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Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Naranjo, Forrest – Bowl with Dragonfly Story

Forrest Naranjo is a grandson of Rose Naranjo and a son of Bernice Naranjo.  He learned to make pottery from his mother.  This bowl is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired brown and then etched with designs.  This bowl has an asymmetric rim and the designs are etched into the clay around the top of the jar.  The design is an interesting story of the birth and various stages of the dragonfly.  The various stages of the larvae and then the dragonfly itself can be seen!  The style of his etching is modern yet pulls from traditional Pueblo designs. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 325.00

Naranjo, Geri  – Tall Black Jar with Feather Design

This is a taller miniature jar by Geri Naranjo.  She is known for her miniature pottery and intricately etched designs.  Here the entire piece is fully polished and around the shoulder are very tiny etched feathers.  No, I was not able to count them all!  But check out how close they are to each other!  Below the feathers is a water serpent (avanyu), which encircles the piece.  The body of the avanyu has cloud and rain designs.  The remainder of the jar is very highly polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 375.00

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Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Martinez, Maria  – Bowl with Lightning Design  (Maria + Santana, 1954-6)

This is a classic bowl by Maria Martinez.  It was made by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana Martinez (the wife of Adam Martinez, Maria’s son).  It is very highly polished and has a glassy surface.  The design is a cloud and lightning pattern.  Note the highly polished surface on this bowl around the design!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria + Santana”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic!  

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 1,800.00

Lewis, Lucy – Bowl with Rain and Lightning Design (1980’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the past century. This bowl is coil built and painted using bee-weed, a plant.  The design consists of a triangular mountain, rain and lightning design. The pattern is repeated around the shoulder of the bowl.  This bowl is thin walled and delicately painted.  It was traditionally fired so the white has much more of a pearlescent coloration, which creates added depth.  In the 1980’s the surfaces of her pieces were more highly polished, giving them a smoother feel.  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00

Gonzales, Rayita – Carved Open Bowl with Avanyu (1930’s)

Rayita Gonzales was a sister of Louis  “Wo-Peen” Gonzales and Raymoncita Gonzales.  She did not make much pottery but it was mostly during the 1930’s.  This is the 4th piece of her work that we have come across for the gallery!  It is an open bowl and carved on the inside with a water serpent.  The style of her carving is very distinctive and especially the “horn” on the water serpent.  The back of the bowl is also fully polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rayita”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 400.00

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Monday, November 12, 2018

Namingha, Les – Day and Night Urban Polychrome Jar

This is a very detailed jar by Les Namingha.  It is stylized with black and white checkerboard pattern inside bird designs around the top of the jar.  Around the shoulder are Hopi-Tewa birds with intricately painted Hopi designs inside them. The bottom has geometric shapes painted in various colors.  While the jar is part of his “Urban Polychrome” series, I included a final photo in the series of the jar next to a piece by Nampeyo of Hano (his ancestor).  Check out the use of her geometric shapes, checkerboards, and lines.  It is easy to that Les’s modernist pottery has deep roots in Hopi-Tewa pottery!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”  Les Namingha

$ 2,200.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Carved Swirl Neck Jar with Bird Tail Design

This is a complex long neck jar by Russell Sanchez.  The shape of the jar is inspired by the work of his great-aunt, Rose Gonzales. The long, straight neck is one which she made famous and which Russell has modified in his current work. Here the neck has 16 carve swirling ribs.  The rim of the jar is polished, as is the interior of the neck.  The body of the jar is an exceptional shape which comes up from base and then extends nearly flat to the neck!  That is always a difficult transition in coil built pottery. The body of the jar is fully polished and it is etched with three stylized bird tail designs.  The style of the design is reminiscent of the work of early San Ildefonso innovators such as Tonita Roybal, Rosalie Aguilar and Juan Cruz.  The transition to the long neck has a single band of mica and there are two bands of hematite hei-shi beads along with inset smaller round beads.  The So, why hematite?  Russell has begun to use it on his recent pieces for several reasons. There is a traditional aspect in that women wear hematite bracelets when they do certain traditional dances at the Pueblo.  There is also hematite content in the clay slips use on the pottery.  Russell also notes that when he is able to fire his pieces to a gunmetal appearance, the hematite captures the shine and also gives them a contemporary appearance.  As Russell has said:

“I’m a traditionalist all the way through.  Innovation is part of our tradition. You use the same materials and tools that you have, and the same design elements, and the Clay Mother will come through you for what she wants you to do,” he explains. “Instead of doing the same cloud pattern or serpent pattern, you take that and make it your own. So, in fact, everything I’m doing is old, but new.”  Russell Sanchez, Southwest Art Magazine

The jar is highly fired with a near gunmetal appearance to the surface.  The contrasts of polished, mica and polished mica give the jar a dynamic appearance.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 9,800.00

Cosen, Reycita – Carved Bowl with Fox Handles

Reycita Cosen (b. 1927)  is a daughter of potter Pasqualita Baca and a niece of Nestora Silva. While she no longer makes pottery, she was known for the complex carving on her pottery.  Each piece was coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This is one of her classic carved vessels with fox handles.  The handles and inside of the bowl are all fully polished!  The exterior is carved with a walking bear paw design around the neck and avanyu (water serpent) around the sides.  Note the depth of the carving and the highly polished surface.  The piece is signed, “Reycita Cosen”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  igns around the body of the piece.  Note the depth of the carving on the jar!  The bottom is signed in the clay.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 450.00

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Sunday, November 11, 2018

Manygoats, Elizabeth – Jar with Navajo Scene

Elizabeth Manygoats is a daughter of noted potter Betty Manygoats.  She is known for her folk-art style pottery with figures in relief or applique on the surface. Elizabeth says that she often emphasizes Navajo women and their daily lives in her work because “They’re the ones I look up to.”  This jar is very thin walled and has a flat shoulder and straight neck.  There is a lot going on around the jar and it is both clever and charming. There is a Navajo girl reading a book.  Behind her is a subtle mesa and she is surrounded by a chicken and sheep (in relief).  As the jar is turned, there is horse applique figure which is tied to a tree with a string.  There is then a row of corn, clouds, and a small wagon.  Finally, there is a classic Navajo hogan and sitting out front is a dog.  The various colors are added to highlight the imagery.  The jar is traditionally fired to create the variations in color to the clay surface.  After the firing the entire piece is covered in pine pitch in the manner of traditional Navajo pottery.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “EM.”  Elizabeth has won numerous awards for her pottery over the years.  It can also be found in museums throughout the southwest.

