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Wednesday, May 23, 2018 

Sarracino, Myron – Jar with Interlocking Cloud Swirls

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. The imagery on much of his pottery is derived from pre-historic pottery designs. This jar a classic round body shape and a slight neck.  The neck has a triangular mountain design.  The shoulder has a painted cloud or step design extending into a swirl cloud pattern. The swirls are painted both black and with a fine-line pattern. The jar is complex in its patterns and yet the designs perfectly match the shape of the jar.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece.  It is seen on much of the historic Acoma and Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 375.00

Maho, Garrett –  Tile with Hopi Bird

Garrett Maho is known for his traditional and innovative Hopi-Tewa pottery.  This tile is very tightly painted with a traditional Hopi style bird as the design. The bird is intricately painted and note the checkerboard pattern on the body!  The tile is painted with a deep red is an additional clay slip while the black is painted with bee-weed (a plant).  The tile has been traditionally fired so that there are blushes on the surface.  The piece is signed on the back in the clay.

$ 300.00

Sarracino, Myron – Jar with Fine-Line Wind Design

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. The imagery on much of his pottery is derived from pre-historic pottery designs. This jar a traditional shape with the low, round shoulder.  The body of the jar is painted with a square “wind” pattern, which is then painted with linear fine lines.  The bolder black lines create a design path which encircles the entire jar.  The neck of the piece has an alternating cloud and rain design. The jar is complex in its patterns and yet the designs perfectly match the shape of the jar.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece.  It is seen on much of the historic Acoma and Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 375.00

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Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Nampeyo, Priscilla Namingha – Large Eagle Tail Bowl (1990’s)

Priscilla Namingha Nampeyo was a great-granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano and granddaughter of Annie Healing,  She was also a sister of  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo. Priscilla was the matriarch of a family of renown potters, including Rachel, Bonnie, Nyla and Jean Sahmie.  Priscilla began making pottery when she was only seven years old, under the guidance of Nampeyo of Hano. This large bowl is a classic of her style.  It is thin walled and painted with the classic “eagle tail” pattern, which was made famous by Nampeyo.  The top section is slipped with red clay while the design itself is painted with bee-weed (a plant) for the black. Each of the four eagle tails extends down over the shoulder and are surrounded by the bird wings.  The bowl was traditionally fired, so there are striking blushes on the surface.  Priscilla was known for her traditional designs along with the tightly painted designs.  The bowl is signed on the bottom “Priscilla Namingha Nampeyo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is nice to see such a large and classic designed piece of her work in the gallery!

$ 3,200.00

Nampeyo, Tonita – Jar with Double Hummingbirds

Tonita Nampeyo is a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and a granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano.  She is known for her traditional pottery using natural clay slips and bee-weed for the black.  This jar is a taller shape with a rounded shoulder that leads to the mouth of the piece.  On one side it is painted with a traditional style hummingbird with the red polished head and wings.  On the opposite side there is another hummingbird, but the body is painted with a series of smaller Hopi designs. There are sections which are polished red.  The lines on the jar are very delicately painted in Tonita’s famous thin lines.  It has also been traditionally fired, which gives the jar the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair but some fugitive slip in the black.

$ 800.00

Medina, Sofia – Jar with Four Birds and Rainbows (1980’s)

Sofia Medina was known for traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece was coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This is an exceptional piece of her pottery in both form and design.  The jar has a high shoulder and a slight neck. There are two large sections, etch with a bird and flower in the center.  Over each bird is a rainbow and cloud designs.  Note how the red and tan areas are stone polished.  Separating the larger medallions are two very intricate medallions.  They have cloud pattern and rain designs with the bird in the center.  The jar is very tightly painted. Did you know that Zia potters use basalt as their temper for the clay, which gives these pieces their stability but also weight.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the side, “Sofia Medina”.

$ 775.00

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Monday, May 21, 2018

Tafoya, LuAnn – Tall Jar with Cloud and Mountain Designs

This is a spectacular new jar by LuAnn Tafoya.  She is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her large, highly polished pottery.  The shape of this jar is one which has become a signature of LuAnn’s pottery over the years.  The wide shoulder has the carved designs.  On this piece the carving is varied around the entire pattern, with cloud, mountain and rain designs.  The carving is very sharp and the area behind is slipped with a cream colored clay slip in the traditional manner.  The jar itself is fully polished and fired a very deep red.  Note as well near the rim there is just a very small rain cloud which is etched into the clay slip!  The highly stone polished surface, the large size and the deep red coloration make this a visually stunning jar! It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  LuAnn continues to keep alive the traditional style of Santa Clara pottery in her techniques and designs.  Just like her mother, Margaret Tafoya, LuAnn won “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market for one of her large wide shoulder jars.

$ 7,000.00

Manymules, Samuel – Long Neck Jar with Sharp Melon Swirls

This water jar by Samuel Manymules  has a stunning coloration!  It is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The neck of the jar is plain and extends down to a sharp shoulder.  The rim is just slightly tuned out.  At the shoulder the ribs are pushed out in the clay and spiral around to the base.  They are each sharp on the edge.  The traditional firing has created strong colorations on the jar with areas from black to deep red.  They way they flow from the neck to the ribs is especially striking.   After the firing, the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,850.00

Manymules, Samuel  – Large Bowl with Flat Melon Ribs

This large bowl by Samuel Manymules.  It is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The melon ribs on the bowl are pushed out from the inside of the clay. On this piece, the ribs begin right at the  mouth of the piece and extend in a swirl to the base.  There are 12 ribs and they are widely spaced and the separating is a sharp edge.  The coloration from the firing ranges from tan to black to red.  Samuel said that the areas which turn tan are the ones where it reached the highest temperatures in the firing.   It is how Samuel places the jar in the firing and the smoke which determine how the colors will range from black to red.  The color changes as the jar is turned but in the photos you get a good sense of the color variations.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 2,250.00

Naranjo, Madeline – Water Jar with Bear Paws (1970’s)

Madeline Naranjo (b. 1916) was known for her deep carved pottery.  This smaller water jar has a double shoulder or “rainbow ridge”.  This is always technically a bit more difficult to make but the result creates an additional angle for the light to reflect off the piece.  The entire jar is fully polished, including into the mouth of the jar.  There are four bear paws impressed into the clay before it was polished. The bear paws are symbolic of a Santa Clara story which told of a bear which led the Pueblo people to water during a drought. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Madeline Naranjo” on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While Madeline no longer makes pottery, her work is certainly a classic and her legacy continues in the pottery of her granddaughter, Madeline E. Naranjo.

$ 500.00

Shupla, Helen – Melon Jar with 16 Ribs (1980’s)

Helen Shupla is certainly most famous for her exceptional melon jars.  Her melon jars are the very traditional form with the ribs pushed out in the clay.  This melon jar is one of her classic shapes with an elongated body showing the full length of each rib.  Each of the 16 ribs is pushed out into the clay.  She would do this by placing her fingers inside the bowl and pushing against the clay from both the inside and outside!  Can you see the slight angle to each section?  This is how she would turn her hand as she was pushing against the clay to create the separate ribs!  The entire piece is fully polished and fired black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Helen Shupla”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,600.00

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Sunday, May 20, 2018

Manymules, Samuel  – Small Sharp Melon Rib Swirl Jar

This is a distinctive shape by Samuel Manymules in a smaller form.  It is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar neck which is fully polished.  Right at the edge of the neck the jar begins the sharp melon ridges.  Each of the ten ribs is pushed out in the clay.  The are very sharp edged and swirl down to the base. The entire jar is fully polished and traditionally fired to create the coloration.  It is how Samuel places the jar in the firing and the smoke which determine how the colors will range from black to red.  The color changes as the jar is turned.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 900.00

Tenorio, Robert  – Large Jar with Hummingbirds

This is a striking large jar by Robert Tenorio.  The jar is painted with wild spinach (black) and red and copper colored clay slips.  Around the sloping neck of the jar is a feather pattern and one section with two hummingbirds.  Each bird is painted in an older style and one has a red clay slip for the body, while the other is more copper in color. Below the shoulder is a cloud pattern. The shape of the jar is classic with the wide shoulder and the sloping neck.  Look inside the jar and you can see a hand print impressed into the clay surrounded by a micaceous clay.  Note as well that the jar has a “spirit line” or a break in the painted line around the rim.  This goes back to historic Kewa pottery when the artist would use the spirit line to release their spirit or connection from the vessel.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Robert Tenorio, Kewa”.

$ 650.00

Manymules, Samuel  –  Jar with Wide Faceted Ribs

This jar by Samuel Manymules is an unusual shape for his pottery.  It is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar has a somewhat square mouth and four ribs which swirl from the neck to the base.  They are pushed out from the inside to create the sharp “edge” but the area separating them is flat.  This turns out to be a striking form as the flat sections have fired to deep colorations from brown black to deep red.  The entire jar is fully polished and traditionally fired to create the coloration.  It is how Samuel places the jar in the firing and the smoke which determine how the colors will range from black to red.  Interestingly, Samuel said that the areas which are tan are the ones which were fired the hottest! The color changes as the jar is turned but in the photos you get a good sense of the color variations.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 1,500.00

Tenorio, Robert  – Small Bowl with Bird Design

This is a smaller bowl by Robert Tenorio.  The bowl is painted with wild spinach (black) and red and copper colored clay slips.  Around the top of the bowl are two bird heads separated by bands of feathers.  Below the shoulder are cloud designs.  The beaks of the birds are painted with a copper micaceous clay.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Robert Tenorio, Kewa”.

$ 175.00

Tenorio, Robert  – Traditional Water Jar

This is a very classic jar by Robert Tenorio.  The jar is painted with wild spinach (black) and red clay slip.  The jar has a high shoulder and a turned out neck. The designs around the shoulder are plant patterns while around the neck are star designs.  Robert has taken inspiration from imagery seen on Santo Domingo pottery from the 1900’s and earlier.  Note as well that the jar has a “spirit line” or a break in the painted line around the rim.  This goes back to historic Kewa pottery when the artist would use the spirit line to release their spirit or connection from the vessel.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Robert Tenorio, Kewa”.

