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Monday, July 16, 2018

Lewis, Eric – Large Jar with Butterfly Design

This jar by Eric Lewis is a wide shape with a short neck. The design of the butterfly encompasses the front of the jar. The wings of the butterfly are painted with geometric patterns. As the jar is turned there is a stylistic butterfly on the back, painted with bold geometric lines.  Eric has taken classic Acoma linear designs and made them both bolder and more graphic. The result is a striking jar with tightly painted imagery.  Eric remains one of the young Pueblo potters to watch!

$ 300.00

Torivio, Dorothy – Wide Long Neck Jar with Mountain Spiral Design

This is wide jar with an elongated neck is by Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  The shape of the jar is one which Dorothy created to emphasize her painted designs.  The long neck has smaller triangular designs which spiral outward to the shoulder and then back to the base.  When looking straight down on it the design is very tightly painted and striking.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Dorothy Torivio” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,850.00

Duwyenie, Preston – Tall “Earth in Balance” Jar

This piece by Preston Duwyenie is made from red Hopi clay. The shape has a taller form with an asymmetrical opening. The body of the piece is fully polished with a matte area near the top.  The polished area is meant to represent the earth, the raised area the waters and the higher matte areas the land and mountains.  It is “the earth in balance” as all three are connected.  The jar is vertically polished to give it an “onion skin” appearance, like much of the ancient Ancestral Puebloan pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay with Preston’s hallmark which is a woman carrying a child.  Preston is from Third Mesa at Hopi, and taught ceramics for years at Institute of American Indian Art (IAIA) in Santa Fe.

$ 1,000.00

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Sunday, July 15, 2018

Clashin, Debbie – Dragonfly Plate

Debbie Clashin has become one of the exciting leaders in Hopi-Tewa pottery over the past several years.  She is known for her large-sized traditional fired vessels.  This plate is fully polished.  It is painted on the front with a larger dragonfly, several small dragonflies and a series of “dragonfly wings” extending across the surface.  It is a wonderful use of design and the space.  The plate is painted with bee-weed and a red clay slip and traditionally fired.  There are blushes across the surface of the plate.   It is signed on the back with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 1,200.00

Ortiz, Seferina – Bear Storyteller with 2 Cubs

Seferina Ortiz is the matriarch of a family of renowned potters, including Virgil Ortiz, Janice Ortiz, and Lisa Holt. This is one of her most famous style of storytellers, which is the bear.  It is a bear holding two cubs.  It is a charming piece and painted with the white Cochiti clay and then painted with wild spinach (black) and red clay slip and fired.  The piece is signed on the bottom.  It was traditionally fired and in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely an exceptional piece by this historically important potter!

$ 650.00

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Saturday, July 14, 2018

Clashin, Debbie – Large Jar with Awatovi Birds & Bird Tails

Debbie Clashin has become one of the exciting leaders in Hopi-Tewa pottery over the past several years.  She is known for her large-sized traditional fired vessels.  This large jar is a wide shape and a slightly turned out neck.  The entire piece is stone polished and then it is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  The design has two large birds, bird tails and and panels with sun and mesa designs. The painting on the jar is delicate and flowing with the additional areas which are mottled.  The jar is traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar and a few little darker areas.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 2,500.00

Huma, Rondina – Bowl with Hopi Bird Designs

Rondina Huma has certainly been one of the most influential Hopi potters working today.  Since her two-time “Best of Show” award at Santa Fe Indian Market, her tight style and intricately painted pottery has changed the face of contemporary Hopi pottery.   Each piece is coil built, fully stone polished and painted with native clays and bee-weed (black), and native fired.  This is one of her early pieces from the 1970’s.  The bowl is made from red Hopi clay and then painted with bee-weed. The bowl is fully polished on the inside and outside.  The design has two Hopi birds which are painted encircling the piece.  It is always interesting to see her early work and how it certainly evolved over time.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 800.00

Nampeyo, Rayvin – Large Jar with Moth Design

Rayvin Nampeyo (b. 1961) is a son of Leah Garcia Nampeyo, a grandson of Fannie Nampeyo and a great-grandson of Nampeyo of Hano. He is a brother of James Nampeyo.  This jar is a classic shape with the wide shoulder.  It has various moths painted on the top. Note how each has either different wings or different style of heads. Around the side of the jar there are classic Hopi cloud and rain designs.  The jar has blushes from the firing.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

$ 675.00

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Friday, July 13, 2018

Navasie, Fawn Garcia – Large Jar with Swirling Birds

Fawn Garcia Navasie (b. 1959) is also known as “Little Fawn”.  She is a daughter of Eunice “Fawn” Navasie and a sister of Dawn and Dolly Navasie.  This large jar is coil built and stone polished. The jar has a striking shape with the round body and the elongated neck.  There are three Hopi style birds painted on the shoulder with their tails extending down over the side.  The designs are painted with bee-wee for the black.  The jar is traditionally fired with elegant blushes to the surface.   It is signed on the bottom, “Fawn”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 650.00

Analla, Calvin – Canteen with Laguna Birds

Calvin Analla learned to  make pottery from his sister, Yvonne Lucas and her husband, Steve Lucas.  This unique canteen is made from mixing two different types of clay together.  That creates the mottled appearance of the clay.  The canteen is thin walled and painted with two Laguan style birs.  They are separated by a round rising sun design.  In the center is a cloud pattern and it is painted with very fine lines!  The delicacy of his painting with bee-weed for the black is amazing.  It is a striking flow of design one one wide of the piece with lots of open areas where the mixed clays create cloud-like swirls.  The canteen is amazingly thin walled, which is typical of Calvin’s pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 450.00

Adams, Sadie – Jar with Cloud and Rain Designs

This is a small jar by Sadie Adams. It is fully polished on the inside and outside. The design is a classic Sikyatki inspired rain and cloud pattern.  It is painted with bee-weed  (black) and two sections of polished red.  The jar is signed on the bottom with her hallmark flower.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some fugitive black areas.

$ 225.00

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Thursday, July 12, 2018

Namingha, Les – Jar with Hopi Birds & Lightning Design Panel

This jar by Les Namingha a creative blend of Hopi-Tewa design and his own linear painting. The jar is unusual with two panels in relief.  They are each painted in black and white.  One panel has Hopi birds and a bat wing design and the other a detailed lightning design.  It is almost as if they are pottery shards on the surface of the jar.  He has then painted the jar with addition flowing layers of patterns.  Note how the imagery flow over onto the two panels!  It is a striking use of color and design.  This jar is part of his “Urban Polychrome” series, of which Les says:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”  Les Namingha

$ 2,200.00

Namingha, Les – “Carnival” Carved Jar with Hopi birds

This jar by Les Namingha a creative blend of Hopi-Tewa design and his own stylistic imagery. The piece is entitled, “Carnival” and it includes both carved and applique sections.  The Hopi birds painted near the base are layered with oval designs.  These same ovals are then replicated in the carved ovals around the shoulder.  The layers of carving, dimension and design on the jar are exceptional!  It is dynamic blend of ideas, layers and forms.  This jar is part of his “Urban Polychrome” series, of which Les says:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”  Les Namingha

$ 3,600.00

Namingha, Les – “Cochiti Motifs” Painted Jar

This jar by Les Namingha is inspired by the wild spinach or Rocky Mountain bee weed plant, used to paint both Hopi-Tewa pottery and Cochiti pottery.  The oval shaped design with the sharp edges is a classic image on Cochiti pottery.  Les says that he was intrigued with the open space of the design and how it could be layered.  It is the dynamic painting on this jar which seems simple but is quite exceptional.  Les was able to paint the various colors and the look nearly transparent, one on top of another!  Les says the jar fits into his “Urban Polychrome” series as it looks at the layer of material and designs used throughout the Pueblos and Hopi.   It is dynamic blend of ideas, layers and forms.  This jar is part of his “Urban Polychrome” series, of which Les says:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”  Les Namingha

$ 3,800.00

Namingha, Les – “Polyphonic Starburst” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Polyphonic Starburst”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series. The painting is on board and it is framed.  The painting is a dynamic overlay of various textures. The various layers and the depth of the painting gives the piece subtle shadows.  The linear patterns can be seen in the background while there is the migration pattern blue line and then the Hopi birds layered on top of one another.  The various colors add to the impact, as they become more vibrant as one moves to the surface.  It captures the strength of Les’s designs and the layering techniques. I included a close up view of one section to show the texture of the piece.  Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 2,800.00

Namingha, Les – “Polychrome II (Dextra Series)” Acrylic on Canvas

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Polychrome II (Dextra Series)”.  It is one of a series of acrylic paintings on canvas he made which explore both his pottery and that of his aunt, Dextra Quotskuyva.  I asked Les if he had any other paintings around and he brought in two pieces he had from the Dextra Series.  The painting is highly detailed with a top view of a piece of pottery, painted with classic design called “Prayer for Rain”.  The various colors depict both his work and Dextra’s.  Interestingly, in the center is a map of where he did his first show with Dextra, at Marti Struever’s gallery in Chicago!  What a great piece of history on so many levels!  It is signed on the front.

