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Friday, January 18, 2019   

Nampeyo, Iris – Large Tan Bowl with Corn Design

Iris Nampeyo was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and well known for her elegant asymmetrical vessels with corn as part of the design in relief.  Iris began using the corn in relief on the surface of her pottery in the early 1980’s. The corn is symbolic of being part of the Corn Clan.  The surface of the jar is stone polished and the corn on the front is in applique relief.  The shape of this jar is striking with the wide shoulder and the short, asymmetric neck.  The husk of the corn is sharp and the matte area extends around to the shoulder of the jar.  The matte areas are in contrast to the remainder of the piece which is polished.  The opening is asymmetrical which is in keeping with the organic style of the form.  There is a simplicity and elegance in her pottery.  Sadly, Iris passed away in September 2018, but her pottery remains a classic.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00

Ami, Loren – Canteen with Cloud and Plant Designs (1997)

Loren Ami’s pottery is inspired by traditional Hopi designs and forms.  He learned to make pottery from Dextra Quotskuyva and the canteens were one of the special pieces she taught him to make.  Each piece is coil built, painted with native clays (red) and bee-weed (black) and outdoor fired.  This canteen has a classic shape and it is fully polished. The design is painted on the front and has a cloud, water and plant pattern.  The red areas are stone polished and there is a bit of mica in the red clay.   This piece is signed on the back with his name and a spider design.  It is from 1997 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Loren is certainly one of the traditionalist Hopi-Tewa potters.

$ 750.00

Youvella, Nolan – Wedding Vase with Hano Mana

Nolan Youvella is a son of noted potters Iris Nampeyo and Wallace Youvella.  He is known for his relief carved pottery.  This wedding vase uses the traditional Hopi red clay.  There is a Hano Mana katsina on one side in matte relief. The remainder of the vase is fully polished.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nolan Youvella”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 130.00

Sahneyah, Madeline – Bowl with Bird Wing Design (1990)

Madeline Sayneyha is a cousin of potter Mark Tahbo.  She learned to make pottery from Mark as well as Ivy Youwyha.  She is a daughter of Herman Sakyneyah and Ernestine Chaca.   In the 1990’s she began making elegant pottery.  Each piece was coil built, painted with native clay slips and traditionally fired.  She was quickly known for her thin painted lines and dynamic firing. This bowl is a classic Hopi shape with a wide, flat form.  The design is painted on the top of the piece.  It has a bird wing pattern with a checkerboard design. The red clay slip is used to accentuate the deisgns.  The bowl is traditionally fired to create the fire clouds.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “M. Sahneyah”.  While Madeline no longer makes pottery, her quality of her pottery and her painted designs remains strong.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 250.00

Komalestewa, Cynthia Sequi – Seedpot with Hummingbird and Corn (1990’s)

Cynthia Sequi Komalestewa (1954-2002) was a daughter of Hugh Sequi and a sister of Miltona Naha.  Her aunt-in-law was Helen Naha.  Cynthia made traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery with her own spin on the Naha family style.  She learned a lot of her pottery techniques from Syliva Naha.  Each piece was coil built, stone polished, painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  This seedpot has a hummingbird and corn design on the top.  The bottom half is very intricately designed with a star pattern. There are additional white and red clay slips used to accentuate the design.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “C. Sequi Komalestewa”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 225.00

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Thursday, January 17, 2019

Youngblood, Nancy – 16 Rib “S” Swirl Tall Jar with Lid (2018)

This is an extraordinary larger jar by Nancy Youngblood. The shape is one which has become iconic for her pottery and especially the melon ribs.  The straight sides show off all the curves for the “s” swirl.  Amazingly, there are SIX times the ribs go back and forth on this jar!  These are the wide ribs but are carved at an angle with a sharp edge which creates a strong surface for the reflection of light.  Nancy said of this style of her work:

“I’ve had problems that if I carve it too thin, it will break. I’ve had that happen so many times. I get to the end and I’m carving the single ribs and it has an air pocket in it. You wet it with slip and then when you touch it, with the first stroke of the stone, the clay falls off. There’s nothing you can do. It’s a loss. See here how the S is carved so deeply that the light plays off it so that it almost glows.”  Nancy Youngblood, Spoken Through Clay

Each of the 16 ribs perfectly reflects the light.  Added to the complexity of the jar is the lid.  The ribs not only extend down the side, but over the top and down onto the base of the lid!  There is a kinetic motion to them on this piece which may simply be the play of the light adding to the highly polished surface.  Thee matte area on the top of the lid is perfectly sanded smooth.  This is important so there are no shadows cast from an uneven surface.  In addition to the depth of carving on this jar, consider that each rib has two “sides”to be polished and the surface area of the piece is about double its size!  The lid and jar are signed on the bottom in the clay.    Nancy has won numerous awards, from “Best of Pottery” to “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market for her melon bowls.  This is undoubtedly a classic of her clay art!

$ 12,000.00

Curran, Dolores – Painted Jar with Bear Lid

This is an intricately painted lidded jar by Dolores Curran.  Before she began making her carved pieces, she was well known for her delicately painted buff-on-red pottery.  The jar is highly polished red and painted with a buff clay for the design.  Amazingly, she would paint each piece up to five times to get the color of the matte painted areas deep and consistent enough!  This jar has a feather pattern around the top of the shoulder.  There are two smaller sections with cloud patterns. Below the shoulder, the jar is fully painted with tablita, cloud and water serpent designs.  At the very base of the bowl are two prayer feathers.  The lid is a bear with a painted heartline.  Look at how perfect the lines are!  So why doesn’t Dolores make this style anymore? She ran out of the cream-colored clay slip for the painting, and so only uses it as an accent on her new work!  As well, this is a larger sized piece of her painted pottery, as she mostly made miniatures due to the time consuming nature of the painting. The jar is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00

Garcia, Tammy & Linda Cain – Avanyu Bowl (2018)

Tammy Garcia is known for her contemporary designs and use of traditional clay. This is one of her few pieces in which she has collaborated with her mother, Linda Cain.  Tammy made the bowl and carved the very intricate avanyu.  The avanyu encircles the bowl and note how thin the carving is on the piece!  The carved areas and the rim were then polished by her mother, Linda.  The rim and base are polished tan while the avanyu is polished red.   It is a unique addition to any collector of Tammy’s work to have one of the rare pieces in which she has collaborated in clay.  Tammy has won numerous awards for her pottery for nearly the past 30 years.  Her creative work in clay, glass, and bronze is found in museums worldwide.  It is exciting to see how her contemporary work continues to move Pueblo pottery forward with its innovations.

 

$ 2,000.00

Roy-Keene, Adrianne – Corrugated Jar with Animal Medallions

Adrianne Roy-Keene is known for her intricately painted and carved miniatures. This jar is painted on the sides with four medallions.  Each medallion has a different Acoma image. There is a heartline deer, fish, bird, and butterfly.  Each is very tightly painted and separated by a fine-line hatchwork design.  However, it is the top of the jar which is Adrienne’s hallmark design.  The top is carved with a series of triangular corrugated patterns which get smaller as they approach the neck of the piece.  It is amazing how detailed it is for the size!  The piece is signed on the bottom with her name inside a feather hallmark.

$ 650.00

Fields, Anita – House and Two Figures Set (1998)

This piece by Anita Fields is from 1998.  This piece is part of her House series, with a stylized house with two figures in the interior.  Here the outside of the house is adorned with an elk tooth motif (the white on black) and the top has swirl designs in the red.  The figures inside the house are painted with a landscape for the lower bodies with the stars and moon for the upper part.  It is a beautiful complement of slips, texture and design.  It is signed on the back, “Anita Fields” and it is  in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Anita was influenced by traditional Osage ribbon work, clothing, and blankets. She also studied the objects and ceremonial dress of other tribes. The personal and emotional elements in these textile designs led Anita to use them symbolically in clay, translating the personality of these vestments into her work. About one of her recent series, Native American Dresses, which are coil-and slab-built installations, Anita says: “The dresses convey my attitudes toward the strength of women and how native peoples show remarkable resourcefulness and adaptability toward their environment. The clothing Indian women created shows great pride, dignity, and hope in a culture facing insurmountable odds.”  

$ 450.00

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Wendesday, January 16, 2019

Medicine Flower, Grace – Basket Weave Jar with Butterflies (2004)

Grace Medicine Flower remains renown for her innovative and creative pottery.  This is one of her dynamic “basket weave” pieces.  She only made the basket-weave pieces for a few years before moving on to the polychrome pottery.   The concept behind these pieces was for them to appear as if the clay had fallen away and there was a woven basket underneath. The basket areas are carved vertically, incised horizontally and then painted with a clay slip.  This piece has two large polished medallions.  Each is incised with butterflies.  Below one there is another matte medallion with a butterfly and a flute player carved in relief.  Below the smaller medallion are two mica slipped medallions with butterflies.  Take a closer look at the jar and note the overall variations of the depth of carving.  There are at least four distinctive levels! Interestingly, Grace does all the carving, polishing, etching and painted slip on the basket designs before the piece is fired.  It is extraordinary how much time is involved in each piece of her pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 5,500.00

Medicine Flower, Grace – Polychrome Jar with Butterflies (2004)

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Grace Medicine Flower began her career making miniature pottery with incised designs.   This jar is from 2004 and is one of her amazing polychrome pieces. The distinctive aspect of her polychrome pottery is that she utilized all possible Pueblo techniques:  carving, incising, sgraffito.  They also incorporate mica, polished and matte clay surfaces.  In terms of the carving, there are multiple levels to the carving. Note how the butterflies on one side are carved to appear to be above the green plant designs behind them! As the jar is turned there are cloud, lightning and prayer feather designs. They are slipped in various colors or stone polished.  Note the depth of the carving on the jar!  Grace also slipped the inside with red clay and created an additional design near the base of the bowl.  The rim of the jar is also carved to create additional angles to give the jar a more modern appearance.  Grace said she was always trying to change the rim shape on her pottery and sometimes they would work and sometimes they would break when she carved when the clay was too dry.   Grace said of this style of her work:

“I don’t know how I even started this. This was a new idea to start carving the rim and into the bowl. I was thinking, what would be so different to change her in a way that would be unique. I started cutting areas out, and the more I started the more ideas that came. Have patience, enjoy what you are doing, and really, really talk to the Clay Lady. Like my dad said, prayers and patience.  ”  Grace Medicine Flower, Spoken Through Clay

All the various colors are from natural clay slips.  The technical difficulty in carving this piece makes it a bit surprising that it didn’t crack in drying or firing. The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.  While Grace is no longer making pottery, this is certainly a reflection of the creativity and originality of her work!

