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Featured New Additions

Monday, August 21, 2017   

Tahbo, Mark  – Bat Tile

Mark Tahbo learned to make pottery from his great grandmother, Grace Chapella.  His pieces reflect the wonderful symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter.  This tile is made from the traditional red clay at Hopi.  It is painted with a Sikyatki style bat as the design. The bat has additional designs on the wings.  Note as well the stars in the sky.  The piece is signed on the back with Mark’s hallmark, which represents that he is tobacco clan.

$ 250.00

Tahbo, Mark  – Bowl with Moth Pattern

Mark Tahbo learned to make pottery from his great grandmother, Grace Chapella.  His pieces reflect the wonderful symmetry and thin walls of an excellent potter. The designs are painted using native clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  This wide shoulder bowl has the moth pattern which was made famous by Grace Chapella.  The moths are male and female (check out the painting on the heads).  The triangular design to the right of each moth is meant to represent each of the three Hopi mesas.  The bowl is traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom with Mark’s hallmark, which represents that he is tobacco clan.

$ 600.00

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Saturday, August 19, 2017   

Martinez, Maria – Gunmetal Water Jar “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

It’s not often that you see “The Perfect” gunmetal piece by Maria Martinez.  This jar is one of those pieces.  The water jar has a fluted rim and a wide shoulder.  There is a slight indention for the shoulder of the jar. However, what makes it so “perfect” is the firing.  It is so perfectly gunmetal in firing that the surface has a silvery appearance. It even appears more gunmetal in low light! The jar is quite extraordinary as the gunmetal color is created from the heat of the firing.   It is signed on the bottom in the clay,  “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

 

$ 7,200.00

Folwell, Susan – “Hennings at Sunset in the Show” Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This jar is part of her series for, “Peering through Taos Light”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This jar is inspired by the painting “Passing By” by Ernest Hennings.  Susan says of this piece,

“In the painting, it is a scene with the two women walking down the lane. When I was working on this jar in Taos, it was the first snow of the season.  I deiced to make it a snow scene instead of an autumn scene.

The color of the jar is the key to this piece.  It captures the mood of the sky after a snow and at sunset.  The piece is mostly matte, with a single band of the Folwell family “x’s” etched into the clay.  The figures are painted but note the use etching around the plants, which gives them just a slight sense of relief.   Sometimes less is more and the strength of the design is powerful enough for the jar.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 4,500.00

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Friday, August 18, 2017

Youngblood, Nathan – Red Tall Jar, “Tribute to Margaret Tafoya”

This is a stunning red jar by Nathan Youngblood. The shape of the jar is based on the classic water jar, which Nathan has elongated. The jar has a turned out rim and a double shoulder.  The design of the jar is inspired by the work of Nathan’s grandmother, Margaret Tafoya.  The jar has a single bear paw medallion in Margaret’s style. As the jar is turned the opposite side has a water serpent (avanyu) which is cut at a spiraling angle around the jar.  There are several bands of design, each with a different part of the story. The avanyu, the sun and the bear paw medallion.    Each connected to the next. The rim has a triangular design which represent the rain falling in the sunlight.  The jar is very deeply carved and highly polished.  The coloration is a deep red and the base is tan.  It is a beautiful tribute and a stunning vessel in shape and design.

$ 21,000.00

Garcia, Tammy – Tall Canteen with Dragonflies & Flowers (2017)

This is a stunning jar by Tammy Garcia who is known for her contemporary designs and use of traditional clay. This jar is in a canteen shape with a wide body and rounded end.  The jar is carved with flowers and a dragonflies. Each flower has carved petals which are stone polished.  Tammy carved the round sections of various flowers to create a variety of dimensions to the piece.  The top is also and has flowers with raised sections.  Tammy said that at times she could only polish two or three petals at a time to get the high shine she was looking to achieve.  One one side is a large dragonfly medallion with her new style “frame” encircling the figure.  The dragonfly is layered over an area which is stippled with tiny dots into the clay. The center of the dragonfly has two pieces of Sleeping Beauty turquoise.  The jar has been traditionally fired black and that is possibly the most stunning aspect of the work as it has a near gunmetal appearance!  The contrast of the black polished and black matte areas is spectacular!  Tammy is never content with her pottery and each new pieces takes her unique style to a new level.  Tammy has won numerous awards for her pottery for nearly the past 30 years.  Her creative work in clay, glass and bronze is found in museums worldwide.  It is exciting to see how her contemporary work continues to move Pueblo pottery forward with it innovations.  We are proud to be the only gallery currently representing her new works in clay.

$ 18,000.00

Folwell, Susan – “Bringers of Rain” Set

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This large open bowl is part of her new series for, “Peering through Taos Light”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This is a set of pieces, which tell the story both of a painting by EI Couse, but also the importance of water to the Pueblo world.  Susan says of this piece:

 

“There is a painting by EI Couse of Flute Player ceremony at Hopi.   It was a serene image focusing on the dancers asking for rain for the village.  The drop of rain hits a bowl and the water splashes out.  In this water, I painted a reflection of the Flute Player ceremony.  I wanted to reflect the prayers for rain in the puddle of water.  There is the water that is here and the water that is coming.

This is a multi-piece set.  The bowl has a rain drop and the water splashing out. The large flat piece has the painted scene from the Couse painting. There are additional smaller droplets of water to surround the larger piece.  It is a striking, thoughtful and timely set of pieces.  The last photos here are the actual painting for comparison.  The pieces are signed on the bottom.

$ 3,200.00

Namingha, Les – Jar with Carved Hopi Birds

This is a striking carved jar by Les Namingha.  The shape of the jar is round with a slight indention before the neck. The neck is fully painted with orange bird wings and a linear maze design. The shoulder of the jar is carved with stylized Hopi birds with raised corn patterns and pointilism painting inside each bird.  The base is carved with a complex maze pattern, similar to on the rim.  The jar has a very modern style with very ancient designs.  Les is a descendant of Nampeyo and learned to make pottery from his aunt Dextra Quotskuyva.  It is signed on the bottom.

 

 

$ 4,000.00

Youngblood, Nathan – Tri-Color Cloud, Rain and Springs Jar

Nathan has created his own distinctive “polychrome” style of pottery with the use of the red, tan and buff surfaces on his pottery.  This large water jar is an elegant form with an elongated neck.  The entire jar is fully carved! The neck is tan with a walking bear paw design.  The shoulder of the jar is carved with cloud and rain designs and polished red.  The base is the amazing section with the carved areas which extend up from the base. The carving in the negative space areas is always more difficult.  Those areas represent the corn plants and the water springs.  The contrast of the polished red and tan is stunning!  It is an exceptionally intricate jar with sharp edges and complex patterns. The jar is traditionally fired and has a striking contrast between the deep red and the tan polished areas.  On his red and tan pieces, after they are fired, he uses screwdrivers to scrape the background area and the side of the carving.  This can take almost as much time as the carving or polishing itself!  Amazing the amount of time that goes into each vessel and yet how effortless it seems that Nathan is able to capture the beauty of his work.

$ 16,000.00

Namingha, Les – Large Carved Jar with Lightning Designs

This is one of the most complex and largest carved jars by Les Namingha to date.  The jar has separated bands of deep carving with cloud, lightning, rain and bird wing designs.  Each band is deeply carved and painted.  Note the complexity of the carving and the number of sharp angles!  Near the neck are circular carved sections. The coloration and design is stunning on this large jar.  Les is a descendant of Nampeyo and learned to make pottery from his aunt Dextra Quotskuyva.  It is signed on the bottom.

 

$ 7,500.00

Qoyawayma, Al – Cliff Dwelling and Bird Figure Serenity Jar

Al Qoyawayma calls the shape of this jar his “Serenity vase”.  It is a distinctive form with the two overlapping spouts. This polychrome jar is carved with an abstract Hopi style bird on one side.  It has various layers of carving which give added depth to the design. The opposite side has a pueblo cliff dwelling which has areas which are recessed and the entire surface is fully carved!  Note the various shapes of the doors with the “key hole” opening.   All the various colors are derived from native clays.   It is a classic piece with a striking balance of designs and form.

$ 3,900.00

Garcia, Tammy – Birds, Rainbows, Frames and Flowers Jar (2017)

Tammy Garcia is known for her contemporary designs and use of traditional clay. This jar incorporates her evolving style of carving her pieces in various layers in the clay.  There are medallions on each side of the bird.  They have flowers carved in relief which create the “frame” around the piece.  The birds are each delicately carved into the clay and have additional small flowers near them. Each of the birds is slipped with different clays to create the various colorations.  Separating the two are flowers which are carved and stone polished. The jar is a beautiful shape with a round body and slight neck.  The various levels of carving are striking as are the colors and the contrast of matte, polished and micaceous clay surfaces.  Tammy has won numerous awards for her pottery for nearly the past 30 years.  Her creative work in clay, glass and bronze is found in museums worldwide.  It is exciting to see how her contemporary work continues to move Pueblo pottery forward with it innovations.  We are proud to be the only gallery representing her new works in clay.

 

$ 8,800.00

Folwell, Susan – “The Twins” Large Jar

Susan Folwell is one of the exciting innovators in Pueblo pottery.  This large jar is part of her new series for, “Peering through Taos Light”.  The focus is on Susan re-interpreting the work of the Taos Society of Artists. This jar is inspired by a Hennings painting of two twins who moved to Taos. Susan says of this piece:

 

“What attracted me to this painting was the striking look of the twins.  They were the Baumgartner brothers who relocated to Taos.  I appreciated the painting captured the essence of the time they lived.  I wanted to do a flask as the shape to accentuate the landscape.  I went a bit “free” form on the shape, but it billows behind them, like the clouds.  The back panel are flowers local to Taos and New Mexico and the painted and etched the basket on the bottom. I love how the basket seems to be both holding them and they seem to be floating out of it as well.  It’s all like a dream.”

This large jar is both painted and etched.  Note on the figures how Susan has etched away the figures to create both depth and bring out the natural color of the clay.  The “lid” for the flask is cork.  The shape, design and story all fit together perfectly on this amazing large vessel!  The last photos here are the actual painting for comparison.  The pieces are signed on the bottom.

