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Wednesday, March 20, 2019 

Borts-Medlock, Autumn  – Mini Deeply Carved Bowl (2002)

This is an exceptional miniature by Autumn Borts.  She is known for her often fanciful carved pottery and use of unique shapes.  The bowl is very deeply carved with traditional Santa Clara designs.  Rain clouds, lightning and wind designs extend from the neck to the base is a flowing pattern.  Note her use of the negative space to create these very intricate designs!  It is amazing she could carve so deep and with complex lines on a piece so small! It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Autumn Borts”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00

Begay, Jr., Harrison – Small Brown Jar with Heartline Bears

This jar by Harrison Begay, Jr.is from 2001.  He has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  The jar is very deeply carved for the size and has four matte polished bears as the design.  Each bear is carved with a heartline.  The surrounding area is fully polished.  The jar is fired a brownish coloration, a close reflection of the color of traditional Navajo pottery.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 200.00

Baca David – Red Long Neck Jar (2006) with Ribbon

David Baca is a son of Angela Baca and known for his traditional pottery.  This jar has a wide body and an elongated neck.  The entire piece is fully polished and fired a deep red.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is from 2006 and received a Blue Ribbon at Santa Fe Indian Market.

$ 300.00

Begay, Jr., Harrison – Small Jar with Heartline Bears

This jar by Harrison Begay, Jr.is from 2001.  He has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  The jar is very deeply carved for the size and has three highly polished bears as the design.  Each bear is carved with a heartline and they are each separated by a lightning design in matte.  It is fired a deep black.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 350.00

Naranjo, Jody –  Jar with Butterflies and Horses (2005)

This jar byJody Naranjo is from 2005.  The entire piece is fully polished.  The design is alternating horses and butterflies.  The background tan area is also fully designed with linear etching.  The jar is fired a brownish coloration.  It is signed, “Jody Naranjo” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00

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Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Gonzales, Rose – Small Bowl with Rain Designs

Rose Gonzales is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career, she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This bowl is one of her classic shapes and designs.  It has a sharp shoulder and the bowl is carved in her “cameo style”.  The design is a series of rain and lightning patterns.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rose”.  It is in excellent condition with no crack, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00

Gonzales, Rose – Large Bowl with Feather Design

Rose Gonzales is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career, she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This wide bowl is her classic shape with the sharp shoulder.  It is painted on the shoulder with a feather and storm pattern.  The painting is sharp and the bowl is very highly polished.  It is fired a deep black in coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rose”.  It is in excellent condition with no crack, restoration or repair.

$ 950.00

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Monday, March 18, 2019

Yepa, Marcella – Swirl Melon Jar

Marcella Yepa (b. 1964) is known for her carved and polished pottery.  She is a cousin of Emma Yepa and learned to make pottery from her aunt, Alvina Yepa.  This jar is carved with eight melon ribs swirling down from the rim to the base.  They are each deeply carved and fully polished.   It is signed on the bottom.

$ 250.00

Cain, Linda – Mini Carved Jar

This is one of the smallest pieces we have had by Linda Cain.  It is deeply carved with a cloud and rain pattern. Note how deeply it is carved and the extension of the carved designs down from the neck.  It is highly polished and fired a brownish-red.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Linda Cain”.

$ 275.00

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Sunday, March 17, 2019

Lewis, Sharon – Seedpot with Four Butterflies

Sharon Lewis has developed her own very distinctive style of painted design.  Her pieces are beautifully formed, thin-walled and then tightly painted.  This seedpot has four dragonflies in the center of the piece.  They are surrounding a fineline star design.  The star is outlined in a red clay.  The piece is very detailed for the size.   The seedpot is signed on the bottom, “Sharon Lewis”.

$ 300.00

Lewis, Sharon – Seedpot with Fine-Line Dragonfly

Sharon Lewis has developed her own very distinctive style of painted design.  Her pieces are beautifully formed, thin-walled and then tightly painted.  This seedpot has a single dragonfly as the design. The dragonfly is painted with thin lines.  It is surrounded by a geometric plant design.  The piece is very detailed for the size.   The seedpot is signed on the bottom, “Sharon Lewis”.

$ 200.00

Lewis, Sharon – Gourd Jar with Feather Designs

Sharon Lewis has developed her own very distinctive style of painted design.  Her pieces are beautifully formed, thin-walled and then tightly painted.  This is one of the first times she has made a “gourd” jar.  The shape is formed with the end of the “gourd” at the top. This piece is fully painted with four bands of feather designs.  It is a unique shape and intricately painted.   It is signed on the bottom, “Sharon Lewis”.

$ 200.00

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Saturday, March 16, 2019

Sanchez, Russell  – Polychrome Jar with Birds, Sun and Lid

This is an exceptional lidded water jar by Russell Sanchez.  He continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This jar is a classic early San Ildefonso shape with a round shoulder, sloping sides and a turned out neck.  The base is polished black and the shoulder is polished a deep red.  It is painted “black-on-red” around the shoulder.  The main design area is polished with a cream-colored clay slip.  There are two large birds etched into the clay and they are separated by two sun designs.  Each of the design areas is highlighted with additional black and red clay slips.  The neck is etched with a mountain design and finally, the rim is polished a deep red.  The complementary colors and the variations of polished and matte areas on the jar are stunning!  There is wonderful detail throughout the entire piece.  The lid is fascinating, as the style is one found on some of the earliest San Ildefonso lidded pieces from the 1880’s.  The top half of the lid is polished black while the border is polished with the cream colored clay.  The jar has five bands of jet (black) hei-shi beads.   As Russell continues to innovate from historic designs, he says, “Tradition means moving forward and adding to it. You keep moving forward.  If we stayed stagnant we would no longer exist.”  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  The last photo is an example of this style of lid on an early San Ildefonso polychrome jar.  It is exciting to see how this imagery is not new but Russell’s reinterpretation of it both modernizes and revives.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 9,200.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Gunmetal Bowl with Circles and Bear Lid

This is a creative bowl by Russell Sanchez.  He continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched. This piece is a round bowl and has 20 circles carved into the clay.  Each is stone polished and they are separated by a mica slip.  The contrast of the polished and micaceous matte surfaces are striking.  Each of the circles is surrounded by a band of hematite hei-shi beads.  So, why hematite?  Russell has begun to use it on his recent pieces for several reasons. There is a traditional aspect in that women wear hematite bracelets when they do certain traditional dances at the Pueblo.  There is also hematite content in the clay slips use on the pottery.  The lid is a fully polished bear which is created with one paw raised. There is a wonderful sculptural aspect to the bear!  The piece is fired to a near gunmetal appearance which is striking with the high polish.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

 

$ 9,800.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Polychrome Corn Meal Box

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This box is one of his first incorporating a polished white clay slip!  The white is the same white clay used on historic San Ildefonso polychrome pottery when it was stone polished.  This piece has a culturally inspired shape and design.  The shape is from the traditional “corn meal” boxes, which were used to hold corn meal during Pueblo events. The raised or step area is a mountain.  This box has two old style snakes surrounding it on three sides.  They are slipped with red an black clay.  On the back side is a Sun Katsina design.  Again, etched into the clay and slipped with red and black clay slips along with the white clay.  Below the central design is a row of checkerboard polished black and matte.  The bottom band of design is separated by two inset bands of hematite hei-shi beads.  Not as if this box doesn’t have a lot going on, but check out the inside, which is highly polished black!  There is a band of turquoise beads separating the black from the red.  Simply spectacular!   As Russell continues to innovate from historic designs, he says, “Tradition means moving forward and adding to it. You keep moving forward.  If we stayed stagnant we would no longer exist.”  The box is signed on the bottom in the clay.  The last two photos are the box next to a San Ildefonso polychrome cornmeal box from the early 1900’s, for a comparison of this historic shape and polychrome coloration.  It is exciting to see how this imagery is not new but Russell’s reinterpretation of it both modernizes and revives.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 6,200.00

Arthur Lopez – “San Sebastian Martir” Contemporary Santos Wood Carving

Arthur Lopez is one of the leading santos carvers in New Mexico.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and watercolor pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.   These are the time involved and historic foundations for his work.  This piece is entitled, “San Sebastian Martir It is a contemporary take on the traditional “Saint Sebastian”, pierced by arrows.