$ 300.00

Medina, Elizabeth & Marcellus – Jar with 12 Birds

Elizabeth Medina is known for traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece is coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This jar was made by Elizabeth and painted by her husband, Marcellus Medina.  The jar is wonderfully designed with twelve birds.  Each bird is different and some are flying, some running and some standing.  They are all painted in the very traditional style of Zia Pueblo.  The different colors are all different clay slips.  There is something both charming and whimsical about each of the birds! The jar is slipped and polished with a red clay slip on the side and signed, “Elizabeth + Marcellus Medina, Zia”.

$ 225.00

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Saturday, May 19, 2018

Lewis, Eric – Jar with Butterfly

This is a creative new jar by Eric Lewis. The jar is coil built and has a lower shoulder and a slight neck.  The design has a butterfly on one side.  The wings of the butterfly and the surrounding area are painted with bold lines in a very graphic manner.  The opposite side has stylized butterfly wings.  Eric has taken classic Acoma linear designs and made them both bolder and more graphic. The result is a striking jar with tightly painted imagery.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Eric Lewis”.   Eric remains one of the young Pueblo potters to watch!

$ 175.00

Garcia, Tammy – “Seeded Woman I” Bronze.  Ed. 35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is taken from a series of clay pieces which she made which were inspired by the paintings of Picasso.  The imagery is a Picasso-esqe woman sitting in a chair.  The piece has multiple layers and textures.  When asked about the name and the imagery, Tammy said:

“I thought about a definition of the word, “seed” which I had read.  It was, ‘A seed is the small, hard part of a plant from which a new plant grows’.  It made me think of women who came to the Southwest when the trains arrived in the 1880’s, or with the Fred Harvey Tours in the 1920’s.  They brought with them their past but became enamored with the Southwest or Native Culture. So on the bronze, the woman is sitting on a chair and the back of the chair is incised with Pueblo designs.  The side has areas which were inlaid hei-shi beads.  These women became the seeds of new interest in the area and culture. They spread this love of the Southwest just like a seed.  I called this, “Seeded Woman I”.  It is the first in this series to pay tribute to those how become aware of Native culture, respect it and spread their love of the art and artists to the world.”.

The piece has striking patinas to differentiate the various textures and depths of carving.  Much like her clay work, the piece is distinctive in style and yet very sharply defined.  This piece is 4/35 and it is signed and numbered on the bottom by Tammy Garcia. Simply a striking piece by one of today’s great potters with a lot of thought behind it!

$ 1,200.00

Garcia, Tammy – “Seeded Woman II” Bronze.  6/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is taken from a series of clay pieces which she made which were inspired by the paintings of Picasso.  The imagery is a Picasso-esqe woman sitting in a chair.  The piece has multiple layers and textures.  When asked about the name and the imagery, Tammy said:

“I thought about a definition of the word, “seed” which I had read.  It was, ‘A seed is the small, hard part of a plant from which a new plant grows’.  It made me think of women who came to the Southwest when the trains arrived in the 1880’s, or with the Fred Harvey Tours in the 1920’s.  They brought with them their past but became enamored with the Southwest or Native Culture. So on the bronze, the woman is sitting on a chair and the back of the chair is incised with Pueblo designs.  The chair itself is has a turquoise colored patina to represent the areas. The woman on one side has a hei-shi necklace and the other a turquoise colored necklace.  These are representative of how those who journeyed and continue to visit here have the culture become an integral part of their lives.  They have become seeds who spread their affection for the Southwest and Native art around the world.  I called this, “Seeded Woman II”.  It is the second in this series to pay tribute to those how become aware of Native culture, respect it and spread their love of the art and artists to the world.”.

The piece has striking patinas to differentiate the various textures and depths of carving.  Much like her clay work, the piece is distinctive in style and yet very sharply defined.  This piece is 6/35 and it is signed and numbered on the bottom by Tammy Garcia. Simply a striking piece by one of today’s great potters with a lot of thought behind it!

$ 1,200.00

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Friday, May 18, 2018

Blue Corn –  Bowl with Feather Design (1970’s)

Blue Corn is certainly one of the most creative potters of her time with a varied used of clays and firing techniques to create her distinctive pottery.  This is one of her distinctive red pieces. The bowl is fully polished red and has a feather pattern painted around the shoulder of the piece.  The jar is painted in a buff-on-red style. The highly polished red is in contrast to the matte painted surface.  The jar was traditionally fired to create the coloration.  The jar is signed in the clay on the bottom, “Blue Corn”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,050.00

Gutierrez, Lois  – Turtles & Avanyu Polychrome Water Jar

Lois Gutierrez is one of the few Santa Clara potters who continues to create traditional polychrome pottery.  Each of the various colors is derived from natural clay slips.  They are then painted onto the vessel and note that there are more than 3 different clay colors, which makes it “polychrome”. This jar is a classic water jar shape with a low shoulder and a slightly turned out neck.  The neck of the jar is fully painted with turtles surrounded by an avanyu and a rainbow design.  Check out the detail in the painted designs and I think I can count over six colors!  Separating the two sections with the turtles are elongated rain cloud and rain designs. Below the shoulder is a very traditional style representation of rain and rain clouds.  The jar is traditionally fired, which adds to the complexity of the overall process!  Note near the base it has been slipped with a deep red clay.  Interestingly, the deep red is not polished and so has some texture.  This harkens to early polychrome pottery when a band of red clay slip would be applied below the shoulder wit a textural feel.  The jar is signed on the bottom “Lois”.

 

$ 1,050.00

Kahe, Val – Seedpot with Shard Design

Val Kahe is a daughter of noted potter Gloria Kahe.  She is known for her intricately painted pottery.  This is one of her more complex designed seedpots. The top half has a series of pottery shards, which are inter-connected.  Most are painted with bee-weed (black) while some are polished a deep red and then painted with the black bee-weed.  Each of the red shards is a different bird or moth or flower or mosquito!  Check out the very fine lines used in her painting!  The seedpot has then been traditionally fired to create the fire clouds.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 875.00

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Thursday, May 17, 2018

Sanchez, Russell  – Gunmetal Bowl with Bear Lid

This is an exceptional gunmetal fired bowl by Russell Sanchez.  His recent work is a modern take on historic San Ildefonso pottery.  Let’s start out first with the firing, which is a true gunmetal.  It is fired longer and hotter than just a black piece, so that the surface has a very metallic appearance.  Russell is one of the only Pueblo potters working today who is able to achieve this with consistency!  The shape of the bowl is perfect for both the etched designs and the bear lid, with a graceful flow of form. The designs on the bowl are inspired by San Ildefonso designs from the 1920’s to 40’s.  The thin etched lines and the triangular shapes were all seen on pottery by Rosalie & Joe Aguilar, Susana Aguilar and Tonita Roybal.  They are perfectly etched into the clay before it was fired!  On the lid there is a checkerboard pattern and there are three strands of hemitite hei-shi beads, which also have a very metallic appearance.  The bowl is both historic and yet seems very modern and almost industrial.  As Russell has said he was told by older potters, “Take this and make it your own”, he has certainly followed that adage on this piece!  Note as well the shape of the bear, which has smaller feet and a more sculptural appearance as part of the lid. Finally, check out the inside of the bowl.  It was slipped with mica and so again, it ended up with a metallic gunmetal appearance. Wow!  A lot going on in one piece, that seems simple but there is a dynamic complexity inherent in the piece.  The bowl and lied are signed on the bottom in the clay.  Simply perfect!

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 7,000.00

Ortiz, Virgil – Tahu 1680 & Hummingbird 4 Tile Set

This is one of the few canteens that Virgil Ortiz makes each year.  The piece is coil built and painted with native clay slips and wild spinach (a plant) for the black.  The front of the canteen is painted with a very intricate version of Tahu, the Blind Archer in her 2180 version.  The story for this imagery from the Pueblo Revolt 1680/2180 series.  The back of the canteen has a hummingbird, which is symbolic for Virgil’s mother, Seferina Ortiz, who taught him to make pottery.  Note as well the “spirit line” which is a space in the painting on the rim.  The additional imagery with the swirls and spirals are the wildflower plants.  Virgil has also incorporated his signature “x”, which is the turkey track, onto the back of the canteen. Virgil made the leather strap.  The piece is signed on the back.  The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

$ 2,800.00

Martinez, Maria – Large Plate with San Ildefonso Birds (1920’s)

This is an extraordinary large plate by Maria Martinez and her husband, Julian.  Maria would make the pottery and Julian would paint the design.  The unique aspects of this piece are the size and the design.  Many of their early plates were under 12″ diameter, as they were less likely to break in the firing.  As well, this design is one which is an early pattern and one which was very rarely used in their pottery.  The design is a series of three San Ildefonso birds.  The heads are near the rim and the wings are extending backwards with the triangle in the center making up their legs.  However, as a whole pattern, it has a beautiful flow and dynamic appearance.  The “wings” on this piece are a design which in Richard Spivey’s book, “The Legacy of Maria Poveka Martinez”, it is identified as an “avanyu” (see last photo).  However, I spoke at length with a San Ildefonso potter about this particular design and he explained how it was a bird and that it is a design often seen around the Pueblo.  To have his input gives an important addition of cultural knowledge about these pieces!  As for the plate, it is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are some light surface scratches which are not unexpected in a piece from this time period.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Marie + Julian”.  In terms of the photos, I tried to take them at different angles and different lighting to reveal both design and condition.  The curve of the plate makes it difficult but I think if you view the various photos it is possible to have a good idea of the overall condition.   This is definitely one of those exciting pieces by Maria & Julian Martinez which rarely come around to the marketplace!