$ 11,000.00

Ortiz, Virgil – “Tahu The Blind Archer: 2180” Tile

This is a classic design on a clay tile by Virgil Ortiz.  The design is taken from his Revolt 1680/2180 series. The figure is Tahu, the Blind Archer. Here she is depicted in her futurist gear in 2180. The face is delicate and intricately painted.  The tile has a wildflower design on the back.  There is also Virgil’s signature “Turkey track” which looks like an “x”.  The tile uses native clay, native clay slips and wild spinach (the black).  The piece is signed on the back. The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

$ 650.00

Qoyawayma, Al – Large Wide Jar with Dancers and Jaguar

Al Qoyawayma often creates vessels based on ancient forms.  This large jar is based on the Gila River forms which were wide and had a low, sharp shoulder.  On this jar, it is fully polished and Al has created a scene with figurative dancers which are pushed out from the inside in the clay. The jar has a procession of dancers encircling the piece.  Each is matte while the area around is polished. The last figure is a small boy and as the jar is turned, he is being chased by a jaguar!  The form and design are both humorous and charming on this piece.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 14,000.00

Namingha, Les – Large Carved Jar with Corn Designs

This is a exceptional large jar by Les Namingha.  Les is a descendant of Nampeyo and learned to make pottery from his aunt Dextra Quotskuyva.  This jar is carved with a series of corn plant extending up from the base and down from the neck. They are stylized and deeply carved.  Les said he chose the coloration so that it would have more of the appearance of a bronze.  The organic coloration adds to the depth of the piece.  The shape is one that Les creates often with the high shoulder and the slight neck. There is something both modern and very ancient about this jar!  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 6,000.00

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Thursday, August 17, 2017

Lucas, Steve – Jar with Grasshopper and Plant Designs

This is a stunning jar by Steve Lucas.  The jar has grasshoppers painted on the top.  This is a very old design and one that Steve said he learned from Dextra Quotskuyva.  Each of the four grasshoppers is painted with red, green and brown clay slips. The colored clays are all stone polished.  Below the very sharp shoulder is a plant design. The bottom of the jar is fully polished with a red clay slip. The black areas are all painted with bee-weed, a plant.  The flow, design and coloration of this jar is exceptional and it is exciting to see such a classic design revived in such a modern style!  The jar was traditionally fired and has slight color variations from the firing.  It is signed on the bottom with his name and an ear of corn (Corn Clan) and a Mudhead Katsina.

$ 2,000.00

de la Cruz, Juan and Lois Gutierrez  – “Blue Corn Maidens and Warriors” Storage Jar

Juan Cruz is creating some beautifully painted polychrome pottery.  He is a son of noted potter Lois Gutierrez.  Lois made the jar and Juan, who is noted for his illustrations, painted the design using natural clay slips..  This is Juan’s first attempt at a large vessel, which certainly requires different skills to paint something so large.  Juan wrote of the scene he painted as follows:

“This jar depicts an array of hero warriors carrying their identifying shields with them as the rush forward into battle.  The Blue Corn Girls look on as the scene is played out.”

The jar is truly polychrome (more than three colors of clay).  Note the intricacy of the painted designs and especially the figures.  They are each distinctive in stance or dress. Each shield is a different design and the designs on the girls dresses are also intricately painted. The jar has been traditionally fired outdoor and overall is a striking coloration.  It is signed on the indented bottom of the jar by both Juan and Lois.  The description is written on the back of a hand painted graphic of a Pueblo woman warrior with an avanyu in the background.  What a phenomenal addition to this piece and the painting helps to better understand how exceptional Juan is with his art.

Juan also won “Best of Pottery” at Gallup Ceremonials in 2017!

$ 7,200.00

Lucas, Steve – Jar with Four Foxes and Two Clays

This is an unique jar by Steve Lucas.  The jar has four foxes painted in the clay encircling the piece.  Each has a section of fully polished red as part of the design.  Below the shoulder is a geometric pattern which is a minimalist version of the coyote.  What is really interesting about this jar is the clay.  Steve mixed several different types of clay together on the rim. See the photo of the rim, and it is possible to see how the two clays look unpolished on the inside and polished on the outside!  The base of the jar is slipped with a brown clay and also fully polished.  It is a striking design and exceptional use of clay.  The jar was traditionally fired and has slight color variations from the firing.  It is signed on the bottom with his name and an ear of corn (Corn Clan) and a Mudhead Katsina.

$ 1,400.00

Moquino, Jennifer – Bear with Feathers and Bear Paw

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and also her amazing animal figures. This bear is fired black.  It is fully polished on its back.  There is a feather pattern and bear paw etched on its back.  Behind the bear paw are kiva steps, lightning and plant designs.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 250.00

Garcia, Shana – Jar with Bird Wing & Kiva Designs

Shana Garcia is known for her very thin walled pottery.  Each piece is coil built and painted with yucca to create the long thin lines.  This jar has a series of bird wing patterns as part of the overall design.  They swirl around the jar creating beautiful op-art imagery.  The rim of the jar is sculptured with three pieces of clay and a fineline bird wing pattern.  Shana said that this meant to represent the birds over the kivas.  It is striking how she is able to combine such traditional imagery with such a modern appearance!

$ 850.00

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Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Begay, Jr., Harrison – Jar with Butterflies, Dragonflies and Handles

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This jar is deeply carved and has a butterfly and dragonflies as the design.  Separating them are cloud and water designs which are carved into the clay. Harrison contrasts matte and polished surfaces to create a striking visual contrast to his pottery. What makes this jar special are the little handles. They are small and fully polished, which is amazing!  They extend from the polished rim to the shoulder. The jar is fired to a near gunmetal appearance.   Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  Harrison has won numerous awards for his work and continues to be one of the leading innovators in Native American Indian pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,100.00

Naha, Rainy – Mini Hummingbird Jar

Rainy Naha learned to make pottery from her mother, Helen “Featherwoman” Naha.  Rainy continues is a similar style using a white clay slip as the foundation for her work.  This jar is one of her tall forms with hummingbirds as the design.  Each pair of hummingbirds are separated by a plant design in the center and a rain design on the rim.  Each bird has a variety of designs derived from classic Hopi pottery. Rainy uses natural clay slips (bee-weed for the black) and a white kaolin clay.  Each of her pieces is also traditionally fired which gives the white a very pearlescent appearance.  It is signed on thbottom with a feather and “Rainy”.

$ 500.00

Begay, Jr., Harrison – Jar with Yei Figure

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This jar is deeply carved and has a Navajo Yei figure as the central design.  As the jar is turned there are feathers extending out from the figure.  There are cloud, wind and a spiraling bird pattern. Note the deeply carved area with the little dots and the rain cloud below.  It is a striking jar with a nearly gunmetal fired surface. The contrast of the polished and matte areas is perfect!  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  Harrison has won numerous awards for his work and continues to be one of the leading innovators in Native American Indian pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,100.00

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Tuesday, August 14, 2017

Tafoya, Margaret – Red Bowl with Mesa and Rain Designs (1980’s)

This  is a smaller red bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1980’s. The bowl is fully polished has a carved mesa and rain pattern.  It is a simple pattern but it wonderfully also has a ribbon appearance.  The the carved line below represents the path taken around the mountains.  It is a simple but striking piece.  The carving is deep and it is highly polished.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,800.00

Martinez, Maria – “Skunk” Plate (Maria + Popovi,1956-9)

This is a charming black plate by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the plate while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The plate is highly polished and is one of his few pieces which has an animal motif.  This plate has a skunk with a plant design.  Popovi Da was an accomplished painter in the San Ildefonso two-dimensional style and this plate captures that style of his art.  The skunk is painted much in the way it was on his polychrome pottery.  It was only from 1956-9  that Popovi painted these pieces, which are among the most sought after and best of his career!   It is  signed on the back in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was made around 1956-9.   The plate is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 6,500.00

Curran, Dolores – Large Polychrome Jar with Feather and Avanyu Design

This is one of the largest polychrome jars we have had from Dolores Curran.  She continues to create intricately incised and painted pottery.  She was inspired to create these red polychrome incised and painted by her husband, Alvin Curran.  He was known for his incised San Juan style pottery in the 1990’s.  This jar is extraordinary in its design!  The jar has a polished rim and there incised feathers and prayer feathers incised into the neck.  Below the feathers is a carved avanyu which is matte.  Below the avanyu are baskets with prayer feathers as the design.  The semi-circular pattern below the shoulder are incised feathers and rain.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips. All the designs are incised (cut very shallow) into the clay!  They are then highlighted with the clay slips.  The base has a micaceous clay slip and the rim has intricately painted designs.  Amazing detail and imagery!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 6,500.00

Simpson, Rose – Large Blindfolded Figure

Rose Simpson is one of the exciting innovative potters working today.  This is an exceptional larger clay figure.  The figure has her classic form and face. There is a blindfold and additional elements on her back. There are embellishments of leather and clay around the figure.  Note the clay tab on the front!  It is a striking and classic piece of her figurative pottery!  Rose continues to expand her style in various museum exhibitions around the US and create new and more dynamic works in clay.

$ 8,500.00

Chino, Rose – Bowl with Rain Designs (1988)

Rose Chino was a daughter of noted potter Marie Z. Chino. This large bowl is painted with rain and cloud designs. The bowl has a very modernist style with the angular painting.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rose Chino”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The bowl comes to us from the collection of Richard Spivey.  It has his code number on the bottom that the piece was acquired in 1988.

$ 450.00

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Monday, August 14, 2017

Martinez, Maria – Gunmetal Long Neck Jar “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

In the 1950's Maria Martinez created a series of pieces which were simply stone polished with no design.  As she primarily made the pottery and polished it this was fitting with the other pieces of her career.  This small bowl is fired with a near gunmetal appearance.  It is possible as the bowl is turned to see how the gunmetal color (which comes from the firing) give the bowl a lustrous appearance.  It is signed in the clay, “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one tiny blister on the piece which can be seen in the photos.