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 2,000.00

Namingha, Les – “Polychrome III (Dextra Series)” Acrylic on Canvas

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Polychrome III (Dextra Series)”.  It is one of a series of acrylic paintings on canvas he made which explore both his pottery and that of his aunt, Dextra Quotskuyva.  I asked Les if he had any other paintings around and he brought in two pieces he had from the Dextra Series.  The painting is highly detailed with a top view of a piece of pottery, painted with classic Hopi-Tewa designs.  The imagery blends the work of Les and Dextra as the pointilism dots seems to show the path of Les’s work navigating through the historic.  It is signed on the front.

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 2,000.00

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Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Lewis, Eric – Double Lobe Jar with Butterfly

This jar by Eric Lewis had a double lobe form.  It rounds in low and the creates a second shoulder up higher.  It’s the perfect shape for his butterfly design!  Here the butterfly encapsulates the shape of the jar. As it is turned there are additional graphics and on the back is a very intricate stylized butterfly design.  Eric has taken classic Acoma linear designs and made them both bolder and more graphic. The result is a striking jar with tightly painted imagery.  Eric remains one of the young Pueblo potters to watch!

$ 300.00

Lewis, Eric – Jar with Hummingbird

This jar by Eric Lewis has a round shoulder water jar shape.  The jar has a hummingbird as the central design.  As the jar is turned there are strong linear graphics creating cloud and wind designs.  Eric uses his designs to follow the shape of the jar and accentuate its form.  The round shoulder and the placement of the head of the hummignbird on the neck is just perfect!  Eric has taken classic Acoma linear designs and made them both bolder and more graphic. The result is a striking jar with tightly painted imagery.  Eric remains one of the young Pueblo potters to watch!

$ 275.00

Moquino, Jennifer – Jar with Tanager and Butterfly

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and realistic sgraffito designs.  This jar has a Western Tanager on one side and a Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly on the other.  There is wonderful detail on both sides!  Separating them are two sections of flowers.  The jar itself is highly polished and fired black.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 800.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Bowl with Birds & Cloud Geometrics

This is a very intricate smaller bowl by Russell Sanchez.  The rim are polished with mica to create a very high sheen.  The sides are etched with a classic triangular cloud design.  The “op-art” appearance of the row and angles of the design on a round surface are striking.  As well, the highly polished surface add to the impact of the light reflecting off the sides of the bowl.  There are two medallions, each highly polished.  They are each incised (before firing!) with two very intricately designed San Ildefonso birds. Note the use of the same triangular design in both of the birds!  The medallions are surrounded by two bands of hematite hei-shi beads.  They are nearly silver in coloration and complement the metallic appearance of the bowl after the firing.  It has a gunmetal metallic shine.  This is one of those pieces that is not only visually impressive, but there is a tactile aspect.  Where one might expect the mica to have texture, it is so highly burnished it is perfectly smooth!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 4,900.00

Victorino, Sandra  – Jar with Plant and Butterfly Swirls

Sandra Victorino is  a niece of noted potter Dorothy Torivio.    Sandra has her own unique style of “op-art”, where the patterns start small, then get larger and then smaller again on the vessel.  This jar is a taller shape with a slight neck.  The jar an “op-art” style of triangular geometric around the neck.  Around the shoulder are a series of plant designs.  As the design extends downward there are spiraling plant and butterfly designs.  It is a visually striking jar with complex imagery and an exceptional connection of form and design.  The intricacy of the designs and the use of the op-art imagery adds to the sophistication of the jar!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,200.00

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Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Sarracino, Myron – Red Clouds and Mesa Jar

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin walled and tightly painted. This jar has a high shoulder and a more classic “olla” shape. The design has a cloud pattern painted in red.  Below is a mesa pattern in black and below that a river design.  The water pattern has a series of fine-lines painted into the clay.  The jar is a nice balance of form and design.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece and it is also a tribute to the potters who came before.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 325.00

Torivio, Dorothy -Large Long Neck Jar with Yucca Design

This is a classic shaped jar by Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  The shape of the jar is one which Dorothy created to emphasize her painted designs.  The long neck has a yucca leaf pattern, which is repeated in smaller and then larger sizes.  The open space of the white and the contrasting black give the jar a very modern appearance.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Dorothy Torivio” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,400.00

Garcia, Effie – Bowl with Bear and Bear Paws

This  bowl by Effie Garcia is combines her deep carving with etched designs by her husband.  The bowl has a deeply carved heartline bear as the main design.  Around the remainder of the piece there are etched bear paws as the design.  The bear is a symbol for strength and good luck as are the bear paws.  The high polish and angle from the shoulder make this a distinctive bowl. It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 650.00

Torivio, Dorothy -Long Neck Jar with Butterfly Design

This is a classic long neck shaped jar by Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  The shape of the jar is one which Dorothy created to emphasize her painted designs.  The long neck has a butterfly pattern which is repeated in smaller and then larger sizes.  The precision and tight painting on the neck is exceptional!  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Dorothy Torivio” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,650.00

Nampeyo, Iris – Bowl with Corn Design & Sun Design

Iris Nampeyo is a daughter of Fannie Nampeyo and a well known for her elegant asymmetrical vessels with corn as part of the design in relief.  Iris began using the corn in relief on the surface of her pottery in the early 1980’s. The corn is symbolic of being part of the Corn Clan.  The surface of the bowl is stone polished and the corn on the front is in applique relief.  The husk of the corn is sharp and the matte area extends around to the base of the jar.  The matte areas are in contrast to the remainder of the piece which is polished.  The opening is asymmetrical which is in keeping with the organic style of the form.  There is a simplicity and elegance in her pottery.  At the base of the jar is a deeply carved and etched rising Tewa sun. It was most likely etched by her husband, Wallace Youvella, who often assisted her with her pottery.  It is a wonderful little surprise in the design!  While she no longer makes pottery, her vessels remain classic.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00

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Monday, July 9, 2018

Sanchez, Russell  – Gunmetal Jar with Bear Lid

This is simple but elegant gunmetal fired bowl by Russell Sanchez.  His recent work is a modern take on historic San Ildefonso pottery.  This jar is a wide shape with just a slight neck.  The lid has bear lid, which is very sculptural in style with the narrow legs.  The lid and jar are fully polished and the piece was fired to a near gunmetal coloration from the firing is striking and it is the result of it being fired longer and hotter than just a black piece.  What is interesting on this piece is that the top of jar has some speckling from the firing.  In effect, the fire, manure and ash created their own design on the surface.  Russell is one of the only Pueblo potters working today who is able to achieve this with consistency.   The jar and the lid are both signed on the bottom in the clay.  A wonderful traditional and yet very modern piece!

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 3,000.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Red Storage Jar with Moth and Seed Design

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This jar is in the shape of a small storage jar with a wide shoulder and a small neck. The jar is highly polished to a deep red.  The design on two sides are a stylized San Ildefonso moth.  Each of the moths has a different design for the body and wings.  Connecting the two moths are a classic seed design.  Russell has used historic San Ildefonso pottery and designs from the early 1900’s as a source for his inspiration.  The stylistic variation in the moths certainly reminds one of the painted of Florentiono Montoya.  The deep red color has also been revived by Russell and is the same red clay slip which was used at San Ildefonso in the 1920’s and 30’s.  There is a band at the top and bottom, which are a checkerboard design which is highlighted with a black clay slip.  The bands each have two rows of shell hei-shi beads.  The shape, creative design and highly polished surface are striking on this piece.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 4,800.00

Garcia, Effie – Bowl with Rain, Lightning and Mesa Designs

This  bowl by Effie Garcia is deeply carved and highly polished.  It has a rain, lighting and mesa design which is carved into the clay. The design is then outlined with a clay slip and the remainder of the bowl is highly polished.  It is fired a deep black.  The high polish and angle from the shoulder make her work distinctive. It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

 

$ 400.00

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Sunday, July 8, 2018

Gonzales, Rose – Red Canteen with Ribbon (1965)

This canteen is a classic piece by San Ildefono potter Rose Gonzales.  She is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This canteen is her classic shape for this form.  It is fully polished red with no design.  It still has the original leather strap and wood stopper!  The canteen won a second place at the 1965 Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonials.  The piece is signed on the back in the clay, “Rose”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,100.00

Gutierrez, Lela & Luther – Polychrome Thunderbird Open Bowl (1956-66)

Lela Gutierrez began making pottery in the 1930’s with her husband, Van Gutierrez.  After Van passed away in 1956 she continued to make pottery with her son, Luther Gutierrez.  She would make the pieces and Luther would paint the designs.  They worked together for only 10 years from 1956 to 1966.  This open bowl is fully painted on the inside.  There is a thunderbird in the center and a star pattern.  On the inside rim of the bowl are alternating sun and lizard designs.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips and painted onto the piece before it was fired.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lela/Luther”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00

Tafoya, Camilio – Tall Seedpot with Coyote, Deer & Rabbits (1980)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is very intricately designed. The entire piece is coil built and then stone polished.  The designs are etched into the clay and then the additional clay colors are added.  There are two coyote on one side.  Note the detail, which is a bit unusual for Camilio’s pottery!  Then as the piece is turned there are rabbits and a fawn.  It is a charming piece!  The top has a butterfly etched into the clay.  It is a complex piece and lots of additional colors are added.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00

Garcia, Tammy – “Thunderbird” Bronze, Artist Copy

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is created in the style she carves in her pottery, with various depths and layers.  The design is a thunderbird in the center.  On the sides are arrow.  The colorations are from various patinas to create the turquoise and silver color. Tammy says that her love of older jewelry and the motifs, such as the thunderbird, were her inspiration for this bronze.  The piece is made to be hung on a wall (the bottom arrow doesn’t let it sit evenly to stand).   The piece is signed on the side.  It is the “AC” or Artist Copy of the bronze.

