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King Galleries of Scottsdale and Santa Fe is pleased to represent Contemporary Native American pottery of many of today's leading potters. Over the years we have taken the time to get to know each of our gallery artists. As each new piece comes into the gallery, we talk with the artist, finding out about the time and thought that goes into their work. It is important with contemporary pottery to understand the designs and motivation of the artist and their work. Over time, we feel as if we not only have a business relationship with most of the potters, but also a friendship. Our collection of contemporary pottery spans a variety of Pueblos and Tribes and Native American Groups.  It ranges from traditionalist work being made today, to the more "edgy" and innovative pottery art that is changing how the next generation will view And collect Naive American Indian art.  Please enjoy!

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Ebelacker, Jason – Wide Bowl with Bear Paw Medallions

This is a very deeply carved wide bowl by Jason Ebelacker.  Jason is a son of noted potter Richard Ebelacker and grandson of Virginia Ebelacker.  This bowl is coil built and very flat across the top.  The bowl is carved with two bear paw medallions.  Separating them are cloud and lightning designs.  The bear paw design is classic in Santa Clara pottery as it represents a story of a bear leading the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  The bowl is very deeply carved!  Note as well the matte area which creates a strong visual contrast to the highly polished surface.  The base of the bowl is also stone polished.  It is fired a deep black coloration.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 2,000.00
Tafoya, LuAnn – Storage Jar with Bear Paws

LuAnn Tafoya is known for her highly polished traditional Santa Clara pottery.  This is a stunning large black storage jar.  A storage jar is a particular shape in Santa Clara Pueblo pottery which usually has a round shape and a short neck.  This piece is a classic shape with a very round form and just a slight indention before the neck.  There are four bear paws on the piece.  They are impressed into the clay and then the entire piece is fully polished.  Did  you know that the whole piece has to be polished at one time?  Otherwise, the clay slip will dry and it won’t be as shiny in appearance.  LuAnn said of her water jars:

“Sometimes the shape depends on how the clay is drying. Sometimes you have to bring it in right away. It is OK you can make it wider and then come in. I think for the first storage jar I used the puki given to my mom from my grandmother. It was narrow at the bottom. They made the base so the puki was just thin. We had to wire it to keep it attached. Later I made a new one with that form so I could have it for the future. It’s a nice shape going up from the bottom.”  LuAnn Tafoya, Spoken Through Clay

The storage jar is highly polished and fired a striking glassy black coloration.  LuAnn is one of the few potters making piece of such quality and historic continuity.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “LuAnn Tafoya”.   It is an exceptional example of her skill, creativity, and commitment to traditional Santa Clara pottery.

$ 7,800.00
Clashin, Debbie – Jar with Birds and Dragonflies

This is wide jar by Debbie Clashin is painted with a stylized bird design.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. The jar has a sloping shoulder and there are two sections with swirling birds.  Surrounding the birds are dragonflies and rain patterns.  The jar is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  It was traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 700.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Red & Black Bear with Checkerboard and Sun Design

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This bear is one of his classic shapes.  This bear is polished with a deep red clay slip.  The front has a sun pattern with a black mica clay line design in the center. The sun pattern is one that is inspired by the early pottery of Tonita Roybal.  The black of the bear has a black matte section along with a traditional San Ildefonso rain design.  The bear has a heartline which is etched into the clay.  The heartline which extends out from the mouth of the bear. The bear is a symbol of strength and the heartline is a traditional image used to symbolize the heart as the center of power in the animal.  The eyes are turquoise.  The bear is hollow as the piece is coil built.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 3,800.00
Garcia, Jason – Four Corn Maidens Box

Jason Garcia is known for his tiles, he also creates a few boxes and jars each year.  This box is one that has four Corn Maidens painted, with one on each side.  They are painted in the old “two-dimensional” style of Santa Clara art and each of the Corn Maidens represents a different direction (North, South, East, West) based on the color (Blue, Red, White, Yellow).  In one hand she is holding corn and the other a basket of cornmeal.  On the ground are stylized corn plants and there is a corn design on each of the dresses.  The detail in this box is fantastic, with even small detailed created with the clay. The box is made of native clay and he uses native clay slips for the colors.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay “Okuu Pin” which is Jason’s name in Tewa (which means Turtle Mountain).  The piece is certainly inspired by the work of San Ildefonso painter Gilbert Atencio and his Blue Corn Maiden (see last photo).

$ 900.00
Daubs, Dennis – Jar with Avanyu and Feathers

Dennis Daubs is known for his intricately incised pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and the imagery is etched into the surface of the clay.  This jar has a water serpent in one section of the design.  The remainder of the jar has etched feathers, rain and cloud patterns.  The designs are very intricately etched and note the precision of the lines. The piece is signed, “Dennis Daubs”.

$ 200.00
Duwyenie, Debra & Preston – Seedpot with Eight Turtles

Debra Duwyenie is well known for her wonderful miniatures and incised designs. Each piece is stone polished and then it is etched before it is fired! This seedpot has eight turtles as the design.  Each of the turtles has a different design on the back.  Note the one with the wavy lines, that one is meant to represent Preston Duwyenie, her husband, who is known for his “shifting sand” pottery.  There are additional dragonflies and a water serpent at the base of the design.  Note that the lighter red matte areas are where Debra has only etched away the polished surface but not down as far as the tan color of the clay. Debra also pays close attention to the little details like the tan background area and how evenly she etches the vertical lines. The seedpot is traditionally fired.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay with Preston’s hallmark and “Debra”.

$ 450.00
Toya, Dominique – Red Bowl with Melon Swirl Design

Dominique Toya is known for her intricately carved pottery with sharp ridged melon swirls.  This is an earlier piece of her pottery which is carved with six swirling melon ribs.  The entire piece is fully stone polished to a high shine.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Damian Toya”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00
Cling, Alice –  Jar with Incised Rain Designs

This jar by Alice Cling is a very classic Navajo shape with the high shoulder and the elongated neck.  The jar has a raised “braid” encircling the piece near the neck.   What is interesting about the raised design is not simply that it is an incised linear rain design.  The pattern around the jar has a great texture and there is one small “gap” in the design, which is the “spirit line”.  The jar is traditionally fired and it was fired very hot as it is a brownish coloration.  The fire clouds still circle around on the surface of the jar.  It was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pine pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alice Cling”.  Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”  She remains one of the great names in the revival of Navajo pottery in the 1980’s

$ 110.00
Lonewolf, Rosemary –  “Corn Spirit’s Fertile Form” Original Etching (1985) 4/60

This is an original etching by Rosemary Lonewolf.  The figure is a Corn Spirit holding an ear of corn and surrounded by a corn stalk and pollen.  It is 4/60 and titled, “Corn Spirit’s Fertile Form”.   It is signed, “Rosemary Apple Blossom Lonewolf”.   It is in excellent condition.

$ 125.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Miniature Kiva Bowl (1975)

While Nancy Youngblood is known for her swirl melon bowls and carved pottery, she started out her career making miniatures.  This miniature is from 1975 which makes it a very early piece of her pottery!  It is a miniature kiva bowl and it is fully polished on the inside and the outside.  The edges of the kiva steps are matte in contrast to the highly polished surface.  Note as well the little holes in the sides of the kiva steps.  On larger pieces the holes would be placed in the kiva bowls so that eagle feathers could be attached.  It is amazing that she was able to replicate this concept in miniature!  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nancy Yellow Aspen ’75”.

$ 900.00
Naranjo, Veronica – Carved Plate with Avanyu Design

Veronica Naranjo is a daughter of Barbarita Naranjo and a granddaughter of Pasqualita Tafoya. This is one of her few plates but carved in her very deep style.  The design is an avanyu which encircles the plate.  It is stone polished and traditionally fired.  The carving is deep for the size of the piece.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Veronica”

$ 120.00
Swentzell, Roxanne – “Indian On the Edge” Original Clay Figure

This is an exceptional original clay piece by Roxanne Swentzell.  It is entitled “Indian On the Edge”.  The figure is one of the few males she has made during her career.  There is a look of uncertainty in the eyes of the eyes of the figure as he is looking over the edge. The piece sits almost flat but when placed on the edge it balances out.  Roxanne had said of this piece, that, its quizzical look and inability to sit evenly on a flat surface is about the feeling of being stranded between two cultures and unable to be comfortable in either one.  It is definitely a powerful piece of her work and a great statement on the lives of many native artists. The hair is sculpted with clay hair ties which extend to the back and the side.  The parrot feathers are tied in bundles and added to the piece. The sculptural quality of the hands and feet is striking on this figure.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is from early 2000 and signed in the clay, “ROX”.

$ 11,000.00
Swentzell, Roxanne – “The Seduction” Original Clay Figure

This is a classic original clay piece by Roxanne Swentzell.  It is entitled “The Seduction”.  The figure is made from clay and she is in a reclining position.  Her one hand is holding up her head while the other is extending outward with the finger extended.   She is beckoning the viewer forward.  There is a gentleness to the figure and the face.  The continuous coloration of the figure accentuates the form.  Note the detail in the hands and the feet as well.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is from early 2000s and signed in the clay, “ROX”.