Maria Martinez Signatures

 

$ 5,300.00

Martinez, Maria – Avanyu Plate (Maria + Popovi 570)

This is classic plate by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the plate while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The plate is highly polished and has a near gunmetal shine.  The avanyu is painted with the traditional horn and clouds around the body. There is a slight curve to the surface and the rim.   It is  signed on the back in the clay, “Maria Popovi 570“. The signature indicates that it was fired in May, 1970.   The plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,500.00

Martinez, Maria – “Pueblo Deer” Plate (Maria + Popovi,1956-9), Published

This is a charming gunmetal fired plate by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the plate while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The plate is highly polished and is one of his few pieces which has an animal motif.  This plate has a pueblo style deer painted on the surface.  Below the deer is a plant design.  Popovi Da was an accomplished painter in the San Ildefonso two-dimensional style and this plate captures that style of his art.  The deer is beautifully painted in motion.  It was only from 1956-9  that Popovi painted these pieces, which are among the most sought after and best of his career!   It is  signed on the back in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was made around 1956-9.    The plate is also published in the book, “The Legacy of Maria Poveka Martinez” by Richard Spivey, on page 89.  It is always a plus to have a piece which has been published in a significant book for both future authenticity and value.  The plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 6,500.00

Medina, Sofia – Large Jar with Birds & Zia Sun Designs (1971)

Sofia Medina was known for traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece was coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This is a large jar in the classic Zia shape. There are painted birds with rainbows on two sides.  On the other two sides are the Zia sun design.  The various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  The jar is signed on the lower side “Sofia Medina, Zia”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some slight areas of wear on the surface. The jar comes to us from the collection of Richard Spivey, who wrote “The Legacy of Maria Poveka Martinez” among other books.  He purchased the jar in 1971. Inside there is also some of the basalt temper which is used to make Zia pottery.  Richard noted of this jar, “It is somewhat overfired, but it does not detract from the beauty of his jar”.  Very true!  It is a beautiful jar and exceptional provenance!

$ 1,000.00

Martinez, Maria – “Prancing Deer” Plate (Maria + Popovi,1956-9)

This is a charming black plate by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the plate while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The plate is highly polished and is one of his few pieces which has an animal motif.  This plate has a prancing deer with a plant design below.  Popovi Da was an accomplished painter in the San Ildefonso two-dimensional style and this plate captures that style of his art.  The deer is beautifully painted in motion.  It was only from 1956-9  that Popovi painted these pieces, which are among the most sought after and best of his career!   It is  signed on the back in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was made around 1956-9.   The plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 5,800.00

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Sunday, August 13, 2017

Blue Corn – Bowl with Feather Pattern

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she also made exquisite black-on-black pottery. Her learned to make pottery from Maria Martinez at San Ildefonso. This jar is very highly polished and painted with a feather pattern. There is a striking contrast of the painted areas with the highly polished surface. The shape of the jar is one of her classic shape with the low shoulder. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  The bowl is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a few light surface scratches seen in the photos.

$ 775.00

Begay, L Charley – Jar with Handle (1969)

This jar is by L. Charley Begay.  The jar is coil built and has a handle.  It has been traditionally fired and covered with pine pitch. There is a raised relief design on the rim of the jar.  It received a second place ribbon at the 1969 Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonials and the artist’s name is on the ribbon. The jar comes from the collection of Richard Spivey, known for his books on Maria Martinez.

$ 175.00

Fragua, BJ – Tan Oval Jar with Ribbon Pattern

BJ Frauga is known for her classic style of Jemez pottery. This oval shaped jar has a carved ribbon pattern.  In the carved area it is painted with various clay slips to create a kiva step pattern. The remainder of the jar is fully polished tan, which is the natural color of the clay.  The jar is  signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 300.00

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Saturday, August 12, 2017

Folwell, Susan –  Tall Jar with Dream Ram Dancers

Susan Folwell is one of the great innovators in Pueblo pottery. Her work has made an impact in shape and design, as she tells her own story in clay. This extraordinary jar is beautifully coil built with an undulating form. The surface is etched with a male and female ram dancer on each side.  They are separated by polished ellipses and checkerboard patterns. The color and flow of this piece are extraordinary.  Susan says that it was inspired by a dream and that the clay was her way to tell this story.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 3,000.00

Youngblood, Nancy – Mini Lidded Bowl with 36 Feathers, Avanyu & Ribbons (1982)

Simple perfection for Nancy Youngblood.  This amazing miniature bowl is from 1982 and it reflects why Nancy has been such a force in Pueblo pottery for over 30 years. The mini bowl has 36 carved feathers around the top of the bowl. There is a deeply carved avanyu around the shoulder of the piece.  Take a close look at how deeply it is carved, it is astounding!  The mini lid is perfectly in the opening.  The bowl is highly polished to a stunning shine.  The bowl has two ribbons, a first place from Santa Fe Indian Market and then a Best of Division ribbon as well!  This is definitely a rare find, not only such a deeply carved and complicated miniature, but also the historic importance with the two ribbons!  It is in perfect condition, with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nancy Youngblood Cutler”.    I’ll just say it again, simple. perfection.

$ 2,200.00

Begaye, Nathan – Melon jar with Birds (1985)

Nathan Begaye was a unique innovator among Pueblo and Navajo potters.  His ethnic connection to both Hopi and Navajo let his work flow between the two distinctive styles and yet find their own unique space.  His work used traditional designs, forms and techniques, yet somehow appeared very modern.  This is an exceptional jar by Nathan Begaye  The shape has a low shoulder and a slightly turned out neck. The shoulder has melon ribs pushed out in the clay.  Below the shoulder is very detailed painted Hopi style birds.  Check out the very intricate checkerboard patterns.  I remember watching Nathan create those patterns and work with the various colors of clay, all of which are natural.  It was fascinating how he knew which ones he could polish and which ones to leave matte. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

$ 1,500.00

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Friday, August 11, 2017

Tafoya, Margaret – Large Kiva Bowl (1940’s)

This is large Kiva Bowl by Margaret Tafoya.  It is from the 1940’s. The bowl is unusual for its size and shape.  The “kiva” is an underground ceremonial room, and there is a ladder out of the top.  The representation of the kiva in Santa Clara pottery is the three step shape carved on the rim of the bowl.  iva bowl are always difficult to make with the carved rim, which can crack in drying as well as in firing.  Adding to the complexity of the bowl is that is fully polished on both the inside and outside!  Amazing that it didn’t crack when polishing, as all the additional wet slip can seep through and cause cracks. The bowl is highly polished and striking in appearance.   It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 15,000.00

Blue Corn – Jar with Feather Pattern (1970’s)

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she also made exquisite black-on-black pottery. Her learned to make pottery from Maria Martinez at San Ildefonso. This jar is very highly polished and painted with a feather and mountain pattern. There is a striking contrast of the painted areas with the highly polished surface. The shape of the jar is one of her classic shape with the low shoulder. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one small rub area shown in the photos.

$ 675.00

Blue Corn –  Tall Jar with Feather Design (1970’s)

Blue Corn is certainly one of the most creative potters of her time with a varied used of clays and firing techniques to create her distinctive pottery.  This is one of her distinctive red pieces. The jar is fully polished red and has a feather pattern painted along the body of the piece.  Around the neck is a triangular mountain design. The jar is painted in a buff-on-red style. The highly polished red is in contrast to the matte painted surface.  The jar was traditionally fired to create the coloration.  The jar is signed in the clay on the bottom, “Blue Corn”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,000.00

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Thursday, August 10 2017

Tafoya, Margaret – Jar with Cloud and Rain Designs (1980’s)

This is a striking jar by Margaret Tafoya from the 1980’s.  It has one of her very classic swirling cloud patterns, which encompass the central band of the jar.  The imagery has clouds, rain, mountains and lightning patterns.  What makes it the most interesting is that it is very much like similar designs and shape she made in the 1950’s and yet on a smaller scale.  Of course, by this time she was in her late 80’s, so smaller scale was expected!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,000.00

Quotskuyva, Dextra – Jar with Four Moths (1980’s)

This is an intricate jar by Dextra Quotskuyva.  She is certainly one of the great innovators among Hopi-Tewa potters.  Her work began with more classic imagery and then has evolved over the years to more unique and stylized designs. This piece is from the late 1980’s, which can be see in the color of the red clay, as well as her signature.  The jar is a classic Hopi shape with a high shoulder and a slight neck.  The inside of the neck is a matte red. The outside is fully polished and there are four moths as the design. Each moth has very intricate fineline hatchwork wings.  The wings are also a polished red clay slip.  The remainder of each moth is very delicately painted with thin lines.  The jar is traditionally fired so that there are blushes and color variations around the surface.  It is signed on the bottom with bee-weed, “Detra” with an ear of corn representing the Corn Clan.   The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Dextra has been the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture called, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 2,800.00

Youngblood, Nancy – 32 Rib “S” Swirl Melon Jar with Lid

This is an exceptional larger bowl by Nancy Youngblood.  Nancy is renowned for her melon carved bowls for which she has won numerous awards over the years.  The “s” swirl, where it goes back and forth from the rim to the base, is one of her most famous and visually striking forms. This bowl has 32 ribs, each tightly carved, sharp on the edge and swirling from rim to base.  The way the light hits the surface of the bowl simply perfect.   Amazingly, Nancy says that she can only polish 3 ribs at a time, as they are so time involved.  As well, each rib has two sides and so the actual volume of the bowl is nearly twice that of its size!  Add to that the lid, which continues the melon rib design up above the rim of the jar.  Each of Nancy’s lids is perfectly fit into the top at just one spot.  This jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nancy Youngblood”.  Simply perfect!

 

$ 15,000.00

Martinez, Maria  – Jar with Prayer Feather Designs (Marie + Santana, 1954-6)

This jar by Maria Martinez is one of her classic pieces.  It was made by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana Martinez (the wife of Adam Martinez).  It is very highly polished and has a glassy surface.  The design is a prayer feather pattern which is at an angle and then a cloud and rain design. The painting is very crisp and stands out against the highly polished surface.  There are some small areas which are nearly gunmetal in appearance.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie + Santana”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic!