Arthur’s work is found in numerous museum and public collections, including Albuquerque Museum of Art & History,  Denver Art Museum,  Freedom Museum (911 Memorial at Ground Zero), Harwood Museum of Art, Museum of International Folk Art,  Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, and the State of New Mexico Permanent Art Collection.

$ 7,200.00

Arthur Lopez – “Geo-Madre-Lupe” Wood Carving

Arthur Lopez is one of the leading santos carvers in New Mexico.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and watercolor pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.   These are the time involved and historic foundations for his work.  This piece is entitled, “Geo-Madre-Lupe”.   It is a series of interconnected pieces based on the Virgin of Guadalupe.  Arthur said of this piece:

“I titled this, “Geo-Madre-Lupe”.  It is an abstract geoemtric form of the Virgin of Guadalupe.  It is based on the idea of building blocks of faith.  This is the first is a series based on this concept based on geometric shapes and forms.  Their iconography remains visually intact but the concept feels modern”.

The piece is very intricately painted and the placement of the squares seems both fragile and yet perfectly balanced.  The large size gives the piece an exceptional appearance in person!

Arthur’s work is found in numerous museum and public collections, including Albuquerque Museum of Art & History,  Denver Art Museum,  Freedom Museum (911 Memorial at Ground Zero), Harwood Museum of Art, Museum of International Folk Art,  Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, and the State of New Mexico Permanent Art Collection.

$ 6,800.00

Arthur Lopez – “San Sebastian” Santos Wood Carving

Arthur Lopez is one of the leading santos carvers in New Mexico.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and watercolor pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.   These are the time involved and historic foundations for his work.  This piece is entitled, “San Sebastian  Arthur says of this piece:  This is a traditional style of Saint Sebastian carving.

Arthur’s work is found in numerous museum and public collections, including Albuquerque Museum of Art & History,  Denver Art Museum,  Freedom Museum (911 Memorial at Ground Zero), Harwood Museum of Art, Museum of International Folk Art,  Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, and the State of New Mexico Permanent Art Collection.

$ 3,200.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Polychrome Box with Bear Lid

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This is a round box with a bear lid.  The round shape is one that is seen at San Ildefonso Pueblo as early as the 1920’s (the last photo is a round box by Maria Martinez from the 1920’s).  This box is polished red on the top and bottom band and the center is polished with the polished white clay.  The top band is painted black-on-red with a hatchwork pattern. The central band is etched with a storm pattern and then slipped with red and black clay slips.  The bottom band is polished black and red with matte tan areas to create the checkerboard pattern.  There are three bands of hei-shi beads, two made from jet (black) and one from turquoise.  The lid is a sculptural bear which is polished a deep red and the base if etched with a polychrome corn design.  There are two bands of inset turquoise hei-shi beads.  As Russell continues to innovate from historic designs, he says, “Tradition means moving forward and adding to it. You keep moving forward.  If we stayed stagnant we would no longer exist.”  The box is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is exciting to see how this imagery is not new but Russell’s reinterpretation of it both modernizes and revives.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 6,000.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Large Red & Black Bear with Summer/Winter Designs

Russell Sanchez continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This large bear is one of his classic shapes.  The piece is coil built and then stone polished a deep red.  The designs on the front are the rain and summer and the back are snow and winter.  Note the variation in the heartline which is a series of dots which flow around the surface.  The heartline which extends out from the mouth of the bear. The bear is a symbol of strength and the heartline is a traditional image used to symbolize the heart as the center of power in the animal.  The inside of the legs is polished black. The band across the back of the bear has five rows of square hematite and two rows of turquoise.  On the back of the bear are two pieces of Lone Mountain Turquoise.  It is not often that he creates such a large piece and the result is quite stunning.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 16,000.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Triple “Gourd” Water Jar

This is an exceptional jar by Russell Sanchez.  The piece is a classic water jar shape but with the traditional “gourd” indentions on all the areas of the piece.  The “Gourd Jar” takes its inspiration from the gourd shards used when smoothing out a piece of pottery.  That same piece then can create an indention on the surface of the vessel.  This jar has eight horizontal indentions on the shoulder.  These are the classic “gourd” indentions.  The neck has 12 and the base has 12 vertical gourd indentions. There is a band of checkerboard designs just below the neck and two more rows below the shoulder.  They are mica and matte in coloration.  The rim of the jar is fluted with 24 undulations!  I took a pic of the area under the rim to show how the clay is pushed up to create the fluted form.  This style of rim harkens back to the original name for this type of rim, the “raindrop rim”.   The rim is slipped with mica, as a contrast to the highly polished surfaces.  All of the hei-shi beads are hematite. Russell continues to revive historic San Ildefonso designs with his innovative style of pottery.  The bottom of the jar has the classic indention of traditional San Ildefonso water jars.  It’s exciting how Russell uses these historic elements to keep them alive on his contemporary pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 7,800.00

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Friday, March 15, 2019

Nampeyo, James Garcia – Jar with Spiral Design

James Garcia Nampeyo is a son of Leah Garcia Nampeyo, a grandson of Fannie Nampeyo and a great-grandson of Nampeyo of Hano.  This jar has a classic Hopi shape with the wide shoulder and short neck.  The design is one which finds inspiration in the work of Nampeyo of Hano.  There is a period when she made pieces with a checkered design (see last photo).  This jar draws from that along more classic Hopi-Tewa spiraling cloud patterns.  The piece is tightly painted with a design which meets the form.   It is painted with bee-weed (black) and was traditionally fired to give it the coloration with some intense blushes.  It is signed on the bottom, “James G. Nampeyo”.  It is in very good with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 525.00

Nampeyo, Fannie – Migration Pattern Jar (1970’s)

This is a classic jar by Fannie Nampeyo. She was the youngest daughter of noted potter Nampeyo of Hano and also the mother of noted potters Iris Nampeyo, Leah Nampeyo, and Thomas Polacca.  She was certainly among the most skilled of her generation for painting designs pottery.  While her mother revived the “migration” or bird wing design, Fannie made is a signature design of her pottery and of the Nampeyo family.  This jar is wide in shape with a round shoulder and a short neck with a turned out rim.  However, it is the migration pattern which dominates the surface of this piece.  The migration pattern, or bird wings, extend around the entire jar in 8 sections.  The jar was traditionally fired so that it has some visually striking blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom, “Fannie Nampeyo” and a corn plant representing the corn clan.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one spot of spalling on the top of the shoulder which can be seen in the photos.  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo said of  the migration pattern:

“This is the one design that was really stressed for us to use, the migration pattern. Nothing but lines, representing the migration of all the people to all the places, including down below and up above. It has seven points at the top and bottom. All the x’s represent life from the bottom and top, telling you the universe is one. The thin lines, I just wanted to paint them real fast and real close to try and include everyone.”  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo, Spoken Through Clay

$ 2,200.00

Quotskuyva, Dextra – Jar with Hummingbird Design (1990’s)

Dextra Quostkuyva Nampeyo is certainly one of the most influential Hopi-Tewa potters of the last 50 years. Not only has she taught numerous potters (Steve Lucas, Yvonne Lucas, Les Namingha, Loren Ami, Hisi Nampeyo, to name just a few), but her creative designs and forms changed have dramatically influenced the pottery itself.  This is one of her pieces from the 1990s. The jar is very highly polished and painted colorful hummingbird below the shoulder.  Note the red on the head and the wings.  Behind the hummingbird is the bird tail design.  It is very detailed in its design.  Across the shoulder is a stylized bird pattern.  The jar is painted with bee-weed (black) and a red clay slip.   The piece as traditionally fired, which created the striking coloration to this piece.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dextra” along with a corn plant to represent the Corn Clan.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Dextra was the subject of a retrospective of her pottery at the Museum of Indian Art and Culture, along with a companion book entitled, “Painted Perfection“.

$ 2,200.00

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Thursday, March 14, 2019

Blue Corn –  Bowl with Feather Pattern (1980s)

While Blue Corn is one of the innovative San Ildefonso potters of the late 1900’s.  She is often best known for her polychrome pottery but began her career making black pottery.  This bowl is from the 1980’s. It is very highly polished and painted with a feather pattern.  The design encircles the entire bowl.  It is fired a deep black.  It is signed in the clay, “Blue Corn”.   The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00

Blue Corn – Polychrome Jar with Carved Avanyu (1970’s)

Blue Corn is often best known for her polychrome pottery and her creative use of various clay slips on her pottery. She learned to make pottery from Maria Martinez at San Ildefonso.  This is one of her few carved pieces which is also polychrome. The jar is carved with a water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece.  The bowl is polished tan and the avanyu and the carved areas are outlined with a black clay.  The background area is slipped with a taupe colored clay.  The result is a striking appearance where the depth of the carving is enhanced by the coloration.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Blue Corn, San Ildefonso”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are two small bubbles in the taupe area below the neck of the avanyu, which appear in coloration to have occurred at the time of the firing.

$ 875.00

Martinez, Maria – Large Fully Polished Open Bowl, “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

During the 1950’s Maria Martinez made and polished pottery and signed using her Tewa name, “Maria Poveka”.  Poveka means “Water Lilly”.  This is one of her classic open bowls, which is polished on both the inside and outside. Interestingly, today, few potters will attempt to fully polish the inside and outside of a piece, as it adds the possibility of it cracking.  The bowl is very highly polished and it was fired a deep black.  It is certainly the classic style of work by Maria.  The bowl is signed in the clay on the bottom, “Maria Pove’ka”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

 

$ 1,850.00

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Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Lucario, Rebecca – Large Jar with “Op-Art” Butterfly Design

This is a spectacular large jar by Rebecca Lucario.  She is known for her delicate and intricately painted pottery.  She uses traditional Acoma clay and paints with bee-weed (a plant) and clay slips.  Ever since one of her plates appeared on the cover the “Changing Hands” exhibition catalog, her work has become iconic with fine-line and “op-art” style painting.  This large jar is a classic Acoma shape with the high shoulder and short neck.  Nearly the entire surface of the jar is fully painted with an interconnecting butterfly design.  The design starts small at the rim and the larger at the shoulder and smaller down to the base.  Each of the butterflies interconnects and there is a diamond shaped “star” in between.  There is simply a beautiful balance of shape and design on this piece. The bottom is the traditional Acoma red clay slip.  The jar is signed, “R. Lucario”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,500.00

Begay, Daniel – Jar with Turtle and Star Designs

This tall jar by Daniel Begay combines both polished and carved designs.  The jar has four sections of design.  One has a turtle with a water and feather pattern. The design is deeply cut into the clay and it is matte.  The opposite side has a feather pattern on the top, then a star and cloud design with a water design near the base.  Again, the carved section is matte.  Separating the two sections are two large panels which are fully polished.  The contrast of the polished and matte sections works well on this jar to highlight the two different techniques.  The matte is always difficult as it has to be sanded smooth or else there will be shadows created by any uneven surface.  The jar is fired a deep black in coloration.   Note how Daniel’s designs also combine both thin and thicker lines to enhance the imagery.  The style of carving has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,000.00

Begay, Daniel – Storage Jar with Avanyu and Stars

This is an exceptional carved storage jar by Daniel Begay. He has been creating some unique shapes with flat or square sides. This piece is very round in shape with a short neck.  It is fully carved around the side, which is a lot of carving space!  The jar has a water serpent in one section.  Note the complexity to the body  and the unique set up of the design.  As the jar is turned there are polished and matte sections of cloud and lightning motifs.  The side opposite the avanyu has deeply carved stars which are both polished and matte.  Note near the base the little carved dragonfly!  There are additional bands of carved clouds and an eternity design.  The top and lower section are fully polished.  It is a striking piece in form and design.  Throughout his work, Daniel creates a strong visual contrast between the polished and matte surfaces, which adds to the sophistication of the imagery. Note how Daniel’s designs also combine both thin and thicker lines to enhance the imagery.  The style of carving has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,800.00

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Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Naha, Helen “Featherwoman” – Bowl with Bird Migration Design (1970’s)

Helen “Feather Woman” Naha was known for her traditional white-ware pottery.  This bowl is from the 1970s and it has a series of birds in flight as the design.  If the design looks somewhat familiar, it should, as it is her variation on the classic “migration pattern”.  Here, Helen has made the design into birds in flight.  The top has the bird heads while the bottom the bird wing. There are intricate lines connecting the birds together. The piece is also polished on the inside!  The bowl is painted with bee-weed (black) and a red clay slip.  It was traditionally fired and there are slight color variations from the firing.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom with her hallmark feather.

$ 975.00

Naha, Burel – Large Seedpot with Awatovi Star Design

Burel Naha is the son of Helen “Featherwoman” Naha and a brother of Rainy Naha and Sylvia Naha.  While he no longer makes much pottery, he was well known for his intricately painted pieces and especially the use of the spider design.  This seedpot has a stylized version of the Awatovi Star design.  The “Awatovi Star” pattern was revived by her mother, Helen “Featherwoman” Naha.  Awatovi is one of the ruins near Hopi where a white slipped style of pottery was made.  It is a fascinating place as it was where Coronado made contact with the Hopi in 1540.  During the excavations in the 1930’s the whiteware pottery was rediscovered.  It was the imagery from his work which inspired much of Helen’s early pottery, as opposed to the more classic Sikyatki inspired pottery of Nampeyo of Hano.  Burel’s design has the star on the top and the bottom.  The central design is the “eternity band” which was also seen on Helen’s pottery.  The bottom half has a swirling cloud and the top has a plant design.  The piece is tightly painted and traditionally fired.  It is painted using bee-weed (black) on a white kaolin clay surface.  It is signed on the bottom with a feather and a Long Hair katsina, which is his hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,600.00