$ 2,200.00

Borts-Medlock, Autumn  –  “Dragonflie’s Raindrop” Bronze, 4/26

Autumn Borts-Medlock is known for her creative carved pottery.  As well, she has created some dynamic pieces in bronze over the past few years.  This bronze is entitled, “Dragonflies Raindrop”.  It is inspired by one of her clay vessels and it is carved with various styles of dragonflies around the surface. The circles surrounding the dragonflies are the raindrops.  The rim of the vessel is carved to have a mountain step pattern.  The base has kiva step designs. The coloration on the jar is from the patina.  The piece is 4 of 26.  It is signed and numbered on the bottom.

$ 4,150.00

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Saturday, July 7, 2018

Moquino, Jennifer Tafoya – Bobcat Clay Figure

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and also her amazing animal figures. This bobcat is made from clay and fully polished. The designs for the face and back are etched into the clay. The face is wonderfully realistic and even not the coloration on the back of the ears!  The body of the bobcat has a bobcat track in the central medallion.  On one side are a rain cloud and river.  The opposite side has a feather pattern and sparrows.  All the various colors are from natural clay slips.  There is remarkable detail for the size of the piece!  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 350.00

Moquino, Ty – “Nebula Stars” Mask (Age 15)

Ty Moquino is a son of noted potter Jennifer Moquino.  At only 15 years old he is making some creative pottery!  This is one of his masks.  They are inspired by the science fiction he has read, along with being a commentary on the environment, sustainability and even imagery from Standing Rock.  For this group, Ty has focused on carving, polishing and etching.  The results are creative and distinctive.  The surface of the mask has matte and mica slipped areas. On the top section is a polished area with the reflection of the nebula of stars.  The creativity to create his various style of mask, with each one being different and yet Ty is also creating his own Pueblo story of the future.  The mask has a museum mount for it, so that it is stable.  Ty won the “Best of Youth” award at the Heard Museum Indian Market in 2017 for one of his masks!  It is signed on the back.

$ 500.00

Moquino, Ty – “Sunrise” Mask With Gold Leaf Visor (Age 15)

Ty Moquino is a son of noted potter Jennifer Moquino.  At only 15 years old he is making some creative pottery!  This is one of his masks.  They are inspired by the science fiction he has read, along with being a commentary on the environment, sustainability and even imagery from Standing Rock.  Ty has focused on carving, polishing and etching.  The results are striking!  This mask has open areas on the front and areas which are matte and micaceous.  He used a piece of gold leaf for the visor, which gives it a very modern and “sci-fi” appearance to show the reflection of the sun!   The mask has a museum mount for it, so that it is stable.  Ty won the “Best of Youth” award at the Heard Museum Indian Market in 2017 for one of his masks!  It is signed on the back.

$ 500.00

Moquino, Jennifer Tafoya – Green Turtle with Avanyu & Feathers

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and also her amazing animal figures. This small turtle is slipped with a green clay.  The back is stone polished and etched with a bear paw in the center.  It is surrounded by an avanyu, water designs, a storm cloud and eagle feathers.  All the various colors are from natural clay slips.  There is remarkable detail for the size of the piece!  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 280.00

Moquino, Ty – “Commander” Mask With Polished Top Fin (Age 15)

Ty Moquino is a son of noted potter Jennifer Moquino.  At only 15 years old he is making some creative pottery!  This is one of his masks.  They are inspired by the science fiction he has read, along with being a commentary on the environment, sustainability and even imagery from Standing Rock.  For this group, Ty has focused on carving, polishing and etching.  The results are creative.  This mask has open areas in the surface along with polished and micaceous areas. The top “fin” is raised and polished.  The mask has a museum mount for it, so that it is stable.  Ty won the “Best of Youth” award at the Heard Museum Indian Market in 2017 for one of his masks!  It is signed on the back.

$ 500.00

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Friday, July 6, 2018

Tenorio, Robert  – Wide Jar with Feathers & Thunderbird

This is a complex wide jar by Robert Tenorio.  The jar is painted with wild spinach (black) and red and copper colored clay slips.  Around the sloping neck of the jar is a feather pattern and a single section with a thunderbird as the design.  Below the feathers are an alternating corn design which is painted with various colored clay slips.  Below the shoulder is a cloud pattern and the jar has a “spirit line” or a break in the painted line around the rim.  This goes back to historic Kewa pottery when the artist would use the spirit line to release their spirit or connection from the vessel.  The inside is slipped with a mica clay slip and there is an impressed hand print on the inside!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Robert Tenorio, Kewa”.

$ 500.00

Tenorio, Robert  – Plate with Birds & Fish

This plate by Robert Tenorio has a complex series of designs.  The plate is painted with wild spinach (black) and red and copper colored clay slips.  The center of the plate has two fish.  They are surrounded by four birds, each looking at the fish in the center. There is something charming and whimsical about the design! Each of the fish and birds is highlighted with red and copper clay slips.  There i a “spirit line” or a break in the painted line around the rim.  This goes back to historic Kewa pottery when the artist would use the spirit line to release their spirit or connection from the vessel.  The back of the plate is fully polished with a red clay slip.  It is signed on the back, in the clay, “Robert Tenorio, Kewa”.

$ 650.00

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Thursday, July 5, 2018

Quotskuyva, Dextra – Jar with Migration Pattern (1970’s)

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This is an earlier jar  from the 1970’s.  It is one of the most unique shapes we have seen in her early work.  The jar narrow base just up to create a round surface for the design.  That style of form certainly seems to have an influence of Zuni pottery forms.  The bowl is painted with the classic migration pattern which encircles the piece. The piece has very thin lines painted for the migration pattern and in a manner for which Dextra became famous in the 1970’s.  The red areas are interesting, as they have a more “painterly” appearance. This is striking as it seems to be more reminiscent of the early Hopi-Tewa pottery before the 1930’s when a new red clay slip was introduced.  The jar reads as a history of early Hopi-Tewa pottery from their influence of Zuni shapes and designs, then the introduction of Sikyatki patterns (migration design) and then the early style of red clay slip.  It’s not surprising that Dextra would be able to combine all these elements into a single jar and have the result be simply striking in appearance!    It is painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired to create the blushes or fire-clouds on the surface.   The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dextra Quotskuyva (Nampeyo).  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,000.00

Nampeyo, Priscilla Namingha – Migration Design Jar (1970’s)

This is an exceptional jar by Priscialla Namingha Nampeyo.  She was a great-granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano and granddaughter of Annie Healing,  She was also a sister of Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo. Priscilla was the matriarch of a family of renown potters, including Rachel, Bonnie, Nyla and Jean Sahmie.  Priscilla began making pottery when she was only seven years old, under the guidance of Nampeyo of Hano. This jar is thin walled and painted with the classic migration pattern.  It is one of those pieces that captures the essence of her pottery skill with very thin lines and a design which matches the shape.  Priscilla was known for her traditional work and this jar is simply one of her best.  It was traditionally fired and so it has blushes across the surface.  It is signed on the bottom “Priscilla Namingha Nampeyo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00

Quotskuyva, Dextra – Bowl with Migration Pattern (1970’s)

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This is an earlier bowl from the 1970’s.  It is very thin walled and a classic bowl shape. The piece is painted with the classic migration pattern.  Dextra said of this design:

“This is the one design that was really stressed for us to use, the migration pattern. Nothing but lines, representing the migration of all the people to all the places, including down below and up above. It has seven points at the top and bottom. All the x’s represent life from the bottom and top, telling you the universe is one. The thin lines, I just wanted to paint them real fast and real close to try and include everyone.”  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo, Spoken Through Clay

The bowl has deep red clay near the rim and the remainder is painted with bee-weed (black).  The lines are very thin and close, as would be expected from her pottery!  This bowl is signed on the bottom, “Dextra Quotskuyva (Nampeyo)”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. Simple, elegant and a classic!