$ 7,500.00

Medicine Flower, Grace – Carved Bowl with Hummingbirds (1990)

Grace Medicine Flower began her career making miniature pottery with incised designs.  This bowl is from 1990 and it is a significant piece as it is part of the period when she began to make larger vessels with smaller incised areas.  She went back to the early work of her father, Camilio Tafoya, and began to carve her pottery. The entire surface is fully polished.  She also began to carve the rim of her vessels, which is technically very difficult, as it can break in the drying or polishing stage.  This bowl has some very deeply carved sections which extend down from the rim.  There are large central medallions on both sides, each with a hummingbird.  One one side there are four additional smaller medallions with hummingbirds and butterflies.  Grace said about her use of hummingbirds:

“We have a lot of hummingbirds by our house. Who knows about a hummingbird on a piece of pottery? They are so tiny and so little. Looking at the hummingbirds and flowers or the squirrels like we have next door. Maybe even that you can put on a piece of pottery. Anything that comes to your mind that you might think would look good on the pottery is fine.”  Grace Medicine Flower, Spoken Through Clay

The bowl is very highly polished and fired a deep red. The inside is slipped with a mica clay slip.  Interestingly, Grace did all of her etching in the clay before the pieces were fired, which added to their overall difficulty.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.   It is large, elegant and stunning!

$ 7,000.00

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Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Cain, Linda – Wedding Vase with Cloud Swirls in Relief

This is a very modernist wedding vase by Linda Cain.  Linda is a daughter of Mary Cain and the mother of Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.  This piece has a very wide shoulder and very tiny spouts.  The body of the jar is carved in relief and then fully polished.  The carved designs are cloud patterns which spiral around the peice on both sides!  The result is a subtle appearance with small shadows cast by the rounded designs.  The spouts are very small and connected by a handle.  The jar is fired a deeper red coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 900.00

Borts-Medlock, Autumn  – Miniature Avanyu Bowl (1993)

This is an exceptional miniature by Autumn Borts-Medlock.  She is known for her often fanciful carved pottery and use of unique shapes.  The bowl is carved with an avanyu encircling the bowl.  The body of the avanyu is made of cloud and wave designs.  It is amazing she could carve so deep and with complex lines on a piece so small! It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Autumn Borts”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00

Naranjo, Teresita  – Mini Carved Bowl (1970’s)

Teresita Naranjo was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and know for her deeply carved pottery.  This bowl is one of her few miniatures.  The bowl is very deeply carved with cloud and lightning designs. The designs spiral around the surface of the bowl.  It is traditionally fired black. The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita Naranjo” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00

Garcia, Tina – Red Bowl with Bear Paws (2000)

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plain ware Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is from around 2000 and it is a classic piece of her pottery.  The bowl is very round in shape and there are two large bear paws impressed in the sides. The entire piece is fully polished and fired a deep red.  The bear paws are part of a story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tina Garcia”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00

Begaye, Nathan – Mini Polychrome Bowl with Clouds (1986)

Nathan Begaye was a unique innovator among Pueblo and Navajo potters.  His ethnic connection to both Hopi and Navajo let his work flow between the two distinctive styles and yet find their own unique space.  His work used traditional designs, forms, and techniques, yet somehow appeared very modern.  This miniature bowl is thin-walled and fully painted with a cloud pattern.  There is a cloud and rain pattern painted with over four different colors of clay plus the black which is bee-weed.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

$ 110.00

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Monday, January 14, 2019

Moquino, Jennifer Tafoya – “Butterflies & Pueblo Girl” Tile

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and exceptional realistic animals.  This is one of her smaller tiles.  It is fully polished and etched.  The piece has a Pueblo girl and butterflies.  The girl is designed in an “anime” style.  As figurative work on pottery is often discouraged at some of the Pueblos, this style of figure is less realistic and more imaginary.  The young girl here is surrounded by butterflies. Each one is a different style of butterfly.  The border on the side has a cloud and rain motif.  It is a contemporary and creative piece!  The tile is framed so that it can be mounted on a wall.  It is signed on the side.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 825.00

Namingha, Les – “Pueblo Series” Jar with Zia Birds

This jar is part of a new series of pieces by Les Namingha.  This, “Pueblo Series” is focused on universal design similarities among various Pueblo pottery. As Les is both Zuni and Hopi-Tewa, he has a lot of cultural imagery to pull from for this body of work.  Les says of this piece:

“This jar is part of my “Pueblo Jar series” that I started recently. This series interprets or incorporates elements from other Pueblos outside of my Zuni and Tewa-Hopi influenced work.  My focus is on finding similarities in design elements across all Pueblo communities.  Here there are two Zia style birds.  There are similar styles of birds seen at Zuni, Acoma, Laguna and in ancient pottery.”

The jar has a round body and a short neck.  The jar has striking colorations and there are birds painted on each side in medallions.  They are additionally designed with different imagery on for the bodies.  One the sides and encircling the jar are large yellow ellipses.  These bold geometrics accentuate the detailed designs on the remainder of the jar.  It is signed on the bottom.  The last photo is one of this jar next to a piece by Elizabeth Medina. It seemed interesting to show the style of birds from Zia in comparison to this jar.

$ 2,200.00

Namingha, Les – “Pueblo Series” Kolowisi and Dragonfly Jar

This jar is part of a new series of pieces by Les Namingha.  This, “Pueblo Series” is focused on universal design similarities among various Pueblo pottery. As Les is both Zuni and Hopi-Tewa, he has a lot of cultural imagery to pull from for this body of work.  Les says of this piece:

“I’m using the avanyu as a theme for a small collection of pots. This jar has a Zuni style representation of “Kolowisi” or rather, my interpretation of the water serpent. They are part of my “Pueblo Jar series” that I started recently. This series interprets or incorporates elements from other Pueblos outside of my Zuni and Tewa-Hopi influenced work.  My focus is on finding similarities in design elements across all Pueblo communities.”

The jar is a taller shape with a very slightly turned out rim.  The jar has a stylized kolowisi or feathered water serpent, encircling the piece.  In addition, there is a small dragonfly.  In Zuni culture, the dragonfly is significant as a prayer messengers. There is additional banding of designs and color.  The jar is painted with acrylic, as with all of Les’s pottery.  It is a wonderfully painted and dramatic jar.   It is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,200.00

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Sunday, January 13, 2019

Yepa, Alvina – Melon Bowl with 58 Ribs

Alvina Yepa (b. 1954) learned to make pottery from her mother, Felipita Nonche Yepa.  She began making pottery in the 1980’s and in 1987 won First Place and Best of Division for her pottery at Santa Fe Indian Market.  This melon bowl is deeply carved with 58 ribs.  Each rib is cut into the clay and then stone polished.  The result is a striking appearance to the piece.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alvina Yepa”.

$ 350.00

Shutiva-Hista, Jackie – Corrugated Water Jar

Jackie Shutiva-Hista (b. 1961) is a daughter of noted potter Stella Shutiva.  She learned to make pottery from her mother who was known for her corrugated pottery. This water jar is corrugated around the neck.  “Corrugated” is a technique which simply means that the coils are left exposed and they are pressed down using a tool or the potter’s finger.  Jackie typically uses her finger to impress the clay, creating this stylistic appearance  Stella’s corrugated style of pottery was inspired by pre-historic style corrugated vessels.  The remainder of the jar is polished white.    The jar is signed on the bottom, “J. Shutiva-Hista”.

$ 250.00

Honyumptewa, Kimberly Riley – Picuris Square Jar with Fluted Rim

Kimberly Riley Honyumptewa is from Laguna Pueblo and married to Aaron Honyumptewa who is Hopi/Picuris. She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law Caroline Simbolo Cine in the traditional Picuris style and using native clay from the area. Each piece is coil built and traditionally fired.  This jar has square sides and the rim is fluted or “undulates”.  The shape is creative and distinctive.  The piece has a darker coloration from the fire clouds but the mica shows through beautifully!  The jar is signed on the bottom.  Kimberly’s work continues to evolve in creating more dynamic Picuris pottery!

$ 275.00

Chino, Emil – Jar with Rain and Snow Patterns

Emil Chino often collaborates with Carmen Lewis.  This jar is a classic Acoma shape with the round shoulder and short neck.  The jar is fully designed with a bird wing pattern on the neck and rain and snow patterns around the remainder of the piece.  It is very fully designed and tightly painted.  It is signed on the bottom, “Emil. C”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 110.00

Honyumptewa, Kimberly Riley – Picuris Bowl with Cloud Rim

Kimberly Riley Honyumptewa is from Laguna Pueblo and married to Aaron Honyumptewa who is Hopi/Picuris. She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law Caroline Simbolo Cine in the traditional Picuris style and using native clay from the area. Each piece is coil built and traditionally fired.  This bowl is thin-walled and the rim is carved with a cloud step pattern.  Looking down from the top it creates a striking appearance.  The bowl has areas of darker coloration from the fire clouds but the mica shows through beautifully!  The jar is signed on the bottom.  Kimberly’s work continues to evolve in creating more dynamic Picuris pottery!