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 11,000.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Red & Black Bear with Checkerboard and Sun Design

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This bear is one of his classic shapes.  This bear is polished with a deep red clay slip.  The front has a sun pattern with a black mica clay line design in the center. The sun pattern is one that is inspired by the early pottery of Tonita Roybal.  The black of the bear has a black matte section along with a traditional San Ildefonso rain design.  The bear has a heartline which is etched into the clay.  The heartline which extends out from the mouth of the bear. The bear is a symbol of strength and the heartline is a traditional image used to symbolize the heart as the center of power in the animal.  The eyes are turquoise.  The bear is hollow as the piece is coil built.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 3,800.00

Tahbo, Mark  – Plate with Four Birds (2002)

This is an unusual plate by Mark Tahbo.  The plate is recessed with a small rim.  It is fully polished and the center is fully painted. The design has four Hopi birds encircling the piece.  The center square is slipped with the mauve clay he was using at this time. The square styling is similar to that used by Nampeyo of Hano in the painting on the top of her pottery.  Note on the birds and the delicately painted lines.  The plate was traditionally fired and has some great blushes on the surface.  It was painted with bee-weed (black) and then clay slips. The plate is signed on the back rim, “Mark Tahbo” and dated 2002.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,600.00

Medina, Elizabeth & Marcellus – Jar with Antelope, Deer and Lid

Elizabeth Medina is known for traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece is coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This jar was made by Elizabeth and painted by her husband, Marcellus Medina.  The jar is wonderfully designed with a traditional deer on one side and an antelope on the other.  The antelope is stone polished while the deer is matte.  The area between the animals very traditional old style Zia designs with cloud and plant designs.  Check out the wonderful curls and lines.  The lid is polished and there is a turtle.  The top of the turtle is painted with a bird design and flowers.  It is a wonderful combination of old style Zia designs.  The jar is signed on the side “Elizabeth + Marcellus Medina, Zia”.

$ 325.00

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Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Kasero, Sr., Robert – Wide Seedpot with Red & Black Op-Art Spiral

This is an intricately painted seedpot by Robert Kasero, Sr..  It is very thin walled and painted with an “op-art” style of spiral triangular mountain design.  It starts small at the top then enlarges as the shoulder and small again at the base.  It is dynamic in the flow of the tightly painted designs. Each of the triangles is either red, white, black or painted with a fine-line pattern.  Note how the base of the seedpot is also indented keeping in the style of historic Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom. 

$ 750.00

Sarracino, Myron – Jar with Plant and Mountain Designs

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. The imagery on much of his pottery is derived from pre-historic pottery designs. This jar has an elegant shape with the high shoulder and the sloping neck. The neck has a mountain and rain clouds.  The body of the jar is strikingly painted with large cloud swirls and rain designs. The thin lines are rain patterns.  Look near the base of the jar and the designs of a snail and its head in black are found!  The black and white coloration gives this jar both an ancient and very contemporary appearance.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece.  It is seen on much of the historic Acoma and Laguna pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 425.00

Estevan, Paula – Wide Basket Weave Design Jar

Paula Estevan is known for her jar is thin walled coil built pottery.  This jar is very tightly painted with an “op-art” basket pattern. The weave lines are in black and white and spiral around the surface of the jar.  The imagery goes from small at the rim to larger at the shoulder and then small again at the base. The jar has a wide shoulder and just a slight neck.  Paula has a wonderful ability to match the shape and designs of her work perfectly!  The jar is signed on the bottom, “P. Estevan”.

$ 650.00

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Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Sanchez, Russell  – Large Checkerboard Bowl with Bear Lid

This is an exceptionally designed bowl by Russell Sanchez.  His recent work is a modern take on historic San Ildefonso pottery.  The sound shape of the bowl is perfect for both the etched designs and the bear lid, with a graceful flow of form. The lower half of the bowl is fully polished with a black micaceous clay slip and then etched with a sun design.  The sun design in one that was a pattern often seen in the work of Tonita Royal. Note how the design is further highlighted with a matte red clay slip, which is applied before the bowl was fired!  However, it is the space from the shoulder to the neck which is the visually dynamic part of this bowl. Russell has etched a series of squares which alternate from a deep polished to matte.  The square spiral in towards the mouth of the bowl and each row is separated by a band of shell hei-shi beads.  The checkerboard pattern is a cornrow design, with the small dots representing the corn kernels.  The bear lid is also polished black and the small dots on the edge of the lid are a visual repetition of the dots on in the design on the bowl.  The shape of the bear is very sculptural and the elongated head seems to perfectly match the wide shape of the jar.  Of course, the final touch is the inside of the bear is slipped red!  Wow!  A lot going on in one piece, that seems simple but there is a dynamic complexity inherent in the piece.  The piece was traditionally fired outside and it is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Simply perfect!

“There is a huge change going on right now. People are rediscovering Pueblo pottery.  History has a lot to do with it. Every time I sell a pot, that’s what I talk about. It says something and it speaks. It’s true. The pots do speak to you, and you can feel the energy and what the pot is saying.” Russell Sanchez in “Spoken Through Clay”.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 9,200.00

Youngblood, Nancy – Large Box with Horses & Melon Rib Lid

It is not often that Nancy Youngblood finishes a box as complicated or as intricate as this piece!  Boxes are inherently difficult to make with chances that they will crack in the drying or firing stages.  As well, making a box at this size is even more difficult. The result, however, is spectacular. This box has four horses, one on each side.  Nancy won a  “Best of Show” award for one of her first large vessels with a horse on it a few years ago.  For this box, she has taken the horse concept and extrapolated it out onto the entire surface. Each horse is carved in a running position with tails and manes flying.  The muscles are rounded out giving each horse a more defined appearance.  Above each horse is a cloud and raindrops are also carved into the clay. It is the lid which actually ties this piece together.  The top is fully carved with melon ribs which create the “clouds” swirling above the horses. The ribs of the clouds connect to the clouds above the horses, adding another dimension to the box.  Finally, the surface has been polished with Nancy’s trademark high shine.  Using a stone, she polishes the surface to a glassy appearance.  Simply.  Stunning.  The interior and rim of the box are slipped with mica, which is a subtle addition to the piece.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  The final photo is of Nancy holding the box, just to give a sense of how big it really is!

 

$ 23,000.00

Naranjo, Johnathan – Wide Jar with Hopi Maidens

This jar by Johnathan Naranjo captures his unique style of sgraffito and etching on his pottery.  The jar is fully polished and the neck is matte in the shape of the kiva steps.  The various colors are simply created by the depth of the etching into the clay!   Jonathan continues to amaze with this designs and technique.  Around the top of the shoulder are bricks, alternating between polished and matte red.  Around the shoulder are a variety of scenes.  One has three Hopi maidens, each very realistically etched into the clay.  As the jar is turned there are rain and cloud designs. There is then a scene with three Hopi girls standing by a kiva with the ladder and there are two pieces of pottery also etched into the clay.  Check out the detail!! These is evocative of the photography of Edward Curtis.  Finally, Johnathan has carved a wood ladder meant to represent the Kiva ladders, which he has placed in the bowl.  It creates a wonderful addition to the overall piece.  The bottom of the bowl is fully polished and the piece has been traditionally fired brown.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Johnathan has won numerous awards for his pottery and  Johnathan is definitely one of the young potters to watch!

$ 2,200.00

Estevan, Paula – Wide Jar with Star Pattern

Paula Estevan is known for her jar is thin walled coil built pottery.  This jar is very tightly painted with an “op-art” star pattern.  Each of the stars is an “x” in white.  They spiral out around the jar from the neck to the base.  It is a visually stunning design!   The imagery goes from small at the rim to larger at the shoulder and then small again at the base. The jar has a wide shoulder and just a slight neck.  Paula has a wonderful ability to match the shape and designs of her work perfectly!  The jar is signed on the bottom, “P. Estevan”.

$ 650.00

Estevan, Paula – Jar with Butterfly Design

Paula Estevan is known for her jar is thin walled coil built pottery.  This jar is very tightly painted with an “op-art” butterfly pattern.  Each of the butterflies is an “x” in white.  They spiral out around the jar from the neck to the base.  The imagery goes from small at the rim to larger at the shoulder and then small again at the base. The jar has a high shoulder and just a slight neck.  Paula has a wonderful ability to match the shape and designs of her work perfectly!  The jar is signed on the bottom, “P. Estevan”.

$ 425.00

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Monday, May 14, 2018

Moquino, Jennifer Tafoya – Jar with Nine Quail

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and exceptional realistic animals. This jar is coil built and fully polished.  It is a wonderful shape which is square on the sides and VERY flat on the top. Technically that is always difficult to achieve with native clay. The flat area has nine quail etched into the clay.  Each one is in a different state of standing or flying.  Note the area behind where she has etched some very intricate plants and agave!  Towards the rim is a micaceous clay slip and the designs on the edge are reminiscent of those by her father, Ray Tafoya.  The bottom is also fully polished.  All the colors are all from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 1,500.00

Naranjo, Johnathan – Seedpot with Avanyu

Johnathan Naranjo is on the creative young innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This seedpot is fully polished and etched just into the top layer of the polished surface! That creates the reddish-brown coloration of the design. The design in the negative space is an avanyu (water serpent) which then encircles the seedpot.  The designs surorunding the polished avanyu are etched into the clay.  There are cloud, pueblo, flower and finally corn designs.  While it is a small piece, there is a wonderful creativity of using the negative space for the main design and surrounding it with other classic imagery! The coloration of the bowl is derived from the firing technique.  Johnathan has won numerous awards for his pottery and  Johnathan is definitely one of the young potters to watch!

$ 400.00

Holt, Lisa & Harlan Reano – Jar with Wild Spinach Plant Designs

Lisa Holt and Harlan Reano make an amazing team, working to create innovative pottery using traditional techniques.  Lisa makes the pottery and it is painted by Harlan.  Each piece is painted with native clays (red, white) while the black is wild spinach (a plant).  They are also traditionally fired.  This water jar is an elegant shape with the high shoulder and elongated neck.  The piece is fully painted with a very complex and elaborate design!  The imagery is based on the wild spinach plant, used for the black paint on the pottery.  This plant design can be see around the shoulder and near the base of the jar.  There are additional plant and lightning motifs around the surface.  It’s exciting to see such a fully designed jar and with such amazing intricacy of patterns! Lisa and Harlan have won numerous awards over the years.  This jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 3,400.00

Duwyenie, Debra – Seedpot with Sunface & Hummingbirds

This seedpot was made, polished and incised by Debra Duwyenie.  The design has a sunface on one side.  It is surrounded by hummingbirds, butterflies and flowers.  All the design work is etched into the seedpot before it is fired!  Few potters take the risk to etch their pieces before they are fired.  However, note the background gray area of her design and the vertical lines etched into the clay.  After the piece was fired, Debra “two-toned” it so that it is black and sienna.  The colors vary across the surface of the piece. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Debra”.