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 1,800.00

Blue Corn – Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1960’s)

While Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery, she began her career making black pottery. This is one of her earlier pieces from the 1960’s and it is deeply carved with an avanyu.  The style of the carving is much like that seen in other early San Ildefonso potters, with a “cameo style”.  The avanyu encircles the shoulder of the bowl.  The piece is highly polished and fired a deep black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  The bowl is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 575.00

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Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Curran, Dolores – Jar with Flowers, Feathers, Avanyu & Lid

This is an extraordinary lidded jar by Dolores Curran.  She continues to create intricately incised and painted pottery.  This jar is incised with a flower design around the rim, below a mountain pattern.  Separating the flowers are cloud and rain designs.  Below the flowers is an angular mountain pattern and then a series of very tightly incised feathers  which are at an angle.  Note how in all these areas they are incised (which means lightly carved into the clay) and the recessed areas are slipped with a red clay.  Around the shoulder is a cameo style carved avanyu, It is very deeply carved for its size and now all the changes in design as the jar is turned!  The lid of the jar is fully polished and has a cloud motif. There are additional dragonflies painted on the top of the lid and clouds on the top of the rim. The base of the jar is fully polished.  It is stunning in detail for the size!

$ 1,200.00

Trammel, Jennie – Jar with Sun and Rain Designs

Stunning!  This is a stunning jar by Jennie Trammel.   She was a daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  Over the years Jennie did not make a lot of pottery as she lived a very private life and was virtually never involved in markets or gallery shows.  However, she created striking pottery with classic shapes and designs which were distinctive to her work.  Each piece was coil built and it was the carving, with the rounded edges, which was a visual key to her work.  This jar is one of her classic shape with the high shoulder. The band is carved with a sun pattern which turns into mountains, clouds and rain. The design is varied as the jar is turned.  The carving is very deep and the piece is a very deep red.  The background area is matte and the traditional creame colored clay slip. The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Jennie Trammel” in the clay on bottom.   Definitely one of her classics!

$ 4,500.00

Trammel, Jennie – Bowl with Rain and Mountain Designs (1970’s)

This is a classic bowl by by Jennie Trammel.   She was a daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  Over the years Jennie did not make a lot of pottery as she lived a very private life and was virtually never involved in markets or gallery shows.  However, she created striking pottery with classic shapes and designs which were distinctive to her work.  Each piece was coil built and it was the carving, with the rounded edges, which was a visual key to her work.  Like many of her bowls, this one is polished on the interior! This always adds more difficulty to the bowl, as the extra moisture from the additional slip inside the bowl can seep out and cause cracking when polishing.  However, the end result is that the inside of the bowl glows as if there is a liquid inside!  The outside of this piece has deeply carved panels with rain and lightning designs. The bowl is highly polished and striking from the firing. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Jennie Trammel” in the clay on bottom.

$ 1,800.00

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Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Tapia, Tom & Sue – Bowl with Sun and Kiva Opening

This bowl was made and polished by Sue Tapia and etched with designs by Tom Tapia.  It is a very intricate piece of his work as it is fully designed.  The shape of the bowl has a kiva step design on one side.  Around the shoulder is a water serpent and as the bowl is turned there is a Pueblo drummer and Deer Dancer.  The next scene is a Pueblo and bear fetish.  Below the kiva step carved rim is a sun design.  The reddish coloration is added after the firing.  The bowl is signed, “Tom & Sue Tapia”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00

Cordero, Helen – Grandfather Drummer (1970’s)

Helen Cordero is undoubtedly one of the great names in Cochiti pottery.  It was in 1964 that Cordero said she made her first storyteller.  According to her, “I made some more of my Storytellers with lots of children climbing on him to listen, then I took them up to the Santo Domingo Feast Day” and the rest is history.  Her pieces were all males, to honor her grandfather, whom she would hear telling children stories of Pueblo life and culture.  She received the New Mexico Governor’s award in 1982 and the NEA Heritage Fellowship in 1986.  This is one of her classic male or grandfather drummers. Here the figure is holding a drum on his lap and the drumstick in his other hand. Her husband would usually make the drumsticks for her.   Note the intricacy of the painting on the entire piece. She has used a variety of traditional Cochiti designs on the figure.  It is signed  on the bottom, “Helen Cordero”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 9,000.00

Vigil, Robert – Black Micaceous Oval Jar

Robert Vigil learned to make pottery from Lonnie Vigil and Virginia Gutierrez.  Each piece is coil made with micaceous clay and micaceous clay slipped.  They are traditionally fired to create the black coloration.  This jar has a sharp edge and an elongated shape.  The surface is smooth and the coloration is striking.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 150.00

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Monday, August 7, 2017

Medicine Flower, Grace – Seedpot with Pheasant (1980)

This is a striking seedpot by Grace Medicine Flower is from 1980.  It is fully polished and etched with a pheasant as the design on the top of the piece.  There are plants below and cloud and wind designs around the bird.  What is really exceptional on this piece is zoom in on the tan area where she has etched away from the red.  There are very tiny etched half circle designs which surround the bird! Amazing!  The seedpot is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips,cracks restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00

Medina, Marcellus – Jar Buffalo Dancers & Heartline Deer

Marcellus Medina is known for contemporary painted pottery.  The jar is made by his wife, Elizabeth Medina.  Marcellus has painted on the surface with acrylic. The jar has male and female buffalo dancers on the sides. There are additional heartline deer along with Zia style rain clouds. The rain cloud patterns are very tightly painted.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “M. Medina”.

$ 300.00

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Saturday, August 5, 2017

Roybal, Tonita – Carved Jar with Avanyu (late 1930’s)

This is one of the few carved pieces we have ever seen by Tonita Roybal.  She is one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This jar is carved with an avanyu around the body of the piece.  The avanyu is polished while the red of the jar is matte red.  What makes this piece so exceptional is the bottom, which has one of the Santa Fe Indian Market stickers, which they began using in 1936!  It is also signed, “Tonita” in the clay on the bottom.  It is overall in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair and certainly one of the most unique pieces of her pottery we have seen.  It’s exciting to see that she excelled in both carved and painted pottery!

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 2,800.00

Gonzales, Ramona Sanchez – Red Jar with Carved Avanyu (1930’s)

This is a certainly a later jar by Ramona Gonzales.  Ramona was known for her delicately painted pottery.  This is one of the only carved pieces of her pottery we have seen. The avanyu is carved in a cameo style, much like that of Rose Gonzales.  Note how the clouds extend down from the neck and the complexity of the head of the avanyu.  It is an exceptional piece by Ramona.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ramona”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some wear on the surface. This is definitely a significant and rare piece of her pottery.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 1,800.00

Pena, Juanita – Red Carved Bowl with Avanyu (1930’s)

This wide shoulder bowl by Juanita Pena is from the 1930’s and it is carved with an avanyu as the design.  Juanita and Tony Pena had a particular style to their avanyu with the triangular eye.  As well, the carving was more in the “cameo” style, as note that the avanyu is in raised relief. It is the small details which are so striking on their work, such as the polished rim and the polish at the base of the bowl.  It is signed, “Juanita, San Ildefonso” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 850.00

The Search For Juanita Montoya Vigil (1898-1933)

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Friday, August 4, 2017

Montoya, Florentino & Martina – Large Fineline Jar (1905-10)

This is an extraordinary large jar by Florentino & Martina Montoya from around 1910.  Johnathan Batkin wrote about them, “The pottery of this husband and wife team is that of artist and innovators who introduced new materials and techniques to other potters. Martina’s experimentation with shapes and slips, and Florintino’s distinctive painting style facilitate the identification of many of their pots. [They] were active during a period of change in San Ildefonso pottery.”  I have included them in our “Early San Ildefonso Innovators” Show as they are the precursors to the changes and innovations in the 1920’s.  Looking at this jar, is is inspiring in the size, shape and designs.  The jar is thin walled and perfectly formed.  However, as with much of the San Ildefonso pottery, it is the shape which is so extraordinary.  The varied designs as the jar is turned is a hallmark of Florentino. The fineline hatchmark patterns along with the delicate plant swirls are almost unexpected on this large jar.  There is so little repetition that each quarter turn seems to evoke a new jar.  It was pottery like this jar which inspired these Early San Ildefonso Innovators.  Maria and other noted that Florentino was one of the finest painters they knew. His early passing during the influenza epidemic, along with so many others, changed the world of San Ildefonso.  This jar is unsigned but easily attributed to Florentino and Martina by shape and design.  I’ve been pleased that numerous other experts, beyond myself (I won’t claim extensive expertise here) all agree that this is one of their classic and more refined vessels.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair.  There are few small rim chips, but nothing unexpected with its age or size.  Simply said, historically important and a classic!

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 15,000.00

Roybal, Tonita -Tall Red Jar with Feather Designs (Late 1930’s)

Tonita Roybal is one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This is simply a classic long neck jar by Tonita.  The jar is a shape which is visually associated with her pottery. The high shoulder, the elongated neck define the elegance of the shape. The entire piece is fully polished red. The designs are red-on-red with a striking feather pattern separated by a bird tail design. The painting was done by Juan Cruz Roybal, her husband. There are white clay slip areas along with his signature “dots” and the hatchmarks.  The jar is from the late 1930’s and has the sticker of “approval” used at the Santa Fe Indian Market after 1936.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita + Juan”.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

$ 5,500.00

Aguilar, Susana – Large Plate with Butterfly Design (1920’s)

It is not often that we see such a large plate by Susana Aguilar.  This is a striking piece of her pottery from the 1920’s.  It is as much an open bowl as a large plate. The front is slipped and highly polished while the back is wet polished.  The design is very intricately painted with a butterfly or moth as the design.  Interestingly, the word for both “moth” and “butterfly” is the same in Tewa (Thanks for the info Russell!!).  The design combines geometric and fine line elements. The butterfly shape can be seen with antennae at the top, the wings at the side.  I took a variety of different angles for the photos to show off both the polish and the design. The plate is signed on the back in clay slip, “Susanna”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 2,400.00

Gonzales, Ramona Sanchez – Red Jar with Snake Handles (1930’s)

This is an extraordinary jar by Ramona Gonzales.  Ramona was known for her delicately painted pottery.   Not only is this jar red, but it also has handles in the shape of snakes!  It is an exceptional jar with beautifully painted cloud and rain designs. The imagery is outlined in white and then slipped with a red clay slip.  Each of the snakes has just a small bit of design on their backs.  It is fascinating to see such an early San Ildefonso jar with figurative aspects!  Ramona was amazingly innovative for the time!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ramona”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks.  There was restoration on one of the snake heads.  There is some light wear on the surface. This is definitely a significant and rare piece of her pottery.