$ 125.00

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Saturday, January 12, 2019

Clashin, Debbie – Jar with Red Birds

This small jar by Debbie Clashin is painted with a stylized bird design.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. The jar has a round shoulder and a short neck. There are two red birds which extend over the shoulder and connect with black painted birds which also have bird tails. The tails extend down over the side of the bowl.  The jar is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  It was traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 600.00

Nampeyo, Iris – Tan Bowl with Corn Design

Iris Nampeyo was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and well known for her elegant asymmetrical vessels with corn as part of the design in relief.  Iris began using the corn in relief on the surface of her pottery in the early 1980’s. The corn is symbolic of being part of the Corn Clan.  The surface of the jar is stone polished and the corn on the front is in applique relief.  The husk of the corn is sharp and the matte area extends around to the shoulder of the jar.  The matte areas are in contrast to the remainder of the piece which is polished.  The opening is asymmetrical which is in keeping with the organic style of the form.  Note there is just a bit of a blush on the rim of the jar from the firing.  There is a simplicity and elegance in her pottery.  Sadly, Iris passed away in September 2018, but her pottery remains a classic.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,100.00

Naranjo, Madeline – Bowl with Buffalo

Madeline Naranjo creates beautifully carved and polished pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This jar has a more classic shape with the high round shoulder. It is fully carved with two stylized buffalo.  Each buffalo is carved with additional lightning designs.  As the bowl is turned there area hills carved in the background. The top and bottom are fully polished.  The central area is deeply carved and matte.  The contrast of the matte and polished surfaces works perfectly. Madeline’s matte areas are sanded and perfectly smooth so that there are no indentations or areas where the matte might make a shadow.  Her designs are always innovative and beautifully executed.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 500.00

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Friday, January 11, 2019

Koopee, Jacob – “All Roads Lead to Home” Bowl (2005)

This is very intricately designed bowl by Jacob Koopee.  It is entitled, “All Roads Lead to Home”.   The bowl is made from the red Hopi clay, and not something that he used very often.  The designs are very tightly painted shard patterns.  There is a similar (but larger) piece at the Museum of Northern Arizona with shard designs.  The setup and placement of each of the squares allowed him to use different imagery for each square within a section.  The sections are divided up by vertical bands of polished red and a horizontal band of polished mauve.  Check out the very thin lines around the rim of the bowl!  Of course, these very intricately painted lines were inspired by the work of Rondina Huma.  However, Jake gave the bowl his own touch with the hands at the bottom.  The hand designs were cut from paper and then he would blow the black bee-weed through a straw to get the little dots!  The bowl was traditionally fired so there are blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom with his hallmark Flute Player and Koopee.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Jake won numerous awards during his career including “Best of Show” in 2005 at both Santa Fe Indian Market and the Heard Museum Market.  I was lucky to have been a pottery judge both years at both events, and it was exciting to see an artist create such dynamic work.

$ 1,800.00

Quotskuyva, Dextra – Jar with Shawl Designs (2000)

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This jar is from around 2000 and it has a wide shoulder and a slight neck. The jar is fully polished in a vertical manner to create an “onion skin” appearance.  This is style of polishing often seen in historic pottery.  The jar is then painted with simple textile or shawl designs.  The black band has polished white areas with arrow designs.  The red section is fully polished.  Note how the shapes of the sections are smaller at the base, wide at the shoulder and then smaller at the neck.  It’s always nice to see a piece of her pottery with such strong polished areas.  The jar was traditionally fired which resulted in the striking blushes on the surfaces.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dextra” along with a corn plant to represent the Corn Clan.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,800.00

Lucas, Steve – Bowl with Katsinas and Sky Designs

This is a wide bowl by Steve Lucas.  The top and bottom are fully polished red. The center section is painted with stylized katsina masks and star patterns.  Steve said of this style of his pottery:

“I try to mix the abstract and the classic design elements on the top to show how the two could be connected. I was always interested looking at stars and finding inspiration there. Where I fire there are no street lights. I can sit at night and see everything and watch a lot of stars.  In my pottery the katsina masks are not an exact representation of them but simply have elements of them in there. I would go and watch the dances, and I liked the way the katsinas looked so I began to put them on the pottery.”  Steve Lucas, Spoken Through Clay

On this jar, it is possible to see a variety of different katsinas from a Chakwaina to Kokopelli to Ogres.  The designs are painted with bee-weed (black) and a red clay slip. The red clay is stone polished for shine and there is just a bit of mica in the clay.  The bottom of the jar is fully polished red.  The jar is traditionally fired which creates the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom with his name and an ear of corn (Corn Clan) and a Mudhead Katsina.

$ 1,600.00

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Thursday, January 10, 2019

Tahbo, Mark  – Wide Bowl with Hummingird Design (1998)

Mark Tahbo was renown for his creative pottery shapes, designs, and firings.  He learned to make pottery from his great-grandmother, Grace Chapella.  Each piece reflects the symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter. The designs are painted using native clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  This bowl is wide with a flat top.  Mark would work hard to create this form inspired by the ancient Sikyatki pottery.  I remember when Mark originally made this piece and he said that it wasn’t the classic eagle tail design.  It’s hummingbirds!  The tail feathers are extending down and on the sides with the points are the hummingbirds.  Mark would often innovate his own creative designs for his pottery.  He said of this:

“There is so much in this pottery career that you have to go through. So many different stages. You are constantly learning. I finally came to this point in my life that when I choose a design it has to have a meaning or a story to connect all together. Today on some of my pieces I might even make the story up myself in order to create a new tale of my own.” Mark Tahbo, Spoken Through Clay

The placement of the imagery on this bowl looks classic, but it actually gives the piece a very modern appearance.  The bowl was traditionally fired which created the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom, “Mark Tahbo”.  There is a pipe to represent the Tobacco Clan.  It is in excellent good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00

Tahbo, Mark  – Lidded Jar with Women and Parrot Men (2001)

Mark Tahbo was renown for his creative pottery shapes, designs, and firings.  He learned to make pottery from his great-grandmother, Grace Chapella.  Each piece reflects the symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter. The designs are painted using native clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  This jar has a refined form with a wide shoulder and slight neck.  Mark hated to make lids for his pottery and made very few.  This is one of the best constructed lids I have seen of his with the clay used to keep it secure on the neck.  While the shape and lid are visually interesting, it’s the design which is the center of this vessel.  The imagery is a series of Hopi-Tewa women and Parrot men.  The women are holding gourds for water while the Parrot men are holding corn pollen.  The idea of the Parrot men was partially inspired by the figures in the Awatovi murals.  However, Mark would often innovate his own creative designs for his pottery.  He said of this:

“For traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery, there are no shortcuts. I feel that the younger people, they aren’t as fortunate as I was. I was born at a time where I was with the elder women who revived Hopi-Tewa pottery and brought it to this level. I learned the old style. From how to get the clay, how to process it, from start to finish. Today, it seems like the storytelling is almost gone. I always tell younger potters that it’s one of the most important foundations we can have as Hopi-Tewa potters. A story. Something to lean back on. If you don’t have that root or that foundation, you have nothing. You are just floating on your own. Soak it all in and listen to all the old stories that you can. There are just no shortcuts. You have to learn the hard way and have patience.” Mark Tahbo, Spoken Through Clay

The eight figures encircle the jar.  They are painted with additional clay slips to give them color and note the little area when he etched designs on the gourds or the hair!  On the bottom of the jar are swirls parrots or birds.  It is almost as if they are the shadow of the figures dancing above.  The jar was traditionally fired which created the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom, “Mark Tahbo”.  There is a pipe to represent the Tobacco Clan.  It is in excellent good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,850.00

Tahbo, Mark  – Large Wide Shoulder Plainware Jar (2001)

Mark Tahbo is known not just for his painted pottery, but especially for the blushes on his pottery.  This jar is from 2001.  It is one of his largest plainware pieces that I remember him finishing.  The shape of this jar is exceptional, as there is a slight edge below the shoulder where he started it in the puki.  Then it extends out to the shoulder and rounds into the neck.  The piece is vertically polished to create an “onion-skin” appearance.  It was then outdoor fired to create the coloration.  Mark was masterful at firing and always wanted to achieve dramatic blushes on the surface of his pottery.  When they turned out with variations like on this jar, from white to deep orange, he was the most pleased.   Mark told me about his plainware work:

“My first plainware pieces were done years ago. I was sure that these would be well received and gallery owner Charles King took a chance with them. They were an immediate hit!  I don’t do very much plainware for it has to be flawless.  The surface has to be free of all dips or air holes and the shape has to be elegant on its own, as there is no design to distract the eye.  The colors achieved on the pots are truly amazing.  Each piece is fired outdoors using sheep dung and coals.  I love it!”

The jar is signed on the bottom “Mark Tahbo” and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic of his pottery!

$ 2,800.00

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Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Quotskuyva, Dextra – Bowl with Migration Pattern (1977)

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This is an exceptional early bowl from 1977  It is very thin walled and classic bowl shape. The piece is painted with the migration pattern.  Dextra said of this design:

“This is the one design that was really stressed for us to use, the migration pattern. Nothing but lines, representing the migration of all the people to all the places, including down below and up above. It has seven points at the top and bottom. All the x’s represent life from the bottom and top, telling you the universe is one. The thin lines, I just wanted to paint them real fast and real close to try and include everyone.”  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo, Spoken Through Clay

The bowl has deep red clay near the rim and the remainder is painted with bee-weed (black).  The lines are very thin and close, as would be expected from her pottery!  This bowl is signed on the bottom, “Dextra Quotskuyva”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. Simple, elegant and a classic!