Why the horned lizard?  “In the Diné culture Horned Toad is addressed as “grandpa” (shicheii). It possesses spiritual power. When you see one, pick it up and rub it on your chest and say, “I will be in good health and harmony.” If you have corn pollen sprinkle it as an offering and then let the horned lizard loose where you found it. You will then have good health and harmony. It is believed that the horned toad is dressed with an armored shield, which is called arrowhead. The spiky horns on the body represent the arrowheads. This protects the horned toad from predators. It was placed on earth with songs and prayers so that in the future the Diné would utilize it. The Diné still know and use its sacred prayers and songs for protection.”  Traditional Dine Teachings on Wildlife (1998)

$ 200.00

Cosen, Reycita – Bowl with Bear Handle

Reycita Cosen (b. 1927)  is a daughter of potter Pasqualita Baca and a niece of Nestora Silva. While she no longer makes pottery, she was known for the complex carving on her pottery.  Each piece was coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This bowl is fully polished and has a bear for the handle!  Even the interior of the bowl is fully polished!  It is a simple but charming piece.  The piece is signed, “Reycita Cosen”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  

$ 275.00

Cain, Joy – Bowl with Cloud Design

Joy Cain (bl 1947) is a daughter of Mary Cain and a sister of noted potters Tina Diaz, Linda Cain, and Billy Cain.  She began making pottery in 1965 but makes almost no pottery today.   This bowl is very round in shape and very deeply carved.  It has a cloud and lightning pattern encircling the bowl.  The surface is fully polished and it is a dark black coloration.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Joy Cain”.

$ 200.00

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Saturday, November 10, 2018

McHorse, Christine -Lidded Bowl with Buffalo & Wolf (1993)

Christine McHorse is well known for her sculptural pottery.  Each piece is coil built and has very thin walls.  This lidded bowl is from 1993.  The bowl itself is very thin walled.  There is a triangular mountain design which is very lightly etched into the clay around the shoulder.  Note the very thin lines!  The lid has a wold and buffalo as a sculpture.  The area around the animals is also etched with very fine lines.  The piece was traditionally fired to create the coloration and then it was covered in pine pitch, which is typical of traditional Navajo pottery.   There is a simplicity to the form and yet a complexity to the animals and the designs.  The bowl received a Blue Ribbon (1st Place) at the 1993 Museum of Northern Arizona Navajo Show. The ribbon is signed by Jack Beasley.  The piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. Both the lid and the bowl are signed on the bottom in the clay.   Today Christine is creating more sculptural works with her pottery currently in the “Dark Light” exhibit which has traveled nationally.

$ 3,900.00

Begay, Jr., Harrison – Canteen with Bear Paws

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This canteen is from 2003.  It is fully polished and carved with a cloud, star and bear paw design on the top.  The handles are also fully polished.  The piece is fired a black-brown coloration.   The polished sections stand out more in contrast to the black matte areas.  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00

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Friday, November 9, 2018

Sahmie, Ida – “Mother Earth” Tile

This is a very traditionally inspired tile by Ida Sahmie.  It is “Mother Earth”, which is a design often seen in sandpaintings.  Here, Ida has painted it on a stone polished tile using natural clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  Mother Earth is in the center with the four sacred plants and other imagery painted on the polished red surface.  The face is etched, as are the sides of the tile in the center area.  The tile was traditionally fired and it is signed on the back, “Ida Sahmie”.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.   The story of Father Sky and Mother Earth, and the Dine people is as follows:

“The Navajo people, the Diné, passed through three different worlds before emerging into this world, The Fourth World, or Glittering World. The Diné believe there are two classes of beings: the Earth People and the Holy People. The Holy People are believed to have the power to aid or harm the Earth People. Since Earth People of the Diné are an integral part of the universe, they must do everything they can to maintain harmony or balance on Mother Earth.  It is believed that centuries ago the Holy People taught the Diné how to live the right way and to conduct their many acts of everyday life. They were taught to live in harmony with Mother Earth, Father Sky and the many other elements such as man, animals, plants, and insects.”

“The Navajo people, the Diné, passed through three different worlds before emerging into this world, The Fourth World, or Glittering World. The Diné believe there are two classes of beings: the Earth People and the Holy People. The Holy People are believed to have the power to aid or harm the Earth People. Since Earth People of the Diné are an integral part of the universe, they must do everything they can to maintain harmony or balance on Mother Earth.  It is believed that centuries ago the Holy People taught the Diné how to live the right way and to conduct their many acts of everyday life. They were taught to live in harmony with Mother Earth, Father Sky and the many other elements such as man, animals, plants, and insects.”

$ 220.00

Sahmie, Ida – “Four Sacred Plants” Tile

This is a very traditionally inspired tile by Ida Sahmie.  It is “The Four Sacred Plants”, which is a design often seen in sandpaintings.  Here, Ida has painted it on a stone polished tile using natural clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  The four sacred plants are corn, beans, squash and tobacco.  There are both painted and matte areas along with incised designs.   The tile was traditionally fired and it is signed on the back, “Ida Sahmie”.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.   The story of the Four Sacred Plants and the Dine people is as follows:

“Four Sacred Plants are assigned to the cardinal points, and amongst the Navajos Maize is the plant of the North, Beans of the east. This means that both are male and as both are grown for edible seeds, recognition of the physiological function of the male was probably involved in the selection. This is entirely possible since the convention could have been established only very late, after settlement in America. Squash, for the Navajos, is the plant of the South, which is fitting since its fruit is called “eight-sided” and the eight-sided earth (an alternative to the square earth, taking account of the diagonal directions) is female. Also the stalk is angled in sections, a feature deliberately exaggerated when the plant is depicted in sand paintings, and crooked things are female. Tobacco, which the Navajos put on the west, is female because it is used to make smoke which is blown out with the breath, and that is female. Below the Plants are white roots, the significance being that these plants still have their roots in the lower world.”

