of her pottery.  It is painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired to create the blushes or fire-clouds on the surface.  The jar has four swans painted around the shoulder.  Note how the deep red is polished on the neck and the rim of the jar.  The base of the jar is matte red and the inside of the mouth of the jar is an unusual tan coloration.  The swans are painted to extend up from the shoulder.  Note the photo of the jar from the top and how she has squared the rim but has the birds swirls around! It is this attention to the small details which makes her work so spectacular.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dextra” along with a corn plant to represent the Corn Clan.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Dextra was the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture, along with a companion book entitled, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 4,500.00
Nampeyo, Iris – Wide Jar with Corn Design

Iris Nampeyo is a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and a well known for her elegant asymmetrical vessels with corn as part of the design in relief.  Iris began using the corn in relief on the surface of her pottery in the early 1980’s. The corn is symbolic of being part of the Corn Clan.  The surface of the bowl is stone polished and the corn on the front is in applique relief.  The husk of the corn is sharp and the matte area extends around to the base of the jar.  The matte areas are in contrast to the remainder of the piece which is polished.  The opening is asymmetrical which is in keeping with the organic style of the form.  There is a simplicity and elegance in her pottery.  While she no longer makes pottery, her vessels remain classic.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 550.00
Fragua, Glendora – Seedpot with Rabbit

Glendora Fragua is known for her intricately incised pottery.  This piece is from 1985 and has a rabbit as the main design.  The piece is etched with intricate lines and traditional designs.  The additional colors are derived from matte clay slips.  The piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay with Glendora’s corn hallmark.

$ 275.00
Sisneros, Ramona – Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1970’s)

Ramona Sisneros has been making pottery since the 1960’s.  She is known for her traditional style pieces which are coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired. This bowl is one of her stylized avanyu (water serpent) designs.  Interestingly, note how she uses the negative space of the design coming up from the base.  The bowl is fully polished and signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ramona Sisneros”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  She was also featured in the book, “Santa Clara Pottery Today”.

$ 150.00
Tafoya, Gwen – Seedpot with Four Butterflies

Gwen Tafoya (b. 1965) is a granddaughter of noted potter Severa Tafoya.  Each piece is coil built and stone polished.  This seedpot is fully polished red and etched with butterflies and flowers. Note the complex designs etched into the wings of each butterfly!  The flowers are also highly detailed around the base of the seedpot.   It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 125.00
Tafoya, Gwen – Seedpot with Butterflies

Gwen Tafoya (b. 1965) is a granddaughter of noted potter Severa Tafoya.  Each piece is coil built and stone polished.  This seedpot is fully polished red and etched with butterflies and flowers.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 100.00
Suazo, Candelaria – Black & Sienna Bowl with Butterfly

Candelaria Suazo is a daughter of potters Joe and Santanita Suazo.  Her sisters include Martha Suazo (the wife of Art Cody Haungooah), Margie Naranjo, Mae Tapia and Shirley Duran.  She learned to make pottery from her mother and has been making pottery for over 20 years.  This miniature bowl is coil built and stone polished.  It is etched with a butterfly and then two-toned to make it black and sienna in coloration.  Note the high polish and delicate etching on this piece.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 100.00
Sanchez, Kathy “Wan Povi” – Black and Sienna Seedpot with Avanyu Design

Kathy “Wan Povi” Sanchez is a great-great granddaughter of Maria Martinez and a sister of Barbara Gonzales.  This bowl is fully polished and etched with an avanyu and feather pattern on the top of the piece.  The area of the rim and the feather pattern are highlighted in sienna.  The remainder of the bowl is fully polished to a high shine.  The bowl is signed, “Wan Povi” on the bottom.  While Kathy makes little pottery today, the technical expertise of her shape, polish and design are certainly evident.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Gonzales, Barbara – Bowl with Feather Design

Barbara Gonzales is a great-great granddaughter of Maria Martinez.  She is known for her innovative pottery which combines etched designs along with inset stones.  This small bowl is one of her more traditional style pieces.  It is signed, “Barbara” and has a feather pattern painted on the top of the piece.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 150.00
Sanchez, Kathy “Wan Povi” – Black and Sienna Bowl with Feathers, Bear and Avanyu

Kathy “Wan Povi” Sanchez is a great-great granddaughter of Maria Martinez and a sister of Barbara Gonzales.  This bowl is fully polished and etched with a bear, avanyu and eagle feather pattern.  The section with the feathers and the bear are highlighted in sienna. The areas with the avanyu is the highly polished black.  Note the very delicate lines used in the etched imagery!  There is also a bear paw etched on the side of the bowl.  The bowl is signed, “Wan Povi” on the bottom.  While Kathy makes little pottery today, the technical expertise of her shape, polish and design are certainly evident.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 150.00
Curran, Dolores – Incised Plate with Dragonflies and Avanyu

Dolores Curran creates intricately incised and painted pottery.  She was inspired to create these red polychrome incised and painted by her husband, Alvin Curran.  He was known for his incised San Juan style pottery in the 1990’s.  This plate is exceptionally intricate in design.  The front has a water serpent etched around the rim.  The center is a complex square pattern which has four plants on each side.  Note both the precision of the incised designs but also how she used clay slips in the incised area to help accentuate the imagery!  The rim is fully polished red and the back is equally as complex with dragonflies, stylized birds, and flowers.  Again it is deeply incised, which is surprising for all the work that is also on the front!  There are both matte and micaceous clays used throughout. The mica adds a bit of “sparkle” to the designs.  The plate may be small but it is amazingly complex in design and color for its size!

$ 950.00
Curran, Dolores – Jar with Avanyu, Stars and Plant Design Lid

This is a striking lidded jar by Dolores Curran.  She continues to create intricately incised and painted pottery.  This jar is incised a star pattern around the neck.  Each star is separated by a rainbow band.  Around the shoulder is a water serpent (avanyu) which is incised into the clay.  Note how she has a red clay above the avanyu and the lighter red below!  The lower section of the bowl is a usual tan coloration.  Ther are incised Pueblo faces and plant designs.  The bottom of the jar is highly polished and painted with dragonflies and prayer feathers.  The lid is designed to fit into the mouth of the jar so that it is stable.  The top of the lid is fully polished red. The finial is incised with a plant design and slipped with red and mica clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.   It is stunning in detail for the size!