Naha, Burel – Seedpot with Awatovi Spider and Star Design

This is an exceptional jar by Burel Naha.  He is the son of Helen “Featherwoman” Naha and a brother of Rainy Naha and Sylvia Naha.  While he no longer makes much pottery, he was well known for his intricately painted pieces and especially the use of the spider design.  This seedpot has a stylized version of the Awatovi Star design on the top.  The “Awatovi Star” pattern was revived by her mother, Helen “Featherwoman” Naha.  Awatovi is one of the ruins near Hopi where a white slipped style of pottery was made.  It is a fascinating place as it was where Coronado made contact with the Hopi in 1540.  During the excavations in the 1930s the whiteware pottery was rediscovered.  It was the imagery from his work which inspired much of Helen’s early pottery, as opposed to the more classic Sikyatki inspired pottery of Nampeyo of Hano.  The bottom half has an Awatovi spider as the design.  It is very intricately painted and a nice variation from his very realistic spider patterns.   The piece is tightly painted and traditionally fired.  It is painted using bee-weed (black) on a white kaolin clay surface.  It is signed on the bottom with a feather and a Long Hair katsina, which is his hallmark.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,800.00

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Monday, March 11, 2019

Nez, Wallace – Sgraffito Jar with Butterflies and Butterfly Lid (2006)

Wallace Nez is known for his intricately etched pottery.  He began to make pottery when he was 12 years old.  He won first place ribbons at the Santa Fe Indian Market in 1999, 2000, and 2001 and Best of Division at the Museum of Northern Arizona Market Show in 1999.  This tall seedpot has amazingly intricate designs etched into the clay. There are four medallions, each with a different butterfly.  Surrounding them are very intricate stylized designs.  Near the base there are larger etched butterflies.  The lid is tiny and fits perfectly.  It is etched with two butterflies.  It is all so intricately and delicately designed, it is quite extraordinary!  The piece is signed on the bottom “Wallace Nez” with the date of 2006.

$ 1,200.00

Nez, Wallace – Sgraffito Seedpot with Butterflies and Deer (2006)

Wallace Nez is known for his intricately etched pottery.  He began to make pottery when he was 12 years old.  He won first place ribbons at the Santa Fe Indian Market in 1999, 2000, and 2001 and Best of Division at the Museum of Northern Arizona Market Show in 1999.  This wide seedpot has amazingly intricate designs etched into the clay. There is one larger medallion with an etched deer looking upward.  It is looking at the five medallions, each with a different butterfly.  Surrounding them are very intricate stylized designs.  Below the shoulder there are larger etched butterflies.  The base is etched with a basket weave design in the style of a Navajo Wedding Basket.  Note the exceptional symmetry of the basket “weave”.  It is all so intricately and delicately designed, it is quite extraordinary!  The piece is signed on the bottom “Wallace Nez” with the date of 2006.

$ 900.00

Chavarria, Stella  – Jar with Avanyu and Feather Design

Stella Chavarria is a daughter of noted potter Teresita Naranjo and a granddaughter of Christina Naranjo. This is a classic piece of her pottery.  The jar has a water jar shape with the elongated neck. The neck is fully carved with a feather pattern while there is an avanyu (water serpent) around the body of the piece. The designs are deeply carved into the clay.  There is certainly a similarity to the work of her mother with the style of carving and carving depth.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  The piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While Stella makes very little pottery today her work continues to reflect Santa Clara pottery traditions.

$ 550.00

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Sunday, March 10, 2019

Sahmie, Jean – Jar with Migration Pattern

Jean Sahmie is a daughter of noted potter Priscilla Nampeyo and a descendant of Nampeyo of Hano. This jar has a wide shoulder and a short neck.  The piece is painted with the classic migration pattern.  There are seven bird wings above and below the shoulder.  Note the thin lines making up the pattern!  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “J Sahme”.   While Jean no longer makes pottery, there is wonderful creativity in each of her pieces!

$ 400.00

Redbird, Ida – Bowl with Cloud and Rain Designs (1960’s)

Ida Redbird is one of the best known of the potters involved in the revival of Maricopa pottery from 1937-40. She was featured in Arizona Highways in 1948. Her pottery is made using a paddle-and-anvil technique and they are twice fired. The black designs are derived from a mixture of mesquite sap and cactus spines.  This bowl is a round shape with a polished exterior and matte interior.  The design is a cloud and rain pattern which encircles the rim of the piece.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Ida Redbird” on the bottom.

$ 375.00

Laate, Carlos – Large Jar with Heartline Deer and Rosettes

Carlos learned to make pottery from his grandmother Daisy Hooee (a descendant of Nampyeo of Hano) and his aunt, Jennie Laate.  He began making pottery in 1989 and utilizes traditional Zuni designs.  The large jar is a classic Zuni shape with the high shoulder and sloping neck.  The jar has three large rosettes around the piece.  They are separated by medallions with heartline deer and birds. The sections with the deer are often called “The Deer in the House”.  The rim has a floral design with small linear patterns.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 800.00

Lucario, Rebecca – Plate with Bird and Sprial Wing Design

Rebecca Lucario is known for her delicate and intricately painted pottery.  This plate is very intricately painted.  In the center is a medallion with a parrot.  This is a design often seen on Acoma pottery.  Spiraling out from this center medallion are wing designs along with rectangular designs of polished red and fine-line patterns. Typical of her work, the lines are very thin and tightly painted.  Note how the designs get larger as they extend to the rim.  The plate is signed on the back, “R. Lucario”.

$ 1,200.00

Lewis, Eric & Sharon Lewis – Jar with Raincloud Designs

This is a creative jar by Eric Lewis and his mother, Sharon Lewis.  Eric made the jar and Sharon painted the piece.  The jar has large rain clouds painted around the neck.  Below is a lightning design and rain patterns, which are the fine-line designs.  Sharn is known for the very thin lines of her painting.  They work well together!  The jar is signed on the bottom by both Eric and Sharon.

$ 400.00

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Saturday, March 9, 2019

Torivio, Mike & Jackie – “Night Protector” Owl Seedpot (1994)

Mike and Jackie Torivio are a collaborative pair known for their innovative pottery. Jackie (b. 1957) is Acoma/Laguna/Acoma and Mike (b. 1958) is from Acoma.  They use traditional clay and slips to paint their pottery.  Jackie learned to make pottery from her grandmother and mother.  Mike only took to making pottery as an adult.  Mike forms all the pottery while Jackie paints the very intricate designs.  Jackie says she draws inspiration for her designs from the Pueblo traditions she learned as a child.