$ 11,000.00
Sahmie, Ida – “Yei-bi-Chi” Double Sided Tile

This is an unusual tile by Ida Sahmie.  The tile is fully polished and painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.    The front side has the Yei-bi-Chi figure, often also called the “Talking God”, who is the first in a series of eight during the Night Chant.  The opposite side has the last figure.  The figures are etched into the clay and then slipped with clay to create the colorations.  Ida is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.  It is signed on the side in the clay, “Ida Sahmie”.

$ 250.00
Antonio, Frederica – Jar with Swirling Clouds, Corn and Rainbow Bands

Frederica Antonio is renown for her intricately painted pottery. Each piece is coil built and then finely painted. Her designs are a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines which are then filled in to create larger images in the squares.  This jar is a striking shape with the sharp shoulder. The designs painted on the surface swirl down from the neck to the rim.  There are four sections with a classic square shaped corn design, a symbol of prosperity. Separating them are bands of square clouds and two rainbow bands painted with two clay colors. The clay is painted over the surface of the black bee-weed lines.  The result on this jar is a striking piece which emphasizes the shape as it is turned.  The base of the jar is concave, reminiscent of historic Acoma jars which were carried on the head.  This combination of thin walls, classic shape, and tightly painted design create a piece which is visually stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,450.00
Sarracino, Myron – Lightning Design Jar

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin-walled and tightly painted. This jar has a high shoulder and a more classic “olla” shape. Around the top and bottom of the jar are classic lightning designs in black and white.  ARound the center is a larger lightning pattern in red with additional rain and cloud motifs.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece and it is also a tribute to the potters who came before.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 375.00
Borts-Medlock, Autumn  – Lidded Canteen with Circle Designs (2001)

This is an intricately carved canteen by Autumn Borts-Medlock.  She is known for her often fanciful carved pottery and use of unique shapes.  The canteen is built with two handles.  It is fully carved with a series of circles which flow around the piece.  They are either polished or slipped with mica.  There is also a micaceous lid which fits onto the top of the piece as well.  The piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Autumn Borts”.

$ 1,400.00
Naranjo, Jody – Jar with Bighorn Sheep (2005)

This jar by Jody Naranjo is from 2005.  It is highly polished and fully designed.  The neck and base of the jar are fully polished and etched with her signature “kiva step” design.  The center band is matte and the design is a series of bighorn sheep.  They are each etched into the clay and they have large round horns, which add to the overall visual strength of the piece.  The variations in color are from the firing.  Note as well the etched linear designs in the background of the piece.  The jar is signed, “Jody Naranjo” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Jody said of her designing:

“As for the design on the top and the bottom, it was the kiva step in the beginning. My family used them but just parts of them, the top half of the design. I started making them just around the top of the pot in one row. Then it became two rows and three rows, and then I started filling in between them.  Now it looks more like a textile, and it’s a signature pattern that I do on everything.” Jody Naranjo, Spoken Through Clay

$ 1,400.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Bowl with 20 Carved Feathers (1977)

This is an early carved bowl by Nancy Youngblood.  The bowl is from 1977 when Nancy was just 22 years old!  The shape is a classic bowl and the feathers are carved into the clay.  Note the depth of the carving!  Each feather is symmetric and precise.  The entire piece is very highly polished and fired a deep black.  It is easy to see looking at this bowl the level of talent evident in her early work and how that same precision in carving and polishing is still part of her work today.  In the area below the shoulder, there is also a carved bear paw.  It is a charming addition to the overall design.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nancy Yellow Aspen Youngblood, Dec. 1977”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It comes to us from the collection of Georgia Loloma, the wife of noted jeweler Charles Loloma.

$ 2,000.00
Komalestewa, Alton –  Melon Jar with 21 Ribs (1980’s)

Alton Komalestewa learned to make pottery from his mother-in-law, Helen Shupla.  She was famous for her traditional melon bowls and over the years Alton has taken and refined this form.  This large melon jar is an earlier piece of his pottery from the 1980’s and it is made with Santa Clara clay.  The jar has 21 melon ribs which each pushed out from the inside so that there is an undulation of the ribs.  Typical of Alton’s work, there is also a symmetry to each rib!  Of course, it is technically difficult to stretch the clay and create even ribs. The jar is highly polished and fired a brown coloration. Again, much like Helen, Alton has continually experimented with various colors of clay throughout his career to create distinctive vessels.  The jar has been traditionally fired and it is signed on the bottom by Alton and he also uses a katsina face as part of the hallmark of his name.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,400.00
Naranjo, Jody – Square Neck Jar with Crazy Horse Rider

This jar by Jody Naranjo is from 2005.  It is highly polished and of her few pieces which is fired a deep black!  The jar is designed after the firing.  The top and base of the jar are fully etched with her signature “kiva step” design.  The center band is also fully polished.  Here she has her iconic “Crazy Horse” girl on a horse.  There is additional etching for the handprint on the rear of the horse and the girl’s hair.  The jar itself has square sides which, being flat, add a striking appearance to both the jar and the burnished surfaces.  The jar is signed, “Jody Naranjo” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Jody said of her designing:

“As for the design on the top and the bottom, it was the kiva step in the beginning. My family used them but just parts of them, the top half of the design. I started making them just around the top of the pot in one row. Then it became two rows and three rows, and then I started filling in between them.  Now it looks more like a textile, and it’s a signature pattern that I do on everything.” Jody Naranjo, Spoken Through Clay

$ 1,200.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Polychrome Wedding Vase with Sun Design

This is wedding vase by Russell Sanchez incorporates three different colors of clay.  The top half is a lighter red clay, while the center band has a black clay slip.  The bottom of the vase is a deep red.  The wedding vase is etched with a sun designs extending down towards the base.  Note that one side has a checkerboard pattern etched into the clay while the opposite has dots.  Russell has been taking inspiration from the work of early San Ildefonso potters Tonita Roybal and Florentino Montoya for his designs.  They are not copied but his own interpretation and revival of these creative designs.  The shape of the wedding vase is elegant with a strong proportion between the shoulder and the spouts.  Wedding vases are considered difficult to polish as the handles and spouts create unusual angles and directions in which the piece must be turned.  It was traditionally fired and after the firing Russell inset two bands of jet hei-shi beads.  The vase is signed on the bottom in the clay.   Once again Russell deftly revives historic San Idlefonso designs and stories and uses them for his own contemporary work.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 3,800.00
Youngblood, Nathan – Avanyu & Dragon Tri-Color Jar

Nathan Youngblood has long taken inspiration from the world around him.  His work for decades has drawn inspiration from both Pueblo and Asian art.  When he was a young boy, while his father was in the military, they were stationed in the Netherlands, and he said he would often go to the museums and look at Asian ceramics.  That has been a life-long love affair with those distinctive forms and designs.  This jar has a very Asian form and the designs play out the duality at times found in his art.  Around the shoulder on one side is a dragon and then the opposite a water serpent (avanyu).  Each facing the other.  There are two opposing medallions, one with Pueblo clouds and the other a cipher.  Around the neck is a band of clouds and around the base, in tan, is a band of clouds, wind and eagle feathers. The deep red clay slip on this jar is exceptional and contrasts perfectly with the tan and matte areas.  While the shape, carving, and designing might seem like enough, Nathan also takes his pottery one step further. After it is fired, he uses small screwdrivers and scrapes the sides of the carved designs and the recessed areas, to create a visually striking contrast.  This style has been called, “the new Santa Clara polychrome”, although I usually called it “tri-color” with the variations of red, matte and buff areas. The jar was traditionally fired.  The result of various levels of color and imagery make for an exceptional jar that is certainly a reflection of how Native art has become a world art, and the two are meeting as equals.

$ 24,000.00
Youngblood, Nathan – Red & Tan Water Jar with Eagle & Fish

Nathan Youngblood has long created his own “lexicon in clay” with his distinctive designs which pull from Pueblo, personal and cultural experiences.  This stunning water jar is an exceptional shape with a round body, a double shoulder and an elongated neck.  The design is a complicated story of the eagle in the sky and the fish under the water. The fish are swimming and the double shoulder of the jar is set at such a point that it becomes the waves above the fish!  The jar is very deeply carved and the surface is polished a stunning deep red coloration. As the jar is turned the eagle and fish swirl around the surface of the piece. The lowest section of the jar is polished tan.  The scene is a reflection of Nathan’s love of nature and it’s interaction with Pueblo life, culture and stories. While the shape, carving and designing might seem like enough, Nathan also takes his pottery one step further. After it is fired, he uses small screwdrivers and scrapes the sides of the carved designs and the recessed areas, to create a visually striking contrast.  This style has been called, “the new Santa Clara polychrome”, although I usually called it “tri-color” with the variations of red, matte and buff areas. The jar was traditionally fired and the result simply speaks for itself.  Lustrous!