$ 800.00

Duwyenie, Debra – Seedpot with Seven Turtles

Debra Duwyenie is well known for her wonderful miniatures and incised designs. Each piece is stone polished and then it is etched before it is fired! This seedpot has seven turtles encircling the piece.  Each of them has a different design etched onto its back.  The turtles are surrounded by stars and in the center is a flower pattern.  Each of the larger turtles has a different design etched into its shell.  The one with the wavy lines is the “shifting sand” design and it is meant to represent her husband, Preston Duwyenie.  After the piece is fired black it is “two-toned” sienna in areas. Debra also pays close attention to the little details like the gray background area and how evenly she etches the vertical lines.  The seedpot is signed, “Debra” on the bottom in the clay.

$ 700.00

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Sunday, May 13, 2018

Sarracino, Myron – Four Color Lightning Jar

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. The imagery on much of his pottery is derived from pre-historic pottery designs. This jar has a high shoulder and a more classic “olla” shape. There are three bands of lightning pattern around the neck, shoulder and base.  Separating them are bands of alternating colors (orange, red, white and black).  The colors are from various clay slips.  It is exciting to see him add additional colorations to his pottery.   Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 375.00

Tenorio, Robert  – Large Jar with Mountain Lions & Antelope Scene

This is a wonderfully painted, rather whimsical jar by Robert Tenorio. The jar has a very round shape and a slight neck.  It has a cloud pattern around the neck and a mountain design just on the shoulder.  Note how he used the micaceous clay to paint the rising sun!  Around the body of the jar various animals which are painted with wild spinach (black) and red and copper colored clay slips.  There is are two mountain lions and a family of antelope.  There is something feels very “old style” about the animals, but also something about their interaction which makes you smile!  The jar has a “spirit line” or a break in the painted line around the rim.  This goes back to historic Kewa pottery when the artist would use the spirit line to release their spirit or connection from the vessel.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Robert Tenorio, Kewa”.

$ 700.00

Spencer, Lorenzo – Bowl with Bird Designs

Lorenzo Spencer is one of the few Navajo males potters.  He learned to make pottery from his mother-in-law, Rose Williams.  This bowl is coil built and stone polished.  The design of a bird is etched into the clay. Notice the precision of the design and there is a wonderful texture to the stippled area around the birds.  The bowl itself has a square opening and it has been traditionally fired.  After the firing it was covered in pine pitch, in the manner of historic Navajo pottery.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “LS”.

$ 150.00

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Saturday, May 12, 2018

Lewis, Lucy – Jar with Fineline Interlocking Star Pattern

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the 1900’s.  She was an important revivalist of Acoma pottery throughout her career. This jar is coil built and painted with a fine-line star pattern.  Each of the stars is painted to interlock with the one next to it.  Lucy would paint her pieces with bee-weed for the black and each piece was traditionally fired outdoors.  This bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.

$ 750.00

Lucario, Rebecca – Fine-Line and Snow Pattern Jar

This is a very intricately painted jar by Rebecca Lucario.  She is known for her delicate and very finely painted pottery.  This jar is a more classic Acoma shape with the high shoulder.  The entire surface is fully painted with small diamond shapes.  Each diamond shape is then designed in series of four, to create a larger design!  Each of the four are either painted with fine-lines or with a checkerboard pattern.  Note at the top and bottom there are a row where each is painted with an additional deep red clay! The base has a orange-red clay slip.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “R Lucario”.

$ 850.00

Lewis, Lucy – Jar with Rain and Lightning Designs

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the 1900’s. This jar is taller in shape with around shoulder.  The designs are all derived from classic Acoma imagery. There are lighting and rain patterns around the shoulder. The neck has a cloud design and near the base, in red, are birds.  It is a very fully designed piece of her pottery!  It has been native fired and has a beautiful coloration to the white clay slip.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.  The black for the design is derived from bee-weed, which is a local plant. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is a very slight lean to the shape.

$ 850.00

Arthur Lopez – “Maria-Posa” Wood Carving

Arthur Lopez is one of the leading santos carvers in New Mexico.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and watercolor pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.   These are the time involved and historic foundations for his work.  This piece is entitled, “Maria-Posa”.   It is a fun play on  the Spanish words for Mary and Butterfly.  Arthur says of this piece:

“It is a piece is about hope that links several old and recognized symbols of the Mexican people. The monarch butterfly leaves Mexico in the spring, migrates to North America and returns to Mexico in the winter, in a near-miraculous cycle that each year spans the lives of several generations of monarchs that normally live less than two months. Guadalupe, the sacred mother Mary who appeared to San Juan Diego in 1531, is the patron saint of the Americas. The piece represents the potential for transformation in all of us and serves as a symbol of our past, our faith and the hope for rebirth in a better future.”

Arthur’s work is found in numerous museum and public collections, including Albuquerque Museum of Art & History,  Denver Art Museum,  Freedom Museum (911 Memorial at Ground Zero), Harwood Museum of Art, Museum of International Folk Art,  Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, and the State of New Mexico Permanent Art Collection.

$ 3,600.00

Arthur Lopez – “Alma Del Maria” Wood Santos Carving

Arthur Lopez is one of the leading santos carvers in New Mexico.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and watercolor pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.   These are the time involved and historic foundations for his work.  This piece is entitled, “Alma de Maria”.   Arthur says of this piece:

“Alma de Maria”  is an allegorical variant of the Immaculate Conception, it represents the descent of the Holy Spirit (Dove) upon Mary and the Announcement of the Incarnation. She wears a crown of roses to symbolize her purity and exemption from the sins of the world. The baby birds in a nest made in the form of a crown of thorns represent innocence at birth and Jesus death for our sins. “If you come across a bird’s nest in any tree or on the ground, with young ones or eggs and the mother sitting on the young or on the eggs, you shall not take the mother with the young. You shall let the mother go, but the young you may take for yourself, that it may go well with you, and that you may live long. – Deuteronomy 22:6-7″

Arthur’s work is found in numerous museum and public collections, including Albuquerque Museum of Art & History,  Denver Art Museum,  Freedom Museum (911 Memorial at Ground Zero), Harwood Museum of Art, Museum of International Folk Art,  Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, and the State of New Mexico Permanent Art Collection.

 

$ 4,800.00

Arthur Lopez – “Saint Inez del Campo” Santos Wood Carving

Arthur Lopez is one of the leading santos carvers in New Mexico.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and watercolor pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.   These are the time involved and historic foundations for his work.  This piece is entitled,  Santa Inez del Campo”  Arthur says of this piece:

“Saint Agnes is also known as Agnes of Rome, Ines, Inez del Campo, and Ynez.  The name “Agnes” is similar to the Latin word agnus, which means “lamb”.  For this reason depictions of Saint Agnes often include a lamb.  The name actually comes from a Greek word which means “chaste, pure, sacred”.  Agnes is one of the “virgin martyrs” of the church of Rome.  She is one of seven women, in addition to the Blessed Virgin Mary, who are mentioned in the Roman Canon of the Mass (Eucharistic Prayer I). Saints Felicity, Perpetua, Agatha,  Lucy, Cecilia, and Anastasia  are the other six.  Agnes is a patron saint of chastity, gardeners, girls, Girl Scouts, engaged couples and victims of rape.”

Arthur’s work is found in numerous museum and public collections, including Albuquerque Museum of Art & History,  Denver Art Museum,  Freedom Museum (911 Memorial at Ground Zero), Harwood Museum of Art, Museum of International Folk Art,  Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, and the State of New Mexico Permanent Art Collection.

 

$ 4,800.00

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Friday, May 11, 2018

Baca, Angela – Melon Jar with 24 Ribs

Angela Baca was famous throughout her career for her melon ribbed pottery.  The form is derived from the melon and squash grown in the area and so there is always an organic style to the shape.  This piece is more of a jar, with a slight neck. The jar has 24 carved ribs and the entire surface is fully polished, even between the ribs!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Angela Baca” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 575.00

Baca, Angela – Miniature Melon Bowl

This is one of the smallest melon bowl by Angela Baca we have seen!  There are 16 melon ribs, and each is carved into the clay and then individually stone polished.  On this bowl, even the space between the ribs is left matte for a visual contrast to the deeply carved ribs.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Angela Baca” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00

Martinez, Maria  – Jar with Feather Design (Maria + Santana, 1954-6)

This large jar by Maria Martinez is one of her classic pieces in both shape and design.  It was made by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana Martinez (the wife of Adam Martinez, Maria’s son).  It is very highly polished and has a glassy surface.  The design is a feather pattern which encircles the shoulder of the jar.  Above the feather pattern is a cloud design. The deep black firing and the tightly painted designs using the matte clay work perfectly together.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria + Santana”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic!

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 4,200.00

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Thursday, May 10, 2018

Naha, Rainy – Jar with Eagle Tail Designs

Rainy Naha learned to make pottery from her mother, Helen “Featherwoman” Naha.  Rainy continues is a similar style using a white clay slip as the foundation for her work.  This jar is thin walled and very detailed in the painted designs.  Here, the eagle tail extends out from the mouth of the bowl.  The wide bands are the tail feathers of the bird while the circular extensions on both sides are the wings.  Each of the tails are composed of various Hopi designs.  Note how Rainy has used over four different clay colors to achieve the dynamic appearance of the designs!  Few potters spend the time to seek out so many colors and few are able to use them with such skill!  Rainy uses natural clay slips (bee-weed for the black) and a white kaolin clay.  Each of her pieces is also traditionally fired which gives the white a very pearlescent appearance.  It is signed on the bottom with a feather and “Rainy”.