 

$ 220.00

Sahmie, Ida – “Father Sky” Tile

This is a very traditionally inspired tile by Ida Sahmie.  It is “Father Sky”, which is a design often seen in sandpaintings.  Here, Ida has painted it on a stone polished tile using natural clay slips and bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  Father Sky is in the center with the cosmos painted on the body.  Surrounding the figure is a rainbow design.  Note how areas are etched into the clay, as well as painted!  The tile was traditionally fired and it is signed on the back, “Ida Sahmie”.  She is a daughter-in-law of Priscilla Nampeyo and Ida continues to make beautifully formed pottery with wonderfully complex designs.  She has won numerous awards for her pottery at events such as Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is the only Navajo potter creating this unique style of ethnographic pottery.   The story of Father Sky and Mother Earth, and the Dine people is as follows:

“The Navajo people, the Diné, passed through three different worlds before emerging into this world, The Fourth World, or Glittering World. The Diné believe there are two classes of beings: the Earth People and the Holy People. The Holy People are believed to have the power to aid or harm the Earth People. Since Earth People of the Diné are an integral part of the universe, they must do everything they can to maintain harmony or balance on Mother Earth.  It is believed that centuries ago the Holy People taught the Diné how to live the right way and to conduct their many acts of everyday life. They were taught to live in harmony with Mother Earth, Father Sky and the many other elements such as man, animals, plants, and insects.”

$ 220.00

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Thursday, November 8, 2018

Williams, Lorraine – Square Neck Jar with Rug Pattern

This is a traditional jar by Lorraine Williams.  It is a long neck and a low shoulder.  The neck of the jar is square.  The surface of the piece is incised with rug designs which encompass the entire surface. The background area is textured which further highlights the designs.  It is a striking and complicated pattern.  The jar has been traditionally fired to create the surface coloration.   After the piece is fired it is covered in pine pitch, which is typical of all traditional Navajo pottery harkening back to when it was utilitarian.  Lorraine has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “A Legacy of Generations”.

$ 350.00

Cling, Alice – Jar with Double Handles

This a traditional jar by Alice Cling.  Alice Cling is one of the great names in the revival of Navajo pottery in the 1980’s. This jar is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  The jar itself has an elongated neck and there are two handles. The handles are twisted or “braided” and extend from the rim to the top of the shoulder.  The jar is traditionally fired which creates the dynamic coloration. The jar ranges from deep red to a dark black.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alice Cling”.  Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 300.00

Cling, Alice – Tall Corn Husk Side Jar

This a striking tall jar by Alice Cling.  Alice Cling is one of the great names in the revival of Navajo pottery in the 1980’s. This jar is coil built, stone polished around the neck and striated corn husk designs down the size.  This tall jar is a very traditional Navajo shape with the elongated shape. The design is very subtle but is the coloration of the firing which is so dynamic!  The colors on this jar swirl and range from black to a deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when the pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Alice Cling”.  Alice has won numerous awards for her pottery and been featured in books such as “Legacy of Generations.”

$ 600.00

Manygoats, Betty –  Wedding Vase with 15 Horned Lizards

Betty Manygoats is known for distinctive Dine (Navajo) pottery with it’s “folk art” feel to the designs.  Around 1978 she began using the horned lizard as a design on her pottery.  The scales on the lizards are created using a bobby pin!  This wedding vase is her own signature shape with the high spouts. There are 15 horned lizards, each one seeming to scale the sides of the vessel!  The piece has been traditionally fired and there are some beautiful color variations from the heat of the fire!  After the vase is fired, it is covered in pine pitch in the manner of traditional Navajo pottery.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “BM.”  Betty has won numerous awards for her pottery over the years.  It can also be found in museums throughout the southwest.

Why the horned lizard?  “In the Diné culture Horned Toad is addressed as “grandpa” (shicheii). It possesses spiritual power. When you see one, pick it up and rub it on your chest and say, “I will be in good health and harmony.” If you have corn pollen sprinkle it as an offering and then let the horned lizard loose where you found it. You will then have good health and harmony. It is believed that the horned toad is dressed with an armored shield, which is called arrowhead. The spiky horns on the body represent the arrowheads. This protects the horned toad from predators. It was placed on earth with songs and prayers so that in the future the Diné would utilize it. The Diné still know and use its sacred prayers and songs for protection.”  Traditional Dine Teachings on Wildlife (1998)

$ 145.00

Crank, Susie – Water Jar with Fire Clouds

Susie Crank is a daughter of Rose Williams and a sister of Alice Cling.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and amazingly, she says he may burnish a piece over and over as many as 15 times to get a high shine!  This water jar has a round body and an elongated neck.  It is an elegant shape which Susie has highly polished and even the inside of the neck is polished almost to the shoulder!  The jar is then traditionally fired to create the fire-clouds on the surface.  The colorations on this jar range from black to a deep red.  The jar was covered in pine-pitch after the firing, a continuation of the traditional Navajo pottery when pitch was used to make the pottery waterproof.  Today, the pine pitch seals the vessel and gives it the shine.  This jar has a stunning shine and a great feel to the surface!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Susie Crank”.

$ 325.00

Manygoats, Betty –  Open Bowl with 18 Horned Lizards

Betty Manygoats is known for distinctive Dine (Navajo) pottery with it’s “folk art” feel to the designs.  Around 1978 she began using the horned lizard as a design on her pottery.  The scales on the lizards are created using a bobby pin!  This is one of her classic open bowls with the horned lizards on the inside.  There are 18 horned lizards, each one seeming to scale the sides of the vessel!  The piece has been traditionally fired and there are some beautiful color variations from the heat of the fire!  After the vase is fired, it is covered in pine pitch in the manner of traditional Navajo pottery.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “BM.”  Betty has won numerous awards for her pottery over the years.  It can also be found in museums throughout the southwest.

Why the horned lizard?  “In the Diné culture Horned Toad is addressed as “grandpa” (shicheii). It possesses spiritual power. When you see one, pick it up and rub it on your chest and say, “I will be in good health and harmony.” If you have corn pollen sprinkle it as an offering and then let the horned lizard loose where you found it. You will then have good health and harmony. It is believed that the horned toad is dressed with an armored shield, which is called arrowhead. The spiky horns on the body represent the arrowheads. This protects the horned toad from predators. It was placed on earth with songs and prayers so that in the future the Diné would utilize it. The Diné still know and use its sacred prayers and songs for protection.”  Traditional Dine Teachings on Wildlife (1998)

$ 125.00

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Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Roybal, Tonita – Jar with Reverse Feather Design (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This jar reflects the exceptional nature of her pottery designs, shapes, and firing.  The jar has a round shoulder and then and a slight indention before extending up to the neck.  The jar itself is very highly polished and beautifully painted.  The design is interesting with a reverse feather pattern which extends up from the base.  What is interesting is the design leaves more open space and draws the eye to the shoulder.  The jar is fired to a gunmetal appearance with areas which even have a gold-tone coloration.  This “goldtone” is a rarity in her work and one which was achieved in the firing. The jar has a very metallic appearance with just the touch of yellow or gold in the light.  The jar is from the 1920’s and it has its original sticker on the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Tonita” in the clay on the bottom.  As a provenance, the jar was de-acquisitioned from the American Indian Culture Research Center in Marvin, South Dakota.  It still has the tag for its catalog number of 00251.