$ 19,500.00
Victorino, Sandra  – Seed Jar with Snow and Rain Designs

Sandra Victorino is a niece of noted potter Dorothy Torivio.    Sandra has her own unique style of “op-art”, where the patterns start small, then get larger and then smaller again on the vessel.  These pieces reflect the variety and intricacy of her pottery designs. This jar has the white clay painted with the black bee-weed (a plant).  The jar has a checkerboard snow pattern swirling down from the rim on one half of the jar.  The other half is a fine-line rain pattern.  Separating the two halves is an eternity pattern.  The intricacy of the designs and the use of the op-art imagery adds to the sophistication of the jar!   The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Sandra creates a beautiful sense of balance between the form and design.

$ 200.00
Patricio, Robert – Water Jar with Lightning Designs

Robert Patricio is known for his classic forms and use of both traditional and pre-historic imagery.  This jar is coil built and thin walled. It has a classic water jar shape with the high shoulder and the sloping neck.  The jar is painted with a classic stylized lightning design.  Here the designs appear to swirl around the jar and are contrasted in black, white and with fine-lines.  The jar has both an ancient and very modern appearance.  Robert is certainly one of the leading traditional Acoma potters working today which is evidenced by his stunning forms and complementary designs.

$ 975.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Four-Color Double Lobe Jar with Waterfall Rim

This is an exceptional revival of a historic shape by Russell Sanchez.  The shape of the jar is a “double lobe”.  It is technically difficult to make as the coiling has to round in and out to create each of the “bowls” which seem to be sitting on each other.  Historically, these are inspired by cooking vessels which were set on top of each other.  The bottom section of this jar has angular carved eagle feathers swirling around the piece. They are polished black and the area at the very base is polished a light red.  Above the feathers is a checkerboard band representing corn alternating polished deep red and matte.  The center band, which Russell said was very difficult to polish, is light red coloration. The top “lobe” or bowl of the jar is polished a very deep red.  There are three designs which he has etched to encircle the jar. They range from a koshari to Early San Ildefonso inspired sun and rain designs.  Above and below the center band are checkerboard snow patterns in both black and light red.  Finally, the neck is polished black and the rim is a deep red. The inside of the rim has been carved with melon style ribs creating Russell’s distinctive “waterfall rim”.  There are so many technical aspects to the creation of this jar, from numerous clays to the form itself.  However, the final result is visually striking and very unusual.  The jar is signed on the base in the clay.  Once again Russell harkens to historic San Idlefonso designs and stories and uses them for his own contemporary work.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 6,800.00
Sahmie, Ida – “Father Sky” Tile

This is a very traditionally inspired tile by Ida Sahmie.  It is “Father Sky”, which is a design often seen in sandpaintings.  Here, Ida has painted it on a stone polished tile using natural clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  Father Sky is in the center with the cosmos painted on the body.  Surrounding the figure is a rainbow design.  Note how areas are etched into the clay, as well as painted!  The tile was traditionally fired and it is signed on the back, “Ida Sahmie”.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.   The story of Father Sky and Mother Earth, and the Dine people is as follows:

“The Navajo people, the Diné, passed through three different worlds before emerging into this world, The Fourth World, or Glittering World. The Diné believe there are two classes of beings: the Earth People and the Holy People. The Holy People are believed to have the power to aid or harm the Earth People. Since Earth People of the Diné are an integral part of the universe, they must do everything they can to maintain harmony or balance on Mother Earth.  It is believed that centuries ago the Holy People taught the Diné how to live the right way and to conduct their many acts of everyday life. They were taught to live in harmony with Mother Earth, Father Sky and the many other elements such as man, animals, plants, and insects.”

$ 220.00
Sahmie, Ida – “Mother Earth” Tile

This is a very traditionally inspired tile by Ida Sahmie.  It is “Mother Earth”, which is a design often seen in sandpaintings.  Here, Ida has painted it on a stone polished tile using natural clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  Mother Earth is in the center with the four sacred plants and other imagery painted on the polished red surface.  The face is etched.  There is a band below the figure which as polished and etched sections.  The tile was traditionally fired and it is signed on the back, “Ida Sahmie”.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.   The story of Father Sky and Mother Earth, and the Dine people is as follows:

“The Navajo people, the Diné, passed through three different worlds before emerging into this world, The Fourth World, or Glittering World. The Diné believe there are two classes of beings: the Earth People and the Holy People. The Holy People are believed to have the power to aid or harm the Earth People. Since Earth People of the Diné are an integral part of the universe, they must do everything they can to maintain harmony or balance on Mother Earth.  It is believed that centuries ago the Holy People taught the Diné how to live the right way and to conduct their many acts of everyday life. They were taught to live in harmony with Mother Earth, Father Sky and the many other elements such as man, animals, plants, and insects.”

$ 220.00
Crank, Susie – Tall Jar with Long Neck

Susie Crank is a daughter of Rose Williams and a sister of Alice Cling.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and amazingly, she says he may burnish a piece over and over as many as 15 times to get a high shine!  This water jar has a high shoulder and an elongated neck.  The jar is then traditionally fired to create the fire-clouds on the surface.  The colorations on this jar range from black to a deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  Today, the pine pitch seals the vessel and gives it the shine.  This jar has a stunning shine and a great feel to the surface!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Susie Crank”.

$ 350.00
Garcia, Gloria “Golden Rod” – Seedpot with Butterfly

This seedpot by Gloria Garcia is fully polished and fired black. The top is fully designed with a butterfly and a flower.  The wings of the butterfly are etched to create the design.  The remainder of the piece is fully polished.  Gloria’s combination of polishing and etched designs is always striking.  This piece is signed on the bottom with her Tewa name “GoldenRod”.

$ 275.00
Naranjo, Geri  – Jar with Avanyu and Cloud Designs

This miniature jar by Geri Naranjo is a striking shape.  It has a round shoulder and a short neck.  Geri is known for her miniature pottery and intricately etched designs.  Here the entire piece is fully polished and around the shoulder is an avanyu and below are cloud, rain and lightning designs.  The designs are all etched into the clay with precision.  The remainder of the jar is very highly polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 375.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Wide Jar with Old Style Birds and Waterfall Lid

This is a distinctive shape jar by Russell Sanchez.  The jar is wide and with a very flat top. The jar is fully polished and the shoulder of the jar is designed with a checkerboard snow pattern using a mica clay slip.  The top is fully stone polished and designed with stylized bird patterns. The birds on this jar certainly have a similarity to those found on Sikyatki pottery, but they are also found on older San Ildefonso pottery as well!  The two birds are different and designed with additional patterns for their bodies.  The tails of the birds are inset with hematite stones while the center of the bodies have a high-grade Kingman turquoise. As old as the designs are, Russell has presented them in a manner that seems very modern!  The lid is highly carved and has “waterfall” ribbed shape with a single piece of turquoise on the top of the lid.  The base of the lid is polished with the ribs are slipped with mica.  The jar is fired a deep black and the mica squares are very metallic in appearance. There are four inset bands of hei-shi beads around the jar.  The bottom of the bowl has the classic indention of traditional San Ildefonso water jars.  Russell uses these historic elements to keep them alive on his contemporary pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 8,800.00
Cain, Linda – Mini Kiva Bowl

This is a classic kiva bowl miniature jar by Linda Cain.  Linda is a daughter of Mary Cain and the mother of Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.  This miniature bowl is carved with the kiva steps on the rim of the piece.  It is a form often seen at Santa Clara Pueblo. The outside of the bowl is polished while the inside is matte.  It is fired a deep black and signed on the bottom in the clay, “Linda Cain”.

$ 175.00
Honyumptewa, Aaron – Picuris Tall Micaceous Cloud Jar

Aaron Honyumptewa is both Hopi and Picuris. He is known for his very intricately carved katinsa dolls.  In the last year, he moved back to Picuris Pueblo in New Mexico, the home of his mother and family and has begun to learn to make pottery from his mother.  The pottery is the traditional style of Picuris Pueblo and Aaron says he is hoping to help revive the art form!  This larger bowl is made from Picuris micaceous clay.  It has the “cloud” terraced rim and the “hobnail” additions to the side. These are often seen on historic Picuris pottery and it’s nice to see their revival.  The clay itself is a beautiful coloration as it was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  If Aaron works with the clay with the same creativity in which he carved katsinas, he has a bright future!

$ 175.00
Estevan, Paula – Op-Art Rain and Lightning Design Jar

Paula Estevan has built a reputation for her highly detailed painted pottery.  This jar is more “trompe l’oile” than “op-art”.  The jar is thin-walled with a wide shoulder and short neck.  The jar has a lightning pattern which extends from the neck to the base.  It is surrounded by linear rain patterns.  The design, however, does fool the eye as the lighting pattern which extends from the neck to the base give the piece added dimension.  It is spectacular painting on this jar and a reflection of how Paula continues to be one of the leaders of Acoma pottery. It is signed on the bottom, “P. Estevan”.