$ 4,000.00

Tahbo, Mark  – Open Bow with Bird Man and Hummingbirds (2000)

This is a large open bowl which is fully painted by Mark Tahbo.  He learned to make pottery from his great grandmother, Grace Chapella.  His pieces reflect the wonderful symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter. The designs are painted using native clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black. The bowl is shallow and has a slight extended rim.  On the inside is one of his anthropomorphic “bird men”.  He made this figures in place of using katsinas on his pottery.  They were part of the stories he would tell about his work and certainly an influence came from the Awatovi murals. This figure has a bird head and is holding a white bird and a gourd canteen. The rim of the bowl is painted with a checkerboard pattern.  It is the surprise of the back which is so dynamic.  The center is a very tightly painted hatchwork flower.  There are four hummingbirds encircling the flower.  The bodies of each are painted with various colored clay slips.  There is a distinctive rainbow band with four different colors connecting each bird.  Mark would seek out the various colors used on his pottery and the mauve clay (the bottom rainbow band) was always the most difficult to find.  The plate was traditionally fired and has dynamic colored blushes across the surface.  The plate is signed on the rim, “Mark Tahbo 2000”.  It won a “Challenge Award” at the 2000 Santa Fe Indian Market.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,800.00

Clashin, Debbie – Jar with Hopi Moth Design

This is a unique shaped jar by Debbie Clashin.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. The shape has high shoulders, a flat top and just a small neck. The top of the jar has two Hopi-Tewa moths as the design.  It is a design which was originated by Grace Chapella.  Next to each moth is a three-pointed section which represents the three Hopi mesas.   The rest of the design are the stars in the sky at night.  Around the side of the jar it is also fully painted with bird wing, bird tail and cloud patterns. The jar is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  It was traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 1,200.00

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Wednesday, July 4, 2018

Naha, Tyra – Large Bowl with Tumbling Hummingbirds

This may be the largest piece we have had from Tyra Naha.  She is a daughter of Rainy Naha.   She learned to make pottery from her mother and continues to make traditional style Hopi-Tewa pottery in the style her grandmother, Helen “Feather Woman” Naha.  This is a large, wide shoulder bowl made in the form of the classic Sikyatki pottery.  The bowl is slipped white and then painted with four “tumbling” hummingbirds.  Each bird is painted with bee-weed (black) and then highlighted with additional clay slips for the color.  The style of the birds is inspired by the tumbling birds on Rainy’s pottery. Around the neck of the bowl is an eternity band.  This design was always on Helen Naha’s Awatovi designed vessels.  The bowl is traditionally fired and signed on the bottom with a feather and spider (Spider Clan ) and a “3” for being Third Generation of the Naha family.

 

 

 

 

$ 975.00

Antonio, Frederica – Jar with Eight Designs

Frederica Antonio is renown for her intricately painted pottery. Each piece is coil built and then finely painted. Her designs are a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines which are then filled in to create larger images in the squares.  This smaller jar is a classic olla shape with a high shoulder and a sloping neck.  The neck has a mountain and rain design.   Frederica has used eight different designs on  this jar.  The patterns are painted vertically and there are square cloud pattern descending from rim to base.  Separating them are various patterns of corn, rain, snow, lighting, stars and other designs.  The result is a piece which is varied as it is turned.  The level of complexity and time involved on the painting of this piece is extraordinary!  The result, however, is stunning with a dynamic appearance and movement to the designs.  The base of the jar is concave, reminiscent of historic Acoma jars which were carried on the head.  This combination of thin walls, classic shape and tightly painted design create a piece which is visually  stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 800.00

Antonio, Frederica – Jar with Starburst Designs

Frederica Antonio is renown for her intricately painted pottery. Each piece is coil built and then finely painted. Her designs are a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines which are then filled in to create larger images in the squares.  This  jar is a classic olla shape with a high shoulder and short neck.  Frederica painted the neck with a stylized Acoma lighting design.  The jar itself is wonderfully detailed with a starburst pattern.  Each of the four stars are outlined wiht red and tan clay slips.  Separating them are cloud designs with a checkerboard pattern near the neck.  Near the base are mountain designs, again with a checkerboard pattern.  The variations in color and design are perfectly balanced on this jar!  This combination of thin walls, classic shape and tightly painted design create a piece which is visually  stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,400.00

Gonzales, Tse-Pe – Jar with Heartline Bear and Turquoise (1998)

Tse-Pe Gonzales as a son of noted potter Rose Gonzales.  This jar combines the various techniques for which he was well known.  The jar is fully polished and has an elongated neck. The neck is etched with a rounded design. The main design is a heartline bear.  It is deeply cut into the clay. There is a single inset piece of turquoise for the eye and an other piece of turquoise offset into the clay.  It is signed on the bottom with Tse-Pe’s hallmark and the year ’98. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 575.00

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Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Tafoya, Camilio – Mini Terrace Bowl with Chipmunks (1982)

This miniature terraced bowl by Camilio Tafoya is simply put, charming.  It is one of the only ones I have seen in this shape!  The form is the traditional ‘terrace bowl” with the step design on one side.  The designs are etched into the polished clay surface. There are two chipmunks, one on either side.  On the back side are strawberries which they are competing to get!  There is additional coloration in the designs with green and white clay slips.  The piece is signed, “Camilio Sunflower” on the bottom in the clay.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 250.00

Tafoya, Camilio – “Turkey Girl” Bronze, 4/16 (1979)

This is one of several different bronzes created by Camilio Tafoya.  The piece is entitled, “Turkey Girl” and it has amazing detail in each of the figures.  There is a Pueblo woman grinding corn and in front of her is another Pueblo woman and a male and female turkey. Take a close look at any of the figures and the detail is exceptional! There is a similar stylistic feel as with his pottery.  For the story of the Turkey Girl I have use the story written by Juan de la Cruz for one of his pieces of pottery.

“Turkey Girl’s tattered and worn raiment was taken and transformed into beautiful garments: a dazzling necklace and intricately woven mantle were draped upon her arms.  The turkeys that she tended to presented these gifts: for they knew her heart’s desire was to participate in the festivities being held in the neighboring village. In exchange for this and the kindness she always bore towards them, they were given freedom and traversed into the narrow mountain pass where they reside to this day”.  Juan de la Cruz

This bronze is an edition of 16 and this is number 4.  It was made in 1979 and signed on the top side.  It is in excellent condition.  One of the last photos is the piece with other pottery by Camilio Tafoya as well as a photo of him!

$ 1,200.00

Tafoya, Camilio – Seedpot with Realistic Bears (1994-5)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is very intricately designed.  It would seem that it most likely was made, polished and the designs was begun by Camilio and then then the designs were finished by his son, Joseph Lonewolf.  While it is signed by Camilio, it would suggest that the piece was already polished.  The sgraffito on the top and in the etched away matte areas are also consistent with the work of Camilo. However, there are indicators that it was finished by Joseph, as he finished several of the pieces which Camilio had in process before he passed.  The bears are all much more intricately etched and designed than on any of the pieces made by Camilio from 1990-5.  There is a bear catching a fish in a stream, and then eating the fish. There is an additional bear family.  The bears are so detailed and they are much closer in style to those of Joseph.  As well, there is the number on the bottom, which is precision etched, and the last letters are JL, which may be Joseph’s initials as the end of the numbering system. The numbering system used by Camilio was typically much shorter and a bit more stylistic in design.  Overall, the piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00

Medicine Flower, Grace – Seedpot with Deer (1976)

This larger seedpot by Grace Medicine Flower is from 1976.  It is designed with 22 jumping deer which encompass the entire surface of the piece.  The deer are separated into various sections which are separated by rain and cloud patterns.  Around the base of the piece is a stylized avanyu.  The seedpot is very highly polished and note how the matte area is also fully etched! The seedpot is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips,cracks restoration or repair.

$ 1,600.00

Tafoya, Camilio – “Leap Frog” Seedpot (1981)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya reflects the often humorous style of his pottery.  The seedpot is fully designed and there is a frog “leaping” over a field mouse.  A cricket and worm look and unexpectedly next to them is a koala bear!  As the piece is turned there is another frog just relaxing.  The opposite side of the seedpot has a plant motif and two hummingbirds.  The tan background area is lightly polished and there are additional green clay slips which add color to the seedpot.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00

Medicine Flower, Grace – Red & Tan Seedpot with Butterflies (1976)

This larger seedpot by Grace Medicine Flower is from 1976.  It is unusual with the top part being polished tan.  The tan is just where water is used to polish the surface of the pottery, while the red is a clay slip.  The tan area is a etched with a water serpent. The sides of the bowl are polished red and there are six different butterflies etched into the surface of the clay.  Typical of her pottery they are delicately etched into the surface of the bowl.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay. It is in excellent condition with no chips,cracks restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00

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Monday, July 2, 2018

Garcia, Tina – Black Water Jar with Stones & Ribbon (1975)

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plainware Santa Clara pottery.  This may well be one of the earliest pieces of her work I have come across.  She would have been 18! The jar is an exceptional shape with a round shoulder and a turned out rim.  It feels just a big thicker (heavier) than her later work, but certainly not unexpected.  The surface is highly polished.  There are insets on the shoulder of turquoise and coral.  Again, something I had never seen on later work.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tina Garcia”.  It received a second place ribbon from the 1975 New Mexico State Fair.  It also has the original entry tag with her name on it. The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a great piece of history!