Click here to read about the Early San Ildefonso Innovators

$ 1,800.00

Martinez, Maria – Bowl with Mesa & Prayer Feather Design “Marie + Julian” (1920’s)

This bowl by Maria Martinez is a classic of her early pottery from the late 1920’s.  It was made and polished by Maria and then painted by her husband, Julian Martinez (1897-1943).  The bowl is Maria’s classic rounded shoulder shape and the entire piece is fully stone polished, including the base.  The design around the sides is painted with a mesa and a prayer feather pattern. The prayer feathers are held in the hands of Pueblo dancers and are often depicted as a series of triangles one on top of the other.  The bowl is very highly polished and was fired to a gunmetal appearance. This metallic or “gunmetal” was achieved by the heat of the firing and note how the coloration changes as the bowl is turned!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay,  “Marie + Julian”.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one small rub below the shoulder but very little wear on the polished bottom, which is unusual, as one might expect more wear just from moving the bowl around over the past 100 years!

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,200.00

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Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Medina, Elizabeth – Jar with 4 Birds, Flowers & Turtle Lid

Elizabeth Medina is known for a traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece is coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This jar is painted with four birds on the sides.  Each bird has different variations in the wings, bodies, and tails.  The bodies of some of the birds are stone polished with red and tan clay slips. Around the neck of the jar are rain and cloud patterns.  Separating the birds are intricately painted flowers with polished petals.  The jar is striking with the variations of matte and polished surfaces.  The top of the lid is polished red while the turtle is added and slipped tan.  There is a polished and painted bird and flowers on the top.  The jar is signed on the side “Elizabeth Medina, Zia.

$ 325.00

Concho, Carolyn – Bowl with Lizards

Carolyn is well known for her beautifully painted pottery using Mimbres style figures.  This seedpot has a Mimbres style quail and the head is in relief from the surface of the piece.  It is surrounded by very tightly painted fineline and geometric patterns. All the different colors are from natural clay slips.

$ 110.00

Natseway, Thomas – Mini Acoma Seedpot

Thomas Natseway is one of the most renown miniaturists in Pueblo pottery.  Rarely does he make a piece which is over 1″ tall or wide!  This is an early piece of his pottery from 1980.  It is a seedpot painted with a fine-line and triangular design on the top.  The sides have Acoma style birds swirling around the piece.  It is tightly painted for the size.  The seedpot is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 100.00

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Monday, November 5, 2018

Zane Smith, Richard – Corrugated Jar with Leaf Design (2017)

This a striking corrugated jar by Richard Zane Smith.   For his pottery, the coils are smoothed out on the inside but left exposed on the outside of the vessel.  This distinctive style of pottery  is a revival of the pre-historic concept of corrugated pottery.  The earliest corrugated pieces were often baskets which had clay applied to them and then fired, creating a “corrugated” appearance.  The small coils are used as part of the design and give each piece a textural feel.  The corrugated area of the jar swirls around from the shoulder to the base.  The neck is smooth and polished to have the appearance like leather.  It is very intricately etched with leaves and highlighted with red and black.  The jar has a great overall coloration and is just so thin-walled!   It is signed on the bottom, “Ricard Zane Smith”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 3,200.00

Clashin, Debbie – Jar with Eagle Tails

This is is a classically shaped jar by Debbie Clashin.  It is painted with four eagle tails as the design.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. This smaller jar continues the strength of her forms and tightly painted designs.   The jar is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  It was traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 500.00

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Sunday, November 4, 2018

Moquino, Jennifer Tafoya – Water Jar with Cherry Blossoms

This is a striking water jar by Jennifer Moquino.  The jar is coil built and is a classic Santa Clara water jar shape with the indented shoulder and slightly turned out rim.  The exterior of the jar is slipped with mica and the inside of the neck is fully polished. The jar is fired black and it is a great coloration with reflections from the mica.  Jennifer said that because she used a micaceous slip, that she was not able to outline the design in advance and it all had to be designed free-hand!  The design is a simple group of Cherry Blossoms which extend up from the base.  The detail in each blossom is exquisite, as she mixes the various clay colors to create the right shading for the blossoms.  Even the wood of the tree is perfectly etched!  She added some falling petals on the inside of the neck as well, in the polished area.  The jar is a dynamic combination of design and shape.  It is signed on the bottom of the clay. The jar is an exciting variation in her forms, scale, and designs.

$ 3,500.00

Moquino, Jennifer Tafoya – Velociraptor Clay Figure

Jennifer Tafoya Moquino is known for her clay vessels and exceptional realistic animals. This figure is a velociraptor made from clay. The front is mica and the back is fully polished.  There are heartlines and geometric designs which extend down the body of the piece.  Note that on the back (in the black) is a long prayer feather.  Check out the eyes as well, as she did an amazing job with the realism around them!  All the colors are all from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 350.00

Moquino, Jennifer – Quail Bird, Clay Figure

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels and realistic sgraffito designs.  This is one of her bird figures.  It is quail and the clay is sculpted and fully polished.  The wings are etched into the clay and designed with cloud and rain designs.  The front and neck are very intricately designed with very tiny feathers.  Check out their intricacy!  The top of the head is matte and there are added feathers.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 550.00

Moquino, Ty – Mask “Guaridan” (Age 16)

Ty Moquino is a son of noted potter Jennifer Moquino.  At only 16 years old he is making some creative pottery!  This is one of his clay masks.  They are inspired by the science fiction he has read, along with being a commentary on the environment, sustainability and even imagery from Standing Rock.  This mask is “Guardian”, which has a complicated form with the triangular eyes and the fin on the top of the mask. Sections of the mask are polished and others are matte and mica slipped.  Note the various levels of carving and design on this piece!   It is a strong piece as part of his mask series. It is great to see new work from his young potter.  Ty won the “Best of Youth” award at the Heard Museum Indian Market in 2017 for one of his masks!  It is signed on the back.  The piece will include a metal museum mount for it to be displayed and will take about a week for delivery.