$ 600.00
Manymules, Samuel   Large Wide Swirl Jar

This is a very wide jar by Samuel Manymules.  It is coil built and slipped with red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar has a stone polished neck and the ribs extend from the shoulder swirling down to the base.  Each rib is pushed out by hand and they come to a sharp point.  There are 10 ribs which extend across the surface of the jar.  However, it is not the size or the ribs which make this jar so remarkable, but the coloration.  Did you know Samuel fires his pottery on its side?!?!  This helps create more dynamic colorations. This jar goes from a deep reddish-purple to dark black and brown.  Interestingly, the brown areas are the more intensely fired sections of his pottery.  After the piece is fired, the jar is covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  The piece is signed on the bottom.   It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 2,800.00
Candelario, Hubert – Seedpot with 44 Holes (2019)

Hubert Candelario is one of the few potters working at San Felipe Pueblo.  He has been known for his micaceous pottery for over thirty years.  This piece has 44 holes cut into the clay before the piece is fired.  The holes all vary in size and add to both the complexity and intricacy of the piece.  It is always interesting with such an open lattice style or clay work that his pieces always feel so structurally sound.  The piece is slipped 3 to 4 times with a micaceous clay before it is fired. This gives the piece such a deep coloration.  It is signed on the bottom, “Hubert Candelario”. 

$ 950.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Avanyu Handle Jar with Lid

Russell Sanchez has found inspiration in the signed historic San Ildefonso pottery for both shapes and designs on his pottery.   This unique jar is inspired by a bowl by his great-great-grandmother, Ramona Sanchez Gonzales.  In the last photo, the red bowl by Ramona can be seen, with the avanyu in relief on the side.  As well, Tony Da made a jar with lizard handles in 1967-8, which is now in the Philbrook Museum (#7095).  The black and sienna of the jar and the etched medallions are certainly a reference for Russell’s latest piece.  This jar has sienna medallions on each side. They are etched with traditional San Ildefonso birds.  Each medallion is surrounded by two bands of hei-shi beads.  The handles are in the shape of the avanyu, much as on Ramona’s bowl.  The neck of the jar has a cloud pattern and the remainder of the piece is a micaceous clay slip.  The lid is fired to a near gunmetal appearance and has a sienna top and a single inset piece of turquoise.  The bottom of the jar has a “foot” which is reminiscent of historic San Ildefonso pottery and it is also indented. The hei-shi beads are all made by the Calabaza family from Santo Domingo Pueblo.  The jar seamlessly blends the old with the new and creates a new vision of how potters can derive inspiration from the past while creating their own new vessels.

$ 5,800.00
Honyumptewa, Aaron – Picuris Cloud Design TIle

Aaron Honyumptewa is both Hopi and Picuris. He is known for his very intricately carved katinsa dolls.  In the last year he moved back to Picuris Pueblo in New Mexico, the home of his mother and family and has begun to learn to make pottery from his mother.  The pottery is traditional style of Picuris pueblo and Aaron says he is hoping to help revive the art form!  This i a round tile which is made from Picuris micaceous clay.  On the front is a cloud pattern which is in raised relief.  It was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  If Aaron works with the clay with the same creativity in which he carved katsinas, he has a bright future!

$ 75.00
Lewis, Dolores – Antelope Bowl

Dolores Lewis is a daughter of renowned potter Lucy M. Lewis.  Dolores is known for use of classic Acoma and Mimbres designs in her pottery.  This bowl is a round shape with high sides.  It is painted with four antelope encircling the bowl.  Each antelope is perfectly painted with red bodies and white bellies.  It is imagery inspired by the Mimbres pottery of the 1100s.  This bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dolores Lewis” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While Dolores makes little pottery today, work remains some of the classic traditional pottery of Acoma Pueblo.

$ 350.00
Clashin, Debbie – Large Jar with Dragonflies and Cloud Spirals

This is a large jar by Debbie Clashin.  It is inspired by the classic Sikyatki style pottery with a wide shoulder and a slight neck.  Around the jar are dragonfly designs.  Dragonflies are symbolic prayer messengers.  Note the extension downward of the cloud designs in two sections. They rise up to the painted band around the neck which has more cloud and rain motifs.  The jar is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  It was traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar.  Debbie is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 2,000.00
Youngblood, Nancy – 16 Rib “S” Swirl Tall Jar with Lid (2018)

This is an extraordinary larger jar by Nancy Youngblood. The shape is one which has become iconic for her pottery and especially the melon ribs.  The straight sides show off all the curves for the “s” swirl.  Amazingly, there are SIX times the ribs go back and forth on this jar!  These are the wide ribs but are carved at an angle with a sharp edge which creates a strong surface for the reflection of light.  Nancy said of this style of her work:

“I’ve had problems that if I carve it too thin, it will break. I’ve had that happen so many times. I get to the end and I’m carving the single ribs and it has an air pocket in it. You wet it with slip and then when you touch it, with the first stroke of the stone, the clay falls off. There’s nothing you can do. It’s a loss. See here how the S is carved so deeply that the light plays off it so that it almost glows.”  Nancy Youngblood, Spoken Through Clay

Each of the 16 ribs perfectly reflects the light.  Added to the complexity of the jar is the lid.  The ribs not only extend down the side, but over the top and down onto the base of the lid!  There is a kinetic motion to them on this piece which may simply be the play of the light adding to the highly polished surface.  Thee matte area on the top of the lid is perfectly sanded smooth.  This is important so there are no shadows cast from an uneven surface.  In addition to the depth of carving on this jar, consider that each rib has two “sides”to be polished and the surface area of the piece is about double its size!  The lid and jar are signed on the bottom in the clay.    Nancy has won numerous awards, from “Best of Pottery” to “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market for her melon bowls.  This is undoubtedly a classic of her clay art!

$ 12,000.00
Fields, Anita – House and Two Figures Set (1998)

This piece by Anita Fields is from 1998.  This piece is part of her House series, with a stylized house with two figures in the interior.  Here the outside of the house is adorned with an elk tooth motif (the white on black) and the top has swirl designs in the red.  The figures inside the house are painted with a landscape for the lower bodies with the stars and moon for the upper part.  It is a beautiful complement of slips, texture and design.  It is signed on the back, “Anita Fields” and it is  in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Anita was influenced by traditional Osage ribbon work, clothing, and blankets. She also studied the objects and ceremonial dress of other tribes. The personal and emotional elements in these textile designs led Anita to use them symbolically in clay, translating the personality of these vestments into her work. About one of her recent series, Native American Dresses, which are coil-and slab-built installations, Anita says: “The dresses convey my attitudes toward the strength of women and how native peoples show remarkable resourcefulness and adaptability toward their environment. The clothing Indian women created shows great pride, dignity, and hope in a culture facing insurmountable odds.”  

$ 450.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Carved Bowl with Hummingbirds (1990)

Grace Medicine Flower began her career making miniature pottery with incised designs.  This bowl is from 1990 and it is a significant piece as it is part of the period when she began to make larger vessels with smaller incised areas.  She went back to the early work of her father, Camilio Tafoya, and began to carve her pottery. The entire surface is fully polished.  She also began to carve the rim of her vessels, which is technically very difficult, as it can break in the drying or polishing stage.  This bowl has some very deeply carved sections which extend down from the rim.  There are large central medallions on both sides, each with a hummingbird.  One one side there are four additional smaller medallions with hummingbirds and butterflies.  Grace said about her use of hummingbirds:

“We have a lot of hummingbirds by our house. Who knows about a hummingbird on a piece of pottery? They are so tiny and so little. Looking at the hummingbirds and flowers or the squirrels like we have next door. Maybe even that you can put on a piece of pottery. Anything that comes to your mind that you might think would look good on the pottery is fine.”  Grace Medicine Flower, Spoken Through Clay

The bowl is very highly polished and fired a deep red. The inside is slipped with a mica clay slip.  Interestingly, Grace did all of her etching in the clay before the pieces were fired, which added to their overall difficulty.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.   It is large, elegant and stunning!

$ 7,000.00
Peynetsa, Jamie – White Clay Owl with Rainbird Designs

This is a small owl figure painted by Jamie Peynetsa and made by his mother, Avelia.  The owl is a classically shaped figure for Zuni pottery.  The piece is charming with a round body with extended beak, tail, and wings.  The piece is fully painted with the feathers.  There is a rainbird design on the back of the head.  In Zuni culture, the owl is the protector of the home and the keeper of the night. He is able to see what others cannot see and is thought to be very observant and perceptive. He is thought to have true wisdom and patience.  Jamie has signed the owl on the bottom.