$ 1,400.00
Naranjo, Forest – Bowl with Butterflies & Flute Players

Forrest Naranjo’s pottery is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired brown and then etched with designs.  The bowl is very tightly etched with butterflies and flute players encircling the top of the piece.  Some of the designs extend down near the base of the piece.  The style of his etching is modern yet pulls from traditional Pueblo designs. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Storage Jar with Carved Medallions & Mica Swirl

This is a stunning larger carved by Grace Medicine Flower.  When Grace began making pottery, she started out making carved pieces.  In 1968 she saw work by Tony Da, and then began to etch her pottery with her own designs.  Her early pieces in the 1970’s were mostly miniatures.  However, in the 1980’s her work evolved to larger vessels with carved sections and smaller medallions of sgraffito or etched designs. The result was that she could make larger pieces and she was able to combine various techniques (carving, etching) with various clay surfaces (polished, matte, mica).  Even today, there is no other Pueblo potter creating pieces in the style she created.  This jar is a storage jar shape with a round body and slight neck.  There is a swirl around the shoulder and side which is slipped with mica.  The the carved areas are polished and are in the shapes of clouds and feathers.  The central etched medallion has two Mimbres figures.  At the base, there are also etched figures of a rabbit, lizard, frog and ram.  The jar is highly polished and a striking balance of design, form and design!  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips,cracks restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.   It is elegant and stunning!

$ 4,000.00
Komalestewa, Alton – Large Wide Shoulder Melon Jar

This is stunning wide shoulder melon jar by Alton Komalestewa.  It is the combination of color, form and polish which makes it exceptional.  Alton learned to make pottery from his mother-in-law, Helen Shupla.  She was famous for her traditional melon bowls and over the years Alton has taken and refined this form with thinner walls and a highly polished surface.  This large jar is thin walled and highly stone polished.  As it was being made, each of the undulating ribs are pushed out from the inside.  It is technically difficult to stretch the clay and create even ribs.  This jar was then fired brown, but it is a color that ranges from brown to red to nearly black . The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay and Alton has also included his hallmark, which isa  katsina face. The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 3,000.00
Nampeyo, Camille “Hisi”  – “Prayer For Rain” Bowl (1995)

Camille “Hisi” Quotskuyva learned to make pottery from her mother, Dextra Quotskuyva, a sister of noted painter Dan Namingha and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano, Annie Healing, and Rachel Nampeyo.  She is known for her use of traditional imagery and the delicate painting of her designs.  This bowl is coil built and very thin walled.  It is painted with bee-weed (for the black) and the design is called the “Prayer for Rain”.  Note how there is the lightning design and then the eagle feathers extending out to the sides.  At the bottom of the design is the red clay slip and the rain drop.  It is a wonderful visual story.  The bowl is traditionally fired with light fire clouds.  It is signed on the bottom, “Hisi Nampeyo”.  It is from 1995 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While Hisi makes very few pieces today, the delicate lines of her work from this period are among her best.

$ 500.00
Nampeyo, Camille “Hisi”  – Large Jar with Swan Design (1999)

Camille “Hisi” Quotskuyva learned to make pottery from her mother, Dextra Quotskuyva, a sister of noted painter Dan Namingha and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano, Annie Healing, and Rachel Nampeyo.  She is known for her use of traditional imagery and the delicate painting of her designs.  This is one of the largest pieces we have had of her work in years.  It is a very wide shoulder jar in the classic Sikyatki shape. The designs are painted on the surface.  It is a series of four swans, each encircling the piece.  They are painted with bee-weed and the red is a highly polished clay with just a bit of mica.  The jar was traditionally fired which created the blushes on the surface.  This jar is from 1999 and while Hisi makes very few pieces today, the delicate lines of her work from this period are among her best.  The jar is signed and dated on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,900.00
Martinez, Adelphia – Seedpot with Feather Design

Adelphia Martinez is a daughter of noted San Ildefonso potter Juanita Gonzales. This seedpot is fully polished and etched with a classic eagle feather pattern on the top.  It is signed on the bottom “Adelphia”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00
Naranjo-Romero, Monica – Black & Sienna Bowl with Fish Design

Monica Romero is a daughter of noted potter Geri Naranjo, a sister of Kevin Naranjo and a niece of Dolores Curran.  She is known for her very detailed miniature pottery.  This bowl is highly polished and etched on one side with a fish. That area has been two-toned sienna.  The remainder of the bowl is designed with feather and lightning patterns. It is very highly polished and note the precision of the lines!  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 175.00
Moquino, Jennifer Tafoya – Jar with Four Koi & Waves

This is a larger jar by Jennifer Moquino.  It is fully polished and has a wide shoulder and a small neck. The jar is very intricately etched with four koi fish.  Each is painted with different clay slips to create the dynamic coloration. Check out the movement of the koi as well as the waves!  They all have a sense of motion and movement!  Not only did she use clay slips, but also mica clays, which give the whole piece a bit of “sparkle”.  The bottom has plum blossoms, along with those on the top.  As well, check out the polishing overall, which has a very high shine!  Perfect balance to the intricate designs.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is this creative evolution in her work which keeps  Jennifer as one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 3,800.00
Moquino, Jennifer – Dragonfly Figure

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and also her amazing animal figures! This dragonfly is fired black and the wings and head are fully polished.  The wings are etched with a complex feather and mountain design.  The tail of the dragonfly is carved to appear segmented.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 300.00
Moquino, Jennifer – Water Jar with Fish and Bear Lid

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and also her amazing animal figures!  This jar is fully polished and has a water jar shape. The shoulder of the jar is etched with a series of trout.  Check out how detailed they are for the size! The band of fish is a perfect complement to the highly polished surface. The lid has a bear fetish with a heartline etched into the clay.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 550.00
Moquino, Jennifer – Red Fox Clay Figure

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and also her amazing animal figures! This is one is a red fox.  The back, tail, and head are fully polished.  The back has a wolf track in the center surrounded by cloud, lightning and a river design.  Check out the wonderful face on this piece!  The feet are matte and all the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 450.00
Moquino, Jennifer Tafoya – Jar with Horned Lizards

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and exceptional realistic animals. This jar is coil built and fully polished.  It is a wonderful shape which is square on the sides and VERY flat on the top. Technically that is always difficult to achieve with native clay. The jar is highly polished to a striking shine.  The flat area has six horned lizards etched into the clay.  Each is detailed and it almost feels like you can pick them up with the realism of their scales.  The bottom is also fully polished.  All the colors are all from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 1,500.00
Moquino, Jennifer Tafoya – Canteen with 4 Carved Trout

This is an exceptional carved piece by Jennifer Moquino.  This is her first carved canteen. The interesting part about the carving for her work is that it is done even before the piece is polished so it takes more planning.  Here, there are four trout carved into the clay.  Note as well how she carved into the background area which is matte with little air bubbles and water ripples!  The fish are Rio Grande Cutthroat Trout, Rainbow Trout, Brook Trout and Gila Trout.  Each of the different trout is etched and highlighted with natural clay slips. The deep caring around them gives them added dimension.  The sides of the canteen are also carved with bear tracks on one side, and water swirls on the other. The polished surfaces are glassy.  Jennifer said it took her hours to polished this piece but the result is striking. The handles and the mouth of the canteen are matte.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is this creative evolution in her work which keeps  Jennifer as one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 3,200.00
Moquino, Ty – Mask With Carved & Polished Air Filter (Age 15)

Ty Moquino is a son of noted potter Jennifer Moquino.  At only 15 years old he is making some creative pottery!  This is one of his masks.  They are inspired by the science fiction he has read, along with being a commentary on the environment, sustainability and even imagery from Standing Rock.  His first group of masks we had in the gallery were polished and etched.  For this group, he has focused on carving and polishing. The results are impressive!  This mask has open space for the eyes and the air filter is carved in relief on the surface.  This piece is exceptional with the carved and relief areas and the polishing.  The polished areas are accentuated by the matte and mica clay around the eyes.  The piece has a museum mount for it, so that it is stable.  Ty won the “Best of Youth” award at the Heard Museum Indian Market in 2017 for one of his masks!  It is signed on the back.