$ 3,600.00

Qoyawayma, Al – Hano Mana and Maori Design Wish Pot (1996)

Al Qoyawayma is known for innovative pottery.  This jar is a shape which he calls his “wish pot”.  It is a distinctive form and one that was inspired by his aunt Elizabeth White.  She made similar shapes and they would be designed with corn or other motifs.  The designs on Al’s pottery area ll in repousse, which is to say that they are pushed out from the inside, not applied to the surface!  This jar is from 1996 and is part of series he made inspired by Maori designs from New Zealand.  In  1991 he was a Fulbright Fellow with the Maori and South Pacific Arts/Te Waka Toi.  This jar has a Hano Mana katsina on the left and a Maori tribal symbol on the right.  What is amazing when you look at the jar from the side, the sharpness of the edge on the tribal design.  While the figurative work is matte, the remainder of the jar is stone polished to create a shine.  The jar is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,000.00

Huma, Rondina – Bowl with Pottery Shard Designs (2000)

Rondina Huma has certainly been one of the most influential Hopi potters working today.  Since her two-time “Best of Show” award at Santa Fe Indian Market, her tight style and intricately painted pottery has changed the face of contemporary Hopi pottery.   Each piece is coil built, fully stone polished and painted with native clays and bee-weed (black), and native fired.  This bowl is fully designed and painted.  Rondina said of this style of her pottery:

“This style is when I first started designing from the bottom to the top. I would get a bunch of sherds and I would put them together and see what pattern they created. Then I would take back the sherds to where I found them. I also polish the inside of all my pottery. People ask how I do it and how I can get so deep inside. I just think it makes a bowl look nicer if it is fully polished. The burgundy-colored [areas] are the water migration. It’s like a spring with the water coming up out of the earth and soaking back into the ground. It’s a full cycle, so the square has to be complete. I do most of the painting freehand. When I look at a pot, I already know what design I’m going to put on there. I can visualize what I’m going to paint, and it is never the same. I don’t really use a pencil—I’m afraid it won’t come off. I try to just measure with my hand to space out the designs.”  Rondina Huma, Spoken Through Clay

The bowl is very tightly painted with a variety of designs in each of the small squares.  They are all derived from historic Hopi-Tewa and Sikyatki pottery.  The rim of the bowl is complex with a variety of design and no patter repeated!   The tight patterns have become more and more intricate and detailed in each passing year.  Amazingly, the inside of the bowl is also fully polished!   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 5,000.00

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Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Loloma, Charles – Hummingbird Bowl (1950’s)

Charles Loloma is a name synonymous with innovative Hopi jewelry. He began his jewelry career with a brief period of time also making pottery in the 1950’s.  The pieces were made form earthenware and were painted and glazed.  By the 1960’s his jewelry was already achieving some fame and he discontinued making pottery.  His clay pieces are relatively rare but fascinating in terms of form, design and glaze. In many ways they mirror the innovative style of his jewelry relative to the other work being created at Hopi at the same time.  This bowl is glazed on the outside with a series of hummingbirds.  The rim and the inside are fully glazed to a shiny brown coloration.  This is certainly a striking piece of his pottery! It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom into the clay, “Loloma”.

$ 1,800.00

Loloma, Otellie – Jar with Women Faces and Fetishes (1965)

This is an extraordinary and unique jar by Otellie Pasiyava Loloma (1921-1993).  So, who is Otellie? She was from Second Mesa at Hopi.  She married Charles Loloma in 1942 and began studying ceramics in 1947.  In 1959 Otellie Loloma became one of the first instructors for the Southwestern Indian Art Project at the University of Arizona at Tucson. That project led in 1962 to the establishment of the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, where Loloma was again one of the first faculty members hired. She instructed students in ceramics.  Otellie told fellow artist Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, “No one Hopi would probably recognize that they are Hopi figures because I have done it all from my own imagination.”  At IAIA she taught numerous present-day potters, including Preston Duwyenie, Jacquie Stevens, Dan Namingha, Robert Tenorio and Christine McHorse!  She is certainly an artist who had an extraordinary impact on the world of contemporary Native pottery!

This large jar is incised with women’s faces around the side.  Each one seems to meld into the next in a Picasso-esque style.  The rim has stone fetishes tied to it.  The jar was made in 1965 and has two ribbons, including an “Honorable Mention’ from the 1965 Scottsdale National and “Special Award” from the 1965 Gallup Intertribal Ceremonials.  Considering how most of the pottery created in the 1960’s was very traditional, this jar would defintley have stood out!  Consider as well, that it was NOT until 1968 that Tony Da created his first sgraffito pottery and entered it at Gallup Ceremonials.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Otellie Loloma”.

$ 2,800.00

Loloma, Charles – Stoneware Vertical Line Jar

Charles Loloma is a name synonymous with innovative Hopi jewelry. He began his jewelry career with a brief period of time also making pottery in the 1950’s.  The pieces were made form earthenware and were painted and glazed.  By the 1960’s his jewelry was already achieving some fame and he discontinued making pottery.  His clay pieces are relatively rare but fascinating in terms of form, design and glaze. In many ways they mirror the innovative style of his jewelry relative to the other work being created at Hopi at the same time.  This jar is made from stoneware and it is striated in designs.  This is a style which he often used in his pottery, keeping them simple in form and design.  In many ways, this matched the underlying themes to his jewelry.  This is a classic piece of his pottery! It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom into the clay, “Loloma”.

$ 1,200.00

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Monday, January 7, 2019

Garcia, Tina – Black Water Jar with Rainbow Ridge (1991)

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plainware Santa Clara pottery. This water jar is one of her classic pieces.  It is an elegant shape with a double shoulder or “rainbow ridge”.  The entire piece is fully polished to a high shine and fired a deep black.   Tina was always focused on form and polish and this created some exceptional vessels.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,000.00

Shupla, Helen – Melon Jar with 16 Ribs (1980’s)

Helen Shupla is certainly most famous for her exceptional melon jars.  Her melon jars are the very traditional form with the ribs pushed out in the clay.  This melon jar is one of her classic shapes with an elongated body showing the full length of each rib.  Each of the 16 ribs is pushed out into the clay.  She would do this by placing her fingers inside the bowl and pushing against the clay from both the inside and outside!  Can you see the slight angle to each section?  This is how she would turn her hand as she was pushing against the clay to create the separate ribs!  The entire piece is fully polished and fired black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Helen Shupla”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,600.00

Garcia, Tina – Black Melon Bowl (1985)

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plainware Santa Clara pottery. This is one of the few melon bowls which we have seen of her work.  The bowl is deeply carved with “melon” ridges extending from the neck to the base.  The entire piece is fully polished and fired a deep black.   Tina was always focused on form and polish and this created some exceptional vessels.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tina Garcia”.

$ 850.00

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Sunday, January 6, 2019

Sarracino, Myron – Rain and Plant Design Jar

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin-walled and tightly painted. This jar has a high shoulder and a more classic “olla” shape. The design has a “T” shaped could pattern painted with a red clay slip.  It is above the terraced mesa design.  Below the mesa design is a spiraling water pattern.  It has a series of fine-lines painted into the clay.  Near the base are plant designs, which are often seen on classic Laguna pottery.  The jar is a nice balance of form and design.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece and it is also a tribute to the potters who came before.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 325.00

Garcia, Effie – Bowl with Deep Carved Avanyu

Effie Garcia is known for her deeply carved pottery.  Each piece is coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired. This bowl has a deeply carved avanyu (water serpent) as the design.  It is a varied design with water swirls as the design when the bowl is turned.  Note the depth of the carving and how she has outlined the design with the clay for emphasis.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Effie Garcia”.

$ 375.00

Concho, Carolyn – Bowl with Fish, Butterfly and Ladybugs

Carolyn Concho is well known for her beautifully painted pottery using Mimbres animals, reptiles and insects.  This small bowl is painted on the top with 2 ladybugs, a fish, butterfly and a flute player.  Separating them are sections of a star design.   All the additional colors are from natural clay slips.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “C. Concho”.

$ 110.00

Crank, Susie – Long Neck Water Jar

Susie Crank is a daughter of Rose Williams and a sister of Alice Cling.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and amazingly, she says he may burnish a piece over and over as many as 15 times to get a high shine!  This water jar has a round body, a slight indention before the neck and a graceful slope to the rim.  It is an elegant shape which Susie has highly polished and even the inside of the neck is polished almost  as far as you can reach inside!  The jar is then traditionally fired to create the fire-clouds on the surface.  The colorations on this jar range from black to a deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  Today, the pine pitch seals the vessel and gives it the shine.  This jar has a stunning shine and a great feel to the surface!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Susie Crank”.

$ 325.00

Naranjo, Geri  – Tall Black Plainware Jar

This is a taller miniature jar by Geri Naranjo.  She is known for her miniature pottery and intricately etched designs.  Here the entire piece is fully polished with no design.  It is in the shape of a high shoulder jar. The piece is very thinly constructed and highly polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Geri Naranjo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 150.00

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Saturday, January 5, 2019

Yepa, Alvina – Jar with Double Avanyu and Feather Design

Alvina Yepa (b. 1954) learned to make pottery from her mother, Felipita Nonche Yepa.  She began making pottery in the 1980’s and in 1987 won First Place and Best of Division for her pottery at Santa Fe Indian Market.  This bowl is coil built and stone polished.  It is fully incised with design.  On the top is a feather pattern while the side has a two avanyu (water serpents) encircling the bowl.  Below the avanyu are cloud and rain designs. The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alvina Yepa”.