$ 575.00

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Saturday, November 3, 2018

Moquino, Jennifer Tafoya – Large Lidded Jar with Birds & Butterflies (2008)

This large jar by Jennifer Moquino is fully designed with butterflies and birds.  The jar has three large medallions, each etched with a different bird.  There is a Cedar Waxwing, American Kestral and Red-Breasted Nuthatch.  The butterflies are Texan Ceregentor, Desert Green and Phoebus Parnassian.  They are all very intricately etched and slipped with additional clay slips for the coloration. The jar is also lidded with a Painted Lady butterfly on top.  Separating all the medallions are small flowers.  Check out the detail on the various birds, and even on the tree behind the Nuthatch!  The jar itself is very highly polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It received a blue ribbon at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2008.  The ribbon is signed by judges Christine McHorse and Clarence Cruz.  It is this creative evolution in her work which keeps  Jennifer as one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 5,000.00

Moquino, Ty – Mask “Visor Up” (Age 16)

Ty Moquino is a son of noted potter Jennifer Moquino.  At only 16 years old he is making some creative pottery!  This is one of his clay masks.  They are inspired by the science fiction he has read, along with being a commentary on the environment, sustainability and even imagery from Standing Rock.  This mask is “Visor Up”, which reveals the face underneath.  This is the first time we have had one of his masks with the face showing.  The visor is carved and fully polished while the face is sculpted and slipped with mica.  It is a striking piece as part of his mask series. It is great to see new work from his young potter.  Ty won the “Best of Youth” award at the Heard Museum Indian Market in 2017 for one of his masks!  It is signed on the back.  The piece will include a metal museum mount for it to be displayed and will take about a week for delivery.

$ 575.00

Moquino, Ty – Mask “Buffalo Warrior” (Age 16)

Ty Moquino is a son of noted potter Jennifer Moquino.  At only 16 years old he is making some creative pottery!  This is one of his clay masks.  They are inspired by the science fiction he has read, along with being a commentary on the environment, sustainability and even imagery from Standing Rock.  This mask is “Buffalo Warrior”, which is inspired by the shape of a buffalo skull.  The respirator and horns are fully polished while the remainder of the mask is matte and slipped with mica in areas.  It is an interesting piece reflecting on the connection of the buffalo to Native culture, their extinction, and their future. Also, the inherent symbolism of a warrior in the future wearing a mask representing the buffalo.  It is a creative and thoughtful piece as part of his mask series. It is great to see new work from his young potter.  Ty won the “Best of Youth” award at the Heard Museum Indian Market in 2017 for one of his masks!  It is signed on the back.  The piece will include a metal museum mount for it to be displayed and will take about a week for delivery.

$ 575.00

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Friday, November 2, 2018

Sanchez, Desideria – Bowl with Cloud & Wind Designs (1920’s)

Desideria Montoya Sanchez was a sister of noted potter Maria Martinez.  She was known for her traditional pottery and use of both classic and innovative designs. This bowl is a round shape and painted with a series of bold line cloud and wind patterns. The thick lines and the style of the imagery give the bowl a very modern appearance and are certainly unusual in the imagery of San Ildefonso.  The firing of the bowl has given it a somewhat gunmetal appearance in areas.  The gunmetal coloration is due to the heat of the firing and note how areas are more black and others are more metallic.   The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Desideria”.

$ 975.00

Aguilar, Rosalie & Joe – Carved Jar with Storm Designs (1930’s)

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional pottery throughout their time working together.  In the 1930’s they began to make carved pottery.  This large jar is carved with two different designs. There is a rain and lighting design and it is separated by a cloud and lightning design.   The carving is done into the negative space creating a visually strong appearance.  The remainder of the jar is fully polished and fired to a gunmetal coloration. The metallic surface and the matte black areas of the carving are beautiful on this jar.  The jar is in is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Rosalie + Joe” on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 1,000.00

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Thursday, November 1, 2018

Aragon, John – Bowl with Mimbres Insects

John Aragon is known for his use of Mimbres imagery on his pottery.  John learned to make pottery from his mother, Florence Aragon.  This new bowl is very tightly painted with various Mimbres insects across the entire surface!  There are insects include bees, crickets, dragonflies, caterpillars and more.  I counted over 100 different insects, and then lost track!  Each one has different fine-line designs which make up the body designs.  John has an amazing ability to fit so many images onto one piece and still have it look cohesive! The bowl is signed on the bottom.

$ 775.00

Tenorio, Robert  – Bowl with Train and Pueblo

This is a creative bowl by Robert Tenorio.  The bowl is painted with wild spinach (black) and red and copper colored clay slips.  The top half of the bowl has a train with the various cars all the way to the caboose.  There is a church with pueblo and surrounding the area in front of the train are the buildings and women from the Pueblo with their pottery.  Robert says that his train pots remind him of the older days when the Kewa village would hear the train whistle and come out to watch it pass by.  The bowl is traditionally fired and has a bit of dark cloudiness on the rim…or maybe that is just the smoke from the engine!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Robert Tenorio, Kewa”.

$ 225.00

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Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Holt, Lisa & Harlan Reano – “Twisted” Clay Figure

Lisa Holt and Harlan Reano make an amazing team, working to create innovative pottery using traditional techniques.  Lisa makes the pottery and it is painted by Harlan.  This figure is amazing as it is hollow and all coil built.  The figure is basically two columns which twist up from the base and then extend out to the arms and up to the head.  The concept for these figures was from Harlan who wanted to create a series of “Pueblo Super Heroes”.  The body has a series of painted swirl and lightning designs.  The shape and movement are exceptional on this figure!   The materials are all traditional as the red and cream are both native clays while the black is wild spinach (a plant). The figure is traditionally fired outdoors.   It is signed on the bottom. 

$ 4,500.00

Sarracino, Myron – Mesa Sunrise Jar

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin-walled and tightly painted. This jar has a high shoulder and a more classic “olla” shape. The design has a sunrise pattern painted with a red clay slip.  It is above the terraced mesa design.  Below the mesa design is a water pattern.  It has series of fine-lines painted into the clay.  The jar is a nice balance of form and design.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece and it is also a tribute to the potters who came before.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 325.00

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Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Tenorio, Robert  – Canteen with Bird Handles

This is a striking canteen by Robert Tenorio.  The jar is painted with wild spinach (black) and red and copper colored clay slips.  On the sides of the jar Robert has painted flowers and clouds.  The petals of the flowers are highlighted with various clay slips.  The handles of the canteen are in the shape of two birds.  Each bird is painted differently.  The canteen has a “spirit line” or a break in the painted line around the rim.  This goes back to historic Kewa pottery when the artist would use the spirit line to release their spirit or connection from the vessel.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Robert Tenorio, Kewa”.