$ 150.00
Tafoya, Jennifer (Moquino) – “Butterflies & Pueblo Girl” Tile

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and exceptional realistic animals.  This is one of her smaller tiles.  It is fully polished and etched.  The piece has a Pueblo girl and butterflies.  The girl is designed in an “anime” style.  As figurative work on pottery is often discouraged at some of the Pueblos, this style of figure is less realistic and more imaginary.  The young girl here is surrounded by butterflies. Each one is a different style of butterfly.  The border on the side has a cloud and rain motif.  It is a contemporary and creative piece!  The tile is framed so that it can be mounted on a wall.  It is signed on the side.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 825.00
Huma, Rondina – Bowl with Pottery Shard Designs (2000)

Rondina Huma has certainly been one of the most influential Hopi potters working today.  Since her two-time “Best of Show” award at Santa Fe Indian Market, her tight style and intricately painted pottery has changed the face of contemporary Hopi pottery.   Each piece is coil built, fully stone polished and painted with native clays and bee-weed (black), and native fired.  This bowl is fully designed and painted.  Rondina said of this style of her pottery:

“This style is when I first started designing from the bottom to the top. I would get a bunch of sherds and I would put them together and see what pattern they created. Then I would take back the sherds to where I found them. I also polish the inside of all my pottery. People ask how I do it and how I can get so deep inside. I just think it makes a bowl look nicer if it is fully polished. The burgundy-colored [areas] are the water migration. It’s like a spring with the water coming up out of the earth and soaking back into the ground. It’s a full cycle, so the square has to be complete. I do most of the painting freehand. When I look at a pot, I already know what design I’m going to put on there. I can visualize what I’m going to paint, and it is never the same. I don’t really use a pencil—I’m afraid it won’t come off. I try to just measure with my hand to space out the designs.”  Rondina Huma, Spoken Through Clay

The bowl is very tightly painted with a variety of designs in each of the small squares.  They are all derived from historic Hopi-Tewa and Sikyatki pottery.  The rim of the bowl is complex with a variety of design and no patter repeated!   The tight patterns have become more and more intricate and detailed in each passing year.  Amazingly, the inside of the bowl is also fully polished!   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 5,000.00
Naranjo, Geri  – Tall Black Plainware Jar

This is a taller miniature jar by Geri Naranjo.  She is known for her miniature pottery and intricately etched designs.  Here the entire piece is fully polished with no design.  It is in the shape of a high shoulder jar. The piece is very thinly constructed and highly polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Geri Naranjo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 150.00
Sarracino, Myron – Rain and Plant Design Jar

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin-walled and tightly painted. This jar has a high shoulder and a more classic “olla” shape. The design has a “T” shaped could pattern painted with a red clay slip.  It is above the terraced mesa design.  Below the mesa design is a spiraling water pattern.  It has a series of fine-lines painted into the clay.  Near the base are plant designs, which are often seen on classic Laguna pottery.  The jar is a nice balance of form and design.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece and it is also a tribute to the potters who came before.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 325.00
Qoyawayma, Al – Slipper Jar with Jaguar and Bird Men

Al Qoyawayma calls the shape of this jar his “Slipper” pots.  He explains; “It is a shape that is ubiquitous form in pre-historic pottery in areas from Hopi south to Chile.  The figures on the slipper bowls are formed from actual Teotihuacán (Mexico) pottery stamps.  The stamps are genuine with an estimated age of 0-200 AD. The animal representation may be a jaguar or perhaps other smaller animal.  The other 3 figure relief characters I might guess as “bird men”.  I give these stamps and figures respect because of their antiquity. Also, Teotihuacan was very cosmopolitan city and pyramid complex, and is said to have many cultural enclaves, some possibly with ancestors to the Hopi.  Some linguists believe that the Teotihuacán’s spoke Uto-Aztecan, the root language of Hopi.

The slipper pot (or “shoe pots”) are an ancient ubiquitous phenomena found in Chile with the northern most extent at Hopi (and that is interesting).  Even today the shoe pots are beings made in Mexico. There are similar Hopi forms, many with a curved conical “nose” and were used for cooking…so sometimes the pots are referred to as “culinary shoe pots” (archaeologically speaking). My aunt Polingaysi (Elizabeth White) gave me a full explanation of the construction and use of these shoe pots in the 1970’s. Interestingly the pots showed up in an excavation at the village of Sikyatki by Walter Fewkes in 1895. Sikyatki likely occupied by Keres speaking (Laguna and Acoma) group who are the Coyote Clan. My ancestry is of the Coyote Clan.”

$ 5,800.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Waterfall Rim Open Bowl

This is a simple but very elegant open bowl by Russell Sanchez.  The shape of the bowl is a classic one for San Ildefonso for holding water.  The interior of the bowl is fully polished and the rim is carved with 36 melon ribs to create a “water fall” rim.  The symmetry of them give the bowl a unique appearance in terms of how the light reflects off the edge.  There is almost a silvery-gunmetal appearance to the rim which seems heightened by the deep black interior.  The exterior is a highly polished and slipped mica, which has a metallic appearance after the firing. While the bowl may seem simple in form, there is an inherent complexity to having it seem so strong with no design.  It is certianly always the challenge to an artist like Russel to restrain themselves and let the clay, form, polish and firing speak for itself.  That is the voice given to this bowl.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Russell”. Russell uses these historic elements to keep them alive on his contemporary pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 2,400.00
Medicine Flower, Grace – Polychrome Jar with Fish

Grace Medicine Flower began her career making miniature pottery with incised designs.   This jar is from 2002-5 and  is one of her amazing polychrome pieces. The jar is carved through to create the various visual areas for design. Around the shoulder are carved through sections with carved fish as part of the design.  Below are sections which are carved into the clay and then slipped with micaceous clay or polished.  They are then etched with additional designs.  Grace has incorporated all the various techniques to make this jar, including carving, incising and etching.  She has also used polished, painted and micaceous surfaces for the designs.  All the various colors are from natural clay slips.  The technical difficulty in carving through the clay for the open areas is surprisingly difficult and amazing that it didn’t crack in drying or firing. Note as well that it is painted on the inside with additional fish! The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While Grace is no longer making pottery, this is certainly a reflection of the creativity and originality of her work!

 

$ 6,800.00
Concho, Rachel – Seedpot with Lizards

Rachel Concho (b. 1936) learned to make pottery from her mother, Santana Cerno.   She is a sister of Joseph Cerno and mother-in-law of Carolyn Lewis-Concho.  In 2000 she won Best in Show at Santa Fe Indian Market.  Her pottery is coil built and painted with bee-weed (black) and clay slips.  This seedpot has two lizards and insects on the top.  On the bottom has a fine-line star pattern along with classic Acoma rain and lightning designs.  There are accents of red clay slip.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 250.00
Lucario, Rebecca – Seedpot with Lizard

Rebecca Lucario is known for her delicate and intricately painted pottery.  This seedpot is painted with a lizard on top.  The lizard is surrounded by intricately painted geometric Acoma designs.  It is delicate in design and traditional in form.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom, “R. Lucario”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 225.00
Lewis, Sharon – Bowl with Red Flower Design

Sharon Lewis has developed her own very distinctive style of painted design.  Her pieces are beautifully formed, thin-walled and then tightly painted.  This bowl is thin walled and painted with a series of flowers with red centers. The red is an additional clay slip.  The flowers spiral around the bowl and are separated by fine-line rain designs.  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Sharon Lewis”.

$ 350.00
Tse-Pe, Dora – Black & Sieanna Jar with Turquoise (1991)

This jar by Dora Tse-Pe is from 1991.  It is her classic highly polished surface. The jar itself is carved with an asymmetric opening.  The piece was fired a deep black and then it was two-toned to create the sienna medallion.  In the center of the medallion, there is an inset piece of turquoise.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dora of San Ildefonso 1991”.

$ 775.00
Roller, Jeff – Tear Drop Shaped Lidded Jar with Mountain Designs (2018)

This is an exceptional lidded jar by Jeff Roller.  Jeff is a son of Toni Roller and a grandson of Margaret Tafoya.  He continues a family legacy of extraordinary traditional pottery.  This jar is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired black.  However, the shape is what Jeff calls a “teardrop form” with narrow sides and a rounder base. The shape is also very much reminiscent of the mountain form. Jeff has carved a mountain design on each side with clouds and wind patterns above. Note the depth of the carving and its consistency throughout the piece.  Below the lid is a half-circle sun and the lid is carved with a traditional step cloud design.  Note how the carving on the sides continues up to the lid as if it is one piece!  The lid is perfectly fit to the jar which adds to the overall difficulty.  The piece is beautifully polished and fired.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Jeff Roller” and dated 2018.

$ 4,500.00
Roller, Toni – Jar with 48 Feathers (2018)

This is a striking carved jar by Toni Roller.  She is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and is known for her classic shapes and exquisite stone polished pottery.   This larger jar is a wide shape with just a slight neck.  Around the shoulder are 48 carved feathers.  Toni’s feathers are distinctive in style with the straight sides and slight curve at the base.  Over the course of her long career, it has become one of her signature carved designs due to the visual strength of the symmetry of the feathers.  Creating a piece this size with this number of feathers (at 83 years old) is remarkable.   The jar is very highly polished and fired a deep black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Toni Roller”.  Toni has said of her traditional style of pottery:

“It’s important to start from scratch and do it the old way. People should understand how difficult the process is and why it takes so long to make pottery. If you are going to be a potter, you are not going to mind all the hard work involved in gathering the clay and the materials. It’s time-consuming, but in the end you are so happy to have this clay that just started as chunks in rock form. Then, coming out with the beautiful final pieces of pottery. How did it come about? With your hands and patience. That is such a good feeling.” Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

$ 3,800.00
Clashin, Debbie – 18″ “New Beginning”  Jar with Grandmother Katsina and Dragonflies

Debbie Clashin has become one of the exciting leaders in Hopi-Tewa pottery over the past several years.  She is known for her large-sized traditional fired vessels. This very large jar is entitled, “New Beginning”.  Debbie said that the designs symbolize the arrival of the Grandmother Katsina in the winter and the beginning of the Hopi new year in the cycle of the katsinas.  She has painted the Grandmother Katsina as a cradle doll on the sides of the jar.