$ 1,100.00

Maho, Garrett –  Bowl with Raven Design

Garrett Maho is known for his traditional and innovative Hopi-Tewa pottery.  This bowl has an unusual raven design.  There are two of the birds and they are painted on both sides of the piece. The deep red is an additional clay slip while the black is painted with bee-weed (a plant).  The bowl has been traditionally fired so that there are blushes on the surface.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 650.00

Sahmie Nampeyo, Rachel – Triple Lobe Jar

Rachel Sahmie is a daughter of noted potter Priscilla Nampeyo and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano.  She is a sister of noted potters Jean Sahmie and Bonnie Sahmie.  This is a fascinating piece, as there are three “lobes” to the piece, which technically is difficult to create.  It is almost as if there are three pots place one on another!  The bottom section has an eagle tail design.  The center section has a bird wing pattern and the top has stars.  The jar is painted with bee-weed (black) and slipped with a polished red clay to accent the designs.  It has been traditionally fired which creates the blush on the surface.  The jar is signed on the bottom with her name (hallmark) “RS”.

 

$ 600.00

Gutierrez, Lois  – Water Jar with Hummingbirds

Lois Gutierrez is one of the few potters who continues to create polychrome pottery at Santa Clara.  Polychrome, or more than three different colors of clay slips, are all painted onto the surface of the vessel before it is fired. This water jar is smaller in size and yet very thin walled.  The jar has a sharp shoulder and then it dips down before rising up to the rim.  Around the neck of the jar, there are two hummingbirds and flowers painted onto the surface.  Below the shoulder are cloud and plant designs.  All the colors are derived from natural clay slips.  The base of the jar is indented, which is reminiscent of the historic Santa Clara water jars which were carried on the head.  This jar has over five different natural clay colors utilized.  This is certainly a classic piece of Lois’s pottery which combines a cultural legacy in design with one in clay.

 

ois Gutierrez is one of the few potters who continues to create polychrome pottery at Santa Clara.  Polychrome, or more than three different colors of clay slips, are all painted onto the surface of the vessel before it is fired. This water jar has a wonderful shape with very round body and elongated neck.  The design around the neck is a feather pattern.  Note the use of the three different colors of clay for the tip of the feather in contrast to the white feathers.  The body of the jar has two intertwined water serpents. Note the use of classic rain and seed patterns in the bodies of each avanyu.  Above them is a rain cloud design. What makes them the “old style” avanyu?  Check out the shape of the horn and the shape of the tongue.  They each have the three prong style, and this is similar to the very early historic style of avany painted on the pottery!   The base of the jar is indented, which is reminiscent of the historic Santa Clara water jars which were carried on the head.  This jar has over five different natural clay colors utilized.  This is certainly a classic piece of Lois’s pottery which combines a cultural legacy in design with one in clay.

 

$ 400.00

Tenorio, Robert  – Open Bowl with Flowers (1980)

This is an open bowl by Robert Tenorio. The bowl is painted on the outside with a classic Santo Domingo (Kewa) design.  The inside has three flowers. They are each connected and the leaves have a rain design.  The background is fully painted black, giving the bowl a negative space appearance.   The bowl also has a “spirit line” or a break in the painted line around the rim.  This goes back to historic Kewa pottery when the artist would use the spirit line to release their spirit or connection from the vessel.   The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It has an interesting provenance, as it comes to us from the collection of Richard Spivey, known for his books on Maria Martinez.  The bowl was made as a Christmas gift to Richard and his wife in 1980.  In the clay on the bottom it says, “To Mr. & Mrs. R. Spivey.  May our friendship float on by spirit as well as by heart.  Robert Tenorio”.  Beautiful.

$ 200.00

Nampeyo, Adelle L. –  Bowl with Bat Wing Design Bowl

Adelle Lalo Nampeyo is known for her stylistic use of traditional Hopi designs.  This bowl is a traditional shape and painted with the classic batwing pattern, made famous by Nampeyo of Hano.  The opening is slipped red and the remainder is painted with intricate lines.  The bowl is traditionally fired to create the coloration on the surface of the jar.  The coloration works beautifully with this piece with shades from white to orange.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 115.00

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Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Sahmie, Ida – Mini “Day Chant” Bowl

This is an amazingly intricate miniature by Ida Sahmie.  It is the Day Chant Dance with eight male Yei-bi-chi dancers encircling the jar.  The background area is fully polished the natural color of the clay.  In the background, there are the mesas, clouds, and even birds!  Note how she has also painted the shadows of each dancer extending to the base of the bowl.  Ida also incises into the clay for the faces and the bodies, leather and masks.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ida Sahmie”.

$ 350.00

Sahmie, Ida – Mini “Night Chant” Bowl

This is an amazingly intricate miniature by Ida Sahmie.  It is the Night Chant Dance with eight male Yei-bi-chi dancers encircling the jar.  The background area is fully painted with bee-weed (a plant) to make it black.  In the background there are the mesas and a fire in the “center”.  This is her attempt to create a “3D” story on the vessel!  Ida also incises into the clay for the faces and the bodies, leather and masks.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ida Sahmie”.

$ 350.00

Sahmie, Ida – “Father Sky” Tile

This is a very traditionally inspired tile by Ida Sahmie.  It is “Father Sky”, which is a design often seen in sandpaintings.  Here, Ida has painted it on a stone polished tile using natural clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  Father Sky is in the center with the cosmos painted on the body.  Surrounding the figure is a rainbow design.  Note how areas are etched into the clay, as well as painted!  Tthe tile was traditionally fired and it is signed on the back, “Ida Sahmie”.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.   The story of Father Sky and Mother Earth, and the Dine people is as follows:

“The Navajo people, the Diné, passed through three different worlds before emerging into this world, The Fourth World, or Glittering World. The Diné believe there are two classes of beings: the Earth People and the Holy People. The Holy People are believed to have the power to aid or harm the Earth People. Since Earth People of the Diné are an integral part of the universe, they must do everything they can to maintain harmony or balance on Mother Earth.  It is believed that centuries ago the Holy People taught the Diné how to live the right way and to conduct their many acts of everyday life. They were taught to live in harmony with Mother Earth, Father Sky and the many other elements such as man, animals, plants, and insects.”

$ 220.00

Sahmie, Ida – “Day Chant” Tile

This is an exceptionally complex tile by Ida Sahmie.  It is the Day Chant Dance with seven male Yei-bi-chi dancers in a line.  They are painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.    The background area is fully polished the natural color of the clay.  In the background, there are the mesas, clouds, and even birds!  Note how she has also painted the shadows of each dancer extending to the bottom of the tile.  Ida also incises into the clay for the faces and the bodies, leather and masks.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Ida Sahmie”.

$ 220.00

Sahmie, Ida – “Night Chant” Tile

This is an amazingly complex tile by Ida Sahmie.  It is the Night Chant Dance with seven male Yei-bi-chi dancers in a row.  The background area is fully painted with bee-weed (a plant) to make it black.  In the background there are the mesas and a fire in the “center”.  This is her attempt to create a “3D” story on the tile!  Ida also incises into the clay for the faces and the bodies, leather, and masks.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ida Sahmie”.  It is traditionally fired and painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (the black).

$ 220.00

Sahmie, Ida – “Mother Earth” Tile

This is a very traditionally inspired tile by Ida Sahmie.  It is “Mother Earth”, which is a design often seen in sandpaintings.  Here, Ida has painted it on a stone polished tile using natural clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  Mother Earth is in the center with the four sacred plants and other imagery painted on the polished red surface.  The face is etched, as are the sides of the tile in the center area.  The tile was traditionally fired and it is signed on the back, “Ida Sahmie”.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.   The story of Father Sky and Mother Earth, and the Dine people is as follows:

“The Navajo people, the Diné, passed through three different worlds before emerging into this world, The Fourth World, or Glittering World. The Diné believe there are two classes of beings: the Earth People and the Holy People. The Holy People are believed to have the power to aid or harm the Earth People. Since Earth People of the Diné are an integral part of the universe, they must do everything they can to maintain harmony or balance on Mother Earth.  It is believed that centuries ago the Holy People taught the Diné how to live the right way and to conduct their many acts of everyday life. They were taught to live in harmony with Mother Earth, Father Sky and the many other elements such as man, animals, plants, and insects.”

“The Navajo people, the Diné, passed through three different worlds before emerging into this world, The Fourth World, or Glittering World. The Diné believe there are two classes of beings: the Earth People and the Holy People. The Holy People are believed to have the power to aid or harm the Earth People. Since Earth People of the Diné are an integral part of the universe, they must do everything they can to maintain harmony or balance on Mother Earth.  It is believed that centuries ago the Holy People taught the Diné how to live the right way and to conduct their many acts of everyday life. They were taught to live in harmony with Mother Earth, Father Sky and the many other elements such as man, animals, plants, and insects.”

$ 220.00

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Tuesday, May 8, 2018

Coriz, Arthur & Hilda  – Large Bowl with Plant Designs (1980’s)

This is very large bowl by Arthur and Hilda Coriz.  Hilda would coil build each piece and then they would be painted by Arthur. The painting was done with natural clay slips (white and red) and then wild spinach (black).  This striking large jar is painted with a classic Kewa (Santo Domingo) plant design encircling the piece.  Arthur alternated the direction the plants, giving the jar a more dramatic appearance.  The lower section is polished red and note on the base that the initial coils seem visible.  There is a “spirit line” or break in the painted design on the rim, which then extends down through the entire design!  This goes back to historic Kewa pottery when the artist would use the spirit line to release their spirit or connection from the vessel.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay. The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is not often that we see their pottery and especially with the use of such classic designs!