$ 225.00

Gachupin, Laura – Singing Mother Storyteller

Laura Gachupin is one of the leading potters from Jemez Pueblo.  This is one of her figurative pieces.  It is a “Singing Mother” storyteller style of figure with the mother holding a single child.  Laura has sculpted the shawl on the figure and it is fully polished. The remainder of the piece is matte.  The base has a mountain pattern painted as the design.  The figure is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 325.00

Gachupin, Laura – Small Bowl with Corn Design

Laura Gachupin is one of the leading potters from Jemez Pueblo.  This small bowl is both painted and polished. The bottom is stone polished red and the rim is polished tan.  The central band of the bowl is painted with a corn plant, which is very intricately painted.  Note the white clay for the corn pollen.  As the bowl is turned there is a cloud and rain design along with the sun.  For a small piece, it is very tightly painted.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 110.00

Naranjo, Dominguita Sisneros – Large Jar with Incised Rain Cloud Designs

Dominguita Sisneros Naranjo is a daughter of noted Ohkay Owingeh potter Tomasita Montoya and a sister of Rosita de Herrera. This large jar is a classic style for San Juan Pottery.  It is polished at the top and bottom. The inside is slipped with a micaceous clay.  The central band is incised with cloud patterns.  There are single vertical lines representing the rain which are slipped with a bluish color of clay.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dominguita Naranjo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 450.00

Sandia, Geraldine – Bowl with Feather Designs

Geraldine Sandia is known for her intricately painted Jemez pottery. This bowl is fully polished red.  It is painted with a tan clay on the top to create the feather design.  On the sides it is painted with a black slip for the rain and cloud patterns.  The use of the two different colors of clay on the highly polished surface is striking.  Nearly the entire surface of the bowl is painted!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 110.00

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Friday, January 4, 2019

Nampeyo, Tonita – Migration Pattern Jar

Tonita Nampeyo is a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and a granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano.  She is known for her traditional pottery using natural clay slips and bee-weed for the black.  This jar is an elegant shape with a round shoulder and a slight neck.    The design on the jar called the “Migration pattern” and it is one that was revived by Nampeyo of Hano in the late 1800’s from ancient Sikyatki pottery.  The design is meant to tell the story of the migration of people from the third to the fourth world in Hopi legends as well as the migration of people around the world.  This jar is delicately painted and note the exceptional thin lines!  It is traditionally fired for the amazing color.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 450.00

Nampeyo, Tonita – Bowl with Eagle Tail Design

Tonita Nampeyo is a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and a granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano.  She is known for her traditional pottery using natural clay slips and bee-weed for the black.  This bowl wide with sloping sides.  The top is painted with a red clay slip.  The sides are painted with an eagle tail design which extends towards the base.  The central square section of the design is highlighted with a red clay slip.  This is a design which was revived by Nampeyo of Hano from the Sikyatki pottery of the 1600’s.  The piece is traditionally fired for the striking color in the blushes.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Tonita Nampeyo”. The corn plant signifies that she is part of the Corn Clan.

$ 550.00

Nampeyo, James Garcia – Wide Bowl with Eagle Tail Design

James Garcia Nampeyo is a son of Leah Garcia Nampeyo, a grandson of Fannie Nampeyo and a great-grandson of Nampeyo of Hano.  This is a wide and very flat shoulder jar by James.  This wide, flat shape is one which is inspired by the historic Siyatki pottery from the area.  This bowl is fully stone polished and painted with the classic eagle tail design.  The neck of the bowl is polished a deep red.  The eagle tails extend down over the side of the bowl.  They are painted with a deep red clay slip along with bee-weed (black).  The bowl is traditionally fired to give it the coloration with some slight blushes.  It is signed on the bottom, “James G. Nampeyo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 475.00

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Thursday, January 3, 2019

Antonio, Frederica – Large Polychrome Four Seasons and Star Jar

Frederica Antonio is renown for her intricately painted pottery. Each piece is coil built and then finely painted. Her designs are a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines which are then filled in to create larger images in the squares.  This water jar is a classic shape for Acoma pottery, with a high shoulder and short neck. There four large sections of designs extending down the sides of the jar.  They represent the four seasons of Spring, Summer, Winter, and Fall.  Frederica has also painted linear bands using different colors of clay slips.  There is a larger cloud pattern which separates each “season”.  Around the top of the jar is a star pattern which can be seen when looking down from the top.  From the sides, it is also made up of numerous stars as well!  Exceptional in planning and design!   Interestingly, the entire jar is first painted black on white.  Frederica then paints all the different clay colors and then had to go back over all the black lines again one more time!  The level of complexity and time involved in the painting of this piece is extraordinary!  The result, however, is stunning with a dynamic appearance and movement to the designs.  The base of the jar is concave, reminiscent of historic Acoma jars which were carried on the head.  This combination of thin walls, classic shape, and tightly painted design create a piece which is visually stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 3,600.00

Herrera, Estephanita – Owl Figure (1930)

This may be on of the most iconic pieces we have had by Estephanita Herrera. She was the grandmother of  Ada Suina and Snowflake Flower.  She is considered one of the earliest of the contemporary Cochiti potters to create jars with birds and animals attached.  Her style of lizard effigy ollas influenced other Cochiti potters, including Seferina Ortiz with her lizard canteens and Martha Arquero with her frogs.   Her animals, like this owl, were often anthropomorphized in style with a combination of animal and human characteristics.  There is a similar owl in the School of American Research permanent collection.  The piece is coil built and slipped with white clay.  The “feathers’ are painted with wild spinach.  Her work is certainly a reflection of the Monos figures and other early Cochiti Pueblo clay figurative work. This piece was traditionally fired and it is signed on the bottom, “Stefanita, 1930”.  It is quite extraordinary that it has survived so well over time!  Definitely a historically important piece of Cochiti pottery from the 1930’s!

$ 2,800.00

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Wednesday, January 2, 2019

Swentzell, Roxanne – Clay “Winking” Mask

This is an original clay piece by Roxanne Swentzell.  She is well known for her clay masks and their unique expressiveness.  This face on this mask winking and check out the lips as well!  The piece was published with Roxanne holding it on the cover of the 1997 Indian Artist magazine.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed in the clay, “ROX”.

$ 2,200.00

Swentzell, Roxanne – Clay Mask with “Bubble” Design

This is an original clay piece by Roxanne Swentzell.  She is well known for her clay masks and their unique expressiveness.  This face on this mask is very expressive.  Roxanne painted it with colored circles and lines.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed in the clay, “ROX”.

$ 2,200.00

Swentzell, Roxanne – Clay Mask with Circles on Cheeks

This is an original clay piece by Roxanne Swentzell.  She is well known for her clay masks and their unique expressiveness.  This mask has such a gentle appearance with the eyes, lips and round circles on the cheeks.  The style of the circles certainly reminds one of some of the women in the Pueblo Butterfly dances.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed in the clay, “ROX”.  The mask is meant to be hung.  A stand can be made for an additional charge.

$ 2,200.00

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Tuesday, January 1, 2019

Haungooah, Art Cody – Black Jar with Feather Design (1978)

This is a small intricately designed bowl by Art Cody Haungooah. The bowl is fully polished and fired black.  The shoulder of the piece is etched with a feather pattern.  Typically, Martha would make and polish the pottery while Art would etch the designs into the clay.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Haungooah”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 350.00

Haungooah, Art Cody – Bowl with Avanyu (1978)

This is a larger bowl by Art Cody Haungooah who was known for his miniatures.  The entire bowl is fully polished and fired red.  It is etched with a very stylized water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece.  Around the rim are clouds while the body of the avanyu is etched with scales.  The tongue is like a bolt of lightning and crosses the tail. It is an interestingly designed piece.  Event he background matte area is textured!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Haungooah”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair with some wear near the base.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 650.00

Haungooah, Art Cody – “The Ancient Ones” (1977)

This is a complex smaller bowl by Art Cody Haungooah. The bowl is fully polished and fired black.  It is entitled, “The Ancient Ones”.  There is a single medallion which is etched humanized grasshopper along with a stylized grassopper figure.  This is one of those pieces where I wish I knew the story of “The Ancient Ones” as Art was masterful as a story teller.  The bowl has some deeper carving (the circular lines) along with Art’s classic straffito.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Haungooah  “The Ancient Ones”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 500.00

Talachy, Joe & Thelma – Polychrome Seedpot

Joe Talachy (b. 1943) and Thelma Talachy (b. 1942) are two of the few potters from Pojoaque Pueblo in New Mexico.  Thelma is a sister of Minnie Vigil, Lois Gutierrez and Gloria Garcia.  Their daughter, Melissa Talachy, is also a well-known potter.  Each piece is coil built and painted with natural clay slips.  This seedpot has a multiple colors of clay used for the rain and lightning designs.  It is very tightly painted.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Joe & Thelma Talachy”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 110.00

Haungooah, Art Cody & Martha – Bowl with Howling Coyote and Moon (1976)

This is one of the few pieces signed by both Art Cody Haungooah and his wife, Martha.  Martha made the small jar and polished the surface.  Art Cody etched the design.  The central medallion is a howling coyote.  In front of the coyote is a quarter moon.  On the opposite side of the moon is a stylized bird.  There is just a slight lip to the jar.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Art & Martha Haungooah  1976”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

$ 500.00

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Monday, December 31, 2018

Ortiz, Virgil – Traditional Jar with Birds & Cloud Designs

This is a new traditional design inspired jar from Virgil Ortiz.  This piece is coil built, polished and painted with wild spinach for the black.  Virgil said that he was inspired by some historic Cochiti pottery recently to create this piece which has such classic imagery.  This jar has a wild spinach design around the rim. The “wild spinach” is the plant used to paint the black on the pottery.   Around the side of the jar, Virgil painted Cochiti style birds and clouds.  Both designs are often seen on historic Cochiti pottery.  The birds, of course, are somewhat modernised in Virgil’s interprertive style.  Separating the birds are cloud designs.  Virgil tried something a bit different with his painting and firing to give clouds a sense of motion. The “motion” comes through the darker areas around them creating what Virgil called, “shadow clouds”. Take a closer look and you can see it’s not just smoke clouds, but also designs created by them!  In addition to the classic imagery, Virgil has also included his signature “x”, which he uses on all his pottery.  On the neck of the jar, there is a space on the rim of the neck where it is unpainted, which is the “heartline”, which Virgil always paints on his clay vessels.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 3,200.00

Youngblood, Nancy – 32 Swirl Rib Mellon (1984)

This is a classic swirl ribbed melon bowl by Nancy Youngblood.  The bowl is coil built and each rib is deeply carved into the clay.  The depth of the carving and the symmetry of each rib is exceptional. This is certainly one of the enduring aspects of her incredible artistry.  Each rib is then polished with a stone to achieve the shine.  The bowl is from 1984 and note the sharp edge to each rib.  This is much more time consuming and difficult than if they are rounded.  The sharp edges easily chip during the carving and polishing stages.  Nancy said of this style of her carving:

“It’s more challenging to make a more pointed shaped shoulder than a simple rounded bowl. You have to flip them over when you are polishing and holding them at an angle. It’s not just one surface to polish but each side of every rib. They are all hard to do. If it was easy, everybody would be doing it.”  Nancy Youngblood, Spoken Through Clay

As you consider that each rib has two sides and how much surface area there is for this piece!  The ribs are also very deeply carved into the clay and almost come to a point at the edge! Check out the image looking down on the bowl to see the depth and symmetry of this piece.  Nancy says she can only polish three ribs in one sitting as they are so time-consuming.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Nancy Youngblood Cutler” and it is from 1984.  Simply an iconic piece of her pottery!