“The Grandmother Katsina (Hahay-i wu-uti) shares with Crow Mother the title of Mother of all the Katsinam. Her husband is said to be Eototo and her children are the monsters, the Nataskas. She appears during the Bean Dance (Powamuya), the Serpent Ceremony and at Home Going (Niman). She speaks in a high voice and is very talkative. Flat carvings of the Grandmother Katsina are given to Hopi infants. As a young girl matures, she receives larger, more detailed forms of the Grandmother Katsina.”

This large jar is a wide shape and a slightly turned out neck.  The entire piece is stone polished and then it is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  Separating the three katsina figures are large Hopi dragonflies which have dark and light red wings!  The jar is traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar and a few little darker areas.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.  Quite an exceptional jar!

$ 6,500.00
Duwyenie, Preston – White Plate with Silver Shard

This plate by Preston Duwyenie is made from white Hopi clay found near Third Mesa at Hopi.  The entire plate is stone polished on the front and back.  He has inset a single piece of silver, which looks much a pottery shard resting in the sand.  The silver piece is from cast from cuttlefish bone.  The textured surface of the silver then has his famous “shifting sand” style of design.   The plate is signed on the back in the clay with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child, which comes from Preston’s Hopi name, which means “carried in beauty”.  Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

$ 800.00
Early, Max – “Eagles in Flight” Jar

Max Early is one of the few traditional potters working today at Laguna Pueblo.  His work combines traditional forms with a blend of contemporary and traditional designs.  This jar is a traditional shape with a high shoulder and elongated neck. The jar has a rain pattern around the neck and a cloud design around the shoulder.  Max noted that these were “older, minimal Laguna designs”.  However, as with much of his work, the bottom area is where he created is own additional designs.  Here he said he had painted four eagles in flight over the four directional mountains.  It is beautiful imagery which complements the simplicity of the designs above. The rounded bottom harkens back to the traditional Laguna pottery when the water jars were meant to be carried on one’s head.  Note as well his use of the various clays to create a “three color” jar!   The jar is also traditionally fired, which adds to the overall difficulty of the piece.  It is certainly exciting to see a potter who is inspired by traditional shapes and designs and yet has the artistry to create his own distinctive variation!  The jar is signed on the bottom and includes a copy of his book, “Ears of Corn: Listen”.

$ 2,000.00
Lewis, Eric – Large Jar with Buffalo

This larger jar by Eric Lewis is a new and more complex design for his pottery.  It is a buffalo on one side and stylized birds on the opposite side.  The jar has high shoulders and a short neck.  The buffalo is wonderfully painted and a bit different from his other more linear designs.  Eric uses his designs to follow the shape of the jar and accentuate its form.  Eric has taken classic Acoma linear designs and made them both bolder and more graphic. The result is a striking jar with tightly painted imagery.  Eric remains one of the young Pueblo potters to watch!

$ 500.00
Tafoya-Sanchez, Linda – Jar with Cloud and Mesa Designs

Linda Tafoya-Sanchez is a granddaughter of noted potter Margaret Tafoya and a daughter of Lee & Betty Tafoya.  She is known for her intricately carved pottery.  The jar has a wide body and a fluted rim. The fluted neck undulates back and forth around the jar and it is slipped with a micaceous clay.  The body of the jar is carved with cloud, lightning, and mesa or mountain designs.  They are deeply carved into the clay.  The jar is highly polished and traditionally fired.  Interestingly, Linda was among the first Santa Clara potters to begin using the mica as a design element after she was given some by her San Juan Pueblo in-laws.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Linda Tafoya-Sanchez”.

“The clay is a really important part of making the pottery. Listening to family members talk about how they used to get clay with Grandma and Grandpa [Margaret & Alcario Tafoya] and how they would make it an all-day venture. You feel that family connection when you are digging the clay out of the earth. It ties you to your home. There’s no other place you are going to find that kind of clay. You think about how many years people have dug that clay out of the earth, how many years Mother Earth has provided that clay for us.”  Linda Tafoya-Sanchez, Spoken Through Clay

$ 900.00
Youngblood, Nancy – 32 Rib Mellon (1987)

This is a classic straight ribbed melon bowl by Nancy Youngblood.  The bowl is coil built and each rib is deeply carved into the clay.  The depth of the carving and the symmetry of each rib is exceptional. This is certainly one of the enduring aspects of her incredible artistry.  Each rib is then polished with a stone to achieve the shine.  Although it is a small piece, consider that each rib has two sides and how much surface area there is for this piece!  The ribs are also very deeply carved into the clay and almost come to a point at the edge! Check out the image looking down on the bowl to see the depth and symmetry of this piece.  Nancy says she can only polish three ribs in one sitting as they are so time-consuming.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Nancy Youngblood Cutler” and it is from 1987.  Simply an iconic piece of her pottery!

$ 3,800.00
Folwell, Polly Rose – Asymmetric Rim Jar with Feather Pattern

Polly Rose Folwell is known for use of classic designs on her traditional inspired Santa Clara pottery.  She learned to make pottery from her mother, Jody Folwell.   This jar is fully polished and has an asymmetric rim. It has been fired a dark reddish brown with a nearly black rim.   The design around the shoulder are etched feathers which encircle the piece.  Above and below are cloud and rain designs.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 400.00
Medina, Elizabeth – Lidded Jar with Rainbow Band and Hummingbirds

Elizabeth Medina is known for a traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece is coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This jar is painted with a large bird with a rainbow band over the top of the section.  The birds on each side are different in style.  Overhead is a polished red rainbow band which has additional cloud and rain designs.  On the sides are flowers and small hummingbirds!  They are very charming.   The jar incorporates various clay slips for the colors and some are polished and some are matte.  The contrast of the matte and polished areas creates a striking appearance. The top of the lid is polished red while the turtle is added and slipped tan.  There is a polished and painted bird and flowers on the top.  The jar is signed on the side “Elizabeth Medina, Zia. Around the neck of the jar are rain and cloud patterns.  Separating the birds are intricately painted flowers with polished petals.  The jar is striking with the variations of matte and polished surfaces.  The top of the lid is polished red while the turtle is added and slipped tan.  There is a polished and painted bird and flowers on the top.  The jar is signed on the side “Elizabeth Medina, Zia.

$ 400.00
Toya, Maxine – Corn Maiden Holding Corn

Maxine Toya is well known for her figurative pottery.   Each piece is coil built and stone polished and painted with natural clay slips.  This is one of her Corn Maiden figures.  The Corn Maiden has a fully polished shawl which she is wearing. On her manta is a very delicately painted corn plant and she is holding an ear of corn in her hand.  Note the intricacy in the face and the overall painting.   It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maxine Toya”.

$ 850.00
Naranjo, Madeline – Jar with Avanyu and Clouds

Madeline Naranjo creates beautifully carved and polished pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  The jar here is a classic shape with a wide shoulder and short neck. Around the neck are carved clouds which are matte.  Below the shoulder is a carved avanyu (water serpent), which encircles the piece.  The shoulder and the area below the avanyu are both polished.  Note how her matte sections are sanded and perfectly smooth so that there are no indentations or areas where the matte might make a shadow.  Her designs are always innovative and beautifully executed.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 225.00
Naranjo, Madeline – Seed Jar with Parrots

Madeline Naranjo creates beautifully carved and polished pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This is a taller seed jar. There are four parrots deeply carved into the clay.  The bodies of each bird are matte, while the tail feathers and beak are polished.  In the center of each is a carved birdwing.  The area separating the birds is also polished.  Note how her matte areas are sanded and perfectly smooth so that there are no indentations or areas where the matte might make a shadow.  Her designs are always innovative and beautifully executed.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 375.00
Holt, Lisa & Harlan Reano – Jar with Wild Spinach and Flame Design

This is an exceptional jar by Lisa Holt and Harlan Reano.  Working together, they make an amazing team as they create innovative pottery using traditional techniques.  Lisa makes the pottery and it is painted by Harlan.  This jar has a tightly painted design around the neck with modernized wild spinach plant patterns around the sides and flowering motifs on the neck.  The designs on the sides are divided by a tendril or flame extension from the jar.  Harlan said that they had tried it before with two bands extruding out from the piece but the four were much more difficult.  The result, however, is a very cohesive appearance and flow of design and form.  The materials are all traditional as the red and cream are both native clays while the black is wild spinach (a plant). The jar is traditionally fired outdoors.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 3,400.00
Lewis, Eric – Jar with Deer and Clouds

This jar by Eric Lewis has a deer and stylized cloud designs.  The jar is round with a short neck. The deer is graphically painted on the front. The wide designs encircle the remainder of the jar with cloud and rain designs.  Eric uses his designs to follow the shape of the jar and accentuate its form.  Eric has taken classic Acoma linear designs and made them both bolder and more graphic. The result is a striking jar with tightly painted imagery.  Eric remains one of the young Pueblo potters to watch!