$ 350.00
Moquino, Ty – Mask With Carved Visor and Filter (Age 15)

Ty Moquino is a son of noted potter Jennifer Moquino.  At only 15 years old he is making some creative pottery!  This is one of his masks.  They are inspired by the science fiction he has read, along with being a commentary on the environment, sustainability and even imagery from Standing Rock.  His first group of masks we had in the gallery were polished and etched.  For this group, he has focused on carving and polishing. The results are striking!  This mask has carved areas to create the air filters and he has polished sections and left others matte and even used some micaceous clay slip!  The piece has a museum mount for it, so that it is stable.  Ty won the “Best of Youth” award at the Heard Museum Indian Market in 2017 for one of his masks!  It is signed on the back.

$ 450.00
Moquino, Ty – Mask With Carved Headdress (Age 15)

Ty Moquino is a son of noted potter Jennifer Moquino.  At only 15 years old he is making some creative pottery!  This is one of his masks.  They are inspired by the science fiction he has read, along with being a commentary on the environment, sustainability and even imagery from Standing Rock.  His first group of masks we had in the gallery were polished and etched.  For this group, he has focused on carving and polishing. The results are impressive!  This mask has a carved headdress surrounding the gas mask.  The influence of imagery from Standing Rock is certainly evident here.  The carving is tight and the piece is well polished.  He has contrasted the polished areas with matte and micaceous slip sections.  The piece has a museum mount for it, so that it is stable.  Ty won the “Best of Youth” award at the Heard Museum Indian Market in 2017 for one of his masks!  It is signed on the back.

$ 450.00
Naranjo, Kevin – Black & Sienna Bowl with Avanyu and Feather Pattern

Kevin Naranjo is known for his very detailed incised pottery.  This miniature bowl has a sienna-colored rim and the sides of the piece are full of very tightly etched designs!  There is a water serpent, feather patterns, mountain and rain designs.  On the bottom are additional water and bear paw symbols.  Note the very highly polished surface of the bowl! It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 200.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Gunmetal Box with Deer Medallions

Russell Sanchez is one of the few Pueblo potters who makes traditional style boxes.  Each piece is flat on the bottom (not started in the traditional puki). The sides are flat the box is square or rectangular in shape.  This box was fired to a gunmetal finish, which is somewhat metallic in coloration.  The lid has etched bear paws on the handle for the lid, along with a cloud design.  Two of the sides have etched deer in mica slipped medallions.  The opposite sides have rain cloud designs using very traditional San Ildefonso imagery.  Russell has used black hei-shi beads to surround the two medallions. On the lid and sides of the box he has inset hemitite.  It is the perfect material to use on a gunmetal box as it reflects much the same coloration as the gunmetal fired surface.  The style of this box is similar to the earlier ones made at San Ildefonso in the 1920’s.  Russell continues to derive inspiration from the Pueblo potters of the past, yet stylize it to make it his own.   The box and lid are both signed on the bottom.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 3,000.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Waterfall Rim & Melon Rib Black & Sienna Jar

This is a traditional form of water jar by Russell Sanchez.  The jar has a round shoulder and fluted rim.  The inside of the neck is carved and polished with 12 melon ribs!  The shoulder of the jar is etched with both a checkerboard and rain clouds.  The area above and below the shoulder is inset with shell hei-shi beads. The shoulder itself has been “two-toned” so that it is sienna in coloration.  The lower section of the jar has 12 melon ribs which are fully polished!  The entire surface is stone polished and it is always amazing that when Russell polishes the inside of the neck, the jar doesn’t crack.  It is fascinating how Russell has gone back to revive old style and create their modern versions.  Russell continues to creatively revive historic San Ildefonso designs with his innovative style of pottery.  The bottom of the jar has the classic indention of traditional San Ildefonso water jars. Russell uses these historic elements to keep them alive on his contemporary pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 2,800.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Black & Sienna Bear with Sun Designs & Turquosie

Russell Sanchez continues to use traditional techniques and materials to create his stunning works in clay.  This bear is highly polished and fired to a deep black coloration. The bear is etched before firing with a sun design inspired by the pottery of Tonita Roybal along the back.  On the sides have a mountain and stylized heartline. The design of the sun on the back has been two-toned so that they are sienna in coloration. Russell also two-toned the inside of the bear’s legs to be sienna. Both are a striking color complement to the black of the bear itself.  There are two large spiderweb turquoise stones in each of the sun medallions. The back of the bear also has four strands of turquoise hei-shi beads and two strands of white shell.  The beads are very thin and smaller than the normal beads he uses in his pottery.  The eyes are also turquoise.  The heartline extends out from the mouth of the bear. The bear is a symbol of strength and the heartline is a traditional image used to symbolize the heart as the center of power in the animal.  The bear is signed on the bottom in the clay.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 4,600.00
Curran, Dolores – Mini Bowl with Eagle Feather Design

This is an intricately painted miniature bowl Dolores Curran.  Before she began making her carved pieces, she was well known for her delicately painted buff-on-red pottery.  The bowl is highly polished red and painted with a buff clay for the design.  Amazingly, she would paint each piece up to five times to get the color of the matte painted areas deep and consistent enough!  This piece has a feather pattern on two sections and a cloud and mountain design on the other two sections. For the size of the piece, it is amazing that it could even be painted!  Look at how perfect the lines are!  So why doesn’t Dolores make this style anymore? She ran out of the cream colored clay slip for the painting, and so only uses it as an accent on her new work!  As well, this is a larger sized piece of her painted pottery, as she mostly made miniatures due to the time consuming nature of the painting. The bowl is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 250.00
Nampeyo, Iris – Mini Jar with Corn Design

Iris Nampeyo is a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and a well known for her elegant asymmetrical vessels with corn as part of the design in relief.  Iris began using the corn in relief on the surface of her pottery in the early 1980’s. The corn is symbolic of being part of the Corn Clan.  The surface of the bowl is stone polished and the corn on the front is in applique relief.  The husk of the corn is sharp and the matte area extends around to the base of the jar.  The matte areas are in contrast to the remainder of the piece which is polished.  The opening is asymmetrical which is in keeping with the organic style of the form.  There is a simplicity and elegance in her pottery.  While she no longer makes pottery, her vessels remain classic.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 125.00
Nampeyo, Iris – Large Bowl with Corn Design