$ 250.00

Abeita, Karen – Large Jar with Katinsa, Birds and Shard Designs (2008)

Karen Abeita is known for her traditional and innovative Hopi-Tewa pottery.  This large, wide bowl is painted with bee-weed (black) and a red clay slip and then traditionally fired.  Karen is known for her very intricately painted pottery. The jar is stunning with a very wide shape and note how flat surface.  There is a Butterfly Maiden in one section. She is surrounded by intricately designed shard which are both painted and then incised on the edges!  Opposite is a section with a classic Hopi-Tewa bird.  Separating the two sections are larger panels with Hopi design, birds, and geometrics.  Interestingly, the jar is designed in three panels, not four, although it appears to be four sections.   The jar was traditionally fired to create the blushes.  It is signed on the bottom in bee-weed, “Karen Abeita”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It received a blue ribbon at the 2008 Santa Fe Indian Market.  The ribbon is signed by Al Qoyawayma and Clarence Cruz.

$ 2,800.00

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Monday, October 29, 2018

Sanchez, Russell  – Red and Black Double Sided Mountain Lion and Bear Canteen

It is not often that Russell Sanchez makes a canteen.  They are a traditional form which Russell creates as fine art in clay. This piece has a medallion on each side.  One medallion has an incised mountain lion and the other a bear.  What is difficult to see in the photos is that each of the animals is etched with a hatchwork pattern and then painted with a red and black clay slip.  Russell said that this was how fetishes were often painted at the Pueblo. The result is that each animal has a visual coloration but also a wonderful textural feel. There is also a single inset piece of turquoise in the center of each animal.   The area surrounding them is polished black and then a band of copper-colored mica.  In the micaceous band there are 40 inset pieces of jet on each side!  There are also two bands of jet hei-shi beads.  This traditional stone accents the traditional designs on this piece.  The remainder of the canteen is polished a deep red. The deep red color is a revival by Russell as it is the same red clay slip which was used at San Ildefonso in the 1920’s and 30’s.  The shape is powerful with a slight curve to the neck and note the rounded bottom of the canteen.  It has 16 melon ribs carved into the piece!  So where is it signed? Russell signed it inside the mouth of the canteen!  The canteen has a metal museum mount which stands it securely upright but also allows you to see both sides. Once again Russell harkens to historic San Idlefonso designs and stories and uses them for his own contemporary work.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 6,200.00

Folwell, Susan – Asymmetrical Jar with Birds & Dragons

This is an exceptional piece by Susan Folwell.  The jar is asymmetrical in form with a section in which the clay is pushed inward. The jar itself is part of a series where Susan broke the piece into sections and reassembled it.  Each section connects to the next and in terms of her designs.  There are interconnected birds and dragons which swirl around the piece.  Susan has long been interested in and influenced by Asian art.  For her, the dragons and “avanyu” are often interchangeable images.  The jar is tan polished and the open space has her signature, “x” design.  The various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  The shape and design create a beautiful poetic motion in this jar!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It has been in numerous museum exhibitions, including “Between Two Worlds” at the Phoenix Airport Museum.

$ 4,000.00

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Sunday, October 28, 2018

Baca, Annie –  Mini Oval Bowl with Rain Designs

Annie Baca is a daughter of Cesencia Tafoya and known for her miniature pottery.  This oval shaped bowl is very highly polished.  Typical of her work it is formed with a very sharp shoulder.  The designs are painted onto the polished surface.  Looking at the bowl, there are cloud, rain and lightning patterns.  The glassy shine and tight painting create a beautiful and traditional Santa Clara bowl!

$ 125.00

Baca, Annie –  Mini Bowl with Avanyu

Annie Baca is a daughter of Cesencia Tafoya and known for her miniature pottery.  This bowl is very highly polished and tightly painted.  Her works are typically three inches or smaller, which is classified as a miniature.  The design on this bowl is a water serpent (avanyu), which encircles the piece.  There are cloud designs above the avanyu.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Annie”.  The glassy shine and tight painting create a beautiful and traditional Santa Clara bowl!

$ 135.00

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Saturday, October 27, 2018

Naranjo, Madeline – Large Jar with Avanyu (1970’s)

Madeline Naranjo (b. 1916) was known for her deep carved pottery.  This is a larger jar with a very deeply carve avanyu (water serpent). The avanyu is an important image in Santa Clara pottery, telling the story of the water serpent who saved the village from a flood. The jar has a wide shape with a sharp shoulder. The avanyu encircles the jar and note the deeply carved clouds around the neck of the jar.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Madeline Naranjo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is a small rub on the side below the shoulder, which can be seen in the photos and I’ve priced the jar accordingly.  While Madeline no longer makes pottery, her work is certainly a classic and her legacy continues in the pottery of her granddaughter, Madeline E. Naranjo.

 

$ 875.00

Tafoya, Myra Little Snow – Jar with Carved Sun and Avanyu

Myra Little Snow Tafoya was known for her creative deep carved pottery. She is a daughter of Lucy Yearflower Tafoya, a granddaughter of Camilio Tafoya and the sister of Shawn, Kelli Little Katchina and Forrest Tafoya. She began making pottery in the early 1970’s and was featured in the “7 Families in Pueblo Pottery” book. While Myra no longer makes pottery, her early pieces are a wonderful part of the history of Camilio Tafoya’s family legacy.  This jar is a larger piece of her pottery.  It is carved around the shoulder with a cloud pattern.  Around the sides there is a feather pattern along with a sun and an avanyu.  The designs are tighly carved and highly polihsed.  The background is also fully etched to create a striking contrast with the highly polihsed designs.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Myra Little Snow”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 450.00

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Friday, October 26, 2018

Aragon, Florence – Jar with Rainbow Band and Birds (1980s)

Florence Aragon was one of the great traditional Acoma potters.  This water jar is indicative of the influence of her pottery and the continuation of traditional designs and forms. The jar is the traditional water jar or “olla”. The high shoulder and sloping neck are part of this form. The jar is painted with Acoma birds on two of the sides.  Above the birds are a rainbow band, which is designed with cloud and lightning patterns.  Separating the birds are two sections with cloud and rain motifs.  The thin lines and tight painting were signatures of Florence’s pottery.  The bottom of the jar is indented in the traditional manner when the pots were made to be worn on the head to carry water!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “F. Aragon”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 850.00

Aragon, Florence – Jar with Fine-Line Rain Patterns (1980s)

Florence Aragon was one of the great traditional Acoma potters.  This water jar is indicative of the influence of her pottery and the continuation of traditional designs and forms. The jar is the traditional water jar or “olla”. The high shoulder and sloping neck are part of this form. The jar is painted with classic fine-line rain and lightning patterns. The lines are thinly painted and perfectly match the from.  The thin lines and tight painting were signatures of Florence’s pottery.  The bottom of the jar is indented in the traditional manner when the pots were made to be worn on the head to carry water!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “F. Aragon”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 450.00