$ 400.00
Lewis, Sharon – Clay Bird Figure

Sharon Lewis has developed her own very distinctive style of painted design.  Her pieces are beautifully formed, thin-walled and then tightly painted.  This piece is a figurative quail or bird.  The wings on the side and the designs on the front and back are all painted with bee-weed. The colors are all from additional clay slips.  The bird is signed on the bottom, “Sharon Lewis”.

$ 90.00
Cling, Alice –  Small Water Jar

This jar by Alice Cling has a round shoulder and an elongated neck.  The jar is highly polished and then traditionally fired to create the coloration.  Note how the fireclouds swirl around the jar creating areas of dark black to deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alice Cling”.  Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 115.00
Sanchez, Russell  – Red and Black Jar with Carved Ribs and Lid

This is a Simple but elegant bowl by Russell Sanchez. He continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  The top of this bowl is carved with hard melon ribs. Each rib extends to the mouth of the piece with a narrow edge.  Each rib is stone polished black.  The lower sections of the bowl are polished a deep red.  Around the side is a checkerboard snow design in black and tan.  The deep red color is a revival by Russell as it is the same red clay slip which was used at San Ildefonso in the 1920’s and 30’s.  Separating the various bands on the side of the jar is inset hematite hei-shi beads.  Note how small they are and the shine!  The lid is polished deep red with a single inset band of hei-shi beads.   The shape, creative design and highly polished surface are striking on this piece.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 5,400.00
Roller, Toni – Melon Bowl with 16 Ribs (1985)

Toni Roller is known for her classic shapes and exquisite stone polished pottery.  She is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and has developed her own distinctive style yet adhering to the traditional methods and techniques of her mother.  This bowl is from 1985 and it is a carved melon bowl with 16 ribs. Each rib is evenly spaced and carved into the clay.  The entire surface is fully polished to a high shine. It was traditionally fired and it is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Toni Roller”.

$ 750.00
Tse-Pe, Dora – Black and Sienna Long Neck Jar (1982)

This jar by Dora Tse-Pe is from 1982.  It is a classic shape which was often used by her mother-in-law, Rose Gonzales.  The sharp shoulder and long neck create a delicate form.  Dora was renown not just for the shapes of her pottery, but especially her highly polished surfaces. The jar is fired black and the neck is two-tone making the piece “black and sienna”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dora Tse-Pe ’82”.

$ 675.00
Manymules, Samuel  – Low Shoulder Jar with Sharp Ribs

This is a classic water jar by Samuel Manymules.  It is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar neck which is fully polished.  The lower section has melon ribs which are pushed out into the clay.  The ribs are wide and sharp, narrowing down from the shoulder to the base.  There is an indented ridge where the neck ends and the melon ribs begin.  The entire jar is fully polished and traditionally fired to create the coloration.  It is how Samuel places the jar in the firing and the smoke which determine how the colors will range from black to red.  The color changes as the jar is turned.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 950.00
Garcia, Tammy – Jar with Butterflies & Melon Rib Cloud Swirls (2000)

Tammy Garcia is known for her contemporary designs and use of traditional clay. This jar was made in 2000.  It is a striking shape with with a round body and small neck.  The design is a series of six butterflies encircling the jar.  They are slipped with a brown polished clay and the heads are matte red.  Near the base of the jar are flowers and Tammy has creatively used the angular melon ribs to represent the air, clouds and paths of the butterflies!  The piece has an elegance of form and flow of design in every direction it is turned.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition, with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. Tammy has won numerous awards for her pottery for nearly the past 30 years.  Her creative work in clay, glass and bronze is found in museums worldwide.  It is exciting to see how her contemporary work continues to move Pueblo pottery forward with it innovations.

$ 25,000.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Black Micaceous Seedpot with Silver Crescent Moon Lid

Preston Duwyenie is renown for his elegant pottery which is often highlighted with silver medallions.  This seedpot is made from micaceous clay and fired black.  The sparkle on the surface comes from the mica clay slip.  The lid is designed in the shape of a crescent moon.  It is cast from cuttlefish bone so there is a “shifting sand” design on both sides. Preston makes the lid to fit perfectly into the seedpot.  Both the lid and the seedpot are signed on the bottom with Preston’s hallmark.  It is a woman carrying a child on her back, which is also Preston’s Hopi name, which means “carried in beauty”.  Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.  He is married to pottery Debra Duwyenie and now resides in Santa Clara Pueblo.  Preston has won numerous awards for pottery, including “Best of Show” at the Heard Indian Market.

$ 650.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Black Mica Jar with 2 Silver Insets

This is a classic jar by Preston Duwyenie.  The shape is one which Preston calls a “shoulder jar” as it is inspired by the historic Sikyaki pottery with the wide shoulders. Preston’s modernist version has a wide shoulder and a small neck.  The piece is made from micaceous clay and slipped with a micaceous clay slip.  It is fired black and the mica gives the piece a somewhat metallic appearance.  There are two inset pieces of silver on the top shoulder of the jar.  Each silver piece has the appearance of “shifting sands”, much in a similar style to the pottery where he has carved a shifting sand pattern.  They are cast by Preston against cuttlefish bone, to create the distinctive texture.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay with Preston’s hallmark, which means “carried in beauty”.  There is certainly something both modern and ancient about this striking piece!   Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.  He is married to pottery Debra Duwyenie and now resides in Santa Clara Pueblo.  Preston has won numerous awards for pottery, including “Best of Show” at the Heard Indian Market.

$ 1,200.00
Duwyenie, Preston – Black Micaceous Seedpot with Silver Corn Plant Lid

Preston Duwyenie is renown for his elegant pottery which is often highlighted with silver medallions.  This seedpot is made from micaceous clay and fired black.  The sparkle on the surface comes from the mica clay slip.  The lid is designed in the shape of a corn plant.  It is cast from cuttlefish bone so there is a “shifting sand” design on both sides. Preston makes the lid to fit perfectly into the seedpot.  Both the lid and the seedpot are signed on the bottom with Preston’s hallmark.  It is a woman carrying a child on her back, which is also Preston’s Hopi name, which means “carried in beauty”. Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.  He is married to pottery Debra Duwyenie and now resides in Santa Clara Pueblo.  Preston has won numerous awards for pottery, including “Best of Show” at the Heard Indian Market.

$ 750.00
Nichols, Robert Cleto – Bowl with Two Fish

Robert Cleto Nichols is known for his deep carved pottery.  Each piece is coil built, carved and stone polished.  This bowl has a large fish chasing a smaller fish.  As the bowl is turned, the body of the larger fish is made up of kiva step and melon rib designs.  Note the depth fo the carving!  The bowl is traditionally fired black and signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 500.00
Garcia, Tammy – Canteen with Mimbres Fish (1997)

This is a stylized canteen by Tammy Garcia from 1997.  The canteen is carved, polished and traditionally fired black.  The design is inspired by the fish on Mimbres pottery from the 1100’s. The fish is on one side and as the canteen is turned there are linear geometric patterns. These patterns were also inspired by the linear designs on Mimbres bowls.  The canteen is in the shape of a Pueblo woman’s canteen with the flat base and the handles on top.  The piece is highly polished and precision carved.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tammy Garcia, 97”.

 

$ 7,000.00
Lonewolf, Rosemary –  Seedpot with Wolf and Stars (1990’s)

This is seedpot by Rosemary Lonewolf is from the late 1990’s.  It is fully polished and there is an etched wolf on the top along with stars and a full moon.  On the sides are basket designs.  The contrast of the matte and polished areas accentuates her imagery.  The piece is signed on the bottom “Apple Blossom”, which is her name in Tewa.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00
Swentzell, Roxanne – “Admiration” Original Clay Figure

This is a striking original clay piece by Roxanne Swentzell.  It is entitled “Admiration”.  It is one of the classic style pieces by Roxanne.  Here the potter is holding two of her pieces of pottery.  There is something so endearing about the look on her face as she is looking at her pottery.  The two bowls are part of the figure so this is all one piece.  It is equally remarkable that both bowls are Mimbres in styles.  This harkens back to the early Mimbres pre-historic pottery, considered some of the best and most refined ancient art in the world.  The connection of the past with this innovative artist of the present and her impact on the future certainly reads throughout this wold piece.  Note as well feet, the movement of the hands, the face, are all perfectly scuplted.  Roxanne is able to achieve such a sense of emotion in the faces of her figures!  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is a monumental bronze similar in style to this piece in clay which is located at Roxanne’s studio in Pojoaque (see last photo).  This piece is from early 2000 and signed in the clay, “ROX”.