$ 600.00

Cain, Mary – Large Double Shoulder Water Jar with Bear Paws

Mary Cain was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and a granddaughter of SaraFina Tafoya.  She was known for her classic style Santa Clara pottery.  I’m not sure if we have ever had one of her pieces this size come back into the gallery.  It is a very large double shoulder water jar.  The entire piece is fully polished. The double shoulders are always more difficult to create with coil built pottery.  However, they create more angles for the light to hit on the surface, adding to the overall dynamic appearance of the piece.  The bear paws are symbolic of a story where the bears led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  On this piece the paws are carved into the clay and then polished, along with the rest of the jar. The entire piece is fired a deep black.  It is signed on the bottom, “Mary Cain”.    It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   The last photo is one of the jar next to a contemporary piece by her daughter, Linda Cain.  It was interesting to contrast two pieces with bear paws and the difference in size and style.

$ 1,800.00

Garcia, Tina – Black Water Jar with Fluted Rim

Tina Garcia was well known for her focus on traditional shape and plainware Santa Clara pottery. This water jar is one of her classic pieces.  It is an elegant shape with the sharp shoulder, the indented rise to the neck and the fluted or “pie crust” rim. The entire jar is fully polished and fired a deep black.  Tina was always focused on form and polish and this created some exceptional vessels.  It is signed on the bottom and  it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 850.00

Sanchez, Desideria – Jar with Feather and Rain Motifs (1960’s)

Desideria Montoya Sanchez was a sister of noted potter Maria Martinez.  She was known for her traditional pottery and use of both classic and innovative designs. This jar is fully polished and painted with a feather and storm pattern.  There are two sections of feather separated by two sections of the rain and lightning designs.  This is a later jar and beautifully painted!  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Desideria”.

$ 650.00

Sanchez, Desideria – Small Jar with Rain Designs

This is one of the few miniatures we have seen by Desideria Montoya Sanchez!  She was a sister of famed potter Maria Martinez. This jar  is fully polished and has a sharp shoulder. It is painted with a cloud, rain and lightning designs.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Desideria”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00

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Saturday, June 30, 2018

Naranjo, Dusty – Jar with Hand Designs

Dusty Naranjo is known for her delicately etched pottery which is fired brown.  This jar has an asymmetric form and it is fully polished. The top has classic Santa Clara designs and the sides are are fully etched with lines and hands.  Note the precision of the lines, which is always amazing to see when they are etched into a polished and rounded surface!  The shape, color and design give the jar a very modern appearance.  It is signed on the bottom, “Dusty”.

$ 225.00

Sahmie, Jean – Tile with Moth

Jean Sahmie is a daughter of noted potter Priscilla Nampeyo and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano. This is one of her intricately painted tiles.  The design is a classic Hopi-Tewa moth. Below the moth are two dragonflies and a rain design. The black is bee-weed and the red is a clay slip.  The tile is traditionally fired.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the back with her hallmark and a corn plant (for Corn Clan).  While Jean no longer makes pottery, there is a wonderful creativity in each of her pieces!

$ 175.00

Peynetsa, Anderson – Turtle Bowl

This is a charming bowl by Anderson Peynetsa. It is made using the red clay and  the bowl is in the shape of a turtle on its back.  The sides of the piece are fully painted and there is a swirling rainbird design.  Anderson has signed the bowl on the bottom.  Yes, definitely charming.

$ 300.00

Martinez, Clara – Bowl with Cloud Design (1970’s)

Clara Martinez was a daughter-in-law of Maria Martinez and the wife of John Martinez (1915-66).  While she did not make a lot of pottery, the pieces were more traditional in style with painted black-on-black designs. This bowl is fully polished and has a cloud pattern painted around the rim. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Clara Martinez”.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00

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Saturday, June 30, 2018

Lonewolf, Greg – Black “Hummingbirds” Seedpot

Greg Lonewolf is the son of Joseph Lonewolf and is known for his intricately incised miniatures.  This seedpot is one of his larger pieces and it is fully designed and fired black.  The design consists of four realistic hummingbirds encircling the seedpot. At the top is a flower and a geometric star pattern.  All the various colors are additional clay slips. which are added after the black firing. The seedpot is entitled, “Hummingbirds”.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 800.00

Tafoya, Ray  – Mimbres Rabbits Seedpot (1980)

This is a very  intricate miniature seedpot by Ray Tafoya.  The design has three Mimbres rabbits etched into the clay.  They are surrounded by Ray’s signature geometric designs. There are cloud, grass and water designs.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  The seedpot is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay with his hallmark.

$ 400.00

Lonewolf, Rosemary “Apple Blossom” – Seedpot with Hummingbird

This is a larger seedpot by Rosemary Lonewolf.  She learned to make pottery from her father, Joseph Lonewolf.  This piece has a large hummingbird and flowers on the top.  On the side are a series of inter-twined vines and flowers.  All the various colors are different clay slips. which are added after the firing.  The seedpot is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Appleblossom”.  While Rosemary no longer makes many traditional style pieces of pottery, her miniatures remain a classic!

$ 800.00

Fragua, Glendora – Jar with Rainbow Band and Lid

Glendora Fragua is known for her intricately incised pottery.  This piece is polished tan and etched around the neck and the shoulder.  The shoulder has both polished and matte areas which are then etched away to create the rainbow band. There are additional insets of turquoise.  The jar is signed on the bottom with a corn stalk, Glendora’s hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 350.00

Lonewolf, Rosemary “Apple Blossom” – Seedpot with Koi & Mimbres Fish

This is a larger seedpot by Rosemary Lonewolf.  She learned to make pottery from her father, Joseph Lonewolf.  This piece is interesting in that Rosemary spent time in China during the early 1990’s and created a variety of pieces in a similar theme to this seedpot.  She would juxtapose various realistic animals and images against Mimbres designs.  Here, the top has two very detailed Koi.  The side has a variety of Mimbres inspired fish.  It is a creative idea and one which works well and is even more interesting relative to the time period!  All the various colors are different clay slips. which are added after the firing.  The seedpot is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Appleblossom”.  While Rosemary no longer makes many traditional style pieces of pottery, her miniatures remain a classic!

$ 700.00

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Friday, June 29, 2018

Ebelacker, Virginia – Jar with Carved Mountain Designs (1970’s)

Virginia Ebelacker was the first daughter of noted potter Margaret Tafoya.  She was known for large sized pottery as well as her deeply carved designs.  This jar is a very classic shape with a carved band around the center. The designs are mountain and lightning patterns. The jar is deeply carved and highly polished. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Her sons Richard and James were both known for their distinctive large pottery and today her grandson, Jason, is also creating exceptional pottery.

$ 1,500.00

Archuleta,  Mary Ester – Red Water Jar with Cloud Designs (1970’s)

This is an elegant shaped water jar by Mary Ester Archuleta.  The jar has a very low shoulder and an elongated neck which has just a slight flare at the rim.  Around the body of the jar are carved step style cloud designs.  They are deeply carved into the clay.  The jar is very highly polished a deep red which is striking on a piece of this shape.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mary E. Archuleta.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Mary is the second youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  She married into San Juan Pueblo in the late 1960’s and created most of her pieces in the San Juan inspired style.  Today they remain a distinctive part of the histories of Santa Clara, San Juan and the Tafoya family.

$ 1,800.00

Ebelacker, Richard – Double Shoulder Water Jar with Bear Paws (1970’s)

Richard Ebelacker was a grandson of Margaret Tafoya and a son of Virginia Ebelacker.  He was known for his large vessels and traditional shapes.  This is a very classic double shoulder water jar.  It is fully polished and has four bear paws as the design. The bear paws are part of a Tewa story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  The jar is very highly polished, even on the inside of the neck!  It is fired a deep lack.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Richard Ebelacker”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00

Begay, Jr., Harrison – Bowl with Hand and Eternity Designs

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This is a piece of his pottery from 1998. It is deeply carved with a hand, flute player and a two wind designs.  The larger designs are surrounded by additional star and wind swirls.  The neck and base are fully polished as are the carved designs.  Harrison achieves an exceptional polish to his pottery!  The matte areas surrounding the carved designs further enhance the imagery.  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00

Nez, Wallace – Sgraffito Jar with Ducks and Hummingbirds (2004)

Wallace Nez is known for his intricately etched potter.  He began to make pottery when he was 12 years old.  He won first place ribbons at the Santa Fe Indian Market in 1999, 2000, and 2001 and Best of Division at the Museum of Northern Arizona Market Show in 1999.  This tall seedpot has two larger sections with etched ducks as the design.  Around the base are five hummingbirds.  The remainder of the piece is fully etched with designs!  It is all so intricately and delicately designed, it is quite extraordinary!  The piece is signed on the bottom “Wallace Nez” with the date of 2004.