Iris Nampeyo is a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and a well known for her elegant asymmetrical vessels with corn as part of the design in relief.  Iris began using the corn in relief on the surface of her pottery in the early 1980’s. The corn is symbolic of being part of the Corn Clan.  The surface of the bowl is stone polished and the corn on the front is in applique relief.  The husk of the corn is sharp and the matte area extends around to the base of the jar.  The matte areas are in contrast to the remainder of the piece which is polished.  The opening is asymmetrical which is in keeping with the organic style of the form.  There is a simplicity and elegance in her pottery.  While she no longer makes pottery, her vessels remain classic.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00
Peters, Franklin – Jar with Acoma Birds

This is a very intricately painted jar by Franklin Peters.  He is known for his thin walled pottery and use of traditional Acoma imagery on his pottery. The jar is coil built with native clay and painted with native slips. The jar has three medallions of design.  Each bird is depicted with additional plant and rain designs.  Note the very thin lines in the painting of the design!  The jar has an indented base which is reminiscent of historic Acoma pottery when water jars were made to be carried on one’s head!  There is a space in the painting on the rim, which is the “spirit line”, which is seen on traditional Acoma pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 650.00
Duwyenie, Debra – Plate with Hummingbirds & Butterflies

This plate was made by Preston Duwyenie and polished and incised by Debra Duwyenie.  The design on the front is fully polished and full of imagery. The design is a flowering plant which extends up from the vase.  Each of the flowers are etched into the clay and the center of each is matte, which is just where the polished slip has been etched away.  For nearly each flower is a hummingbird, each of which are also etched into the clay and with matte bellies.  There are 22 hummingbirds on the plate! There are also additional butterflies and note near the top is a sunface with the extending sun rays.  The back of the plate is fully polished and signed with Debra’s name and Preston’s hallmark.

 

$ 650.00
Duwyenie, Debra & Preston – Seedpot with Turtles, Quail, Butterflies & Quail Lid

Debra Duwyenie is well known for her wonderful miniatures and incised designs. Each piece is stone polished and then it is etched before it is fired! This seedpot has quail, flowers, rabbits, butterflies, and hummingbirds on the top half of the piece. Each is etched into the clay and note how the center of each flower and the wing of each quail is matte! This is achieved by etching away just the surface of the polished slip, but not deep enough to reach the tan colored clay.  The lower half of the seedpot has numerous fish and seven turtles.   Each of the turtles has a different design on the back of its shell. Note the one with the wavy lines, that one is meant to represent Preston Duwyenie, her husband, who is known for his “shifting sand” pottery. There is a lot going on for such a small piece!  Debra also pays close attention to the little details like the tan background area and how evenly she etches the vertical lines.  The lid is made by her husband Preston.  It is case from cuttlefish bone and cast in silver.  It has the same “shifting sand” style pattern as the back of the one turtle and it is cut into the shape of a quail. The bottom of the lid is stamped with Preston’s hallmark and the seedpot with signed with both their names.

$ 800.00
Clashin, Debbie – Tall Jar with Koshari Figures

This is an exceptional tall jar by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. This one of the first times she has tried one of the most difficult shapes in coil-built pottery.  The difficulty here is to get the sides even and straight. Her addition of the shoulder and the slight neck is a strong variation in the form, as it seems to give it feeling of completion. The design is one that I first saw her cousin, Mark Tahbo, do years ago.  It is a Koshari clown depicted three times around the piece.  Look in the center of the design and you can see the eyes, then the headdress and the arms and legs.  Certainly, it is stylized but a wonderful way to combine Hopi-Tewa culture into the pottery designs!  The Koshari Clown is a staple at most Hopi ceremonial dances, but also at the Rio Grande pueblos.  It is one of those cross-over figures who can be traced to the diaspora of Tewa people after the return of the Spanish in 1694 after the Pueblo Revolt.  The figures here are tightly painted with thin lines and the mottled surfaces add a nice variance in design.  The black is all bee-weed and the reds are natural clay slips.  The jar has been traditionally fired and the blushes encompass the entire surface.  The open spaces and their color ranges add to the “design” of the jar.  It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 3,800.00
Clashin, Debbie – Large Jar with Three Eagles

This is an exceptional large wide shoulder jar by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. The wide shape rounds up from the shoulder and there is just a slight neck.  The design around the shoulder consists of three eagles.  Each is painted with more complex Hopi-Tewa patterns for their bodies. They are highlighted with additional red and brown clay slips.  Debbie said that it is always more complicated to design a piece with just three designs than four, to create equal symmetry.  It’s not just the design here but the open spaces near the top, which are so engaging.  The jar has been traditionally fired and the blushes encompass the entire surface.  The open spaces and their color ranges add to the “design” of the jar.  It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 2,500.00
Garcia, Shana – Long Neck Jar with Lightning Design and Bird Relief Rim

Shana Garcia is known for her creative shaped and sculptural rim pottery.   Each piece is coil built and painted with yucca to create the long thin lines.  This tall jar has a lightning design which spirals up to the rim. The rim is sculpted with additional clay to create the bird wing pattern and additional yucca and rain patterns.  Shana said the shape of the rim is meant to represent the birds over the kivas.  It is striking how she is able to combine such traditional imagery with such a modern appearance!

$ 650.00
Clashin, Debbie – Jar with Bird Wind Designs

This is a tightly painted jar by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. This jar is painted with bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  It has been traditionally fired outside to create the strong blushes.  The design is one of birds and bird wings. The birds extend down below the shoulder. The wings become the tails and then a cloud motif.  The thin lines and simple use of additional color works well with the variances in tonality from the firing.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 800.00
Namingha, Les – “Scalunck” Jar

This jar by Les Namingha is entitled, “Scalunck” and combines a classic Hopi shape with contemporary flowing designs.  The surface is textured and painted. As for the name and the design, I had to ask Les!  He says of the title:

“Scalunck”. Noun. An abstract word created by me to title this work befitting the abstracted, non-subject design on the jar.  The was formed by scouring innermost internet for unusual words.”

There is certainly both the abstract and unique flow of designs across the surface of the piece.  It is exciting to see how Les reinterprets such pivotal historic designs on his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,200.00
Tse-Pe, Irene – Jar with Carved Cloud Designs

Irene Tse-Pe is a daughter of Dora Tse-Pe and Tse-Pe Gonzales and a granddaughter of Rose Gonzales.  This jar is coil built and carved with cloud pattern around the neck. The carving is in the cameo style made famous by Rose. The jar is slipped with mica to the surface which gives it a bit of a sparkle in the light!  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Irene Tse-Pe”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While Irene no longer makes pottery, it is certainly a striking piece of her creative pottery!

$ 300.00
Allison, Marla – “Blue Birds in Cedar Brush” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Blue Birds in Cedar Brush“.  The imagery is bound in the designs of Laguna pottery.  The pottery patterns flow across the surface with interspersed bluebirds against the color of the cedar brush.

Marla says of this painting:

This painting is one that came to me after driving home after a Deer dance in Mesita.  All these bluebirds were flying around. I was thinking..there’s a pretty blue bird…and another..and another.  It was a moment of peacefulness away from my studio and it showed what nature can inspire.  I saw inspiration simply fluttering around me.