$ 6,000.00

Namingha, Les – Hopi Hummingbirds Jar

This is a striking painted jar by Les Namingha.  The jar is one of Les’s iconic shapes with a round body and an elongated neck. The background of the jar has been painted with large swaths of color which Les has blended one into the next.  The green, red. blue and brown all create a subtle mosaic flow of coloration meant to represent the colorations on a hummingbird.  On the surface of the jar are painted two large Hopi style hummingbirds.  Each large bird is designed as if they are in frantic motion.  They are further detailed with additional Hopi-Tewa designs.  Note the use of the classic red and burgundy colors in the designs.  The “yellow” of the birds represents the “yellow-ware” of the classic Hopi-Tewa pottery.  The coloration works well on this jar on various levels.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,000.00

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Sunday, December 30, 2018

Lewis, Sharon – Bowl with Red Flower Design

Sharon Lewis has developed her own very distinctive style of painted design.  Her pieces are beautifully formed, thin-walled and then tightly painted.  This bowl is thin walled and painted with a series of flowers with red centers. The red is an additional clay slip.  The flowers spiral around the bowl and are separated by fine-line rain designs.  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Sharon Lewis”.

$ 350.00

Candelario, Hubert – 37 Rib Melon bowl

Hubert Candelario is one of the few potters working at San Felipe Pueblo.  This is one of his melon bowls with 37 ribs!  Each rib is individually carved into the clay and start very narrowly at the neck and get larger at the shoulder and narrow to the base.  There is a beautiful symmetry that he is able to create with these pieces.  The ribs are round and slipped with a micaceous clay which gives the pieces its coloration and sparkle.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Hubert Candelario”.

$ 1,350.00

Lucario, Rebecca – Seedpot with Lizard

Rebecca Lucario is known for her delicate and intricately painted pottery.  This seedpot is painted with a lizard on top.  The lizard is surrounded by intricately painted geometric Acoma designs.  It is delicate in design and traditional in form.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom, “R. Lucario”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 225.00

Concho, Rachel – Seedpot with Lizards

Rachel Concho (b. 1936) learned to make pottery from her mother, Santana Cerno.   She is a sister of Joseph Cerno and mother-in-law of Carolyn Lewis-Concho.  In 2000 she won Best in Show at Santa Fe Indian Market.  Her pottery is coil built and painted with bee-weed (black) and clay slips.  This seedpot has two lizards and insects on the top.  On the bottom has a fine-line star pattern along with classic Acoma rain and lightning designs.  There are accents of red clay slip.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 250.00

Naranjo, Madeline – Four Interlocking Avanyu Jar

Madeline Naranjo creates beautifully carved and polished pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This jar has a more classic shape with the high shoulder and short neck.  The design is four interlocking avanyu which encircle the piece.  Note how the polished ones are carved over the top of the matte ones, creating several layers of carving!  The contrast of the matte and polished surfaces works perfectly, especially with the polished neck.  Her matte areas are sanded and perfectly smooth so that there are no indentations or areas where the matte might make a shadow.  Her designs are always innovative and beautifully executed.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 500.00

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Saturday, December 29, 2018

Roller, Toni – Jar with 48 Feathers (2018)

This is a striking carved jar by Toni Roller.  She is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and is known for her classic shapes and exquisite stone polished pottery.   This larger jar is a wide shape with just a slight neck.  Around the shoulder are 48 carved feathers.  Toni’s feathers are distinctive in style with the straight sides and slight curve at the base.  Over the course of her long career, it has become one of her signature carved designs due to the visual strength of the symmetry of the feathers.  Creating a piece this size with this number of feathers (at 83 years old) is remarkable.   The jar is very highly polished and fired a deep black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Toni Roller”.  Toni has said of her traditional style of pottery:

“It’s important to start from scratch and do it the old way. People should understand how difficult the process is and why it takes so long to make pottery. If you are going to be a potter, you are not going to mind all the hard work involved in gathering the clay and the materials. It’s time-consuming, but in the end you are so happy to have this clay that just started as chunks in rock form. Then, coming out with the beautiful final pieces of pottery. How did it come about? With your hands and patience. That is such a good feeling.” Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

$ 3,800.00

Lewis, Sharon – Dragonfly Seedpot

Sharon Lewis has developed her own very distinctive style of painted design.  Her pieces are beautifully formed, thin-walled and then tightly painted.  This seedpot has four dragonflies in the center of the piece.  They are surrounding a flower design. There are additional checkerboard and fine-line patterns surrounding each dragonfly.  Around the rim of the seedpot are interlocking plant designs.  The piece is very detailed for the size.   The seedpot is signed on the bottom, “Sharon Lewis”.

$ 300.00

Roller, Jeff – Tear Drop Shaped Lidded Jar with Mountain Designs (2018)

This is an exceptional lidded jar by Jeff Roller.  Jeff is a son of Toni Roller and a grandson of Margaret Tafoya.  He continues a family legacy of extraordinary traditional pottery.  This jar is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired black.  However, the shape is what Jeff calls a “teardrop form” with narrow sides and a rounder base. The shape is also very much reminiscent of the mountain form. Jeff has carved a mountain design on each side with clouds and wind patterns above. Note the depth of the carving and its consistency throughout the piece.  Below the lid is a half-circle sun and the lid is carved with a traditional step cloud design.  Note how the carving on the sides continues up to the lid as if it is one piece!  The lid is perfectly fit to the jar which adds to the overall difficulty.  The piece is beautifully polished and fired.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Jeff Roller” and dated 2018.

$ 4,500.00

Tse-Pe, Dora – Black & Sieanna Jar with Turquoise (1991)

This jar by Dora Tse-Pe is from 1991.  It is her classic highly polished surface. The jar itself is carved with an asymmetric opening.  The piece was fired a deep black and then it was two-toned to create the sienna medallion.  In the center of the medallion, there is an inset piece of turquoise.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dora of San Ildefonso 1991”.

$ 775.00

Garcia, Tina – Red Water Jar with Fluted Rim (1991)

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plainware Santa Clara pottery. This water jar is classic in both form and color.  The jar has a sharp shoulder which dips down before extending up to the neck.  It is this indention at the shoulder, which is difficult at times to see in photos but easy to feel, which was a distinctive technique of Tina’s pottery.  The result is often the “surprise” of feeling it when it is not really seen.  The rim is fluted which means that it is undulating.  This is always a more difficult technique as there are more opportunities for it to crack in drying or polishing.  The jar is fully polished and traditionally fired red.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 625.00

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Friday, December 28, 2018

Namingha, Les – Mesa Birds at Sunset

This is an intricately painted jar by Les Namingha.  The jar is one of Les’s iconic shapes with a round body and an elongated neck. The background of the jar has striated bands of color.  Les has combined the color with mica to give the piece added dimension and texture.  The sections of them are reflective of the Hopi mesas and their colorations at sunset. There are give Hopi-Tewa birds which are painted onto the surface of the jar.  Each bird is a different color and they are detailed with Hopi-Tewa designs.  Each bird is designed as if they are reflecting the colors of the setting sun. Striking! The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,000.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Four-Color Double Lobe Jar with Waterfall Rim

This is an exceptional revival of a historic shape by Russell Sanchez.  The shape of the jar is a “double lobe”.  It is technically difficult to make as the coiling has to round in and out to create each of the “bowls” which seem to be sitting on each other.  Historically, these are inspired by cooking vessels which were set on top of each other.  The bottom section of this jar has angular carved eagle feathers swirling around the piece. They are polished black and the area at the very base is polished a light red.  Above the feathers is a checkerboard band representing corn alternating polished deep red and matte.  The center band, which Russell said was very difficult to polish, is light red coloration. The top “lobe” or bowl of the jar is polished a very deep red.  There are three designs which he has etched to encircle the jar. They range from a koshari to Early San Ildefonso inspired sun and rain designs.  Above and below the center band are checkerboard snow patterns in both black and light red.  Finally, the neck is polished black and the rim is a deep red. The inside of the rim has been carved with melon style ribs creating Russell’s distinctive “waterfall rim”.  There are so many technical aspects to the creation of this jar, from numerous clays to the form itself.  However, the final result is visually striking and very unusual.  The jar is signed on the base in the clay.  Once again Russell harkens to historic San Idlefonso designs and stories and uses them for his own contemporary work.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 7,800.00

Ebelacker, Jason – Jar with Bear Paws and Rainbow Ridge

This is a striking double shoulder water jar by Jason Ebelacker.  The shape is distinctive with the wide shoulder, sloping neck and slightly turned out rim.  The movement of the shape creates numerous angles for the reflection of the light.  The wide shoulder of the jar has a second, raised shoulder or “rainbow band”.  This is technically difficult to achieve and you can even feel on the inside how the coils are pushed out to achieve the shape! The jar is very highly polished and there are two impressed bear paws as the design on either side. The paws represent the story of the bear who saved the village from a flood and they are represented on vessels which hold water.  The jar is stone polished to a high shine and then traditionally fired. The firing is always an unknown how a piece will turn out but this jar has the classic deep black coloration.  Jason is a son of noted potter Richard Ebelacker, a grandson of Virginia Ebelacker and great-grandson of Margaret Tafoya.  He has won numerous awards for his pottery and continues to be one of the younger potters to watch.  It’s great to see the continuing evolution of his work in clay.