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 2,000.00

Roybal, Tonita – Jar with Handles and Lightning Designs (1930’s)

Tonita Roybal is one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This amazing long neck jar is simply one of the most unique we have had of her pieces.  The jar has a long neck and two handles on the side.  The neck of the jar is painted by Juan and has a angular lightning pattern. There is also his signature hatchmark designs on the jar.  The handles are also painted with design! However, what makes the jar so dynamic is the gunmetal coloration to the firing.  It is seems to have a glow from within with the overall metallic appearance.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita + Juan”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

 

$ 3,000.00

Gonzales, Juanita – Large Bowl with Carved Rain Designs (1930’s)

This bowl is one of the larger bowls we have had  by Juanita and Wo-Peen Gonzales.  It is carved with the cameo style which Juanita learned from Rose Gonzales.  It has a flowing design on the shoulder with rain and lightning designs separated by mountains.  The carving is deep and perfectly fits the shape of the bowl.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.    The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Juanita”.   It is great to find one of their pieces in such wonderful condition!

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 1,200.00

Martinez, Maxamiliana “Anna” – Black-on-Red Bowl with Sun and Rainbow (1920’s)

This is a striking wide bowl by Maximiliana “Anna” Martinez, who was a sister of Maria Martinez.  It is one of her few black-on-red pieces.  The jar has a sun design (the center checkerboard) with a rainbow pattern above and an overall tablita appearance.  The shape is a classic one for Anna with a wide sharp shoulder.  The red is a very deep coloration on this bowl and the painting creative in style   It is unsigned but easy to attribute to Anna.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 3,800.00

Roybal, Tonita – Black-on-Red Bowl with Mountain & Cloud Designs (1932)

It is very rare that we come across a black-on-red piece by Tonita Roybal.  This bowl is an early piece from the 1920’s.  Tonita and her mother, Dominguita Pino, were both very well known for their black-on-red pottery before the advent of the black-on-black pottery in 1920.  This bowl has beautifully painted designs in the band around the shoulder.  There are mountain, cloud and rain patterns.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. This bowl has exceptional provenance.  It was part of the original collection of Dick Howard and featured in the booklet published on her pottery.  It also has the original Indian Market sticker for 1932!  Amazing!  This is definitely a piece of history, as much as piece of art!

$ 5,500.00

Martinez, Maria – Red Carved Bowl with Avanyu (1930’s), Maria/Julian

This is an exceptional carved bowl by Maria Martinez and her husband, Julian.  Maria would make the pottery and Julian would paint, or in this case, carve, the design.  While he did a variety of carved pieces, this is one of the only ones we have seen with a water serpent (avanyu) as the design! The avanyu encircles the shoulder of the bowl.  Note how it is carved into the negative space, while most other potters carved away around the avanyu, leaving it the polished relief section.  The bowl is from the 1930’s and it is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie + Julian”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 4,800.00

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Thursday, August 3, 2017

Roybal, Juan Cruz – Bowl with Lightning Designs (1940’s)

Juan Cruz Roybal is one of the great painters in San Ildefonso pottery.  He worked on pottery with his wife, Tonita, and often painted for other potters after her death in 1945.  Juan was known for his very distinctive style of painting using fine lines and flowing designs.  This is an unusual bowl which is just signed, “Juan”.  It has his very distinctive style of painting a lightning design.  It may be that he painted on a series of pieces which remained unfinished after the passing of Tonita.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 275.00

Atencio, GIlbert – Red Jar with Feather & Rain Pattern

Gilbert Atencio is a name synonymous with classic two-dimensional style paintings at San Ildefonso Pueblo.  He is undoubtedly one of the most famous of the painters yet he also made a few pieces of pottery throughout his career.  Gilbert was a son of Isabel Montoya Atencio and a nephew of Maria Martinez.  His sister Helen Gutierrez was a well known potter.  This jar has a classic feel to the shape and it is highly polished red.  The design around the neck is a feather pattern with a stylized mountain steppe design separating the sections.  Around the shoulder are checkerboard painted panels and rain designs.  The style and placement of the imagery has a very planned appearance and works perfectly with the shape of the jar.  It is painted with the traditional cream colored clay on the red polished surface. The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a dramatic piece and exciting to see one of the few pieces he made during his career

$ 1,200.00

Naranjo, Florence Aguilar – Polychrome Jar with Cloud, Rain and Snow Designs (1950s’)

Florence Naranjo is a daughter of noted potters Rosalie & Joe Aguilar and a granddaughter of Susana Aguilar.  This is one of her few polychrome pieces of pottery. The jar is fully painted with black and red rain, cloud and snow patterns on a cream background.  The jar is a classic San Ildefonso water jar shape.  It is signed on the bottom, “Florence Naranjo”.  It is good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Click here to learn more about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 400.00

Montoya, Simona Pena – Wide Bowl with Rain Designs (1920’s)

This is one of the only pieces we have ever seen by Simona Pena Montoya Naranjo (1902-82).  She was a daughter of Juan and Isabelita Pena.  She did not make much pottery and this bowl is from the 1920’s.  The bowl is signed, “Simona M.” and that was during the 1920’s when she was first married.  Her second marriage made her a Naranjo.  The bowl has painted triangular designed around the shoulder.  It is fully polished if a bit heavy to one side.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a unique piece!

 

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 175.00

Aguilar, Joe – Polychrome Plate with Birds (1950’s)

Joe Aguilar began his career painting pottery for his mother, Susana Aguilar,  He also made pottery with his wife, Rosalie, through the 1940’s.  In the 1950’s he created a fascinating group of polychrome pottery including both plates and vessels.  He was one of the few potters at the time still using traditional techniques and designs for his work. This plate is a very stylized birds as the design.  The style of painting, with the central square and the spiraling designs is very similar to his earlier black-on-black painted pottery. The plate is signed on the back, “Joe Aguilar + Katherine”.  Katherine was his daughter.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 850.00

Atencio, Isabel – Plainware Black Water Jar

Isabel Atencio was a daughter of Nicolasa Montoya (the aunt who taught Maria Martinez to make pottery) and a sister of Rayita Montoya, Santana Montoya and Alfredo Montoya (the first husband of Tonita Roybal). Among her children Gilbert Atencio is known primarily for is paintings. Her daughters Helen Gutierrez and Angelita Sanchez are both well-known potters.  This is one of her classic water jars, which has been fired black.  It is fully polished to a beautiful shine.  This jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Belle Atencio”.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 475.00

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Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Gutierrez, Margaret Lou Roybal – Large Bowl with Feather Designs

Margaret Lou Gutierrez was the only daughter of noted potters Tonita & Juan Roybal.  She began making pottery in the 1970’s. This bowl is one of the largest we have seen of her pottery.  It is very highly polished and beautifully painted with a feather pattern.  Note how tight and sharp the feather are in the design!   This bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Lou Gutierrez”.

$ 900.00

Atencio, Isabel – Red Turtle

Isabel Atencio was a daughter of Nicolasa Montoya (the aunt who taught Maria Martinez to make pottery) and a sister of Rayita Montoya, Santana Montoya and Alfredo Montoya (the first husband of Tonita Roybal). Among her children Gilbert Atencio is known primarily for is paintings. Her daughters Helen Gutierrez and Angelita Sanchez are both well-known potters.  This is one of her charming turtle figures.  The back is polished while the remainder of the piece is matte.  It is signed on the bottom, “Belle”.  She signed her work both Isabel and “Belle”.  This piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 125.00

Atencio, Isabel & Gilbert Atencio- Buff-on-Red Bowl with Rain Designs

Isabel Atencio was a daughter of Nicolasa Montoya (the aunt who taught Maria Martinez to make pottery) and a sister of Rayita Montoya, Santana Montoya and Alfredo Montoya (the first husband of Tonita Roybal). Among her children Gilbert Atencio is known primarily for is paintings. Her daughters Helen Gutierrez and Angelita Sanchez are both well-known potters.  This is one of her few collaborative pieces with her son, Gilbert. The bowl was made and polished by Isabel and painted by Gilbert.   The design is a plant, rain and mountain pattern.  It is signed, “Belle + Gilbert”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00

Atencio, Isabel – Plainware Red Bowl

Isabel Atencio was a daughter of Nicolasa Montoya (the aunt who taught Maria Martinez to make pottery) and a sister of Rayita Montoya, Santana Montoya and Alfredo Montoya (the first husband of Tonita Roybal). Among her children Gilbert Atencio is known primarily for is paintings. Her daughters Helen Gutierrez and Angelita Sanchez are both well-known potters.  This is one of her later plainware vessels. The bowl is highly polished and fired red.  It is a simple piece, but beautifully polished.  Note the bottom has a classic indention and signed, “Isabel” in the clay.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 275.00

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Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Tafoya, Margaret – Red on Red Bowl with Kiva Step Designs (1960’s)

This  is a smaller red bowl by Margaret Tafoya is from the 1960’s. The bowl is fully polished and has a white outline for the design, which is a series of kiva steps and rain clouds.  There are areas that are filled in with the red clay which accentuate the design.  While it is a smaller bowl, it is very detailed in its design.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret”.  It is in very good good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,600.00

Martinez, Maria – Plainware Bowl “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

In the 1950’s Maria Martinez created a series of pieces which were simply stone polished with no design.  As she primarily made the pottery and polished it this was fitting with the other pieces of her career.  This small bowl is fired with a near gunmetal appearance.  It is possible as the bowl is turned to see how the gunmetal color (which comes from the firing) give the bowl a lustrous appearance.  It is signed in the clay, “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one tiny blister on the piece which can be seen in the photos.