As for her painting in general, she says:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.  She was also the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 3,100.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Red Micaceous Shoulder Jar with Silver Inset

This shoulder jar by Preston Duwyenie is made from micaceous clay and slipped with a red micaceous slip.  The red color is a clay from Santa Clara.  The red clay is mixed with mica to create the coloration.  The shape of the jar has a very Hopi feel with the wide shoulder.  There is a single inset piece of silver which Preston casts against cuttle-fish bone.  The wavy impression on the silver is meant to represent the shifting sands found in the areas around Hopi.  The bottom of the jar is signed on the back in the clay with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child.   Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.  He is married to pottery Debra Duwyenie and now resides at Santa Clara Pueblo.  Preston has won numerous awards for pottery, including “Best of Show” at the Heard Indian Market.

$ 400.00
Allison, Marla – “Laguna Strong” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Laguna Strong“.  The imagery is inspired by historic photos of the women of Laguna pueblo. The colors from the pottery and they are combined in Marla’s unique painting style

Marla says of this painting:

The painting is exactly what is in the tile.  There are some very strong women in the pueblo not only now, but especially in the past.  There was the strength to be gained in the old days and this painting is a away for me to pay homage to those who came before us.  If you look closely, you can see that she has a slight smirk, there is an underlying happiness within her strength.

As for her painting in general, she says:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.  She was also the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 2,300.00
Whitegeese, Daryl  – Large Jar with Mesa and Rain Designs

This is an exceptional large jar by Daryl Whitegeese. Sometimes a photo just doesn’t do a piece justice and this is one of those times.  To capture the design, you miss the deep black of the firing. What shows up is the amazing polish, which is like a glossy black surface.  The jar has a wide shoulder and a slight neck.  It is the carving around the jar which is so engaging.  There is a mesa pattern, with the rain coming down over the mesa and mountains. As the jar is turned there are both sharp-edged lightning patterns and round cloud swirls. The contrasting of the round and the angular designs is both technically difficult and visually engaging.   The top and bottom sections are fully stone polished and the center is polished around the sharp carved edges. Note as well the edge of the rim of the jar and how he has polished into the rim!  The size, shape, and design all work perfectly on this piece. It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Daryl has won numerous awards at Santa Fe Indian Market and other events.  He remains one of the exciting traditional potters working today!

 

 

$ 5,000.00
Naha, Rainy – Long Neck Vase with Flower Pattern

This jar is one of Rainy Naha’s most famous shapes with a round body and elongated neck.  The body of the jar is polished with a white clay slip.  The tan neck is the natural color of the clay. The design is a flower petal pattern which encircles the upper and lower sections of the jar.  There are two different clay slips used on this piece for the various colors.  Rainy seeks out many of her clay slips to create the various colors.  This jar was traditionally fired which gives the white a very pearlescent appearance.  It is signed on the bottom with a feather and “Rainy”.

$ 900.00
Swentzell, Roxanne – “Grateful” Original Clay Figure

This is a serenity to this clay piece by Roxanne Swentzell.  It is entitled “Grateful”.  It is one of the classic style pieces by Roxanne.  The figure is sitting with her feet outstretched and hands clasped. It is the face which gives voice to the title.  The prayerful, grateful look on her face is wonderfully sculpted.  The back of the figure has a contrasting detail with the braid of the hair.  The hands, feet, and toes are sculpted with her distinctive style.  It’s always charming when the toes are curved and separated.  The color is earthy, like the clay and the feeling created around this piece. Roxanne is able to achieve such a sense of emotion in the faces of her figures!  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This piece is from early 2000 and signed in the clay, “ROX”.

$ 9,000.00
Holt, Lisa & Harlan Reano – Jar with Extended Flames

Lisa Holt and Harlan Reano make an amazing team, working to create innovative pottery using traditional techniques.  Lisa makes the pottery and it is painted by Harlan.  This jar has a tightly painted design around the neck with wild spinach plant patterns and flowering motifs.The sides have a similar design but each section is divided by a tendril or flame extension from the jar.  Harlan said that they had tried it before with two bands extruding out from the sides of the piece but the four were much more difficult.  The result, however, is a very cohesive appearance and flow of design and form.  The materials are all traditional as the red and cream are both native clays while the black is wild spinach (a plant). The jar is traditionally fired outdoors.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 3,800.00
Moquino, Jennifer – Miniature Bowl with Fish and Avanyu

Jennifer Moquino creates extraordinary miniature pottery!  This miniature bowl is fired black and then the designs are etched into the clay.  There is a water serpent around the top of the bowl.  Below are wave designs and below that are fish. All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  It is amazing how detailed her work can be for the size!  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today.

$ 225.00
Qoyawayma, Al – Double Lobe Jar with Doorways & A Star

This is a thoughtful piece from Al Qoyawayma.  It is one of his architectural pieces, with the pueblo wall scene carved into the center of the jar. The shape has two lobes and the top and bottom part are vertically polished.  It is the center section which is fascinating with three different pueblo doorways and one window, found at ruins throughout the southwest.  Each of these are each carved into the clay and note the detail on the walls.  The color variations is created using various clay slips.  Al says about this piece:

There are four opening shapes….only three are doorways. The “cross” or Star design is that used in weavings, pottery and petroglyphs. One could ask “which star”. Well it is likely more emblematic of many different stars depending on location.  The Polynesians used stars to navigate.  A late 1970’s recreation of the double hulled vessel used to navigate the Pacific is called Hokulea, or the “Star of Gladness”.  I like that metaphor. In Hopi, star is “soohu” and gladness is “háalayi”.  Although Hopi and Polynesian language may have no relation I like that “Ho-ku” and “soo-hu” are phonetically similar and “lea” might sound a little like “-layi”.  No matter.  I worked with and was a friend of Hawaiian artist and historian Herb Kané.  I asked if I could create a piece by that name (and he said yes)….and created a star in the motif. So a “long story” short I have an affinity for a star that brings or gives us gladness or happiness…..and especially the “Star of Bethlehem”.

The three doorways can be found in various ruins in the Southwest.  The “tee-door” is the most recognizable.  It’s possible origin in the americas is a much longer discussion. We don’t have a precise story about the T-door shape….at least I don’t, but I like it. It can be found in other locations around the world. The “trapzodial” shaped door is common throughout the Americas, especially pre-Ican precision stone architecture.  The last polygonal shape is just part of a doorway where the beam above the door has rotted away and the outline created by doorway rock falling away….I saw it in a ruin

Al’s architectural pieces are among his most iconic works!  This one encompasses much of the story of his art!