Aragon, Rachel – Jar with Parrots and Sun Design (1980’s)

This is an exceptional jar by Rachel Aragon.  She is known for her classic Acoma pottery.  This is the imagery for which she is most famous and it is exciting to see it on a bit smaller jar. The size and the precision of the painting give the piece a wonderful intensity.  This water jar is a classic Acoma shape with a high shoulder and neck.  The jar has the famous sun medallion painted in two sections.  It was this design from an Acoma jar from the 1880’s which potters like Tonita Roybal took inspiration.  There are additional very tightly painted birds and fine-line patterns.  The intricacy of his jar is striking in person.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “R. Aragon”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 575.00

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Thursday, October 25, 2018

Nampeyo, Adelle L. –  Bowl with Migration & Mesa Designs

Adelle Nampeyo is known for her stylistic use of traditional Hopi designs.  This bowl has a migration pattern encircling the shoulder of the piece.  Note how she has used the lines for the migration pattern above the shoulder and the thinly painted lines.  Below the shoulder is a double band of black and red, representing the mesas.  The designs are painted with bee-weed (black) and a red clay.  The migration design is a classic Hopi-Tewa pattern revived by Nampeyo of Hano and tells the story of the migration of the people around the world.  The jar is traditionally fired to create the coloration on the surface of the jar.  The coloration works beautifully with this piece with shades from white to orange.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 125.00

Chavarria, Denise – Jar with Cloud and Rain Patterns

Denise Chavarria is a daughter of noted potter Stella Chavarria and a granddaughter of Teresita Naranjo.  She is known for her contemporary pottery.  This jar has a raised lip on one side.  It is very deeply carved with a cloud and rain motif. The carving is fluid and the entire surface is fully polished.  The jar is fired a deep black and it is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Densie Chavarria”.

$ 175.00

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Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Nez, Wallace – Sgraffito Seedpot with Butterflies

Wallace Nez is known for his intricately etched pottery.  He began to make pottery when he was 12 years old.  He won first place ribbons at the Santa Fe Indian Market in 1999, 2000, and 2001 and Best of Division at the Museum of Northern Arizona Market Show in 1999.  This miniature seedpot is incredibly intricate for the size!  There are three butterflies on one section and the remainder is etched with feather and star patterns.  Take a look at the top and check out the variety of the designs.  It is all so intricately and delicately designed, it is quite extraordinary!  The piece is signed on the bottom “Wallace Nez”.

$ 325.00

Niadi – Wide Mini Bowl with Cloud Swirls

Niadi learned to make pottery from Theresa Wildflower.  While she no longer make pottery, her pieces are amazing for the variety of their styles and the intricacy of the painting. This miniature bowl is wide in shape and painted with interlocking bands of cloud patterns.  Note the subtle variations in the colors of the gray and black!  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Nidai”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks restoration or repair.

$ 125.00

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Monday, October 22, 2018

Martinez, Maria – Jar with Plant Design “Marie + Julian” (1930’s)

This jar by Maria Martinez is a classic of her early pottery from the late 1930’s.  It was made and polished by Maria and then painted by her husband, Julian Martinez (1897-1943).  The jar has a distinctive form with a sharp shoulder and a sloping neck.  The design is a plant pattern which extends up from the shoulder to the neck.  The bowl is highly polished and fired a deep black.  It is signed, “Marie + Julian” on the bottom.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one small rub below the shoulder and a small pre-firing indention on the shoulder (last photo).

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 1,800.00

Martinez, Maria – Bowl with Feather Pattern (Maria Popovi 665)

This is a rounded neck bowl by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the bowl while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The bowl is highly polished and has the traditional eagle feather pattern painted in matte around the shoulder.  Typical of the work of Popovi Da, the feathers are perfectly painted with each feather nearly the same width as the one next to it. It is remarkable as Popovi painted them free-hand and each feather would be painted over several times. The shape of this bowl is one of Maria’s classics, as the round shoulder accentuated the shape of the feathers.  The firing is a very highly polished black with a mirror-like shine.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi 665“. The signature indicates that it was made around in June 1965.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 4,400.00

Martinez, Maxamiliana “Anna” – Bowl with Avanyu (1920’s)

This is a very traditional style bowl by Maximiliana “Anna” Martinez, who was a sister of Maria Martinez.   It is fully polished and painted with a water serpent (avanyu), encircling bowl.  The avanyu is delicately painted with cloud and rain motifs.  The bowl was fired was fired black and has near-gunmetal appearance.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Anna”.   Why is the work of Anna Martinez important? Interestingly, Maria would often say she was the best painter in the family.  She was married to Cresencio Martinez, who was known for his paintings and was also a brother to Tonita Roybal.  One can begin to see how her talent was easily fostered by those around her making a jar like this simply a classic!

Click here for more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators!

$ 1,000.00

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Sunday, October 21, 2018

Garcia, Tammy – “Gold Moth” Bronze, 19/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is carved in the style she carves in her pottery, with various depths and layers.  It is entitled, “Gold Moth”.  It has a Sikyatki inspired moth as the design in relief.  Behind the moth are some of her classic Pueblo geometric designs and a leaf pattern around the edge as the “frame”.  The bronze is made to hang on a wall, although it can also stand (or sit in an easel).  The piece has a striking use of patinas to enhance the coloration of the moth’s wings and the plants in the frame.  The piece is signed on the side.  It is the 19/35 in the edition of the bronze.

$ 2,200.00

Garcia, Tammy – “Green Moth” Bronze, 21/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is carved in the style she carves in her pottery, with various depths and layers.  It is entitled, “Green Moth”.  It has a Sikyatki inspired moth as the design in relief.  Behind the moth are some of her classic Pueblo geometric designs and a butterfly pattern around the edge as the “frame”.  The bronze is made to hang on a wall, although it can also stand (or sit in an easel).  The piece has a striking use of patinas to enhance the coloration of the moth’s wings and the butterflies in the frame.  The piece is signed on the side.  It is the 21/35 in the edition of the bronze.

$ 2,200.00

Garcia, Tammy – “Red Moth” Bronze, 29/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is carved in the style she carves in her pottery, with various depths and layers.  It is entitled, “Red Moth”.  It has a Sikyatki inspired moth as the design in relief.  Behind the moth are some of her classic Pueblo geometric designs and a leaf and vine pattern around the edge as the “frame”.  The bronze is made to hang on a wall, although it can also stand (or sit in an easel).  The piece has a striking use of patinas to enhance the coloration of the moth’s wings and the leaves in the frame.  The piece is signed on the side.  It is the 29/35 in the edition of the bronze.