$ 12,000.00
Crank, Susie – Water Jar with Fire Clouds

Susie Crank is a daughter of Rose Williams and a sister of Alice Cling.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and amazingly, she says he may burnish a piece over and over as many as 15 times to get a high shine!  This water jar is an elegant shape with a sharp shoulder and short neck.  The jar is stone polished and even the inside of the neck is polished to the shoulder!  The jar is then traditionally fired to create the fire-clouds on the surface.  The colorations on this jar range from black to a deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  Today, the pine pitch seals the vessel and gives it the shine.  This jar has a stunning shine and a great feel to the surface!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Susie Crank”.

$ 175.00
Peynetsa, Anderson – Large Duck Figure with 6 Deer

Anderson Peynetsa is known for his vessels as well as his figurative pottery.  This duck figure is one of his technically amazing pieces.  The figure is opened at the top and has extended pieces of clay at the head and tail.  It is fully painted but it is the use of the heartline deer around the body of the piece which is so striking.  They are painted in his own style with the elongated necks.  Anderson has an elegant and modern stylization of the heartline deer on his pottery.  It is fascinating how a piece can appear both modern and yet reflect cultural history and charm.  The area above and below the deer painted with a mottled red and black over the white.  The piece is complex in both form and design.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,600.00
Archuleta,  Mary Ester – Red Canteen with Bear Paws (1970’s)

Mary Ester Archuleta is the second youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  She has never prolific and most her pottery was made in the 1970’s and 1980’s.  This canteen is a striking piece and fully polished a deep red. There are bear paws on both sides.  The entire piece is fully polished. The bear paws represent a story of how the Pueblo people were led to water during a drought by a bear.  This particular style of canteen is one which is very reminiscent of the work of her mother, Margaret Tafoya.  The stopper is hand carved and there are leather straps.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mary E. Archuleta”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Garcia, Gloria “Golden Rod” – Seedpot with Prancing Fawn

This seedpot by Gloria Garcia is fully polished and fired black. The top is fully designed with a prancing fawn in the older “two-dimensional” style of Santa Clara paintings.  The fawn is surrounded by flowers.  Gloria’s combination of polishing and etched designs is always striking.  This piece is signed on the bottom with her Tewa name “GoldenRod”.

$ 275.00
Peynetsa, Anderson – Jar with 12 Heartline Deer

This is a striking olla by Anderson Peynetsa. The jar is a beautiful shape with a wide shoulder, a slight indention before the neck and a slightly turned out rim.  The body of the jar is painted with painted with two rows of heartline deer. All together there are 12 of them on this jar!  Each deer is very tightly painted and they are stylized with thin legs. Each deer is surrounded by a prayer feather and cloud pattern.  The additional designs adds to the dynamic appearance of this jar.  The heartline deer is a classic image in Zuni pottery, with the heart representing the strength and spirit of the animal. Anderson has signed the bowl on the bottom.

$ 1,000.00
Nampeyo, Tonita – Jar with Migration Pattern

Tonita Nampeyo is a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and a granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano.  She is known for her traditional pottery using natural clay slips and bee-weed for the black.  This large jar is an elegant shape with a low shoulder and a slightly turned out rim.  The design on the jar called the “Migration pattern” and it is one that was revived by Nampeyo of Hano in the late 1800’s from ancient Sikyatki pottery.  The design is meant to tell the story of the migration of people from the third to the fourth world in Hopi legends as well as the migration of people around the world.  This jar is delicately painted and note the exceptional thin lines!  It is traditionally fired for the amazing color.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 650.00
Naha, Rainy – Jar with Awatovi Star Design

Rainy Naha is known for her delicately painted Hopi-Tewa pottery.  This bowl is one of her classic shapes with a wide shoulder and just a slight neck.  The design is the “Awatovi Star” pattern, which was revived by her mother, Helen “Featherwoman” Naha.  Awatovi is one of the ruins near Hopi where a white slipped style of pottery was made.  It is a fascinating place as it was where Coronado made contact with the Hopi in 1540.  During the excavations in the 1930’s the whiteware pottery was rediscovered.  It was the imagery from his work which inspired much of Helen’s early pottery, as opposed to the more classic Sikyatki inspired pottery of Nampeyo of Hano.  This bowl has the “Awatovi Star” pattern painted on the top and the bottom.  Around the shoulder is her “eternity band” design.  The bowl has been traditionally fired and there is some variation to the color with the fired cloud, which certainly adds to the beauty of the piece.  It is tightly painted using bee-weed (black) on a white kaolin clay surface. There is a balance of the design on the surface as the piece is turned which is simply beautiful!  It is signed on the bottom with a feather and her name.

$ 975.00
Naranjo, Geri  – Tall Black Jar with Feather Design

This is a taller miniature jar by Geri Naranjo.  She is known for her miniature pottery and intricately etched designs.  Here the entire piece is fully polished and around the shoulder are very tiny etched feathers.  No, I was not able to count them all!  But check out how close they are to each other!  Below the feathers is a water serpent (avanyu), which encircles the piece.  The body of the avanyu has cloud and rain designs.  The remainder of the jar is very highly polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 375.00
Naranjo, Forrest – Bowl with Dragonfly Story

Forrest Naranjo is a grandson of Rose Naranjo and a son of Bernice Naranjo.  He learned to make pottery from his mother.  This bowl is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired brown and then etched with designs.  This bowl has an asymmetric rim and the designs are etched into the clay around the top of the jar.  The design is an interesting story of the birth and various stages of the dragonfly.  The various stages of the larvae and then the dragonfly itself can be seen!  The style of his etching is modern yet pulls from traditional Pueblo designs. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 325.00
Davis, Titus – Jar with Moon Phases

Titus Davis is the son of noted potter Darla Davis and a brother-in-law of Eric Lewis.  He creates hand-built pottery that combines the classic fine-line designs with a modern approach.  This jar has a taller shape with a slight shoulder. There are a series of moon phases as the design with larger moon designs changing into smaller ones.  They are surrounded by a fine-line pattern.  The intricately painted lines and the open space give the jar a very modern appearance.  The shape and designs work perfectly together.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 140.00
Peynetsa, Jamie – Jar with Rain & Lightning Designs

Jamie Peynetsa is the son of noted potters Anderson and Avelia Peynetsa.  Avelia, his mother, coil builds the clay vessel.  Jamie paints the design.  He has a strong attention to the detail of the painting as well as his inspiration from classic Zuni pottery.  This jar is very tightly painted with rain designs above the shoulder.  The thin lines are even and add complexity to the piece.  The sides of the jar are boldly painted with lightning patterns.  Note how well Jamie paints to match design and form.  It is signed by Jamie and his mother on the bottom.  At only 20 years old, he certainly has a great future in pottery!

$ 450.00
Cain, Joy – Bowl with Cloud Design

Joy Cain (bl 1947) is a daughter of Mary Cain and a sister of noted potters Tina Diaz, Linda Cain, and Billy Cain.  She began making pottery in 1965 but makes almost no pottery today.   This bowl is very round in shape and very deeply carved.  It has a cloud and lightning pattern encircling the bowl.  The surface is fully polished and it is a dark black coloration.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Joy Cain”.

$ 200.00
Manygoats, Elizabeth – Jar with Navajo Scene

Elizabeth Manygoats is a daughter of noted potter Betty Manygoats.  She is known for her folk-art style pottery with figures in relief or applique on the surface. Elizabeth says that she often emphasizes Navajo women and their daily lives in her work because “They’re the ones I look up to.”  This jar is very thin walled and has a flat shoulder and straight neck.  There is a lot going on around the jar and it is both clever and charming. There is a Navajo girl reading a book.  Behind her is a subtle mesa and she is surrounded by a chicken and sheep (in relief).  As the jar is turned, there is horse applique figure which is tied to a tree with a string.  There is then a row of corn, clouds, and a small wagon.  Finally, there is a classic Navajo hogan and sitting out front is a dog.  The various colors are added to highlight the imagery.  The jar is traditionally fired to create the variations in color to the clay surface.  After the firing the entire piece is covered in pine pitch in the manner of traditional Navajo pottery.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “EM.”  Elizabeth has won numerous awards for her pottery over the years.  It can also be found in museums throughout the southwest.

Why the horned lizard?  “In the Diné culture Horned Toad is addressed as “grandpa” (shicheii). It possesses spiritual power. When you see one, pick it up and rub it on your chest and say, “I will be in good health and harmony.” If you have corn pollen sprinkle it as an offering and then let the horned lizard loose where you found it. You will then have good health and harmony. It is believed that the horned toad is dressed with an armored shield, which is called arrowhead. The spiky horns on the body represent the arrowheads. This protects the horned toad from predators. It was placed on earth with songs and prayers so that in the future the Diné would utilize it. The Diné still know and use its sacred prayers and songs for protection.”  Traditional Dine Teachings on Wildlife (1998)

$ 200.00
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