$ 2,700.00

Trammel, Jennie – Jar with Feather Pattern (1970’s)

This is classic smaller jar by Jennie Trammel.   She was a daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  Over the years Jennie did not make a lot of pottery as she lived a very private life and was virtually never involved in markets or gallery shows.  However, she created striking pottery with classic shapes and designs which were distinctive to her work.  Each piece was coil built and it was the carving, with the rounded edges, which was a visual key to her work.  This jar is a water jar shape and it has carved feathers as the design.  It is both classic in shape and style.  The feathers are deeply carved and the entire jar is highly polished.  It is fired a deep black.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Jennie Trammel” in the clay on the bottom.

$ 800.00

Garcia, Tina & Greg – Double Shoulder Water Jar (1980’s)

This is an unusual dual signature jar by Tina Garcia and Greg Garcia.  Tina and Greg were brother and sister and both made traditional style pottery.  The jar is a classic water jar shape with a double shoulder.  It is most likely that Greg made the jar and then Tina polished the surface. The jar is well polished and has a high shine.  The jar was fired a deep black coloration.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tina & Greg”.

$ 350.00

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Thursday, December 27, 2018

Clashin, Debbie – 18″ “New Beginning”  Jar with Grandmother Katsina and Dragonflies

Debbie Clashin has become one of the exciting leaders in Hopi-Tewa pottery over the past several years.  She is known for her large-sized traditional fired vessels. This very large jar is entitled, “New Beginning”.  Debbie said that the designs symbolize the arrival of the Grandmother Katsina in the winter and the beginning of the Hopi new year in the cycle of the katsinas.  She has painted the Grandmother Katsina as a cradle doll on the sides of the jar.

“The Grandmother Katsina (Hahay-i wu-uti) shares with Crow Mother the title of Mother of all the Katsinam. Her husband is said to be Eototo and her children are the monsters, the Nataskas. She appears during the Bean Dance (Powamuya), the Serpent Ceremony and at Home Going (Niman). She speaks in a high voice and is very talkative. Flat carvings of the Grandmother Katsina are given to Hopi infants. As a young girl matures, she receives larger, more detailed forms of the Grandmother Katsina.”

This large jar is a wide shape and a slightly turned out neck.  The entire piece is stone polished and then it is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  Separating the three katsina figures are large Hopi dragonflies which have dark and light red wings!  The jar is traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar and a few little darker areas.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.  Quite an exceptional jar!

$ 6,500.00

Early, Max – “Eagles in Flight” Jar

Max Early is one of the few traditional potters working today at Laguna Pueblo.  His work combines traditional forms with a blend of contemporary and traditional designs.  This jar is a traditional shape with a high shoulder and elongated neck. The jar has a rain pattern around the neck and a cloud design around the shoulder.  Max noted that these were “older, minimal Laguna designs”.  However, as with much of his work, the bottom area is where he created is own additional designs.  Here he said he had painted four eagles in flight over the four directional mountains.  It is beautiful imagery which complements the simplicity of the designs above. The rounded bottom harkens back to the traditional Laguna pottery when the water jars were meant to be carried on one’s head.  Note as well his use of the various clays to create a “three color” jar!   The jar is also traditionally fired, which adds to the overall difficulty of the piece.  It is certainly exciting to see a potter who is inspired by traditional shapes and designs and yet has the artistry to create his own distinctive variation!  The jar is signed on the bottom and includes a copy of his book, “Ears of Corn: Listen”.

$ 2,000.00

Duwyenie, Preston – White Plate with Silver Shard

This plate by Preston Duwyenie is made from white Hopi clay found near Third Mesa at Hopi.  The entire plate is stone polished on the front and back.  He has inset a single piece of silver, which looks much a pottery shard resting in the sand.  The silver piece is from cast from cuttlefish bone.  The textured surface of the silver then has his famous “shifting sand” style of design.   The plate is signed on the back in the clay with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child, which comes from Preston’s Hopi name, which means “carried in beauty”.  Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

$ 800.00

Lewis, Eric – Large Jar with Buffalo

This larger jar by Eric Lewis is a new and more complex design for his pottery.  It is a buffalo on one side and stylized birds on the opposite side.  The jar has high shoulders and a short neck.  The buffalo is wonderfully painted and a bit different from his other more linear designs.  Eric uses his designs to follow the shape of the jar and accentuate its form.  Eric has taken classic Acoma linear designs and made them both bolder and more graphic. The result is a striking jar with tightly painted imagery.  Eric remains one of the young Pueblo potters to watch!

$ 550.00

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Wednesday, December 26, 2018

Folwell, Susan – “Bread Bakers” Large Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series for, “Taos Light: Maidens to Mantas”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This jar is inspired by the painting “The Bakers” by Walter Ufer.  Susan says of this piece,

I made this jar to have a very open and organic appearance.  I wanted to capture the fun and intensity of Pueblo women getting ready for Feast Day.  There is so much movement in the clouds and sky and there was an unexpected translucence when I put on the clay slip.  It made me want to keep the clay showing and create a piece which was more subtle.  The use of the layers of rope around the neck are the passing of the legacy of Feast Day and baking bread from one generation to another.

The jar is a large but organic shape with a wide body and indented neck.  The rim of the jar is fully incised to create the appearance of the rope. The body of the piece is painted with the scenes of Pueblo women baking bread.  The clouds are intricately painted with small dots and note how the background areas has large swaths of white clay slip against the natural color of the clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 4,400.00

Tafoya-Sanchez, Linda – Jar with Cloud and Mesa Designs

Linda Tafoya-Sanchez is a granddaughter of noted potter Margaret Tafoya and a daughter of Lee & Betty Tafoya.  She is known for her intricately carved pottery.  The jar has a wide body and a fluted rim. The fluted neck undulates back and forth around the jar and it is slipped with a micaceous clay.  The body of the jar is carved with cloud, lightning, and mesa or mountain designs.  They are deeply carved into the clay.  The jar is highly polished and traditionally fired.  Interestingly, Linda was among the first Santa Clara potters to begin using the mica as a design element after she was given some by her San Juan Pueblo in-laws.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Linda Tafoya-Sanchez”.

“The clay is a really important part of making the pottery. Listening to family members talk about how they used to get clay with Grandma and Grandpa [Margaret & Alcario Tafoya] and how they would make it an all-day venture. You feel that family connection when you are digging the clay out of the earth. It ties you to your home. There’s no other place you are going to find that kind of clay. You think about how many years people have dug that clay out of the earth, how many years Mother Earth has provided that clay for us.”  Linda Tafoya-Sanchez, Spoken Through Clay

$ 900.00

Namingha, Les – “Clangere” Jar

This is an intricately painted jar by Les Namingha.  The piece is entitled, “Clangere”.  While much of Les’s pottery is inspired by Hopi and Zuni imagery, there are often those pieces inspired by music.  Les says of this jar:

“Clangere” Latin.  Clang(ing). The design represents sound and reverberations.”

The shape of the jar is one of his classic forms with a wide body and elongated neck. The piece is painted with strong geometric patterns, which certainly do make one think of music and sound.  The small sections of pointilism are a style which he often uses on his pottery.  The design extends downward to the vase and up to the neck.  The colors are vivid but easily connect to the concept of this piece.   It is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,500.00

Natseway, Charmae –  Seedpot with Bear and Antelope (1980)

Charmae Natseway is known for her exceptionally painted pottery and use of distinctive forms. This piece is from 1980 and it is one of her very classic style seedpots. The piece is painted with three Mimbres figures. The Mimbres people lived in the Southwest and made pottery around 1100.  On this seedpot there is an antelope eating a plant and a man wrestling a bear.  Charmae’s pottery often has a bit of humor to the designs, as with the bear wrestler!  The top has a fineline spiral star design.  Charmae is both an exceptional potter and also among the best Acoma painters.  The fine lines and precision of her imagery is always a perfect match of form and design.  The piece is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 250.00

Natseway, Charmae –  Seedpot with Bird, Mountain Lion & Antelope (1980)

Charmae Natseway is known for her exceptionally painted pottery and use of distinctive forms. This piece is from 1980 and it is one of her very classic style seedpots. The piece is painted with three Mimbres animals. The Mimbres people lived in the Southwest and made pottery around 1100.  On this seedpot there is a bird (eating fish), a mountain lion and an antelope.  The top of the seedpot has a fineline design and plants.  Charmae is both an exceptional potter and also among the best Acoma painters.  The fine lines and precision of her imagery is always a perfect match of form and design.  The piece is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 250.00

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Tuesday, December 25, 2018

Martinez, Maria   – Gunmetal Bowl with Cloud Designs “Maria Popovi 569”

This gunmetal fired bowl is a classic piece by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the bowl and it was fired by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). Popovi focused on both the painted surfaces of the pottery as well as the firings.  This bowl is one of Maria’s classic shapes with her low shoulder and sloping sides. The design is a very tightly painted rain and lightning pattern which encircles the piece. The openness of the design elements reveals the gunmetal coloration from the firing.  The piece is about three-quarters gunmetal with one section that is a darker black.  However, the entire bowl is very highly polished with a “mirror-like” surface. The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria / Popovi 569”.  The firing date is when the pottery was made, so this bowl was from May 1969. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Great gunmetal fired pieces by Maria and Popovi with such high polished surface are always stunning and a great addition to any collection!

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 3,600.00

Martinez, Maria – Large Plate with San Ildefonso Birds (1920’s)

This is an extraordinary large plate by Maria Martinez and her husband, Julian.  Maria would make the pottery and Julian would paint the design.  The unique aspects of this piece are the size and the design.  Many of their early plates were under 12″ diameter, as they were less likely to break in the firing.  As well, this design is one which is an early pattern and one which was very rarely used in their pottery.  The design is a series of three San Ildefonso birds.  The heads are near the rim and the wings are extending backwards with the triangle in the center making up their legs.  However, as a whole pattern, it has a beautiful flow and dynamic appearance.  The “wings” on this piece are a design which in Richard Spivey’s book, “The Legacy of Maria Poveka Martinez”, it is identified as an “avanyu” (see last photo).  However, I spoke at length with a San Ildefonso potter about this particular design and he explained how it was a bird and that it is a design often seen around the Pueblo.  To have his input gives an important addition of cultural knowledge about these pieces!  As for the plate, it is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are some light surface scratches which are not unexpected in a piece from this time period.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Marie + Julian”.  In terms of the photos, I tried to take them at different angles and different lighting to reveal both design and condition.  The curve of the plate makes it difficult but I think if you view the various photos it is possible to have a good idea of the overall condition.   This is definitely one of those exciting pieces by Maria & Julian Martinez which rarely come around to the marketplace!