$ 2,200.00

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Saturday, October 20, 2018

Davis, Titus – Seedpot with Flower Design

Titus Davis is the son of noted potter Darla Davis and a brother-in-law of Eric Lewis.  He creates hand-built pottery that combines the classic fine-line designs with a modern approach.  This is the first seedpot of his we have had in the gallery.  The piece is painted with a flower design on the top.  It is surrounded by traditional fine-line patterns which accentuate the design.  The shape and designs work perfectly together.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 175.00

Davis, Titus – Canteen with Birds

Titus Davis is the son of noted potter Darla Davis and a brother-in-law of Eric Lewis.  He creates hand-built pottery and is known for his more contemporary style.  However, this is one of his traditional Acoma canteens. The canteen has a classic bird pattern on one side and painted with native clay slips.  It is charming with the handles and the taller shape.  It’s great to see a potter who can create both traditional and contemporary styles in his pottery.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 110.00

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Friday, October 19, 2018

Manymules, Samuel  – Jar with Rounded Swirl Melon Ribs

This  jar by Samuel Manymules has a tall shape with a slight neck.  The melon ribs swirl down from the neck to the base.  The ribs are pushed out in the clay and there is a deep groove separating each rib.  The jar is traditionally fired and the coloration is striking!   The symmetry of each rib adds to the overall appearance of the jar.  The variation from black to red to brown give the piece a sense of motion on the surface.  The browner areas are where it was fired to a higher temperature.  After the firing the jar is the covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 1,800.00

Antonio, Frederica – Large Polychrome Sunrise and Sunset Design Jar

Frederica Antonio is renown for her intricately painted pottery. Each piece is coil built and then finely painted. Her designs are a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines which are then filled in to create larger images in the squares.  This water jar is a classic shape for Acoma pottery, with a high shoulder and short neck. There are two sections which are painted in four colors with triangular shapes. This is meant to be the sunrise and sunset.  The various colors are from natural clay slips.  Note the angular lines running through the pattern, which Frederica said is a rain pattern.  Separating these two areas are her classic ‘checkerboard’ patterns.  On one side is a star pattern and the opposite has a lightning design.  However, Frederica pointed out how this design draws the eye in multiple directions and she worked to have it read both left and right.  Interestingly, the entire jar is first painted black on white.  Frederica then paints all the different clay colors and then had to go back over all the black lines again one more time!  The level of complexity and time involved on the painting of this piece is extraordinary!  The result, however, is stunning with a dynamic appearance and movement to the designs.  The base of the jar is concave, reminiscent of historic Acoma jars which were carried on the head.  This combination of thin walls, classic shape, and tightly painted design create a piece which is visually stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 3,600.00

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Thursday, October 18, 2018

Ortiz, Virgil – Blind Archer and Hummingbirds Canteen (2018)

This is a larger canteen by Virgil Ortiz.  The piece is coil built and painted with native clay slips and wild spinach (a plant) for the black.   The design on the front of the canteen is Tahu, the Blind Archer in her 1680 version.  The story for this imagery from the Pueblo Revolt 1680/2180 series.  Regarding Tahu, the Blind Archer, Virgil gave her the iconic line, “Don’t be blinded by your Fear”.  The last photo is one by Virgil of Tahu standing in the forest and you can see where he has taken this imagery to create the design on the canteen.  I wrote in Virgil Ortiz: Pueblo Revolt 1680/2180:

“In 2007 Ortiz began to identify and give form to characters who would populate his fictionalized version of the Pueblo Revolt: Tahu, a girl blinded by the Spanish conquistadors; Mopez, the leader of the Pueblo Runners; and the Castilians to represent the Spanish invaders. The characters who make up the Pueblo Revolt series are inspired by names and words in Keres (the indigenous language of Cochiti Pueblo) and other Puebloan languages. “Tahu” is a word used as a sign of respect for older Pueblo women. “Mopez” means “cardinal” and was the Keres name of Ortiz’s brother. “I wanted to use native language words and names to identify the characters. Part of the Revolt story had to be the actual events, but I also wanted it to tie into our language. If I could get the kids interested in history I might also be able to get them interested in our language and keep it alive.”

There are also two hummingbirds which are symbolic for Virgil’s mother, Seferina Ortiz, who taught him to make pottery.  Can you see the “spirit line” in the design? It is at the rim of the canteen.  The spirit line is a break in the painting and used on traditional Cochiti pottery.  Virgil has also incorporated his signature “x”, which is the turkey track into the designs.  The back of the canteen has a wildflower design which encircles the piece and flows onto the front.  The piece is signed on the back.  The canteen sits in a metal museum mount so show both the front and the back of the piece.  The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

$ 3,500.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Large Gunmetal Bear with Hemetite, Heartline & Avanyu

This is one of the largest bears we have had from Russell Sanchez.  He continues to use traditional techniques and materials to create his stunning works in clay.  This bear is highly polished and fired to a striking gunmetal coloration.  The bear has a wide body and a sculptural form.  From the mouth of the bear is a heartline, which is a traditional image used to symbolize the heart as the center of power in the animal.  In addition, the bear is a symbol of strength.  On this piece, the heartline extends backward and rises up on the back and turns into an old style avanyu (water serpent).  The style of the avanyu and the fine-line etching are inspired by the painted designs of Tonita Roybal in the 1920s.  The back half of the bear continues the heartline and has two additional avanyu.  Across the back of the bear are eight bands of square hematite hei-shi beads.  So, why hematite?  Russell has begun to use it on his recent pieces for several reasons. There is a traditional aspect in that women wear hematite bracelets when they do certain traditional dances at the Pueblo.  There is also hematite content in the clay slips use on the pottery.  Russell also notes that when he is able to fire his pieces to a gunmetal appearance, the hematite captures the shine and also gives them a contemporary appearance.  As Russell has said

“I’m a traditionalist all the way through.  Innovation is part of our tradition. You use the same materials and tools that you have, and the same design elements, and the Clay Mother will come through you for what she wants you to do,” he explains. “Instead of doing the same cloud pattern or serpent pattern, you take that and make it your own. So, in fact, everything I’m doing is old, but new.”  Russell Sanchez, Southwest Art Magazine

This bear is a stunning example of how the history and culture of San Ildefonso Pueblo is modernized in concept in his hands.  The bear is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Simply stunning!

$ 9,000.00

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All Contemporary   All Signed Historic

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