$ 975.00

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Thursday, June 28, 2018

Tafoya, Shirley – Large Plainware Water Jar (1970’s)

Shirley Tafoya was the youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her miniature pottery.  I couldn’t help but say that this was a “large” water jar, but for Shirley, it definitely was a large piece as much of her work was under 2″ tall!  This water jar is an elegant shape with a round body and a slight neck.  The entire piece is fully polished and fired a deep black.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya”.  Simple but a classic of Tafoya Family pottery!

$ 1,500.00

Archuleta,  Mary Ester – Red & Tan Open Bowl (1970’s)

This is a classic small bowl by Mary Ester Archuleta.  Mary is the second youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  She married into San Juan Pueblo in the late 1960’s and created most of her pieces in the San Juan inspired style.  This small bowl reminds us of a contemporized version of the classic San Juan red and tan bowls of the early 1900’s. This bowl is fully polished red on the outside and then polished tan on the inside! The tan is the natural color of the clay and always difficult to achieve this coloration.  While Mary no longer makes much pottery, her work from the 1970’s was beautifully carved, polished and fired.  She was important in the re-revial of San Juan (Ohkay Owingeh) pottery in the 1970’s.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mary E. Archuleta.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 400.00

Roller, Toni – Tall Water Jar with Bear Paws (1977)

Toni Roller is known for her classic shapes and exquisite stone polished pottery.  A daughter of Margaret Tafoya, Toni has developed her own distinctive style yet adhering to the traditional methods and techniques of her mother.  This tall water jar is from 1977 and it is fully polished and has a bear paw on each side.  The bear paw design is first carved into the clay and then polished (along with the rest of the jar) with a stone. Toni says of the story of the bear paw:

“The story behind the bear paw, according to my grandmother, she said that our ancestors came from Puye, from the cliffs. One time when the people were living up there, there was a drought so bad they couldn’t grow anything. They were so worried. They wondered why the bear was well fed and not thin like they are. So they tracked the bear, and the bear led them to the Rio Grande. The reason we put the bear paw on the pots is to honor the bear that saved the people, the ancestors that came to Santa Clara from Puye. That’s why now most of the Indian people live along the Rio Grande. The bear saved all our ancestors.”  Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

The jar was made in 1977 yet remains a classic in shape, size and design!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,800.00

Cling, Alice –  Large Jar with Short Neck

This larger jar by Alice Cling has a high shoulder and a short neck.  The jar has been vertically polished so you can see the stone marks in the polished surface.  The jar is then traditionally fired to create the coloration.  This jar has a deep coloration with a dark brown coloration and yet the fire clouds create areas of red and brown.  The jar was covered in pinon-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alice Cling”.  Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 450.00

Cling, Alice –  Tall Elongated Shaped Jar

This tall jar by Alice Cling has an elongated shape.  The jar has been vertically polished so you can see the stone marks in the polished surface.  The jar is then traditionally fired to create the coloration.  Note how the fireclouds swirl around the jar creating areas of dark black to deep red.  The jar was covered in pinon-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alice Cling”.  Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 425.00

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Wednesday, June 28, 2018

Antonio, Frederica – Polychrome Wind Design Jar

Frederica Antonio is renown for her intricately painted pottery. Each piece is coil built and then finely painted. Her designs are a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines which are then filled in to create larger images in the squares.  This jar is a classic olla shape with a high shoulder and a short neck.  Around the neck the design is a geometric rain pattern.  The remainder of the jar is fully painted with a geometric wind design.  The ares of the design are then filled in with two different colored clay slips.  Frederica noted that she painted the red first, then the ochre color and then had to go back over all the black lines again one more time!  The level of complexity and time involved on the painting of this type of piece is extraordinary!  The result, however, is stunning with a dynamic appearance and movement to the designs.  The base of the jar is concave, reminiscent of historic Acoma jars which were carried on the head.  This combination of thin walls, classic shape and tightly painted design create a piece which is visually  stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,400.00

Martinez, Maria –  Bowl with Avanyu, “Maria + Popovi” (1956-9)

This a classic bowl by  Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and stone polished the bowl while it was painted and fired by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). Popovi focused on both the painted surfaces of the pottery as well as the firings.  This bowl has a water serpent (avanyu) as the design, which encircles the piece.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria / Popovi”.  The signature shows that is in an early piece from between 1956-9. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   It is certainly a classic by Maria and Popovi Da!

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,800.00

Nampeyo, Iris – Mauve Jar with Corn Design

Iris Nampeyo is famous for her pottery with the corn in relief.  This jar is unusual as it is slipped with a “mavue” colored clay.  It is an interesting story about the color, as Iris found this mauve colored clay in the early 1990’s and began to use it as a slip to polish her pottery.  What’s interesting is that other potters (Mark Tahbo and Jake Koopee) also found some of the mauve colored clay, but they were never able to polish it and have it retain its coloration.  To this day, Iris is the only HopiTewa potter to have found a polish-able form of the mavue clay.  However, Hopi potters Al Qoyawayma and his aunt, Elizabeth White also found a mauve colored clay from another source.  The result, as in this jar, is an unusual and striking coloration.  While it has a more purple hue, she always called it “mavue”.  Iris began using the corn in relief on the surface of her pottery in the early 1980’s. The corn is symbolic of being part of the Corn Clan.  The surface of the bowl is stone polished and the corn on the front is in applique relief.  The husk of the corn is sharp and the matte area extends around to the base of the jar.  The matte areas are in contrast to the remainder of the piece which is polished.  The opening is asymmetrical which is in keeping with the organic style of the form.  There is a simplicity and elegance in her pottery.  While she no longer makes pottery, her vessels remain classic.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,600.00

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Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Lonewolf, Joseph – “Safe Territory” Seedpot (1988)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This seedpot is from 1988.  Joseph wrote of this piece:

“Representing the Mimbres Period of the 10th to the 14th centuries, is a male quail about to fall prey to a nearby fox.  Alerted to the danger the quail moves quickly to the brush growing in its natural habitat.

Encircling the base of the seedpot is Mother Earth [the red clay slip] with several quail tracks…To the left of the tracks is a bear print.  Perhaps the frightened quail, aware of the bear’s presence, sought refuge in the bear’s range of territory.  To the left is the 1988 yearly symbol of a “bear paw” representing strength and good medicine.  The tiny butterfly, also atop Mother Earth represents beauty in life”.

The style of this seepdot is similar to a series he made throughout 1988.  The have a combination of cartoon and Mimbres style, with the fox having more of a “cartoon” appearance.  What makes that interesting is that Joseph was a big fan of cartoons and loved to watch them. It’s great to see that he found a way to design some pieces that are almost a reflection of his love for the style.  All the additional colors are natural clay slips.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,200.00

Lonewolf, Joseph – “Bald Eagle” Seedpot (2001)

This is a very detailed realistic seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 2001.  The piece is one from the period when he began to create  exceptionally detailed and realistic animals on his pottery surfaces.  The seedpot is flat with the bald eagle head carved into the clay.  It is hard to see in the photos but the area round the eye and beak are recessed.  The feathers are then etched into the clay and highlighted with additional clay slips.  The use of the carved areas creates a more dramatic appearance to the surface of the piece and gives it a more realistic style.  On the side there is a single white feather and two macaw parrot feathers.  It would be interesting to know the significance of both feathers, but certainly there is the importance of both parrot and eagle feathers in Pueblo culture and ceremonies.  The side has an incised and polished feather design.  Lower on the seedpot are are the two “yearly” medallions on this piece, which signify 2001 and are symbolic for his mother (Agapita, a daisy) and father (Camilio, a sunflower).  The two symbols are reflective of their names in Tewa. There is also a small butterfly which Joseph would almost always include as a symbol for beauty.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is certainly a classic in this realistic period of Joseph’s pottery.

$ 4,200.00

Lonewolf, Joseph – “Standing Fawn & Butterflies” Seedpot (1989)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1998.  The piece is entitled, “Secreted Fawn”.  It includes a signed version of the card which Joseph made for each of his miniatures.  This piece was actually made for our show at the gallery with Joseph and Grace Medicine Flower in 1998.   Joseph wrote partially of this piece,

“Portrayed against a blue sky background is a single realistically designed Mule Deer fawn, most of which are born in June or July.  Nestled, side view, in an abundance of sheltered valley grasses, remote to other members of the heard, the fawn is partially encircled by eight yellow disked, red tipped daisy blossoms, which denote all that is sweet, or pleasant, in life.