$ 6,900.00
Youvella, Wallace – Jar with Buffalo (1976-9)

This is an intricate jar by Wallace Youvella, the husband of Hopi-Tewa potter Iris Nampeyo  It is fully polished red and the design is etched into the surface. The jar has buffalo on both sides and separating them is a Hopi-Tewa style kilt or sash design.  There are cloud, rain and feather patterns in the band.  The jar was made between 1976-9.  Wallace was one of the first three men at Hopi in the mid-1970’s to begin making pottery (the others were Mark Tahbo and Thomas Polacca).  Interestingly, Thomas and Wallace (who were brothers-in-law) both started with traditional Hopi-Tewa designs but met resistance from the women potters, so began making pieces which were either fully polished and etched, or carved.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 625.00
Naranjo, Johnathan – Water Jar with Hummingbirds & Flowers

This water jar by Johnathan Naranjo is an elegant shape. The shoulder and the turned out neck give it a graceful appearance.  The jar is fully polished and etched. The design consists of three sections with flowers and hummingbirds.  Each of the flowers is highly detailed.  In addition to the hummingbids there is a little bee and a flying lady bug!  The outside rim of the neck has an additional rain and lightning pattern.  The use of the highly polished surface and the detailed designs works beautifully on this jar. Note on the flowers how they are etched to be both red and tan, in a slight gradation of color, which gives them both depth and realism.  The jar is traditionally fired, which gives it the distinctive coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Johnathan has won numerous awards for his pottery and  Johnathan is definitely one of the young potters to watch!

$ 2,200.00
Duwyenie, Preston – “Shards” Black Water Jar with 21 Silver Insets

Stunning!  This is an exquisite water jar by Preston Duwyenie.  The water jar is made from micaceous clay and fired black.  The multiple layers of micaceous clay give the jar a metallic appearance to the surface.  The shape is a classic double shoulder water jar with a fluted rim.   The jar is entitled, “Shards” and Preston has taken cast 21 silver “shards” against cuttlefish bone.  Each “shard” is the cut and a space carved into the clay before the jar is fired.  After it is fired, each piece is then put into the jar and it is etched around the silver. Each silver piece has the appearance of “shifting sands”, much in a similar style to the pottery where he has carved a shifting sand pattern.  The complement of the silver and the silvery color of the micaceous clay is perfection!  The last two photos show the jar before it was fired and after it was fired black (before insetting the silver).   The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay with Preston’s hallmark, which means “carried in beauty”.  There is certainly something both modern and ancient about this striking piece!   Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.  He is married to pottery Debra Duwyenie and now resides at Santa Clara Pueblo.  Preston has won numerous awards for pottery, including “Best of Show” at the Heard Indian Market.

 

$ 4,500.00
Huma, Rondina – Tall Jar with Geometric Shard Design

Rondina Huma has certainly been one of the most influential Hopi potters working today.  Since her two-time “Best of Show” award at Santa Fe Indian Market, her tight style and intricately painted pottery has changed the face of contemporary Hopi pottery.   Each piece is coil built, fully stone polished and painted with native clays and bee-weed (black), and native fired.  This is one of her pieces from the early 1990’s.  The rim has the linear mountain pattern and below is the pottery shard design.  The squares are larger than in her later work, but there is still a striking flow of pattern.   The red clay is polished while the black (bee weed) is painted onto the burnished surface.  The bowl is traditionally fired to create the coloration.  Rondina says that she tries to not duplicate the same “shard” patterns on the same vessel!  The tight patterns became more and more intricate and detailed in each passing year.  An amazing part of this piece is that the entire interior is fully polished!  Rondina says that she makes pieces with openings large enough to fit her hand so that she can fully polish the inside! The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,850.00
Garcia, Greg – Wide Bowl with Bear Paws

Greg Garcia was known for his use of classic Santa Clara forms for his pottery.  This is a wide shaped bowl with a sharp edge which slopes to the rim. The bowl has three bear paws as the design. The entire surface is stone polished and fired black. The bear paw is a traditional symbol for Santa Clara pottery, telling the story of a bear who led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Greg Garcia”.

$ 600.00
Youvella, Wallace – Seedpot with Antelope (1976-9)

This is an intricate miniature seedpot by Wallace Youvella, the husband of Hopi-Tewa potter Iris Nampeyo  It is fully polished red and the design is etched into the surface. There is a single medallion with an incised antelope in the center.  Note how he etched the background area with the linear bands.  The edges of the design are also incised.  The seedpot was made between 1976-9.  Wallace was one of the first three men at Hopi in the mid-1970’s to begin making pottery (the others were Mark Tahbo and Thomas Polacca).  Interestingly, Thomas and Wallace (who were brothers-in-law) both started with traditional Hopi-Tewa designs but met resistance from the women potters, so began making pieces which were either fully polished and etched, or carved.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00
Youvella, Wallace – Jar with Bears (1976-9)

This is an intricate miniature jar by Wallace Youvella, the husband of Iris Nampeyo  It is fully polished red and the design is etched into the surface. There is a bear on each side and they are separated by Hopi-Tewa bird, cloud and lighting designs.  The jar was made between 1976-9.  Wallace was one of the first three men at Hopi in the mid-1970’s to begin making pottery (the others were Mark Tahbo and Thomas Polacca).  Interestingly, Thomas and Wallace (who were brothers-in-law) both started with traditional Hopi-Tewa designs but met resistance from the women potters, so began making pieces which were either fully polished and etched, or carved.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00
Youvella, Wallace – Seedpot with Deer (1976-9)

This is an intricate miniature by Wallace Youvella, the husband of Iris Nampeyo  It is fully polished red and the design is a wildlife scene with a deer and mountains.  The seedpot was made between 1976-9.  Wallace was one of the first three men at Hopi in the mid-1970’s to begin making pottery (the others were Mark Tahbo and Thomas Polacca).  Interestingly, Thomas and Wallace (who were brothers-in-law) both started with traditional Hopi-Tewa designs but met resistance from the women potters, so began making pieces which were either fully polished and etched, or carved.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Diaz, Tina – Black Jar with Avanyu

Tina Diaz is a daughter of Mary Cain and a sister of noted potters Joy, Linda and Billy Cain.  She makes very few pieces of pottery each year and this is one of the few carved black pieces.  The jar is very thin walled and fully carved.  The design is an avanyu (water serpent), which encircles the piece.  It is slipped in mica.  The remainder of the piece is fully carved and polished.  Note how her designs are very fluid from top to bottom.  As well, the background area which is matte is “rounded”, which adds another dimension to her pottery!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 400.00
Nampeyo, Janell – Bowl with Bat Wing Design

Janell Nampeyo is a daughter of Adelle Nampeyo, a granddaughter of Elva Tewaguna Namepyo, a great-granddaughter of Fannie Nampeyo, and a great-great-granddaughter of the Nampeyo of Hano.  She creates coil built pottery painted with bee weed.  This bowl has a batwing design painted from the neck of the bowl.  The rim is slipped with a red clay.  The bat-wing pattern is one that was revived by Nampeyo of Hano.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 125.00
Garcia, Shana – Wide Jar with Yucca Designs and Bird Design Rim

Shana Garcia is known for her creative shaped and sculptural rim pottery.   Each piece is coil built and painted with yucca to create the long thin lines.  This large jar has a spiraling yucca or plant design extending up from the shoulder to the rim. The rim is sculpted with additional clay to create the bird wing pattern and additional yucca and rain patterns.  Shana said the shape of the rim is meant to represent the birds over the kivas.  It is striking how she is able to combine such traditional imagery with such a modern appearance!