$ 950.00

Aragon, Rachel – Rain and Rainbows Olla

Rachel Aragon is known for her classic Acoma pottery.  This water jar or “olla” is a classic Acoma shape with a high shoulder and slightly turned in neck.  The jar has a rainbow band encircling the piece in red.  Inside the rainbow are rain and tiny cloud patterns.  The delicate lines are inspired by classic Acoma pottery from the late 1800’s.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 500.00

EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED: The Ceramic Art of Les Namingha

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Monday, July 31, 2017

Sale!
King, Charles S., “Spoken Through Clay”

Spoken Through Clay

A NEW  RELEASE SPECIAL:  $95.00, including shipping (US)! Extended Through September 1, 2017

 Just a few things which make this book unique!
*   The size!  The book is 11.75″ x 14.25″ and weights over 8 pounds!
*  The photography of the pottery is stunning, emphasizing the individual pieces.
*  Each caption is the artist discussing the individual piece on the page.
*  The artist “biographies” are from interviews with the artists and they discuss their art, culture, lives and history.
*  Organization: The book is not organized by pueblo or family, but entails new ways to think about the future of Native pottery.
*  Printing in Italy gives the book very high quality color and paper.
* The photos of the living artists were taken by Will Wilson using a tin-type process. He was a recipient of the 2107 New Mexico Governor’s Award for the Arts in photography!
*  The book features work by more than 30 contemporary potters and more than a dozen important historic potters.
*  There are essays by myself, Peter Held and Eric Dobkin.  They add to the overall understanding of the project a historic perspective.

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“It’s one of the things that makes us who we are. It’s what holds our family together. We are a family of potters. It’s our identity. People don’t realize how much work goes into it just processing the clay and making it. You have to do it with your heart.”—Linda Tafoya-Sanchez

 

FEATURED ARTISTS Grace Medicine Flower • Dextra Quotskuyva • Autumn Borts-Medlock • Jody Naranjo • Harrison Begay Jr. • Jordan Roller • Sara Fina Tafoya • Lonnie Vigil • Margaret Tafoya • Steve Lucas • LuAnn Tafoya • Loren Ami • Toni Roller • Popovi Da • Linda Tafoya-Sanchez • Mark Tahbo • James Ebelacker• Yvonne Lucas • Jeff Roller • Lisa Holt • Harlan Reano • Nampeyo • Jacquie Stevens • Nathan Youngblood • Jacob Koopee Jr. • Jennifer Moquino • Christopher Youngblood • Maria Martinez • Tony Da • Tammy Garcia • Virgil Ortiz • Joseph Lonewolf • Johnathan Naranjo • Nancy Youngblood • Les Namingha • Russell Sanchez • Christine McHorse • Richard Zane Smith • Rondina Huma • Susan Folwell • Dominique Toya • Jody Folwell

Spoken Through Clay features the pottery of iconic Native American artists from historic potters Nampeyo and Maria Martinez, to contemporary potters Tammy Garcia, Virgil Ortiz, and many others, are featured in a new book published by the Museum of New Mexico Press. Spoken Through Clay: Native Pottery of the Southwest showcases nearly three hundred pottery vessels from the acclaimed Eric S. Dobkin Collection, covering a wide range of mostly Pueblo artists from the Southwest.

“The physical scale of the vessels combined with the depth of the contemporary collection [is] breathtaking,” says author Charles S. King. The book is part of a “transitional process of looking to the clay, the vessel, and the potter’s voice and allowing the pieces to stand on the merit of their artistic integrity.”

The book includes portraits and voices of renowned potters speaking about their artistry and technique, families, culture, and traditions. Many of the artists are connected by Pueblos, generations, or family members. Dynamic color photography captures the depth and dimension of the pieces, while the artists provide an illuminating perspective through narrative captions. Artists, academics, collectors, family members, and gallerists add additional insight about the lives, historical context, and importance of these potters and their work.

SPOKEN THROUGH CLAY Native Pottery of the Southwest The Eric S. Dobkin Collection
By Charles S. King Essay by Peter Held

Artist portraits by Will Wilson
ISBN: 978-0-89013-624-9

352 pages, 320 color plates, 40 artist portraits

Publication Date: August 01, 2017
ABOUT THE AUTHOR Charles S. King is the author of Born of Fire: The Life and Pottery of Margaret Tafoya, The Life and Art of Tony Da, Virgil Ortiz: Revolt 1680/2180, and numerous articles on Pueblo pottery. He has served on boards of art associations, judged pottery at prestigious events, and lectures about the art form. His business King Galleries represents many of today’s leading Native potters and important historic works in clay. Charles lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

$ 125.00 $ 95.00

Garcia, Tammy – “Another Fish Tale” Carved Jar (2004)

Tammy Garcia is known for her contemporary designs and use of traditional clay. This jar was made in 2004.  It is a fascinating shape with a carved edge that swirls out from the inside of the mouth to the base.  Looking at the inside of the bowl you can see how the edge begins and swirls outward. The design, like much of Tammy’s work, tells a story. This one has the figure holding up his hands with the outline of a fish about.  Obviously telling the story of how big the fish was that got away.  As the jar is turned one can see the fishing pole and the smaller fish that are jumping in the water.  Surrounding the figure and fish are very complicated carved designs which add to the complexity of the piece.  It is no wonder her work takes to long to create, with so many angles and such intricate carving.  All the surfaces are fully polished.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Tammy has won numerous awards for her pottery for nearly the past 30 years.  Her creative work in clay, glass and bronze is found in museums worldwide.  It is exciting to see how her contemporary work continues to move Pueblo pottery forward with it innovations.

 

$ 8,800.00

Medicine Flower, Grace – Large Seedpot with Hummingbirds (1980)

This is a large seedpot by Grace Medicine Flower is from 1980.  It is fully polished on the top and very intricately etched with hummingbirds and butterflies.  There is a central plant design which swirls up from the side of the bowl.  Note all the tiny feathers etched into the design!  Each of the birds is different, and it is elegant how the plant spirals up across the surface.  Note in the lower right hand side of the design, the small sun headdress, which is a classic part of the Lonewolf family designs.  The area surrounding the polished surface is micaceous.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,000.00

Tafoya, Margaret – Large Jar with Rain & Kiva Step Designs (1950’s)

This is an exceptional large carved jar by Margaret Tafoya.  It is from the 1950’s and it is featured on page 12 of the book, Born of Fire.  The jar is an elegant form with a wide, round shoulder and sloping neck. The entire jar is fully polished.  However, it is not the shape or size which makes it exceptional, it is the carved band of design.  Most likely this jar was designed by Margaret’s husband, Alcario.  He was known as one of the best pottery designers at the Pueblo and withing the Tafoya family.  His designs are renowned for their complexity and his innate ability to match form and design.  This jar has a design which is varied around the entire surface.  Rain clouds lead to rain which lead to the mountains which transform into the kiva steps.  It is a beautiful story and in terms of the complexity, it is possible to see how influential he was in the work of his grandson, Nathan Youngblood, as well as others.  The polishing and firing on this large jar are visually striking, as it has a very glassy appearance. The jar is in exceptional condition, which is not always the case for such large vessels from the 1950’s.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

$ 18,000.00

Youngblood, Nancy – Miniature Red & Tan Box (1980)

While Nancy Youngblood is known for her swirl melon bowls and carved pottery, she started out her career making miniatures.  This miniature is from 1980 and it is one of her few early boxes.  Around the shoulder of the box it is very deeply carved with a tan polished avanyu.  The background area is slipped red.  The lid of the box is also very deeply carved with an avanyu.  It is exceptional how deeply she is able to carve into her her pottery relative to the size of the piece!  This box is in excellent condition and it is signed on the bottom, “Nancy Youngblood”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,950.00

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Sunday, July 30, 2017

Garcia, Jessie – Very Large Owl Figure (1970’s)

Let’s just start with this owl figure being almost 12″ tall!  Jessie Garcia is one of the great names in Acoma pottery.  Between 1950 and 1970, she along with Lucy Lewis and Marie Z. Chino, led the revival of Acoma pottery.  There is a history of owl figures at Acoma but most are smaller and few are as detailed as the work by Jessie Garica.  This large owl is coil built and hollow.  It is painted with the red clay slip and bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired. The owl is signed under the wing.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is an excellent piece of her figurative pottery.

 

 

$ 1,250.00

Chino, Marie Z. – Large Seedpot with Lightning Design (1971)

This is an exceptional large seedpot by Marie Z. Chino.  The piece is from 1971 and it is a tightly painted piece by Marie Z. Chino, one of the great revivalist potters of Acoma Pueblo.  This piece is coil built, painted with bee-weed (a plant) and traditionally fired.  The design is a very complicated black and white lightning design. The pattern alternates with black areas and fine-line areas. The complex pattern has a very dynamic appearance to the eye.  It was inspired by Chano Canyon black and white style pottery.  This piece received a Blue Ribbon at the 1971 Gallup Intertribal Ceremonials.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,200.00

Gutierrez, Margaret & Luther – Wedding Vase (1970’s)

This wedding vase is Margaret and Luther Gutierrez. Margaret would make the pottery and Luther, her brother, would paint the surface.  They were one of the few potters creating polychrome pottery.  This wedding vase has a corn, raincloud and rainbow pattern in the center and Yei figures going up the spouts.  All of the colors are from natural clay slips.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Margaret/Luther”.

$ 2,500.00

Garcia, Sarah – Fineline Bowl (1970’s)

Sarah Garcia (1928-2015) was born at Laguna Pueblo to Maria Trujillo.  However, she spent her adult at Acoma Pueblo.  She, along with Jessie Garcia, Lucy M. Lewis, and Marie Z. Chino, were largely responsible for the revival of Anasazi and Tularosa designs on contemporary Acoma vessels.  Her daughter Goldie Hayah continues making pottery.  This is a classic Acoma jar with very tightly painted fineline patterns.  Note how the fine lines create interlocking patterns.  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Sarah Garcia”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 475.00

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Saturday, July 29, 2017

Shupla, Helen – Large Melon Jar with 22 Ribs

Helen Shupla is famous for her carved pottery as well as her exceptional melon bowls.  Her melon jars are the traditional style with the ribs pushed out in the clay.  This melon jar has ten ribs which are wide and there is a narrow groove separating each of the ribs.  The jar is Helen Shupla is certainly most famous for her exceptional melon jars.  Her melon jars are the very traditional form with the ribs pushed out in the clay.  This large melon jar is one of her classic shapes with the wide shoulder and slight neck. Each of the 22 ribs are pushed out into the clay.  She would do this by placing her fingers inside the bowl and pushing against the clay from both the inside and outside!  The entire piece is fully polished and fired black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 3,000.00

Garcia, Tammy – Jar with Butterflies & Melon Rib Cloud Swirls (2000)

Tammy Garcia is known for her contemporary designs and use of traditional clay. This jar was made in 2000.  It is a striking shape with with a round body and small neck.  The design is a series of six butterflies encircling the jar.  They are slipped with a brown polished clay and the heads are matte red.  Near the base of the jar are flowers and Tammy has creatively used the angular melon ribs to represent the air, clouds and paths of the butterflies!  The piece has an elegance of form and flow of design in every direction it is turned.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition, with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. Tammy has won numerous awards for her pottery for nearly the past 30 years.  Her creative work in clay, glass and bronze is found in museums worldwide.  It is exciting to see how her contemporary work continues to move Pueblo pottery forward with it innovations.