Three small realistically designed cabbage white  butterflies, symbolic of beauty in life, are portrayed with the fawn.  two wings about the new born in a delicate, unhurried flight and one alight on the tip of the newborn’s right ear.”

On the back of the seedpot in the red is a Mule Deer buck, doe and fawn sketched into the clay.  They are inspired by the Mimbres pottery designs of the 11th century.  The interlocking rings medallion represents the attachment between friends and was the yearly symbol for 1997.  Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  The piece is signed on the bottom and includes the signed artist card.  There is also a photo of Joseph holding the piece! It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,200.00

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Monday, June 25, 2018

Singer, Mary – Carved Turtle (1975)

Mary Singer was known for her intricately carved pottery and figurative work.  This is one of her iconic turtles.  The turtle is made from clay and then the back and feet are carved. The shell is carved with a feather design.  The entire piece is fully stone polished.  It is signed on the foot, “Mary Singer”.  The piece received a First Prize ribbon at the 1975 New Mexico State Fair.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While she no longer makes pottery, her work can be found in museums nationwide.

$ 800.00

Roller, Tim -Bowl with Sun and Rain Designs

Tim Roller (b. 1959) is a son of noted potter Toni Roller and a grandson of Margaret Tafoya. This is one of the first pieces we have had directly from Tim.  It is a very intricately carved bowl with a story of the clouds, rain and then the sun coming out and the eagle feathers over the mesa.  The complex style of carving is complemented by the burnished surface.  Tim does not make a lot of pottery so it is nice to have a new piece of his work in the gallery!   The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,000.00

Archuleta,  Mary Ester – Clay Turtle Figure (1970’s)

Mary Ester Archuleta is the second youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  While she no longer makes pottery she was active in the 1970’s and 1980’s.  This is one of her few figurative pieces.  It is a clay turtle and the shell is corrugated and then fully polished!  It is really amazing that she could polish all the various angles and edges of the shell and not have it chip!  The piece is fired a dark black.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mary E. Archuleta”.

$ 275.00

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Sunday, June 24, 2018

Tafoya, Agapita – Jar with Carved Cloud and Feather Designs (1950’s)

Agapita Tafoya was the wife of noted potter Camilio Tafoya and the mother of Grace Medicine Flower and Joseph Lonewolf. Agapita created most of her pottery from the 1930’s to the early 1950’s. This jar is from the 1950’s and it is deeply carved and stone polished. The design is a cloud pattern extending down from the neck and a prayer feather pattern extending up from the base.  The piece is fully polished and fired red.  The recessed area has a cream colored slip which was used for contrast with the red clay slip.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Agapita Tafoya”.

$ 350.00

Medicine Flower, Grace – Carved Jar with Feather Design (1960’s)

This jar by Grace Medicine Flower is fully carved and polished.  It is an early piece of her pottery before she began doing the sgraffito work in the late 1960’s.  The jar has 20 carved feathers encircling the piece.  They are deeply carved and it is fully polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 350.00

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Saturday, June 23, 2018

Manymules, Samuel  – Jar with Rounded Swirl Melon Ribs

This  jar by Samuel Manymules has a tall shape with a slight neck.  The melon ribs swirl down from the neck to the base.  The ribs are pushed out in the clay and there is a deep groove separating each rib.  The jar is traditionally fired and the coloration is striking!   The symmetry of each rib adds to the overall appearance of the jar.  The variation from black to red to brown give the piece a sense of motion on the surface.  The browner areas are where it was fired to a higher temperature.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 1,800.00

Manymules, Samuel  – Tall Jar with Impressed Rug Design

This is striking tall jar by Samuel Manymules.  It is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar has angular designs inspired by Navajo Crystal Rug designs (see last image).  Typical of Samuel’s pottery, the designs are not carved into the clay, nor are they applique.  Each row is pushed out in the clay to create the various layers of angles!  It is technically very difficult but the result is striking and gives the jar added dimension.  Samuel had tried this style on a smaller scale but on this jar it has four rows of rug designs! Looking inside the jar you can even see how they are pushed out int he clay.  The entire jar is polished and it is traditionally fired outdoors.  The coloration, which ranges from red to black to brown, where the fire was the hottest!  The color changes as the jar is turned.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 2,500.00

Manymules, Samuel  – Tall Wide Faceted Melon Jar

This tall jar by Samuel Manymules is an unusual shape for his pottery.  It is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The jar has a square mouth and four ribs which swirl from the neck to the base.  They are pushed out from the inside to create the sharp “edge” but the area separating them is flat.  This turns out to be a striking form as the flat sections have fired to deep colorations from black to deep red.  The entire jar is fully polished and traditionally fired to create the coloration.  It is how Samuel places the jar in the firing and the smoke which determine how the colors will range from black to red.  The color changes as the jar is turned but in the photos you get a good sense of the color variations.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 2,375.00

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Friday, June 22, 2018

Garcia, Tammy – Thunderbird Jar (2018)

This new jar by Tammy Garcia is one of her classic shapes with a round body and elongated neck.  The jar is carved with three “thunderbirds” as the design. The birds are inspired by jewelry of the Southwest from the 1940’s and 50’s.  The birds are deeply carved and polished a deep red.  Extending out from them are arrows which are polished tan.  Surrounding them are spiral designs which are simply slipped matte red.  The background she has texturized.  It is interesting to note the various levels of her carving and how she is able to use them to create shadows and emphasize the designs on her work.  Each of the three birds has in set turquoise stone.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  The last two photos are of the piece in process, which is always fascinating!  Tammy has won numerous awards for her pottery and been the recipient of the New Mexico Governor’s award.  It’s not surprising that with the intricate nature of her pottery she makes only about ten pieces of pottery a year.  Yes. Ten!  Yet each piece is unique and expands on her distinctive style and voice in the clay.

We are pleased to be the only gallery in the country to represent her new works in clay!

$ 7,200.00

Tafoya, Margaret -Jar with Swirl Melon Ribs (1970’s)

It is not often that Margaret Tafoya made melon jars during her career. This exceptional pieces is from the 1970’s and it is stunning with the swirl melons. The piece has one of her classic necks and then it is carved with eight melon ribs. They swirl down from the shoulder to the base. The jar is highly polished and fired a shiny black.  It is simply exceptional!  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It’s always great see the expanse of Margaret’s creativity throughout her career.

$ 4,200.00

Youngblood, Nancy – Red & Buff Bowl with Avanyu (2003)

This is a classic red and tan bowl by Nancy Youngblood.  The bowl is deeply carved with a water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece. The avanyu tells the story of the village being saved during a flood. The shape of the avanyu is reminiscent of water coursing through a canyon or arroyo and note how the tongue and tail always intersect.  On this piece Nancy has deeply carved the avanyu into the clay.  The body of the avany is carved with swirls and sharp lighting edges.  It is fully polished red and the remainder of the piece is matte tan.  What you can’t see in the photos, but can feel in person is how perfectly Nancy has sanded the tan areas at the top and bottom of the bowl.  They are perfectly smooth and feel like soft leather.  As with all pottery, the tactile side of holding a piece is always important.  On this bowl it is critical as the smooth surfaces and the sharp edge of the carving, in addition to the coloration, are what make it so stunning! The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nancy Youngblood, 2003”.

$ 5,500.00

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Thursday, June 21, 2018

Naha, Rainy – Solstice Jar

This is an intricately designed jar by Rainy Naha.  She learned to make pottery from her mother, Helen “Featherwoman” Naha.  Rainy continues is a similar style using a white clay slip as the foundation for her work.  This jar  is a classic Sikyatki style with a wide sloping shoulder.  The jar is slipped with a white clay and then painted with natural clay slips and bee-weed (black).  The design around the jar is a striking use of the solstice pattern.  Around the neck are the four phases of the moon.  Below are various Hopi-Tewa designs representing sun, cloud, rain, and corn. Some of the colors are polished and some are left matte.  The painting on the surface is wonderfully intricate and varied.  The jar is signed on the bottom with her name and father hallmark.

$ 1,800.00

Naha, Rainy – Bowl with Interlocking Birds

The “interlocking” or “tumbling” parrots is a design originated by Rainy Naha. This piece has a taller shape, so that the top and bottom parrots are easily seen. The bowl is fully polished with a white clay slip and then there are five sections of interlocking birds.  Each bird is painted with various Hopi-Tewa designs and then additional clay slips.  Rainy uses bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips for her colors. Each piece is traditionally fired.  The bowl is signed on the bottom with the feather hallmark and “Rainy”.