This seedpot is entitled, “Night Protector”.  It is in the shape of an owl, with raised ridges along the head.  The eyes and beak are slipped with a red clay.  The eyes are painted with a spiraling feather pattern.  The remainder of the piece is a series of fine-line designs which are meant to emulate the feathers of the owl.  It is very detailed in design!  The piece is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00

Medina, Marcellus – Dancers and Clown Jar

Marcellus Medina is known for contemporary painted pottery using acrylic.  The jar is made by his wife, Elizabeth Medina.  This jar is a more complicated and intricately painted series of figures. There is a Koshari Clown, a “War Dance” and a “Zia Dance” figure.  Around the neck is a rain pattern and separating each of the figures is a traditional style dragonfly.  The clown is one of his classic figures and is wonderful in it’s detail.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Marcellus Medina, Elizabeth Medina”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 850.00

Lonewolf, Joseph – Red & Black Bowl with Nine Birds (1978)

Joseph Lonewolf began making pottery in 1970-1.  This is a classic piece of his pottery in the black and red style. The firing is one where he created a “red and black” coloration at the end of the firing process before the manure was added to turn the piece black.  The bowl is polished, incised and etched before it is fired.  The design on this piece is a series of nine birds.  The top half of the bowl is red and the bottom half is black.  The area behind the birds is more deeply incised with a swirling linear design.   The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,250.00

Yazzie, Angie – Wide Micaceous “Grandmother Jar” with Fluted Rim

Angie Yazzie is renown for her thin-walled Taos pottery. Each piece is coil built and made from micaceous clay from near Taos Pueblo.  Angie focuses on traditional shapes along with making each piece nearly paper thin!  It almost feels like there is nothing there when you hold one! This jar is thin-walled and one which she calls her “Grandmother Jar”.  It has a sharp shoulder and a fluted rim.  The jar is made form micaceous clay so when it is fired it has a sparkling/metallic appearance.  Angie fires her pieces using wood, so it is a different firing process than Santa Clara blackware.  The result is that you can very slightly see the fire-clouds on the surface of the piece.  That is a great addition, as it speaks to the traditional firing methods!  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Angie Yazzie”.  She has won numerous awards for her work, including “Best of Pottery” at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2017.

$ 2,000.00

Garcia, Gloria “Golden Rod” – Bowl with Fish

This bowl by Gloria Garcia is fully polished and fired black. The designs are etched into the clay.  There are eight Mimbres inspired fish as the design.  Each fish is different.  There is a water design around the rim of the bowl.   Gloria’s combination of polishing and etched designs is always striking.  This piece is signed on the bottom with her Tewa name “GoldenRod”.

$ 450.00

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Friday, March 8, 2019

Begay, Jr., Harrison – Jar with Hummingbird, Flowers and Dragonfly

This is a larger and complex jar by Harrison Begay, Jr..  He has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This jar is a water jar shape with a flat rim and tall sides.  The designs are deeply carved into the clay and combine both polished and matte surfaces.  There is a large hummingbird which is fully polished along with two flowers.  This jar combines both “realistic” and traditional design elements. As the jar is turned there is a water pattern and then two large old style dragonflies.  The dragonflies have the double wings and are surrounded by wind designs.  It is a complex but flowing group of designs.   The polished sections stand out more in contrast to the black matte areas.  The jar also has a flat rim, which is fully polished on the top and side.  The polished rim is a nice complement both to the shape and the intricate designs.  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Harrison”.

$ 2,200.00

Medicine Flower, Grace – Lidded Bowl with Butterfly Medallion (1980’s)

This small lidded bowl by Grace Medicine Flower is from the 1980s.  She remains renown for her creative pottery.  This piece has a single medallion on one side with etched butterflies and flowers.  Surrounding the top of the medallion are carved lightning designs.  As the bowl is turned there are two melon ribs which encircle the bowl from the base to the medallion. The lid fits down into the bowl. The entire piece is very highly polished and fired a deep black.  Grace always etched the designs into her pieces before they were fired, which creates the coloration of the matte area on the bowl. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00

Garcia, Tammy – Large Jar with Parrots & Melon Swirls (1998)

This is an exceptional large jar by Tammy Garcia from 1998.  It is deeply craved with parrots, melon swirls, and cloud patterns.  Tammy said of this piece back in 2003 when it was featured in a museum exhibition and publication:

“When it comes to designing a piece, I reflect on my ancestors who made pottery, and it seems like one of their purposes in designing pottery was to record their history.  You can look at a pot, and it’s almost like a book in the sense that it can tell a story of what was going on during their time.”

She said that the parrots and parrot feathers have long been part of Pueblo culture and regalia.  The design of the parrot here is one sitting on a floral branch below the clouds. The melon swirls are the rainbow and the geometric designs are abstract water symbols.  It’s not just the complexity of the design which is so striking and unique, but the polishing. The stone polished surfaces are stunning and add a depth to the appearance of the piece.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tammy Garcia”.  It is definitely an important piece of her classic pottery art!

$ 20,000.00

Garcia, Tammy – “Harvest Time”, Bronze 2/35

This is a new bronze by Tammy Garcia.  The piece is entitled, “Harvest Time” and it is in the shape of one of her water jars.  The designs are Pueblo maidens dancing along with dragonflies.  The entire piece is fully designed.  Around the neck of the jar is a feather pattern.  The bronze has several patinas used to create the various colors of green and red. The additional colors give the piece added depth.   It is signed on the side near the base “TG” for Tammy Garcia and the number is 2/35.  Tammy has been innovative with her exploration of various medium using her amazing artistic style.

$ 6,800.00

Garcia, Gloria “Golden Rod” – Bowl with Bears

This bowl by Gloria Garcia is fully polished and fired black. The designs are etched into the clay.  There are two scenes, each with realistic bears as the design.  Separating them are two bands with etched bear paws. There is an additional red clay slip added to the rain design around the rim of the bowl.  Gloria’s combination of polishing and etched designs is always striking.  This piece is signed on the bottom with her Tewa name “GoldenRod”.

$ 575.00

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Thursday, March 7, 2019

Yazzie, Angie – Black Micaceous Water Jar with Fluted Rim

Angie Yazzie is renown for her thin-walled Taos pottery. Each piece is coil built and made from micaceous clay from near Taos Pueblo.  Angie focuses on traditional shapes along with making each piece nearly paper thin!  It almost feels like there is nothing there when you hold one! This jar is thin-walled with a wide, round shoulder and a thin, fluted neck.  The jar has an elegant balance of form.  Angie fires her pieces using wood, so it is a different firing process than Santa Clara blackware.  The result is that you can very slightly see the fire-clouds on the surface of the piece.  That is a great addition, as it speaks to the traditional firing methods!  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Angie Yazzie”.  She has won numerous awards for her work, including “Best of Pottery” at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2017.

$ 900.00

Begay, Daniel – Square Bowl with Yei Figures and Lid

This is the first lidded piece we have had by Daniel Begay. He has been creating some unique shapes with flat or square sides. This piece is carved around the body of the bowl with feathers and clouds, Yei figures, water, and star designs.  Daniel is both Navajo and Santa Claran and so his full heritage comes into play with his pottery.  The Yei figures are inspired by Navajo textiles and sandpaintings. The eagle feathers and clouds from Santa Clara.  The bowl is very deeply carved and contrasts the polished and matte areas as the piece is turned.  The lid is made to fit in just one manner with a notch on the bowl and lid to signify the correct fit.  The lid is matte with a square finial which is fully polished.  Throughout his work, Daniel creates a strong visual contrast between the polished and matte surfaces, which adds to the sophistication of the imagery. Note how Daniel’s designs also combine both thin and thicker lines to enhance the imagery.  The style of carving has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,200.00

Manymules, Samuel  – Water Jar with Wide Facets

This water jar by Samuel Manymules is striking shape for his pottery.  It is coil built and slipped with a red clay and then traditionally fired.  The shape is inspired by the classic water jar with the elongated neck and the slightly turned out rim.  On the shoulder, the jar just dips down a bit before the sharp edge which starts the swirls.  There are four large swirls which circle around the jar from the shoulder to the base.  They are basically flat and each is separated by a sharp ridge.  Each rib is pushed out from the inside to create the sharp “edge”.  This turns out to be a striking form as the neck and sides reflect the intense coloration form the traditional firing.   From dark black to brown and red, the colors spiral across the surface of this jar.  After the firing, the jar is covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 2,100.00

Lewis, Sharon – Plate with Dragonflies

This is a striking plate by Sharon Lewis.  She has developed her own very distinctive style of painted design.  Her pieces are beautifully formed, thin-walled and then tightly painted.  This plate has a dragonfly in relief on the right side.  On the left are two medallions, each with a dragonfly.  The remainder of the plate is painted with a fineline pattern and the rim has a dragonfly wing design.  The red is an additional clay slip.  The plate is signed on the back, “Sharon Lewis”.