 

$ 1,850.00

Williams, Lorraine – Large Storage Jar with Eight Yei Figures

This is an exceptional very large storage jar by Lorraine Williams.  While she no longer makes pieces this size, the shape and scale of this piece is exceptional!  The jar has flat sides and a sharp shoulder leading up to the neck.  The sides are incised with eight Yei figures.  They are then painted with clay slips. The shoulder has an additional Yei figure which encircles the piece. The neck has a basket design and there is an additional mountain design above and below the Yei figures.  The jar has been traditionally fired, which creates the variations in color. Interestingly, these large pieces are fired upside down!  After the firing, it is covered in pine pitch, which is typical of all traditional Navajo pottery harkening back to when it was utilitarian.  Lorraine has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “A Legacy of Generations”.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “LW”.    It is not often that we see such important piece of her pottery come back onto the market at this size, but it is definitely an extraordinary jar!

$ 1,800.00

Zane Smith, Jamie – Very Large Corrugated “Basket” Jar

Jamie Zane Smith learned to make pottery from his uncle, Richard Zane Smith.  He creates dynamic pieces which combine strong forms with stamped surface designs. This striking jar is made with Oklahoma clay and coil built.  The large jar is “corrugated” which simply means that it is coil built and the coils are left exposed on the outside of the jar!  It is these VERY small coils which undulate back and forth to create the texture of the piece. Areas of the jar are incised to created additional designs.  The colorations are various clay slips which give the jar it’s distinctive coloring and shading.  Take a closer look at the jar and check out how many coils it took to make a piece this large! Amazing!  Then the rim is also fully polished and slightly incised, to give it the appearance of leather around the top of the piece. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “JZS”.  Jamie also made a wood base for the jar to sit on.  While it can stand on its own, it does appear much more dramatic in the wood base.  Jamie brings together a multitude of dimensions in his work blending the historic past with his modern visions.  Jamie remains one of the young creative potters bringing life to the clay in an area outside the southwest.

$ 1,500.00

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Monday, May 7, 2018

Sahmie, Jean – Jar with Pottery Shard Base

Jean Sahmie is a daughter of noted potter Priscilla Nampeyo and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano. This jar has a wind pattern painted around the shoulder.  Below the shoulder is a complex shard design.  Each of the sections has a different design and they are painted with bee-weed for the black and two different clay slips.  The red slip is polished and the burgundy is matte.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom with her hallmark and a corn plant (for Corn Clan).  While Jean no longer makes pottery, there is a wonderful creativity in each of her pieces!

$ 500.00

Nampeyo, Iris – Bowl with Corn Design

Iris Nampeyo is a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and a well known for her elegant asymmetrical vessels with corn as part of the design in relief.  Iris began using the corn in relief on the surface of her pottery in the early 1980’s. The corn is symbolic of being part of the Corn Clan.  The surface of the bowl is stone polished and the corn on the front is in applique relief.  The husk of the corn is sharp and the matte area extends around the corn.  This jar was made with the red Hopi clay, giving it this distinctive coloration.  There are slight blushes to the clay which can be seen in the surface.   The matte areas are in contrast to the remainder of the piece which is polished.  The opening is asymmetrical which is in keeping with the organic style of the form.  There is a simplicity and elegance in her pottery.  While she no longer makes pottery, her vessels remain classic.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00

Sahmie, Jean – Large Bowl with 16 Flute Players

Jean Sahmie is a daughter of noted potter Priscilla Nampeyo and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano. This large bowl is fully vertically polished and painted with bee-weed (a plant)f or the black.  The vertical polish harkens to historic pottery which had this “onion skin” type of polished surface.  There are sixteen flute players encircling the bowl.  Each is painted with lines of rain separating them.  The bowl has been traditionally fired and it has some striking blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom, “Jean Sahme”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While Jean no longer makes pottery, there is a wonderful creativity in each of her pieces!

 

$ 800.00

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Sunday, May 6, 2018

Crank, Susie – Tall Water Jar

Susie Crank is a daughter of Rose Williams and a sister of Alice Cling.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and amazingly, she says he may burnish a piece over and over as many as 15 times to get a high shine!  This tall jar is an elegant shape with a high shoulder and an elongated neck. The jar is highly polished and then traditionally fired to create the fireclouds on the surface.  The colorations on this jar range from black to a deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery water proof.  Today, the pine pitch seals the vessel and gives it the shine.  This jar has a stunning shine and a great feel to the surface!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Susie Crank”.

$ 385.00

Manygoats, Betty –  Wedding Vase with 17 Horned Lizards

Betty Manygoats is known for distinctive Dine (Navajo) pottery with it’s “folk art” feel to the designs.  Around 1978 she began using the horned lizard as a design on her pottery.  The scales on the lizards are created using a bobby pin!  This wedding vase is her own signature shape with the high spouts. There are 17 horned lizards, each one seeming to scale the sides of the vessel!  The piece has been traditionally fired and there are some beautiful color variations from the heat of the fire!  After the vase is fired, it is covered in pine pitch in the manner of traditional Navajo pottery.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “BM.”  Betty has won numerous awards for her pottery over the years.  It can also be found in museums throughout the southwest.

$ 145.00

Williams, Lorraine – Long Neck Jar with Yei Figures & Rug Designs

This is a classic long neck jar by Lorraine Williams.  She married George Williams in 1977.  George is the son of Rose Williams, one of the best-known Navajo potters. Lorraine was adept at making beads and sand paintings, and she was a weaver. “But when I married George I saw pottery with new eyes.” Her new eyes led to Lorraine’s beginning with clay about 1980. Ultimately, Lorraine would make the largest pots produced at Navajo today.  This tall jar is fully designed with a rug pattern on two of the sides and Yei figures on the other two sides.  The various colors are added to the piece before the firing.  The jar is traditionally fired and then after the firing, it is covered in pine pitch, which is typical of all traditional Navajo pottery harkening back to when it was utilitarian.  Lorraine has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “A Legacy of Generations”.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “LW”.

$ 350.00

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Saturday, May 5, 2018

Vigil, Albert & Josephine – Jar with Feather Pattern (1970’s)

Albert and Josephine Vigil worked together on their pottery. Albert Vigil (1927-2009) was the son of painter Romando Vigil, one of the members of the San Ildefonso School of watercolor artists.  He as also a nephew of Maria Martinez. His wife was Josephine Cordova Vigil (1927-2001) from Taos Pueblo. She moved to San Ildefonso when she married Albert. Josephine learned pottery making by watching her aunts-in-law Maria Martinez and Clara Montoya. Maria taught her how to shape the clay and Clara taught her how to polish.  They began making pottery in 1945.  This  This is a larger piece of their pottery with a wide shoulder and an elongated neck. The jar is painted with a feather pattern which extends down from the neck to the shoulder.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Albert + Josephine”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair

 

$ 875.00

Dunlap, Carmelita – Wide Shoulder Jar with Rain Patterns (1980’s)

Carmelita Dunlap is one of the San Ildefono potters best known for her large vessels.  This jar is more of a medium size for her work, yet it captures much of her creativity in form and design.  The jar is fully polished and it is fully painted above the shoulder.  The design is a rain, cloud and lightning design which encircles the jar.  What is interesting is the delicate lines used for painting the pattern.  As well, the polishing itself becomes an interesting visual part of this piece.  Below the jar it is fully polished in a vertical manner, which creates an older style “onion skin” appearance to the surface.  The jar is fired a black-brown color.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Carmelita Dunlap”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. 

$ 950.00

Melchor, Santana – Wide Bowl with Birds (1970’s)

Santana Melchor was one of the great potters from Santo Domingo throughout the 1900’s.  In 1974 she was part of the delegation of Pueblo potters who visited the White House as a guest of first lady Pat Nixon.  This bowl is a very classic piece of her pottery.  It is fully polished red on the inside and the base.  The body is slipped with a white clay and then painted with the black wild spinach plant. The design has two different Santo Domingo style birds, along with plant designs.  Note the firm lines int he painting!  There is also a spirit line painted on the rim.  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Santana Melchor”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 650.00

Crank, Susie – Wide Jar with Fireclouds

Susie Crank is a daughter of Rose Williams and a sister of Alice Cling.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and amazingly, she says he may burnish a piece over and over as many as 15 times to get a high shine!  This wide jar is an elegant shape with just a slight neck. The jar is highly polished and then traditionally fired to create the fire-clouds on the surface.  The colorations on this jar range from black to a deep red.  Check out the variation “design” created by the smoke on the clay!  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  Today, the pine pitch seals the vessel and gives it the shine.  This jar has a stunning shine and a great feel to the surface!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Susie Crank”.

$ 285.00

Cling, Alice –  Tall Jar with Incised Rain Design

This jar by Alice Cling is a very classic Navajo shape with the high shoulder and the elongated neck.  The jar has a raised “braid” encircling the piece.  It is incised with rain and mountain designs. There is one small “gap” in the design, which is the “spirit line”.  The jar is traditionally fired and there are beautiful colorations from deep black to dark red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alice Cling”.  Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”  She remains one of the great names in the revival of Navajo pottery in the 1980’s

$ 350.00

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Friday, May 4, 2018

Cerno, Joseph  – Four Color Water Jar with Acoma Birds (2004)

Joseph Cerno are known for his large coil built vessels.  While he usually works with his wife Barbara, this is one of the piece he made and painted on his own.  The jar is coil built and it is a classic water jar shape with the high shoulder and short neck. The design is a rainbow patterns which encircles the jar.  There are two bands, each in a different color of clay. Speaking of which, the jar is a “four color” which means that there are four different colors of clay used on the piece. There is a dark red, orange, brown and white (along with the black, which is not a clay, but vegetal).  Interestingly, the four color Acoma jars died out after the early 1900’s and were only revived in the 1970’s  Both Rick Dilingham and Richard Spivey claim part of the credit of reviving this unique coloration!  Back to this jar, as there are two birds below the rainbow band and two above.  They are each holding plants or berries.  They are surrounded by black painted rain and plant designs.  Note the very thin lines used for painting throughout the jar.  One would think the four-colors makes this unusual, but it is actually that the jar has been traditionally fired!  The photo inside the jar shows some of the discoloration from the outdoor firing and the jar itself has a stunning color. The white is more pearlescent and the colors have more depth from this type of firing as opposed to the electric kiln.  The jar has an indented bottom, which again harkens back to the Acoma pottery of the late 1800’s. The jar is signed on the bottom “Jospeh Cerno” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is certainly a wonderful contemporary Acoma vessel with a dramatic use of revivalist designs and techniques.