$ 1,600.00

Toya, Dominique – Micaceous Swirl Meon Seedpot

Dominique Toya is known for her intricately carved pottery with sharp ridged melon swirls.  She has created her distinctive style of pottery using native clay and micaceous clay slips for the surface.  This seedpot has 8 deeply carved ribs, each with a sharp edge. The seedpot has a small opening at the top.  After it is carved it is then slipped with an additional mica clay to create the striking coloration.  Looking down from the top it is possible to see how perfectly the ribs spiral out from the opening!  Dominique has won numerous awards for her pottery and continues to be one of the leading Jemez potters working today!

$ 1,000.00

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Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Sahmie, Ida – Miniature “Night Chant” Bowl

This miniature by Ida Sahmie has incredible detail, as one might expect from a great minature in pottery!   It is the Night Chant Dance with eight male Yei-bi-chi dancers encircling the jar.  The background area is fully painted with bee-weed (a plant) to make it black.  In the background, there are the mesas and a fire in the “center”.  This is her attempt to create a “3D” story on the vessel!  Ida also incises into the clay for the faces and the bodies, leather, and masks.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ida Sahmie”.

$ 250.00

Williams, Lorraine – Storage Jar with Eight Yei Figures

This is an exceptional large storage jar by Lorraine Williams.  While she no longer makes pieces this size, the shape and scale of this piece is striking!  The jar has  a rounded base and straight sides.  The shoulder is very sharp and comes across flat to the neck. Technically, this is amazing how she was able to achieve just a flat surface!  On the sides are eight Yei figures and each is different in design.  Above them is a rug pattern and a mountain pattern on the flat shoulder.  There is also a flag design.  The jar has been traditionally fired, which creates the variations in color. Interestingly, these large pieces are fired upside down!  After the firing, it is covered in pine pitch, which is typical of all traditional Navajo pottery harkening back to when it was utilitarian.  Lorraine has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “A Legacy of Generations”.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “LW”.   

$ 1,400.00

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Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Medicine Flower, Grace – Mini Carved Bowl with Avanyu

This miniature bowl by Grace Medicine Flower is fully carved and polished.  The design is a very complicated water serpent encircling the bowl.  The carving is very complex for the size and the entire piece is fully polished. There is one little etched area on the tongue of the water serpent.  The piece is from around 2002 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace M. F.”.

$ 600.00

Medicine Flower, Grace – Jar with Three Deer

This jar by Grace Medicine Flower is fully polished and incised.  The jar has high sides and a short neck. There is a large leaping deer on one side. On the opposite side are two fawns and flowers.  Grace has incorporated additional Pueblo cloud, rain and feather designs.  The jar is from the 1990’s and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.

$ 1,800.00

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Monday, June 18, 2018

Howato, Ramon – Seedpot with Wind Designs

Ramon Howato is a son of noted potter Diana Tahbo.  He learned to make pottery from his uncle, Mark Tahbo.  This seedpot is coil built, painted with bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired.  The piece is fully painted with a variety of cloud, rain and other Sikyatki inspired designs.  The painting seems both traditional in style and yet with a stylistic sense of designs matching the form.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ramon Howato” and a pipe, as he is “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 175.00

Howato, Ramon – Jar with Hummingbirds

Ramon Howato is a son of noted potter Diana Tahbo.  He learned to make pottery from his uncle, Mark Tahbo.  This jar is coil built, painted with bee-weed and native clay slips and traditionally fired.  The jar has four stylized birds painted around the shoulder.  The neck has a checkerboard pattern.  The painting seems both traditional in style and yet with a stylistic sense of designs matching the form.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ramon Howato” and a pipe, as he is “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 375.00

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Sunday, June 17, 2018

Folwell, Susan – “Pueblo Woman, Pueblo Clouds” 3 Tile Set

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This tile set is part of her series entitled, “Peering through Taos Light”.  The design for the tile comes from a painting by Taos Society Artist Victor Higgins.  The imagery has a reclining pueblo woman wearing her moccasins.  The next tile has Higgins signature style “puffy” clouds.  The final is a Pueblo design, emulating the room around her.  These tiles are made from native clay and painted with acrylic.  There are open areas which Susan says, “allows the clay to breathe”.  They each have a lucite stand, as Susan noted that they should not necessarily be static, but allowed to move.  The reverse of the two larger tiles are impressed with a shell design.  Each tile is signed on the back.  The numbers (1/3, 2/3, etc) are to denote that there are three tiles in the set.

“My newest pieces serve as commentaries and reflections on the classic Taos Society of Artists Work. I specifically want to focus on their portrayal of Native Women”.  Susan Folwell
Native Art Magazine, April 2018

$ 650.00

Cling, Alice –  Jar with Elongated Neck

This taller jar by Alice Cling has an elongated shape with a longer neck.  The jar has been vertically polished so you can see the stone marks in the polished surface.  The jar is then traditionally fired to create the coloration.  Note how the fireclouds swirl around the jar creating areas of dark black to deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alice Cling”.  Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 180.00

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Saturday, June 16, 2018

Folwell, Susan – Bowl with Hand Designs

Susan Folwell is known for her innovative and unique Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is polished on the top half and matte below the shoulder.  In the polished section it is fully designed with hand designs.  They are additional cloud and star patterns.  Susan has also included the Folwell family “x’s” as part of the design. The piece was traditionally fired which created the coloration on the rim.  The bowl is signed on the bottom.

$ 500.00

Antonio, Frederica – “Four Design” Jar

Frederica Antonio is renown for her nearly precision perfect-painted pottery. Each piece is coil built and then finely painted.  The black is bee-weed (a plant) and the colors are all various clay slips. Her designs are a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines which are then filled in to create larger images in the squares.  This is a smaller jar which utilizes the shape to focus on the design.  The jar has four large sections of design, wit the rain, snow, wind and corn patterns.  Separating them are linear bands of wind patterns.  The neck of the jar is intricately painted with a checkerboard pattern which is then painted with four different colors representing the four directions.  Check out the detail in the painting on this piece!  It is exceptional!  The base of the jar is concave, reminiscent of historic Acoma jars which were carried on the head.  This combination of thin walls, classic shape and tightly painted design create a piece which is visually  stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,100.00

Naranjo, Madeline – Jar with Parrots in Flight

Madeline Naranjo creates beautifully carved and polished pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This jar is a more classic form with a high shoulder and slight neck.  Around the shoulder of the piece there are two parrots. Each is deeply carved into the clay.  Madeline has portrayed them in flight!  The bodies are matte while the beaks and tail feathers are polished.  Note as well how her matte areas are sanded and perfectly smooth so that there are no indentations or areas where the matte might make a shadow.  Her designs are always innovative and beautifully executed.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 275.00

Da, Jarrod – “Pueblo Bees” Original Pastel

Jarrod Da has created a distinctive style of painting using pastels for his work. Each piece is hand painted and it is amazing how much detail he is able to achieve in each piece!  His new work is a blend of contemporary themes with San Ildefonso and Pueblo imagery.  This piece is entitled, “Pueblo Bees”.  The painting has two bees painted in blue and yellow with Pueblo designs on the wings . They are flying near pueblo painted flowers and with interspersed geometric shapes.  Jarrod wrote of this piece:

“Pueblo Bees was created pondering the modern effect we have on honeybees. This one of three of a series of mixed media pieces. The design work is influenced through a mix of traditional San Ildefonso Pueblo design and modern art deco influences. The fine detail work is done in India ink. This piece is my ode to saving the honeybee and realizing the crucial role they play in this giant organism we call earth.”

The painting is subtle in color but complex in design.  It comes in a black frame and matted. It is signed, “DA 17”.  The photo shows the painting unframed (to capture the detail) and then framed on the wall with other paintings by Jarrod, for scale.

$ 500.00

Da, Jarrod – “Nambe Butterfly” Original Pastel

Jarrod Da has created a distinctive style of painting using pastels for his work. Each piece is hand painted and it is amazing how much detail he is able to achieve in each piece!  His new work is a blend of contemporary themes with San Ildefonso and Pueblo imagery.  This piece is entitled, “Nambe Butterfly”.  Jarrod says of this painting:

“This piece was made after a trip to Nambe falls in northern New Mexico. The design work is influenced from San Ildefonso Pueblo Pottery design along with influences from Deco design. You can see this Deco influence within design elements like the rainbow in the center of the piece with its gradating small circle pattern varying in many colors. The various colors of the circles represents spray coming from the falls and shows that water is not clear but has a whole spectrum of color when light hits it. Traditional Pueblo design is represented through the staircase and kiva designs along with the flower motif in each of the butterfly’s wing is indicative of pottery design.   The butterfly represents the fragility of our eco system and its mission to recreate time and time again.”

The painting is subtle in color but complex in design.  It comes in a black frame and matted. It is signed, “DA 17”.  The photo shows the painting unframed and matted. The second photo is the painting framed on the wall for scale.

$ 1,200.00

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All Contemporary   All Signed Historic

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