$ 25,000.00

Medicine Flower, Grace – Black Carved Bowl with Butterflies & Hummingbirds (1989)

Grace Medicine Flower is one of the masterful potters of Santa Clara Pueblo.  She began with sgraffito (etching) technique in her pottery around 1970 and was always creative in her forms and designs.  This is one of her distinctive black pieces that is fully carved and etched. The bowl is carved with flower petal swirls coming up from the base.  There are additional cloud patterns which swirl up to the carved rim.  In two of the cloud swirls are etched hummingbirds and butterflies.  The opposite side has a medallion with a single hummingbird and iris flowers.  The bowl is very highly polished and has her typical perfect polish!  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is from 1989.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While Grace has now retired from pottery, her work remains elegant and stunning!

$ 2,500.00

Lucas, Steve & Yvonne – Jar with Sunface Designs

This is an stunning large jar by Steve Lucas and his wife Yvonne.  Steve said that this is only the third or fourth collaborative piece they have ever made!  The jar was made by Yvonne and she also did the white clay slip.  Interestingly, this can take four to six coats of the white clay to create the right color and consistency to the surface.   The jar was painted by both Steve and Yvonne. The shape is beautiful with the tall shoulder and the elongated neck.  The top area is slipped with a red micaceous clay.  The design is very detailed in the imagery and a visually striking combination of both Laguna Pueblo and Hopi imagery.  The sunface is derived from the Hopi Sun (Tewa) katsina.  It is tightly painted on a white clay slip background.  It is the surrounding imagery beyond the sunface and also separating each section, which is reflective of Laguna pottery.  The precision of the painting and how it fits the form is perfect.  The jar is traditionally fired and has slight color variations from the firing.  It is signed on the bottom with Steve Lucas’s name and an ear of corn (Corn Clan) and a Mudhead Katsina along with Yvonne’s name.  It is not often that we get such a beautiful collaborative piece of their pottery!

$ 4,000.00

Swentzell, Roxanne – Clay Mask with Hands Design

This is an original clay piece by Roxanne Swentzell.  She is well known for her clay masks and their unique expressiveness.  This mask has two hand prints painted on the sides of the face. There is a very serene appearance.  The mask has a metal museum mount stand made for it.  It is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed in the clay, “ROX”.

$ 2,500.00

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Friday, July 28, 2017

Sanchez, Russell & Arthur Lopez – Virgin of Guadalupe & San Ildefonso Roses

Russell Sanchez (San Ildefonso) and Arthur Lopez (Hispanic), have created unique collaborative works for the first time this year.  The vessel was made by Russell and stone polished with a black clay. The wood sections were carved by Arthur.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and water color pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.  Russell uses traditional clay from San Ildefonso, which is then coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  These are the time involved and historic foundations for this collaboration.

This oval clay vessel is the foundation for the “Virgin of Guadalupe” wood bultos added to one side.  The back is etched with roses and inset with Lone Mountain Turquoise.  The sides of the jar are inlaid with multi-color heishi beads.

Arthur and Russell say of this piece:

The Virgil of Guadalupe is the patron saint of Mexico.  She is depicted with brown skin, an angel and moon at her feet and rays of sunlight that encircle her.   According to tradition, the Virgin Mary appeared to an indigenous man named Juan Diego on Dec. 9, 1531.  Juan was told to take a message to the local bishop to build a church.  When he was ignored, he returned and the inside of his robe was filled with roses in the middle of winter.  When he opened his robe the roses fell to the ground and the Virgin’s image appeared on his cloak.  The Virgin of Guadalupe is therefore associated with Roses.  The back of the jar has San Idlefonso style roses.  The multicolor hei-shi is for the rainbow and also all the colors of the world.  The colors of the world represent light and all the people of the world.

$ 7,000.00

Sanchez, Russell & Arthur Lopez – Mother of Sorrows/Sacred Heart

Russell Sanchez (San Ildefonso) and Arthur Lopez (Hispanic), have created unique collaborative works for the first time this year.  The vessel was made by Russell and stone polished with a black clay. The wood sections were carved by Arthur.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and water color pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.  Russell uses traditional clay from San Ildefonso, which is then coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  These are the time involved and historic foundations for this collaboration.

The jar is polished with a black clay slip.  The rim is polished a deep red.  Russell has included two bands of copper leaf and inset hei-shi beads.  The sgraffito design is meant to complement the carved figurative work.

The clay vessel made by Russell Sanchez in a stylized form of the Sacred Heart. The wood panel on the front, and the wood sword, were carved by Arthur Lopez. The figure represents the Mother of Sorrows and the sword is symbolic of how Mary’s heart was broken seven times during the Passion.   Asymmetrical heart shape also has the ‘blood’ coming from the wound, represents the pain a mother is always feeling for their children.

$ 7,800.00

Sanchez, Russell & Arthur Lopez – San Isidro the Farmer Saint Box

Russell Sanchez (San Ildefonso) and Arthur Lopez (Hispanic), have created unique collaborative works for the first time this year.  The vessel was made by Russell and stone polished with a black clay. The wood sections were carved by Arthur.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and water color pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.  Russell uses traditional clay from San Ildefonso, which is then coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  These are the time involved and historic foundations for this collaboration.

“San Isidro” is a charming piece which is both modern and historic in style.  The box was made by Russell Sanchez and the wood lid by Arthur Lopez.  The box is polished with a red clay slip and painted with black mica in the checkerboard near the base.  The lid depicts San Isidro, known as the Farmer Saint and for his piety to the poor and animals.  Here Arthur has depicted him surrounded by the bounty of his farm and a modernized version of the figure kneeling in prayer.  Around the sides are scenes depicting the farmland with an angel plowing the field in on scene and the crops sprouting in another.  Separating them are polished sections where Russell has etched Pueblo plants in bloom.

Russell and Arthur say about this piece:

The story of San Isidro told in New Mexico is that Isidro was always working in the fields and didn’t have time to go to church. God sent an angel to plow the fields so he would have time to pray.  The figure of San Isidro on the top of the box is him praying after a bountiful harvest.  The checkerboard at the bottom represents the heaven and earth, the two worlds.  The plants on the side are sprouting with the rain.  The brown hei-shi represents he earth and soil while the green hei-shi represents the crops.

 

$ 7,400.00

Sanchez, Russell & Arthur Lopez – Immaculate Conception & Avanyu Jar

Russell Sanchez (San Ildefonso) and Arthur Lopez (Spanish), have created unique collaborative works for the first time this year.  The vessel was made by Russell and stone polished with a black clay. The wood sections were carved by Arthur.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and water color pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.  Russell uses traditional clay from San Ildefonso, which is then coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  These are the time involved and historic foundations for this collaboration.

The jar has a black and red polished surface. The neck and base are polished black and there are very classic San Ildefonso style handles.  The central band is polished with a deep red clay. There are inset bands of turquoise hei-shi beads.  The coloration of the firing of the black is deep and a striking complement to the deep red.

Arthur and Russell said of this jar:

This jar combines to similar concepts, the Immaculate Conception and the pueblo Avanyu.  The vessel is a classic San Ildefonso water jar.  The black, red and tan are representative of the San Ildefonso polychrome pottery.  The jar is a “pot within a pot”, where the outer pot represents the acceptance of the pueblos of Catholicism.  People looked at the religion and not how it was forced on the pueblo people.  The avanyu (water serpent) encircling the back of the jar is representative of the avanyu as a symbol of cleansing.  In a similar manner the wood lid is a representation of the Immaculate Conception.  The painted section is painted in a Spanish style and has baby Jesus and a lamb, representing ‘the Lamb of God’.  So, much as the, “lamb of God washes away the sins of the world”, the avanyu is a cleansing force in the Pueblo world.

$ 11,500.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Red & Black Bear with Checkerboard and Sun Design

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This bear is one of his classic shapes.  This bear is polished with a deep red clay slip.  The front has a sun pattern with a black mica clay line design in the center. The sun pattern is one that is inspired by the early pottery of Tonita Roybal.  The black of the bear has a black matte section along with a traditional San Ildefonso rain design.  The bear has a heartline which is etched into the clay.  The heartline which extends out from the mouth of the bear. The bear is a symbol of strength and the heartline is a traditional image used to symbolize the heart as the center of power in the animal.  The bear is hollow as the piece is coil built.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 3,800.00

 

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, July 27, 2017

Moquino, Jennifer – Red Fox Clay Figure

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and also her amazing animal figures! This is one is a red fox.  The back is fully polished and etched with a fox track, feather and flower design.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 450.00

Moquino, Jennifer – Praying Mantis Clay Figure

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and also her amazing animal figures! This unique piece is one of her few insects, a praying mantis!  The figure is all clay and the back is fully polished. The designs are rain and flower patterns.  Note the flowers going up the neck!  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 300.00

Roybal, Tonita – Oval Shallow Bowl with Lightning Designs (1920’s)

This is a charming open bowl by Tonita Roybal, from the 1920’s.  It is either a small plate or a small dish.  It is oval and has a slight rim.  The bowl is painted on the inside with a lightning and cloud pattern.  The piece is polished which creates a strong contrast for the design.  The bowl is signed on the back in the clay, “Tonita”.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair. There are few tiny dings on the rim.  Amazingly, the center of the piece is in excellent condition!

 

$ 675.00

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Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Simpson, Rose – “Sky” Clay Figure

Rose Simpson is one of the exciting innovative potters working today.  This is an exceptional articulated figure of her work in clay.  The figure is entitled, “Sky” and it can be hung on a wall or we had a metal museum mount made for the piece.  She has painted the clay face and written “Sky” on the chest.  The legs and hands are also clay. The arms are a combination of clay and metal beads.  The legs and arms are all attached and free moving.  She wrapped the figure with a piece of cloth.  The figure, like much of her work, is edgy and intricate. Check out the complexity in the face, hands and legs!  Rose continues to expand her style in various museum exhibitions around the US and create new and more dynamic works in clay.