$ 1,200.00

Quotskuyva, Dextra – “Bird Wings” Jar (1984), Painted Perfection p. 75

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This is an earlier jar from 1984.  It is painted with a very fine-line bird wing pattern. The design is repeated four times around the shoulder of the piece.  The rim of the jar is also very tightly painted. It is painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired to create the blushes or fire-clouds on the surface.   The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dextra” along with a corn plant to represent the Corn Clan.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is a little superficial slip crack on the base, which can be seen in the photo of the signature.  This jar is also published in the book, “Painted Perfection” on page 75.  Dextra was the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture, along with a companion book entitled, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 1,950.00

Maho, Garrett –  Bowl with Rainbird Design

Garrett Maho is known for his traditional and innovative Hopi-Tewa pottery.  This bowl has rainbird painted on one side with its wings outstretched.  As the jar is turned, there is an opening in the bowl and it is surrounded by a checkerboard pattern.  This is the bird’s nest!  The bowl is painted with a deep red clay while the black is painted with bee-weed (a plant).  The bowl has been traditionally fired so that there are blushes on the surface.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Garrett most recently won “Best of Pottery” at the 2018 Heard Indian Market.

$ 350.00

Maho, Garrett –  Jar with Hopi Birds

Garrett Maho is known for his traditional and innovative Hopi-Tewa pottery.  Garrett said that the designs on this jar were inspired by the work of his grandmother,  Marilyn Mahle.  She would often use this classic style of Hopi birds as a design on her pottery.  The jar itself is highly polished.  The birds encircle the jar, rising above and below the shoulder.  They are painted with bee-weed and an additional red clay slip.  There is also the mauve clay slip, which is used on two sections of the jar.  The black is bee-weed, a plant.  The jar has been traditionally fired so that there are blushes on the surface.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Garrett most recently won “Best of Pottery” at the 2018 Heard Indian Market.

$ 875.00

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Thursday, May 3, 2018

Moquino, Ty – Painted Helmet with Carved Visor (Age 15)

Ty Moquino is a son of noted potter Jennifer Moquino.  At only 15 years old he is making some creative pottery!  This is one of his masks.  They are inspired by the science fiction he has read, along with being a commentary on the environment, sustainability and even imagery from Standing Rock.  This is the first time he has made a full helmet instead of a mask. The helmet is fully polished and painted black-on-black on one side. The design is a classic feather and mountain design.  The front of the helmet and the top “fin” are slipped with mica. Ty said it was more of a challenge to create this piece and make it stable than his other work.  The front visor is carved and also slipped with mica. The combination of shape, polish, carved and painted designs is exceptional on this piece.  It is great to see new work from his young potter.  Ty won the “Best of Youth” award at the Heard Museum Indian Market in 2017 for one of his masks!  It is signed on the bottom.  It is set on a metal museum mount stand, which is included.

$ 385.00

Maho, Garrett –  Tile with Hopi Birds

Garrett Maho is known for his traditional and innovative Hopi-Tewa pottery.  This tile is very tightly painted with traditional Hopi birds as the designs.  The birds beaks are in black and circling towards the edges while the wings and tail feathers are placed in the diagonal center of the tile. The deep red is an additional clay slip while the black is painted with bee-weed (a plant).  The tile has been traditionally fired so that there are blushes on the surface.  The piece is signed on the back in the clay.

$ 300.00

Maho, Garrett –  Butterfly Tile

Garrett Maho is known for his traditional and innovative Hopi-Tewa pottery.  This tile is very tightly painted with a traditional Hopi style butterfly as the design.  Garrett has taken classic designs and used them for the wings of the butterfly!  It is very finely painted and traditionally fired.  The tile is painted with a deep red is an additional clay slip while the black is painted with bee-weed (a plant).  The tile has been traditionally fired so that there are blushes on the surface.  The piece is signed on the back in the clay.

$ 300.00

Maho, Garrett –  Jar with Moth Design

Garrett Maho is known for his traditional and innovative Hopi-Tewa pottery.  This jar has a classic moth pattern. The jar itself is a classic shape with the high shoulder and slightly turned out rim.  There are four moths painted above the shoulder.  Check out the detail int he heads and the bodies.  Below the shoulder is a band of traditional wind and cloud patterns.  The jar is highly polished and the deep red is an additional clay slip while the black is painted with bee-weed (a plant).  The jar has been traditionally fired so that there are blushes on the surface.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Garrett most recently won “Best of Pottery” at the 2018 Heard Indian Market.

$ 875.00

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Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Adams, Sadie – Tile with Hopi Bird

Sadie Adams is one of the great names in Hopi pottery throughout the 1900’s.  There was a creativity in her shapes and use of Hopi and Sikyatki designs.  As well, there was a wonderful perseverance in her work for nearly a century!  This is one of her tiles.  It is painted with a Hopi or Sikyatki style bird.  The sections of the bird are paitned with rain, wind and cloud designs.  The tile is fully polished and traditionally fired.  It is signed on the back with her hallmark and name.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is certainly and beautiful example of her pottery and painting skill.

$ 400.00

Sahmie, Jean – Tile with Bird Wing Designs

Jean Sahmie is a daughter of noted potter Priscilla Nampeyo and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano. This is one of her intricately painted tiles.  The design is a double bird wing or migration pattern.  Each of the wings is tightly painted with fine lines. The black is bee-weed and the red is a clay slip.  The tile is traditionally fired.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the back with her hallmark and a corn plant (for Corn Clan).  While Jean no longer makes pottery, there is a wonderful creativity in each of her pieces!

 

$ 175.00

Cheeda, Zella – Plate with Geometric Designs (1970’s)

Elva Tewaguna Namepyo, was a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo, a granddaughter of the Nampeyo of Hano and a sister of Iris and Tonita Nampeyo and Thomas Polacca.  Her pottery was coil built, stone polished and painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips. This bowl has a very tightly painted classic migration pattern as the design.  The piece was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The original price tag from when it was purchased in the 1970’s is still on the bottom! Her daughter Adelle Nampeyo continues in the same family tradition.

$ 175.00

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Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Martinez, Maria – Jar with Feather & Rain Design (Maria + Popovi, 1956-9)

This is a traditional jar by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the jar while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The jar is highly polished and has a feather design on two sections and a mountain and rain pattern in two opposing sections. The jar has a sloping shoulder which shows off the design.  The firing is nearly gunmetal in coloration with a very high shine.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was made between 1956 and 1959 before Popovi began to add the firing date.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,400.00

Aragon, Florence – Jar with Rainbow Band and Rain Clouds

Florence Aragon was one of the great traditional Acoma potters.  This water jar is indicative of the influence of her pottery and the continuation of traditional designs and forms. The jar is the traditional water jar or “olla”. The high shoulder and sloping neck are part of this form. The jar is painted with a rainbow band which encircles the jar.  The band is slipped with a red clay.  Above and below the band are cloud and rain designs.  The imagery is tightly painted with fine lines and accents of red clay slip.  The bottom of the jar is indented in the traditional manner when the pots were made to be worn on the head to carry water!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 575.00

Martinez, Maria -Bowl with Cloud Designs (Maria + Popovi, 1956-9)

This is an unusual design by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the jar while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The bowl is highly polished had painted with a cloud pattern around the shoulder.  The high polish of the bowl is a striking contrast to the simple painted design.  The firing is nearly gunmetal in coloration with a very high shine.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was made between 1956 and 1959 before Popovi began to add the firing date.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,300.00

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Monday, April 30, 2018

Koopee, Jacob – “Hopi Sikyatki” Bowl

This bowl by Jacob Koopee is from around 2000.  It is a round shape with a smaller opening.  The bowl is painted with four eagle tails designs.  Jake wrote of this piece, “Eagle tail with eagles emerging along with parrots.  Speckling represents the rain”.  The bowl has the four eagle tails and the four parrots painted in black (bee weed) and there are additional red and burgundy clay slips.  Typical of Jacob’s painting, there are thin lines as the design.  The bowl was traditionally fired which created the blushes on the surface.   The piece is signed on the bottom, “Koopee” and a flute player hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   This bowl also has a card with the designs written out by Jacob, which is a nice piece of provenance!   Jake won numerous awards during his career including “Best of Show” in 2005 at both Santa Fe Indian Market and the Heard Museum Market.  I was lucky to have been a pottery judge both years at both events, and it was exciting to see an artist create such dynamic work.

$ 2,200.00

Sahmie Nampeyo, Rachel – Small Eagle Tail Bowl

Rachel Sahmie is a daughter of noted potter Priscilla Nampeyo and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano.  She is a sister of noted potters Jean Sahmie and Bonnie Sahmie.  This small bowl is painted with a classic eagle tail design.  This design is one which Nampeyo of Hano revived from the Siyatki pottery of the 1400’s.  The black is bee-weed and the red is a polished clay slip.  It has been traditionally fired.  The bowl is signed on the bottom with her name (hallmark) “RS”.

 

$ 125.00

Tahbo, Mark  – 16″ Wide Eagle Tail Shoulder Jar (1999)

This is a striking very large wide shoulder jar by Mark Tahbo.  The jar is a classic Hopi or Sikytaki shape, with the wide shoulder and a slight neck. The neck is just slightly turned out, which for Mark, it was the little details in his pottery which were important to him.  The shoulder of the jar is painted with an intricate eagle tail design.  Mark would often try and stylize patterns so that they were not just a repetition of previous work.  Here, the tail feathers can be seen in the center of the design, and then the wings extruding outward and mottled.  The jar was painted with bee-weed (black) and then clay slips.  Note that he used a deep red clay, but also a mauve clay slip in the center areas.  It was only around 1998-9 that he began to use the mauve clay, which he found near Hopi.  It was difficult to use and he didn’t have much, so he used it as an accent in his designs.  The jar is traditionally fired and the blushes are simply amazing!  The color variations range from white to orange almost red!  Mark worked diligently to create blushes on the surface of the pottery so that they would almost function as another design element!  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Mark Tahbo” and dated ’99.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. The owners of the jar acquired it directly from Mark. Finding pieces of his this size, design and coloration is a great testament to his skill as a potter and painter!