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 6,800.00

Martinez, Santana & Adam – Bowl with Feather Designs (1970’s)

This bowl by Santana and Adam Martinez is a smaller but classic piece of their pottery.  Adam was the youngest son of Maria Martinez, and Santana (his wife) painted Maria’s pottery in the 1940-50’s.  The entire surface of this is fully polished.  The design was then painted around the top shoulder of the bowl.  It is a classic feather pattern encircling the piece.  The bowl was traditionally fired to a very dark black appearance.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Santana + Adam”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic piece!

$ 600.00

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Monday, December 24, 2018

Sanchez, Russell  – Red Bear Lid Bowl with Bear Medallion

This lidded bowl by Russell Sanchez is from around 2000.  It is fully polished and has a bear lid. Note how the bear has its head just a bit turned!  The bowl is fully polished and has a central medallion.  The medallion has an etched bear and the bear has a heartline and a bear paw as additional designs.  The bear medallion is polished a darker brown coloration.  It is surrounded by a band of micaceous clay.  There are two inset bands of hei-shi beads, one is a brown shell and one of white shell.  The bowl and the lid are both signed in the clay, “Russell Sanchez”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,500.00

Gutierrez, Margaret Lou – Jar with Feather Pattern (1990’s)

Margaret Lou Gutierrez was the only daughter of noted potters Tonita & Juan Roybal.  She began making pottery in the 1970’s and this is one of her pieces from the 1990’s. The jar has a long neck and a round shoulder.  It is painted with her elongated feathers and it is very highly polished.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Lou Gutierrez”.  It is hard to see the signature in the photo, but it is clear on the piece. 

$ 250.00

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Sunday, December 23, 2018

Garcia, Jessie – Wedding Vase with Bird Wing Designs (1970’s)

Jessie Garcia is one of the great names in Acoma pottery.  Between 1950 and 1970, she along with Lucy Lewis and Marie Z. Chino, led the revival of Acoma pottery.  This wedding vase is a classic shape with the twisted handle.  The body of the piece is painted with a series of bird wing designs.  They are both fineline and black in alternating coloration.  It is painted with bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired. The jar is signed on the bottom, “Jessie Garcia”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 750.00

Lewis-Garcia, Diane – Seedpot with Two Mimbres Lizards

Diane Lewis is known for her tightly painted miniature pottery.  This is one of her very intricately painted seedpots.  The top is painted with intricate Mimbres inspired lizards. The lizards are inspired by the Mimbres pottery of the 1100’s.  Around the edge of the seedpot are cloud and rain designs, which are very intricately painted.  All the colors are from natural clay slips. The thin lines are very time consuming to paint!    It is an exciting modern interpretation of classic Acoma imagery.  It is signed on the bottom, “D. Lewis”.

$ 75.00

Peynetsa, Jamie – Large Seedpot with Flower Design

This large seedpot was made by Avelia Peynetsa (the wife of Anderson) and painted by her son, Jamie Peynetsa.  The piece is an interesting shape with a sloping base, round shoulder and slightly pointed top.  However, the shape works great for such complex designs.  Around the base are classic Zuni designs such as dragonflies, waterbug, tadpoles and plants.  The top is very intricately painted with four petals of a flower and cloud patterns on four opposite sides.  Note the fine line painting and use of the red clay slip at the center of the flower.  Jamie and Avelia have signed the seedpot on the bottom.

$ 600.00

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Saturday, December 22, 2018

Youngblood, Nancy – 32 Rib Mellon (1987)

This is a classic straight ribbed melon bowl by Nancy Youngblood.  The bowl is coil built and each rib is deeply carved into the clay.  The depth of the carving and the symmetry of each rib is exceptional. This is certainly one of the enduring aspects of her incredible artistry.  Each rib is then polished with a stone to achieve the shine.  Although it is a small piece, consider that each rib has two sides and how much surface area there is for this piece!  The ribs are also very deeply carved into the clay and almost come to a point at the edge! Check out the image looking down on the bowl to see the depth and symmetry of this piece.  Nancy says she can only polish three ribs in one sitting as they are so time-consuming.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Nancy Youngblood Cutler” and it is from 1987.  Simply an iconic piece of her pottery!

$ 3,800.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Polychrome Mountain Lion Lidded Box

The box itself has a mountain lion on each side.  Each one is different as one is red and the other tan. Below them is a corn design in checkerboard.  Note the use of both the light and dark red clay slips on the piece!  Each mountain lion has an inset piece of Lone Mountain Turquoise.  There are two bands of hematite beads below the animal.  The lid has a very sculptural mountain lion which is fully polished.  Russell textured the area below the mountain lion so that it has a greater sense of movement.  Again on the lid, there are two bands of hematite hei-shi beads set into the clay.  The box has both a striking historic appearance and a contemporary feel.   Dark red, light red, black, and tan all work together to create a true polychrome work and a revival of historic style for which Russell has been working for the past several years.   The box was traditionally fired and the result is a striking coloration, especially for the red. The box is signed on the bottom, as is the lid.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 7,400.00

Lonewolf, Joseph – Seedpot with Carved Quail (1978)

This is a very unusual seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf.  He began making pottery in 1970-1 and he quickly achieved fame for his sgraffito (etched) designs.  This seedpot is from 1978 and it is a unusual in that the designs are carved into the clay.  There are three quail along with a feather and plant design.  There are sgraffito designs on the plants and birds.  The remainder of the piece is fully polished and note the linear designs in the background behind the carving.   This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,500.00

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Friday, December 21, 2018

Folwell, Polly Rose – Asymmetric Rim Jar with Feather Pattern

Polly Rose Folwell is known for use of classic designs on her traditional inspired Santa Clara pottery.  She learned to make pottery from her mother, Jody Folwell.   This jar is fully polished and has an asymmetric rim. It has been fired a dark reddish brown with a nearly black rim.   The design around the shoulder are etched feathers which encircle the piece.  Above and below are cloud and rain designs.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 400.00

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Thursday, December 20, 2018

Speckled Rock, Paul – Plainware Seedpot (1983)

Paul Speckled Rock is a grandson of Severa Tafoya but learned to make pottery from Joseph Lonewolf.  This seedpot is from 1983.  It is a very early piece of his pottery.  When he first started to make pottery, he began making unusual shapes, which were very much like “rocks”.  They were immediately distinctive in form and design.  This piece is highly polished but with not design. It is the shape and angels of the piece and the highly polished surface which make it so striking. The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Paul Speckled Rock, 1983”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 275.00

Speckled Rock, Paul – Red Bear with Feathers (1991)

Paul Speckled Rock is a grandson of Severa Tafoya but learned to make pottery from Joseph Lonewolf (his then father-in-law).  Paul’s son Adam Speckled Rock has made pottery, as well as his niece, Jennifer Tafoya.  This is one of his iconic clay bears.  He began making them in the early 1980’s and they remained one of his most famous forms.  The bear is more modernized and this one is polished and fired red.  There is a geometric heartline on the piece which he has highlighted with a blue clay slip.  There is a stone arrowhead on the back and three parrot feathers.  This is the bear’s “medicine bundle”.  The piece is signed on the inside of the back leg, “Paul Speckled Rock, 1991”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 650.00

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Wednesday, December 19, 2018

Toya, Maxine – Box with Rainbow Lid and Birds

This is an exceptional piece by Maxine Toya.  She said it is one of the few boxes which she has made.  Boxes are always difficult to make as they tend to crack in drying and firing.  The box itself is polished on the bottom band.  On two sides is a three-color rainbow over a bird.  On the sides of the rainbow are corn plants. The ends have stylized corn plants.  It is the lid which is white striking for this piece.  The handle is painted like a rainbow and below is a painted cloud.  The lid sits on a sculpted ridge on the top of the box.  She has made it so that it fits one way and there are little red clay dots to indicate the perfect fit!  The painting is all with natural clay slips and they lines are very fine and delicate.  Maxine traditionally fires her pottery, which adds to their striking appearance and difficulty.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maxine Toya”.

$ 900.00

Toya, Maxine – Corn Maiden Holding Corn

Maxine Toya is well known for her figurative pottery.   Each piece is coil built and stone polished and painted with natural clay slips.  This is one of her Corn Maiden figures.  The Corn Maiden has a fully polished shawl which she is wearing. On her manta is a very delicately painted corn plant and she is holding an ear of corn in her hand.  Note the intricacy in the face and the overall painting.   It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maxine Toya”.

$ 850.00

Medina, Elizabeth – Lidded Jar with Rainbow Band and Hummingbirds

Elizabeth Medina is known for a traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece is coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This jar is painted with a large bird with a rainbow band over the top of the section.  The birds on each side are different in style.  Overhead is a polished red rainbow band which has additional cloud and rain designs.  On the sides are flowers and small hummingbirds!  They are very charming.   The jar incorporates various clay slips for the colors and some are polished and some are matte.  The contrast of the matte and polished areas creates a striking appearance. The top of the lid is polished red while the turtle is added and slipped tan.  There is a polished and painted bird and flowers on the top.  The jar is signed on the side “Elizabeth Medina, Zia. Around the neck of the jar are rain and cloud patterns.  Separating the birds are intricately painted flowers with polished petals.  The jar is striking with the variations of matte and polished surfaces.  The top of the lid is polished red while the turtle is added and slipped tan.  There is a polished and painted bird and flowers on the top.  The jar is signed on the side “Elizabeth Medina, Zia.

$ 400.00

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All Contemporary   All Signed Historic

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