$ 350.00

Lewis, Eric – Seedpot with Dragonfly

This seedpot by Eric Lewis has a graphically painted dragonfly as the design. He has painted it in a very geometric style which gives is a modern appearance.  Eric has taken classic Acoma linear designs and made them both bolder and more graphic. The result is a striking seedpot with tightly painted imagery.  Eric remains one of the young Pueblo potters to watch!

$ 125.00

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Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Garcia, Tammy –  Black-on-Black Jar with Avanyu (1991)

This is a very unusual small jar by Tammy Garcia from 1991.  Instead of being deeply carved, it is painted black-on-black.  What is interesting is that it is painted in the style of her complex, deeply carved pieces of the same time.  The jar is fully polished then painted and the avanyu encircles the piece.  It is striking and unusual early work from her.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tammy Borts Garcia”.  It is definitely a classic of her pottery art!

$ 1,200.00

Medicine Flower, Grace – Polychrome Jar with Four Deer and Swirl Melon Ribs (1997)

This is an unusual jar by Grace Medicine Flower.  She remains renown for her creative pottery.  This jar has an interesting story.  When I had my first gallery show with her in 1997, this was the very first piece she sent to me and our first one to sell.  It was her first departure into carved and polychrome style pottery which would then be indicative of her later work.  This jar has four deer, which are deeply carved into the clay.  Note that each deer is one level of carving further back so that a subtle sense of perspective is created!   They are highlighted with three different clay slips.  As the jar is turned there are 12 sharply carved melon ribs which swirl down from the neck to the base.  They are slipped with a micaceous clay.  The jar has both a modernist feel and yet it is founded in traditional clay and Santa Clara style designs.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  I think over 20 years later, it is still quite wonderful to see it again!

$ 1,850.00

Huma, Rondina – Small Bowl with Geometric Patterns

Rondina Huma has certainly been one of the most influential Hopi potters working today.  Since her two-time “Best of Show” awards at Santa Fe Indian Market, her tight style and intricately painted pottery has changed the face of contemporary Hopi pottery.   Each piece is coil built, fully stone polished and painted with native clays and bee-weed (black), and native fired.  This small bowl is from the early 2000s and it is fully designed and painted.  Rondina said of this style of her pottery:

“This style is when I first started designing from the bottom to the top. I would get a bunch of sherds and I would put them together and see what pattern they created. Then I would take back the sherds to where I found them. I also polish the inside of all my pottery. People ask how I do it and how I can get so deep inside. I just think it makes a bowl look nicer if it is fully polished. The burgundy-colored [areas] are the water migration. It’s like a spring with the water coming up out of the earth and soaking back into the ground. It’s a full cycle, so the square has to be complete. I do most of the painting freehand. When I look at a pot, I already know what design I’m going to put on there. I can visualize what I’m going to paint, and it is never the same. I don’t really use a pencil—I’m afraid it won’t come off. I try to just measure with my hand to space out the designs.”  Rondina Huma, Spoken Through Clay

The bowl is very tightly painted with a variety of designs in each of the small squares.  They are all derived from historic Hopi-Tewa and Sikyatki pottery.  The rim of the bowl is a mountain design.   The tight patterns have become more and more intricate and detailed in each passing year.  Amazingly, the inside of the bowl is also fully polished!   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 925.00

Youngblood, Mela  – Gourd Bowl (1974)

Mela Youngblood began making pottery in the late 1960’s and quickly achieved a distinctive style for her work.  Each piece of her work very highly polished and when carved the edges are distinctly rounded.  This bowl is a stylized version of the classic “gourd pot”. This style usually has indented areas on the surface of the vessel. On this piece Mela has created indentions on the side of the bowl leaving the top and bottom a fully polished surface.  The bowl was made in 1974 and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is beautifully polished and unique in its form.

$ 1,200.00

Nampeyo, Rayvin – Jar with Rainbow Design

Rayvin Nampeyo (b. 1961) is a son of Leah Garcia Nampeyo, a grandson of Fannie Nampeyo and a great-grandson of Nampeyo of Hano. He is a brother of James Nampeyo.  This jar is from the 1990s.  It has a round shoulder and a short neck.  The jar is painted with four rainbow designs.  Each is detailed with Hopi-Tewa designs.  The top star design is stippled.  The jar has very light fire-clouds and it is signed on the bottom, “Rayvin Nampeyo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

$ 275.00

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Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Whitegeese, Daryl  – Rainbow Ridge Water Jar with Bear Paw

This is a striking water jar by Daryl Whitegeese.  Daryl said he was inspired by the shapes of the water jars made by his grandmother, Margaret Tafoya.  The jar has the classic double shoulder or “rainbow ridge”.  This is not just an added coil on the surface, but if you feel inside the jar, you can actually feel the second shoulder.  I wrote of the rainbow ridge on Santa Clara pottery:

“Sarafina was inspired by the myths and legends of Santa Clara Pueblo, which were incorporated into her pottery. On the shoulder of her water jars, a second raised section or ‘double shoulder’ created a ‘rainbow band.’ This band was a prayer to keep the water from evaporating from the jar.” —CHARLES S. KING, 2008, Born of Fire: The Life and Pottery of Margaret Tafoya

The jar is highly polished and traditionally fired a dark black.  There is a single bear paw as the design on one side of the neck.  The bear paws represent a Tewa story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.   The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Definitely a classic piece keeping family history alive!  Congrats to Daryl who recently won “Best of Pottery at the Heard Museum Indian Market in 2019!

$ 4,500.00

Roller, Jeff – Box with Sun Design and Mountain Lion Lid (2019)

This is a very intricate carved box by Jeff Roller.  Jeff is a grandson of Margaret Tafoya and continues a family legacy of extraordinary traditional pottery.  The box part of the piece is deeply carved with a sun and mountain design on two sides.  The opposite ends have a cloud pattern.  There are additional incised lines for the rays of the sun. The lid is also made from Santa Clara clay.  It is a sculptural mountain lion lying down!  There is some great detail in the tail and head of the figure!  It looks great with the ears up!  The bottom of the lid extends downward so that it fits into the inside rim of the box.  The piece is traditionally fired to a brownish-red coloration creating some exceptional color variations.  It is a striking and complex piece.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Jeff Roller”.