$ 800.00
Sarracino, Myron – Long Neck Jar with Tularosa Swirl Patterns

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. The imagery on much of his pottery is derived from pre-historic pottery designs. The shape of this jar has a long neck and low shoulder. The design is inspired by the Tularosa black-on-white pottery made from 1150-1325 in the Chaco Canyon and southern Colorado areas. The neck has a lightning pattern painted with very fine lines.  The Tulrosa swirl comes up from the base. The black and white coloration remains inspired by the historic colors.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 475.00
Sarracino, Myron –  “Lightning Over the Mesa” Jar

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. The imagery on this jar is a classic lightning pattern over the mesas. The lightning pattern is painted around the top 3/4 of the ajr and the last section has a red for the earth and a painted mesa pattern.  The use of the red near the base in the design is visually striking.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 325.00
Clashin, Debbie – Large Jar with Bird and Plant Designs

This is a large wide shoulder jar by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. The wide shape created a perfect space for the tightly painted design.  There are two panels of design.  Each has a bird and bird wing connected with plant and rain patterns.  The  jar is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  It it was traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 2,400.00
Begay, Jr., Harrison – Jar with Heartline Bears

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This tall jar is a classic shape with a round body and a slightly turned out neck.  The rim of the jar is fully polished.  Around the side of the jar it is fully carved.  Harrison says that he tries to carve his pieces so that the imagery looks to be in motion.  This jar has two heartline bears carved into the clay. The heartline represents the strength of the animal.  As the jar clouds and water designs.  The carving is deep and the polishing is nearly glassy. The contrast of the matte and polished surfaces is perfection!  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 575.00
Whitegeese, Daryl  – Long Neck Water Jar with Clouds & Mountains

This is a classic long neck water jar by Daryl Whitegeese.  The jar has a round body and an elongated neck. The rim is very sharp, which is always a bit of a surprise that it didn’t crack in the drying or polishing stage.  The neck is fully stone polished and the body of the jar is fully carved.  There is a cloud, kiva step, mountain, wind and prayer feather design which encircle the piece.  What makes the design interesting is the variations of circular and angular designs.  The full designs tell a story as the jar is turned and there is no repetition.  Typical of Daryl’s carving there are sharp edges to the carving.  The bottom of the jar is also fully polished.  The jar is highly polished and fired a dark black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Daryl has won numerous awards at Santa Fe Indian Market and other events.  He remains one of the exciting traditional potters working today!

 

 

$ 3,500.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Miniature 32 Rib Melon Bowl

This is an exceptional miniature by Nancy Youngblood.  This bowl is from 2017.   It is one of her classic deep carved miniature melon bowls. The bowl has thirty-two ribs and each is very deeply carved into the clay in a vertical manner. They are narrow at the base and neck and wider at the shoulder.  Each rib is individually polished.  Nancy has a particular stone which allows her to polish so deeply and the piece has a glassy surface.  She says she can only polish three ribs at a time.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nancy Youngblood”.  While it may be a small piece, it is certainly spectacular and an iconic work by this renowned artist.

$ 3,800.00
Youngblood, Nathan – Tan Polished “Egg” – 3 Pieces

Nathan Youngblood is one of those few potters who has actually created new shapes which are unique in Pueblo pottery.  His “tear drop shaped” plates and his “eggs” are the two most famous of his innovative forms.  This egg is three pieces, each perfectly designed to fit with the next piece. The base is carved with a cloud pattern. The top of the egg is carved with rain and cloud symbols. The bottom half of the egg has walking bear paw, mountain patterns and an encircling avanyu.  All three pieces are fired tan, which is one of the most difficult colors to achieve in Pueblo pottery.  Why?  It is water instead of a clay slip that is used to polish the piece.  Polish too hard and it is streaky, and not hard enough and it is dull.  When a piece is traditionally fired it also takes in more smoke which changes the color.  This piece has perfect firing and the result is a caramel coloration, which is always so rich and distinctive for the tan fired vessels.  All three piece are signed with Nathan’s name and deer tracks, which represents his name in Tewa.

$ 11,000.00
Archuleta,  Mary Ester – Red Jar with Tan Kiva Step Pattern

This is a beautifully shaped jar by Mary Ester Archuleta.  The jar has a round body and a slightly turned out neck.  It is fully polished red and carved around the body with a kiva step design.  The carved areas are polished tan in contrast to the red of the remainder of the jar.   The tan is the natural color of the clay and always difficult to achieve this coloration.  There is also the traditional cream colored slip painted into the carved areas.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mary E. Archuleta.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Mary is the second youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  She married into San Juan Pueblo in the late 1960’s and created most of her pieces in the San Juan inspired style.

$ 1,800.00
Eteeyan, Mary Louise – Mini Bowl with Butterfly Lid and Plant Designs

Mary Louise Eteeyan is known for her delicately painted pottery and carved lids.  This bowl is polished red around the base and painted with flowers around the side.  Mary Louise uses classic Jemez clays to create her designs.  The lid has a polished rim and a sculptured butterfly on top.  Note the detail in the design and shape of the butterfly!  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 75.00
Garcia, Shana – Jar with Bird Wing & Kiva Designs

Shana Garcia is known for her very thin walled pottery.  Each piece is coil built and painted with yucca to create the long thin lines.  This jar has a series of bird wing patterns as part of the overall design.  They swirl around the jar creating beautiful op-art imagery.  The rim of the jar is sculptured with three pieces of clay and a fineline bird wing pattern.  Shana said that this meant to represent the birds over the kivas.  It is striking how she is able to combine such traditional imagery with such a modern appearance!

$ 350.00
Garcia, Gloria “Golden Rod” – Bowl with Turtles and Fish

This bowl by Gloria Garcia is fully polished and fired black. The design is a series of fish and turtles. They are intermixed as they swim around the surface of the piece.  There are additional areas with a red clay slip in contrast to the polished black.  Gloria’s combination of polishing and etched designs is always striking.  This piece is signed on the bottom with her Tewa name “GoldenRod”.

$ 450.00
Lucas, Yvonne – Large Jar with Plant and Laguna Designs

Yvonne Lucas learned to make pottery from her husband, Steve Lucas and his aunt, Dextra Qutoskuyva.  She is one of the few Laguna potters who uses all traditional materials and traditionally fires their pottery.  The jar is slipped with a white clay and then painted with a red clay slip and bee-weed (for the black). The design has a plant motif around the neck, and then a Laguna Pueblo style checkerboard pattern.  The visually striking part of the jar is the shoulder design, with the fan-shaped plants.  They are slipped with a polished red cay and encircle the jar.  The contrast of the red and black on the white works perfectly for this size.  The jar is traditionally fired outdoors, so there are blushes on the surface creating the slightly tan areas.  The jar is thin-walled and perfectly shaped.  Yvonne focuses on the black-on-red coloration, as that was a style seen at Laguna Pueblo around 1900.  This is Yvonne’s way of paying tribute to these pieces but also giving it her own modern style.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 4,400.00
Allison, Marla – “Shawls and Pottery” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a member of Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. Marla lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

Marla began her expression through art in her youth and gained formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.