$ 2,500.00

Folwell, Polly Rose – Mini Plainware Jar

Polly Rose Folwell is known for use of classic designs on her traditional inspired Santa Clara pottery. This jar is coil built and stone polished.  It is fired brown, a style which is a hallmark of Polly’s pottery.  The firing has created a color variation across the entire surface. It is thin walled and the combination of shape and firing is striking.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 125.00

Namingha, Les – Contemporary Hopi Birds

Les Namingha is one of those potters who continues to defy expectations in his innovative clay art.  This jar is an elegant shape with a high shoulder.  It has a series of stylized Hopi birds encircling the piece.  The birds are outlined in white and then highlighted with pointilism dots. The neck has an even more intense and dramatic array of the dots in various colors.  This is a complement to the dots in the geometric pattern on the base.  The contrast of the various colors and the matte/glossy surfaces adds to the impact of this jar! Les continues to be excite us with each new piece and it’s great to see how he has brought such thought to one vessel!  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 3,000.00

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Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Gonzales, Cavan  – Polychrome Bowl Rainbow Band Design

This bowl by Cavan Gonzales is classic design in polychrome pottery.  Cavan is a descendant of Maria Martinez and a son of Barbara Gonzales.  He is one of the few potters at San Ildefonso who continue to paint traditional polychrome pottery. This bowl has a rainbow pattern painted around the shoulder.  There are four inset pieces of turquoise near the neck. At the shoulder he has painted a scalloped cloud pattern. T he use of the red, black and cream color is striking.  The bowl is signed on the bottom.

 

$ 1,000.00

Gonzales, Cavan  – Black Clay Big Horn Sheep

This large clay Big Horn Sheep is made out of clay by Cavan Gonzales.  Cavan is a descendant of Maria Martinez and the son of Barbara Gonzales.  This piece is polished on the front and then mica slipped on the back.  It has been fired black.  The use of the Big Horn Sheep is a symbolic representation of one’s own self worth.  There are inset bands of hei-shi in turquoise and shell.  It is a striking contrast of matte and polished surfaces.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 850.00

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Monday, July 24, 2017

Folwell, Jody – Large Jar with Buffalo and Wolves

Jody Folwell is known for her creative pottery shapes and designs.  This is a very tall jar and the rim has an asymmetrical form, for which she is known. The jar is polished with a slip which fired a greenish-brown. There are lightning patterns across the surface which are a matte red.  Around the entire jar are a series of etched wolves and buffalo.  Some are etched and some are just painted with a white clay slip.  They are in different directions and different degrees of motion.  The size and coloration with the green, red and white is striking.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Jody”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,800.00

Tafoya-Sanchez, Linda – Large Jar with 55 Feathers & Fluted Rim

Linda Tafoya-Sanchez is a granddaughter of noted potter Margaret Tafoya and she is know for her carved pottery.  This large jar has a fluted rim, which is fully polished. This is technically difficult as the undulating form of the rim can crack during polishing or firing. The body of the jar is fully carved with 55 feathers, each of which is fully polished!  There is a single matte band above and below the feathers and the bottom is also fully polished!  The glossy appearance to the bowl from the firing is striking.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Linda Tafoya-Sanchez”.

$ 2,800.00

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Sunday, July 23, 2017

Gonzales, Cavan  – Polychrome Plate with Old Style Avanyu

This plate by Cavan Gonzales is a beautiful example of both his clay and painting skill.  As a form, many Pueblo potters dislike to create plates, as they break frequently while drying and firing.  Cavan is one of the few who has been making this form most of his career.  This plate is polychrome with the very oldest style of Avanyu design known.  In the center is a single inset piece of turquoise and 6 inset pieces of coral.  The pattern is a series of interlocking avanyu “tongues” which circle around the plate.  It is signed on the back in the clay.

 

$ 325.00

Gonzales, Cavan  – Red Clay Big Horn Sheep

This large clay Big Horn Sheep is made out of clay by Cavan Gonzales.  Cavan is a descendant of Maria Martinez and the son of Barbara Gonzales.  This piece is polished on the front and then mica slipped on the back.  It has been fired red.  The use of the Big Horn Sheep is a symbolic representation of one’s own self worth.  There are inset bands of hei-shi in turquoise, coral and shell.  there is also an additional inset piece of turquoise near the neck of the Big Horn Sheep.  It is a striking contrast of matte and polished surfaces.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 800.00

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Saturday, July 22, 2017

Martinez, Maria   – Gunmetal Fired Bowl “Maria + Popovi 869”

This bowl is a simple but stunning piece by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the bowl while it was fired by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). Popovi focused on both the painted surfaces of the pottery as well as the firings.  This bowl is a true gunmetal with a metallic appearance across most of the surface.   The glassy shine is nearly perfect!   It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria / Popovi 869”.  The firing date is when the pottery was made, so this bowl was from August, 1969. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Great gunmetal fired pieces by Maria and Popovi with such high polished surface are always stunning and a great addition to any collection!

$ 2,200.00

Tafoya-Sanchez, Linda – Swirl Melon Bowl with 25 Ribs

Linda Tafoya-Sanchez is a granddaughter of noted potter Margaret Tafoya and she is know for her carved pottery.  This bowl is one of her few fully polished melon bowls.  It has 25 rounded ribs which swirl from the neck to the base. They are each fully stone polished for a high shine.  It is always more difficult to create the ribs at an angle than to do them linear from the neck to the base and the result is visually striking.  The bowl is signed in the clay on the bottom, “Linda Tafoya-Sanchez”.

 

$ 1,600.00

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Friday, July 21, 2017  

Ortiz, Virgil – “Bi-Furcation” Figure, Taboo Series

This figure by Virgil Ortiz is part of his new series, “Taboo”.  The figure is coil built, rag polished and painted with wild spinach (a plant) for the black.  The figure is all one piece and the designs painted with geometric patterns. Virgil is able to use these strong linear patterns to emphasize the forms he created in the clay. Note the turkey track design at the point of connection between the two figures.  Figures such as this are originally inspired by the Monos figures of the 1880’s. They were created to express social commentary, much as Virgil’s work is commentary today.

He says of Taboo:

“Creativity comes to me from continuing the story of my Cochiti people and how we see the world around us.  Our art from the late 1800’s told the stories of what those people were experiencing at that time.  That opened the door for me to use Taboo topics to engage people about today’s society, culture, politics, religion and even social media.  There are so many issues that people are increasingly afraid to talk about.  It’s important to show the type of imagery I’ve painted for “Taboo” and record it, even if people are afraid of it or it makes them uncomfortable.  I want to demonstrate that Native artists can innovate while using traditional methods.  We don’t have to be pigeonholed by those who want the same piece of pottery over and over again.  It’s time to give the voice back to the clay.”

Virgil writes of his particular figure…

“It’s not all black or white, passion or pain, male or female.  I painted this double figure with one side appearing darker and the other lighter.  Symbolically, it is represents the irrelevancy of the skin color of any person.  More importantly, the figures are a couple, joined together yet seemingly pulled apart. While they are male, the gender here is unimportant.  The key is that they are holding on to each other, fighting to be accepted. I wanted to create the feelings of passion, struggle, acceptance, love, unity, and eternity.  For the faces, they are wearing “helmets”, so there are no expressions.  The statement of this figure is about what we are, not just who we are.  About our struggles to find love, to join with another person and at times, take on the world, together.” Virgil Ortiz

The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

Click here to see other pieces in the Taboo Series

$ 6,800.00

Ortiz, Virgil – “Alter-Native Equality” Jar, Taboo Series

This jar by Virgil Ortiz is part of his new series, “Taboo”.  The jar is coil built, rag polished and painted with wild spinach (a plant) for the black.  Virgil says he has wanted to go back to the traditional shapes and techniques as part of his message for the Taboo series.  He says of Taboo:

“Creativity comes to me from continuing the story of my Cochiti people and how we see the world around us.  Our art from the late 1800’s told the stories of what those people were experiencing at that time.  That opened the door for me to use Taboo topics to engage people about today’s society, culture, politics, religion and even social media.  There are so many issues that people are increasingly afraid to talk about.  It’s important to show the type of imagery I’ve painted for “Taboo” and record it, even if people are afraid of it or it makes them uncomfortable.  I want to demonstrate that Native artists can innovate while using traditional methods.  We don’t have to be pigeonholed by those who want the same piece of pottery over and over again.  It’s time to give the voice back to the clay.”

Virgil writes of his particular jar…

“The Zuni “princess” We’wha (WAY-wah; b.1849), as the local media dubbed her, was an instant celebrity. She boldly stepped forward in the late 1800s as the embodiment of the two-spirit, an individual who combined male and female traits into a socially-recognized third gender roll. As much as she mesmerized Eastern American society, she also characterized the strength of her role in her tribal community. Natives often considered two-spirit people to be among the strongest and most intelligent. Today’s transgender issues and controversy find inspiration in the life of We’wha, and also a voice in pop culture through musical icons like Boy George, Pete Burns, Ru Paul, Grace Jones and others who are shaping and pushing forward the agenda of the LGBT rights movement.” Virgil Ortiz

The jar has the “spirit line” which is a break in the painting on the rim.  The piece is signed on the bottom. The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

Click here to see other pieces in the Taboo Series

$ 9,000.00

Garcia, Effie – Bowl with Rain Clouds

This  bowl by Effie Garcia is her classic shape and deeply carved pottery.  The bowl has a rain cloud pattern.  The rain is the long line extending down from the rim and the clouds are the part below the shoulder. It is very deep and evenly carved and the design is outlined on the edges.  The high polish makes this a distinctive bowl.  It is signed on the bottom.

 

$ 450.00

Lonewolf, Joseph – Mini Seedpot with Flute Players (1986)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This is a very small seedpot and yet it is very fully designed!  The seedpot has two Mimbres style flute players as the design.  They are surrounded by plant and rain designs. There is a butterfly on the opposite side.  The heart medallion is the yearly symbol for 1986.  There is an additional green clay slip used to highlight the designs.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00

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