$ 3,200.00

Begay, Daniel – Square Jar with Bears and Stars

This jar by Daniel Begay is a striking shape.  He learned to make pottery from his father, Harrison Begay, Jr.  Each piece is coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired.  Daniel has created a distinctive style of carving, similar to that of his father, yet with more angular and graphic designs. This jar has somewhat square sides with two sides being carved and two fully polished.  One side has a polished bear near the base and polished stars.  There are matte water and cloud designs.  The opposite side has a polished bear near the neck and carved cloud and wind patterns which are matte.  Of course, it is the rim of the which adds to the complexity of the piece.  The rim is square and fully polished on the top and side.  The flat and polished surface creates a striking contrast to the carving and complement to the polished sides.  Overall, there is a strong contrast between the polished and matte surfaces, which adds to the sophistication of the imagery. Note how Daniel’s designs combine both thin and thicker lines to enhance the imagery.  The style of carving has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,300.00

Begay, Jr., Harrison – Jar with Two Heartline Bears

Harrison Begay, Jr. has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This jar has two heartline bears on each side.  The bears are fully polished and carved with a heartline.  Above each bear is a cloud pattern while in front of one is a plant and the other a circular pool of water.  Separating them are river designs.  The jar combines both matte and polished surface.  It is highly polished and fired a deep black.  The polished sections stand out more in contrast to the black matte areas.  Note as well the style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. This is a very distinctive style of carving for his pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Harrison”.

$ 900.00

Tafoya, LuAnn – Red Water Jar with Avanyu

LuAnn Tafoya is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her large, highly polished pottery.  This jar is a classic shape for Santa Clara pottery with the round body and the elongated neck.  For LuAnn, it is the perfect surface!  The jar is deeply carved with a water serpent encircling the piece.  The water serpent (avanyu) is part of a story where it saves the village from a flood.  That is why as the jar is turned the body of the avanyu consists of cloud and rain pattern.  However, that also gives the jar a distinctive appearance as it is turned beyond just the one design.  The jar is very highly polished and traditionally fired.  The color is a striking deep red.  The recessed area surrounding the carving is filled in using a white or cream-colored clay.  This creates a striking visual contrast between the tan and red areas.  The coloration is beautiful and the shape of his piece is a great example of her skill, creativity, and commitment to traditional Santa Clara pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 2,400.00

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Monday, March 4, 2019

Martinez, Adam – Black Clay Bear (1980’s)

This black polishhed bear is by Adam Martinez.  Adam was the youngest son of Maria Martinez, and Santana (his wife) painted Maria’s pottery in the 1940-50’s.  Adam made clay bear figures in the 1980’s and 1990s and they are just signed by him.  They are clay and stone polished.  This bear has a stylized head an body.  It is signed on the bottom “Adam”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic piece!

$ 600.00

Gonzales, Marie – Bowl with Incised Feather Pattern and Turquoise (1990s)

Marie Gonzales is a sister of note potter John Gonzales. This bowl is fully polished red and etched with two sections of feather designs.  Separating the elongated feathers are two circular medallions.  Each medallion has an inset piece of turquoise.  The bottom of the bowl is also etched with bear paw and lightning designs.  The bowl is from the 1990’s and it is signed on the bottom, “Marie Gonzales”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00

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Sunday, March 3, 2019

Youvella, Wallace – Seedpot with Sunface

This is an intricate miniature by Wallace Youvella, the husband of Iris Nampeyo  It is fully polished with a blue clay slip.  It is etched with a sunface as the central design.  The lighter blue areas are where he etched away from the polished surface but not deep enough for the tan.  Wallace was one of the first three men at Hopi in the mid-1970’s to begin making pottery (the others were Mark Tahbo and Thomas Polacca).  Interestingly, Thomas and Wallace (who were brothers-in-law) both started with traditional Hopi-Tewa designs but met resistance from the women potters, so began making pieces which were either fully polished and etched, or carved.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00

Youvella, Jr., Wallace – Seedpot with Hemis Mana Katsina

This is an intricate small bowl by Wallace Youvella, Jr.  He is the son of noted potters Wallace Youvella and Iris Nampeyo.  It is fully polished with a Hemis Mana Katsina as the design.  It is in relief on one side of the bowl. Note the detail to the hair and the face of the katsina!  The remainder is fully polished and it is traditionally fired so there are color variations on the surface.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Wallace Youvella, Jr..  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 250.00

Youvella, Wallace – Large Seedpot with Carved Eagle

This is a larger seedpot by Wallace Youvella, the husband of Iris Nampeyo  It is very deeply carved with an eagle as the main design.  The eagle is surrounded by a rainbow pattern and the back of the seedpot is carved with a feather pattern.  The eagle and eagle feathers are slipped with a brown colored clay while the background is red. The lower tan area is the natural color of the clay.  Note the detail int he background and on the eagle!  Wallace was one of the first three men at Hopi in the mid-1970’s to begin making pottery (the others were Mark Tahbo and Thomas Polacca).  Interestingly, Thomas and Wallace (who were brothers-in-law) both started with traditional Hopi-Tewa designs but met resistance from the women potters, so began making pieces which were either fully polished and etched or deeply carved and slipped to look like a wood carving.  This piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 775.00

Nampeyo, Loren Hamilton – Jar with Flute Players

Loren Hamilton is a son of noted potter Tonita Nampeyo and a grandson of Fannie Nampeyo.  This jar is carved with two flute players and a corn plant.  The figures are then painted with additional clay slips to create pottery designs. There are additional shard patterns along the edge of the carving.  The recessed area around the carved designs in etched with linear patterns. The remainder of the ajr is polished tan.  The jar was traditionally fired and it is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Loren H Nampeyo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 375.00

Nampeyo, James Garcia – Bowl with Bear Claw Designs

James Garcia Nampeyo is a son of Leah Garcia Nampeyo, a grandson of Fannie Nampeyo and a great-grandson of Nampeyo of Hano.  This is a wide and very flat shoulder jar by James.  This wide, flat shape is one which is inspired by the historic Siyatki pottery from the area.  This bowl is fully stone polished and painted with a creative design. The squares are cloud symbols. The four other designs are either bear paws or hands.  A similar design is often used by various Hopi jewelers as a bear claw design.  The area surrounding the four bear paws is stippled to create the full style od design.  It is painted with bee-weed (black) and was traditionally fired to give it the coloration with some slight blushes.  It is signed on the bottom, “James G. Nampeyo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00

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Saturday, March 2, 2019

Medicine Flower, Grace – Polychrome Jar with Four Women in the Pueblo (1997)

This is an innovative jar by Grace Medicine Flower.  She remains renown for her creative pottery.  This jar is one of a series she made in 1996-7, when we first began to show her pottery.  The jar is carved on various levels. On the outer most level, there are pueblo women in shawls with pottery on their heads.  The shawls or blankets are each painted with various colors of clay and each has a different design.  The vessels on their heads are either polished red or black matte.  The next level down is the Pueblo buildings. The walls are polished tan and there are carved doors and windows with a red slip in the background.  The jar is an amazing variation of depth and color and to think that all the work has to be done before the piece is fired!  It is extraordinary how much time is involved in each piece of her pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicine Flower”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00

Namingha, Les – Jar with Cloud Swirls

This jar by Les Namingha uses traditional Hopi clay, is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips,  and it was traditionally fired. The jar is from the late 1990’s.  The piece is fully polished and it has a free flowing cloud, rain and sun design.  It is interesting to see how early on Les had evolved from traditional Hopi-Tewa designs to more create and innovative imagery.  Today, his work utilizes acrylic as opposed to the traditional clay slips.  The various colors on the surface are the blushes from the firing.  It is signed, “Les Namingha” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00