$ 5,000.00

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Sunday, April 29, 2018

Cerno, Barbara & Joseph  – Intertwined Snake Figures

Barbara & Joseph Cerno are known for their large coil built vessels.  This is one of their figurative pieces.  There are two snakes intertwined together.  The backs of each snake are painted with diamond designs.  It is interesting how they weave together to become one piece.  The snakes are from 2006 and it is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Barbara & Joseph remain among the most renown contemporary Acoma potters for their revival of historic patterns.

$ 100.00

Laate, Jennie – Clay Zuni Owl (1980’s)

Jennie Laate was among the most important revival potters at Zuni in the 1970’s.  This miniature owl clay figure.  It is coil built and in the style of the classic Zuni owls.  She has painted the feathers onto the surface of the piece.  It signed on the bottom and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The last photo is of the owl next to the large jar which is online relative to scale.

$ 75.00

Tahbo, Grace – Mini Canteen and Ladle

Grace Tahbo is a relative of Mark Tahbo’s who is known for her miniature pottery.  This miniature canteen is painted with a cloud and lightning design  The black is bee-weed (a plant) and the red and orange are two different clay slips.  Grace also made the little fiber handle for the canteen.  The little ladle goes with the canteen and it is also clay. Both are traditionally fired.  The canteen is signed, “G. Tahbo” and a pipe for Tobacco Clan.

$ 100.00

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Saturday, April 28, 2018

Tafoya, LuAnn – Mini Red Water Jar with Avanyu

This is one of the few miniatures we have ever had from LuAnn Tafoya.  She is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her large, highly polished pottery.  This jar is a classic shape for Santa Clara pottery with the round body and the elongated neck.  The jar is deeply carved with a water serpent encircling the piece.  The water serpent (avanyu) is part of a story where it saves the village from a flood.  That is why as the jar is turned the body of the avanyu consists of cloud and rain pattern.  However, that also gives the jar a distinctive appearance as it is turned beyond just the one design.  The jar is very highly polished and traditionally fired.  The color is a striking deep red.  The recessed area surrounding the carving is filled in using a white or cream-colored clay.  This creates a striking visual contrast between the tan and red areas.  The coloration is beautiful and the shape of his piece is a great example of her skill, creativity, and commitment to traditional Santa Clara pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  There is a photo of it with the larger vessels here in the gallery for scale.

$ 675.00

Trammel, Jennie – Double Handle Bowl (1970’s)

This is small plainware bowl by Jennie Trammel.   She was a daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  Over the years Jennie did not make a lot of pottery as she lived a very private life and was virtually never involved in markets or gallery shows.  However, she created striking pottery with classic shapes and designs which were distinctive to her work. This small bowl is fully polished, even on the inside!  There are two handles and this form is one which was often seen in the work of Margaret Tafoya and Sara Fina Tafoya in the 1920’s.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Jennie”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 250.00

Tafoya, LuAnn – Mini Red Bear Paw Bowl

This is one of the few miniatures we have ever had from LuAnn Tafoya.  She is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her large, highly polished pottery.  This jar is a classic shape for Santa Clara pottery with the round body and it is fully polished.  There are four bear paws carved into the clay.  The bear paw design is part of a story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  The bowl is highly polished and traditionally fired.   The coloration is beautiful and even at a small size, it is a wonderful example of her skill, creativity, and commitment to traditional Santa Clara pottery.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  There is a photo of it with the larger vessels here in the gallery for scale.

$ 450.00

Trammel, Jennie – Small Pitcher with Handle (1970’s)

This is small plainware pitcher by Jennie Trammel.  The shape of the spout is squared off and similar to that of the spouts seen on wedding vases by her mother, Margaret Tafoya.  The pitcher and handle are all fully polished, even on the inside!  Over the years Jennie did not make a lot of pottery as she lived a very private life and was virtually never involved in markets or gallery shows.  However, she created striking pottery with classic shapes and designs which were distinctive to her work. This small bowl is fully polished, even on the inside!  The pitcher is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Jennie Trammel”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 225.00

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Friday, April 27, 2018

Ortiz, Seferina – Storyteller Mocassin with 14 Kids (1970’s)

Seferina Ortiz is the matriarch of a family of renowned potters, including Virgil Ortiz, Janice Ortiz, and Lisa Holt. This is an unusual storyteller which is in the shape of a shoe or moccasin.  There are fourteen “windows” carved out of the piece and each one had a child in the window!  It is a charming piece and structurally amazing that it survived the firing with all the little windows!  It is slipped with the white Cochiti clay and then painted with wild spinach (black) and red clay slip and fired.  The piece is signed on the inside.  It was traditionally fired and in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely an exceptional piece by this historically important potter!

$ 900.00

Clashin, Debbie – Large Jar with Hopi Birds

Debbie Clashin has become one of the exciting leaders in Hopi-Tewa pottery over the past several years.  She is known for her large-sized traditional fired vessels.  Her recent work also reflects designs which originated at Sikyatki in the 1400’s and revived by Nampeyo of Hano and Debbie’s ancestor Grace Chapella.  This large jar is a wide shape and a slightly turned out neck.  The entire piece is stone polished and then it is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  The design is two connected birds.  Each pair covers have the jar.  The bodies of the birds have traditional Hopi-Tewa designs and they are surrounded by stars.  Separating them are vertical lines and bird tails. The painting on the jar is delicate and flowing with the additional areas on the birds which are mottled.  The jar is traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar and a few little darker areas.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 2,800.00

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Thursday, April 26, 2018

Peynetsa, Ian – Jar with Rain Birds (1994)

This jar by Ian Peynetsa is from 1994.  It is a more classic style of Zuni design with the Zuni rainbirds and the fine-line rain deigns.  It is an interesting combination of these classic designs with the vertically polished white slip to enhance the designs.  The jar won a 2nd place at the 1994 Zuni High School Art show. It is signed, “Ian Peynetsa”.  While he no longer makes pottery, it is a striking example of creative student art!  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00

Lewis, Lucy – Large Double Sided Canteen with Lizard & Bird Wing Designs (1970’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the past century. This large canteen is coil built and painted using bee-weed, a plant.  It is not often that we see pieces of hers this size and with such extensive intricate designs.  The canteen has a flat base and it is painted on the front and back with a spiraling bird wing pattern.  It is this type of painting which would later become the “op-art” of Acoma pottery in the 1980’s. The central medallion on the front has a lizard painted with red clay accents.  Note the little white dots on the tail of the lizard!  The handles are also painted and there is a leather strap.  The canteen is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair, but a few little areas of wear and spalling which can be seen in the photos.  Interestingly, this canteen has an interesting provenance.  There is a photo which accompanies the canteen with Lucy holding it. In the photo, it looks like it had a red ribbon with it, but that has been lost.  The canteen is also published with another photo of Lucy holding it in the book, “14 Families in Pueblo Pottery” by Rick Dillingham.  It’s rare to see a piece that has such a great provenance of photos of the artist with the piece and published as well!

$ 5,800.00

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Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Duwyenie, Preston – Black Shifting Sand Jar with Silver Insets

This is a striking wide shoulder jar by Preston Duwyenie.  It is made from Hopi clay and then slipped with mica on the base and neck. The shoulder of the jar is carved in a natural manner to represent the sand in the desert and its constant movement.  The “sand” sections are matte while the remainder is slipped with mica.  The entire jar is fired black and the result is stunning!  The micaceous areas are almost metallic in appearance.  The matte is a perfect contrast.  There are also three inset pieces of silver, which have an additional “shifting sand” pattern.  The silver is cast against cuttle-fish bone (a type of squid).  This process creates a similar style of shifting sand design to complement the clay.  The jar is flat on the bottom and signed in the clay with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child as the hallmark for his name in Hopi.  Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

“Why the shifting sand designs? Preston says he remembers watching a smooth pebble caught in sand being shifted by the wind, “there was beauty in its isolation within the sea of sand. It was like an island.  The endless sands of time, and the fact that people, too are tossed about by the wind. There is always rippling in our lives”.

$ 2,500.00

Clashin, Debbie – Bowl with Moth Design

This is classic design bowl by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. The shape of this bowl has a sloping shoulder.  The piece is painted with two moths, one on each side.  It was a design which was originated by Grace Chapella.  Next to each moth is a three-pointed section which represents the three Hopi mesas.   The rest of the design are the stars in the sky at night.  The jar is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  It was traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar along with a few darker areas from the smoke.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 975.00

Clashin, Debbie – Jar with Birds & Dragonflies

Debbie Clashin has become one of the exciting leaders in Hopi-Tewa pottery over the past several years.  She is known for her large-sized traditional fired vessels.  Her recent work also reflects designs which originated at Sikyatki in the 1400’s and revived by Nampeyo of Hano and Debbie’s ancestor Grace Chapella.  This jar is fully polished and painted with bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips. The design is a series of Sikatki inspired birds and dragonflies.  The birds (the black swirls) spiral down toward the base of the jar and are surrounded by the dragonflies.  It is delicately painted and striking in appearance.  It was traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar and a few little darker areas.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 1,200.00

Tapia, Belen – Red Carved Jar with Mountain Designs (1970’s)

Belen Tapia was a diverse potter creating everything from painted to carved pottery.  This jar is from the 1970’s and at that time she was making primarily carved pottery.  Belen Tapia was a niece of Sara Fina Tafoya and the mother of Anita Suazo, and Anna Archuleta.  This jar is very deeply carved with a mountain or kiva step pattern on two sides.  Separating the mountains are cloud, wind and rain patterns.  It is unusual as it is a very fluid design across the surface.  The neck of the jar is just slightly turned out. The surface is highly polished and the background area has the traditional cream-colored clay slip.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00

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