She was the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

Marla says of her painting:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Shawls and Pottery (Going to see Charles)“.  Ok, how you can you not LOVE the tile!  The painting utilizes what we love about her work:  a vibrant color scheme and Pueblo graphics.  It is a subtle but striking piece and a reflection of why she has become such an important name in contemporary Native painting!

$ 3,400.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Red & Black Bear with Checkerboard and Sun Design

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This bear is one of his classic shapes.  This bear is polished with a deep red clay slip.  The front has a sun pattern with a black mica clay line design in the center. The sun pattern is one that is inspired by the early pottery of Tonita Roybal.  The black of the bear has a black matte section along with a traditional San Ildefonso rain design.  The bear has a heartline which is etched into the clay.  The heartline which extends out from the mouth of the bear. The bear is a symbol of strength and the heartline is a traditional image used to symbolize the heart as the center of power in the animal.  The bear is hollow as the piece is coil built.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 3,800.00
Clashin, Debbie – Plate with Awatovi & Sikyatki Birds

This is striking plate by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. This plate is fully polished and painted with bee-weed for the black and an orange/red clay slip.  The design is derived from the Awatovi murals, which  were near Hopi.  The bird on the left is one of the Awatovi style birds. In the center is a band with cloud and rain designs and on the right a Hopi-Tewa style Nampeyo bird which was derived from the Sikyatki pottery.  It’s an interesting combination to have representations from both of the earlier styles of Hopi pottery on one piece.  The back is stippled with numerous dots from the black bee-weed.  The plate has been traditionally fired which creates the blushes across the surface.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 1,200.00
Ami, Loren – Total Eclipse Sun Canteen

This canteen by Loren Ami was made in recognition of the solar eclipse of 2017.  It has the sun design on the front and note on the left side he used the brown clay slip and the right the red.  It symbolizes the eclipse in a visually striking manner!  The handles and neck are polished with a red clay slip.  Loren also braided the leather strap.  He learned to make pottery from Dextra Quotskuyva and the canteens were one of the special pieces she taught him to make.  Each piece is coil built, painted with native clays (red) and bee-weed (black) and outdoor fired.  The red areas are stone polished and there is a bit of mica in the red clay.   This piece is signed on the back with his name and a spider design for the Spider Clan.  Loren is certainly one of the traditionalist Hopi-Tewa potters to watch.

$ 950.00
Ami, Loren – “Dance of the Ants” Seedpot

Loren Ami learned to make pottery from Dextra Quotskuyva.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and painted with native clay slips.  Loren said he entitled this seedpot, “Dance of the Ants”.  The ants encircle the seedpot and note how they alternate from being painted in red and the in black. The red top to the seedpot is the anthill.  The seedpot is traditionally fired, which creates the fire clouds.  This piece is signed on the bottom with his name and a spider design for the Spider Clan.  Loren is certainly one of the traditionalist Hopi-Tewa potters to watch.

$ 450.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Large Long Neck Jar with Avanyu & Lid

Stunning! This is one of the largest pieces we have had from Russell Sanchez in a while!  It is a classic shape with an innovative use of clay and design.  The shape of the has a low sharp shoulder and a long neck.  The shape of the jar is a classic which is typically seen in the work of his aunt, Rose Gonzales.  The jar is fired black and incised with a water serpent around the shoulder.  There is a single piece of inset turquoise for the eye. The neck of the jar is fully polished and then two-toned green at the rim with an incised mountain pattern.  There are also additional insets of turquoise hei-shi beads.  The lid has a rectangular finial with a carved “key hole” design.  The edges are polished and the top of the lid is incised, two-toned and inset with two pieces of turquoise.  The bottom of the jar has a “foot” which is reminiscent of historic San Ildefonso pottery and it is also indented.  The gunmetal firing of the jar can easily be seen in the area on the neck below the green band, where there is a “halo” of black.  The hei-shi beads are all made by the Calabaza family from Santo Domingo Pueblo.  The exciting addition to this jar is that we were there when it was fired!  There are additional photos of the piece before and right after the traditional firing at Russell’s house.  What a great piece of provenance to add to this important jar!

$ 12,000.00
Clashin, Debbie – Polychrome Water Jar with Eagle Tail Design

This is is a wide shoulder water jar by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. This jar has a wide shoulder and a slightly turned out neck.  The body of the piece is painted with a mesa and eagle tail pattern.  In addition to the black (bee weed) she has used a deep red and an orange color of clay.  They provide a visual along with textural aspect to this jar. The rim is stippled with the bee weed.  Note how the design and the colors accentuate the shape fo this jar!  It has been traditionally fired which creates the blushes across the surface of the bowl.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 1,200.00
Vigil, Lonnie –  Open Bowl with Fireclouds

Lonnie Vigil is known for his creative use of micaceous clay and is one of a handful of potters from Nambe pueblo.  He has taken this style of pottery and transformed it from utilitarian into fine art.  This large open bowl is thin walled and beautifully fired. The shape is an open bowl with a slight rim.  The piece has been traditionally fired so that the exterior reveals the color of the micaceous clay while the interior has the smoke giving it a color variation from a metallic to deep black. The firecloud extend just around the edge of the lip.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   It is this refinement of a traditional art form for which Lonnie won “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market in the 1998.

$ 1,950.00
Sale!
Peynetsa, Jamie – Jar with Rainbirds & Rosettes

Jamie Peynetsa is the son of noted potters Anderson and Avelia Peynetsa.  Avelia, his mother, coil builds the clay vessel.  Jamie paints the design.  He has a strong attention to the detail of the painting as well as his inspiration from classic Zuni pottery.  This jar is a distinctive shape with the very low indented base and the wide shoulder.  There are two large rosettes on either side of the jar.  Separating them are bands of rainbirds and Zuni birds.  Along the top of the shoulder are cloud designs with fineline patterns.  Note how well Jamie paints to match design and form.  The patterns bends and flows with the shape of the piece!  It is a striking jar and striking coloration! It is signed by Jamie and his mother on the bottom.  At only 20 years old, he certainly has a great future in pottery!

$ 1,400.00 $ 1,200.00
Manymules, Samuel  – Large Water Jar with Billowing Ribs

This is a striking combination of shape and firing by Samuel Manymules.  The jar is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar has rounded ribs which billow up from the base and get larger as they reach the neck.  Each rib is pushed out from the inside of the jar as the piece is made.  The round ribs are in contrast to the sharp ridge before the neck and rim, which is slightly turned out.  The jar is polished and it is traditionally fired outdoors.  The coloration, which ranges from red to black to tan in areas.  The color changes as the jar is turned and the strong black areas seem to perfectly enhance the shape of the ribs.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 2,500.00
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