Torivio, Dorothy – Seedpot with Butterfly Design

This is a classic seedpot by Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  The sharp shoulder shape of the seedpot helped to emphasize the shape of her painted designs.  The piece has a butterfly pattern which is repeated in smaller and then larger sizes.  The precision and tight painting near the opening is exceptional.   The seedpot is signed on the bottom, “Dorothy Torivio” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 550.00

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Friday, March 1, 2019

Qoyawayma, Al – Large Mesa Verde Jar with Seven Kivas

This is a spectacular large piece from Al Qoyawayma.  It is one of his architectural pieces from his “Mesa Verde” series.  The oval area is pushed into the clay and then the building is pushed back out from the inside of the bowl.  This piece is one of his more complex works.  There are towers in the background and in the front are seven kivas.  Each is highlighted with vigas and windows. There is even a building to the front left and a stairway down to the front of the bowl!  It is quite extraordinary in complexity and size.  Note how Al etches and then paints all the “bricks” that make up the buildings!  This is one of the largest and most complex architectural pieces we have had from Al in several years.  Al’s architectural pieces are among his most iconic works.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is from the late 1990’s and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 19,750.00

de la Cruz, Juan and Lois Gutierrez  – “Pleiades Star” Jar

Juan Cruz creates complex painted polychrome pottery.  He is a son of noted potter Lois Gutierrez.  Lois made the jar and Juan, who is noted for his illustrations, painted the design using natural clay slips.  This jar has a rounder shape and intricately painted figures.  Juan wrote of the scene he painted as follows:

“This piece was inspired by my admiration for ancient Greek pottery and is my own interpretation of the Pleiades star cluster, which is also known as the Seven Sisters.  In Greek mythology, the Pleiads were the seven daughters of Atlas and the oceanid Pleione. The sisters were Maia, Electra, Alcyone, Taygete, Asterope, Celaeno and Merope.  In my design, I’ve depicted them as Tewa women with some holding stylized star pattern baskets.

The jar is truly polychrome (more than three colors of clay).  Note the intricacy of the painted designs and the flow of imagery across the piece.   The description is written on the back of a hand-painted graphic of the four directions.  What a phenomenal addition to this piece and the painting helps to better understand how exceptional Juan is with his art.   While Juan is new to the pottery world, he recently won “Best of Pottery” at Gallup Ceremonials in 2017 and has been featured in articles in Cowboys & Indians Magazine and Native Art Magazine in 2018.

$ 2,500.00

Ebelacker, Jason – 17″ Storage Jar with Bear Paws

This is an exceptional storage jar by Jason Ebelacker. The storage jar is a classic shape for Santa Clara pottery.  It is also one which many potters try to achieve and many consider one over 16″ to be a goal height when each added inch adds additional risk.  The shape of the jar has a high shoulder and a short neck. This taller style of storgae jar (as opposed to rounder) is most often associated with the work of Jason’s father Richard Ebelacker, as well as Sarafina Tafoya (Jason’s great-great-grandmother).  The jar is coil built and stone polished.  There are two bear paws as the design on either side.  The bear paw is carved into the clay and then polished.  The use of the bear paw is part of a story where a bear led the Pueblo people to water during a drought.  Jason fired the jar a deep red, which is always a bit more difficult to fire than a black, as the color can vary more dramatically from the flames and smoke.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Jason is a son of noted potter Richard Ebelacker, a grandson of Virginia Ebelacker and great-grandson of Margaret Tafoya.  He has won numerous awards for his pottery and continues to be one of the younger potters to watch.  It’s great to see the continuing evolution of his work in clay and to see him continuing a family tradition of storage jars!

$ 8,000.00

Namingha, Les – Hopi Moth and Birds Layered Design Jar

This jar by Les Namingha is inspired by Hopi-Tewa moth and bird designs.  The top of the jar has the Hopi style birds.  Around the shoulder are mountain patterns.  On the side of the jar are two sections with Hopi moths. In the areas with the moths and the birds, Les has layered the designs so that areas appear almost translucent!  The black areas with the white twisted lines are “tying” the top and bottom designs together.  The jar brings together numerous ideas and imagery from Hopi-Tewa pottery.  Les says of this style of his work:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing.”  Les Namingha

Around the base are vertical lines of color representing the grass, soil and earth with the birds and hummingbirds above. The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,400.00

Namingha, Les – “Polychrome I (Dextra Series)” Acrylic on Canvas

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Polychrome II (Dextra Series)”.  It is one of a series of acrylic paintings on canvas he made which explore both his pottery and that of his aunt, Dextra Quotskuyva.  This piece was made in 2010.  The central panel has a classic Hopi-Tewa design with two hummingbirds.  Note the intricacy of the two birds and the surrounding designs.  The various colors depict both his work and Dextra’s.  The painting is signed on the front and on the back.  It is in excellent condition.

$ 1,800.00

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Thursday, February 28, 2019

Qoyawayma, Al – Mesa Verde Architectural Jar with Three Kivas

This is a spectacular architectural piece from Al Qoyawayma.  It is one of his pieces from his “Mesa Verde” series.  The oval area is pushed into the clay and then the building is pushed back out from the inside of the bowl.  Beyond the technical, this large bowl has a very intricate designed Mesa Verde series of buildings. There are four tall towers in the background, which are square in shape.  Against the back as well is a long wall,which is beautifully incised and painted with clay slips to give the “bricks” a more realistic appearance.  In the front of the piece are three kivas.  A kiva is a ceremonial round room which historically was built into the ground. There are two covered kivas and one to the right which is missing the roof.  The other two have small ladders which lead down into the kiva.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Al’s architectural pieces are among his most iconic works!

$ 12,500.00

Garcia, Tammy – Dragonfly Jar (2019)

This new jar by Tammy Garcia is a round shape with a slight neck.  The jar has a classic dragonfly carved into the clay and polished red.  Behind the dragonfly is a lightning pattern polished tan.  The remainder of the jar has deeply carved sections which are either polished or stippled. The jar has various levels of carving, which give the piece a dramatic appearance.  There is a single inset piece of turquoise.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Tammy has won numerous awards for her pottery and been the recipient of the New Mexico Governor’s award.  It’s not surprising that with the intricate nature of her pottery she makes only about ten pieces of pottery a year.  Yes. Ten!  Yet each piece is unique and expands on her distinctive style and voice in the clay.

$ 7,000.00

Youngblood, Nathan – Jar with Medallions and Impressed Avanyu and Rainbows

This is a striking jar by Nathan Youngblood which is part of his series, “The Space Between”.  These pieces are inspired by the early carved work of Sarafina Tafoya (1863-1949) and Margaret Tafoya (1904-2001).  This jar is a shape which Nathan has often used in his work.  It is a tall water jar with an elongated neck.  There are four impressed avanyu around the neck and four rainbows around the base.  Each of these areas is slipped with a micaceous clay.  The three large medallions, each has a different design.  There is one with rainclouds, one with a star and a cloud motif.  The impressed avanyus around top of the jar are inspired by the impressed work of Sarafina Tafoya.  Nathan said of the avanyu design:

 “The water serpent (avanyu) is not what people think of a ‘water snake’.  It is a reference to the way the rivers run.  They are all integrated and connect everything.  Creeks become streams, streams become rivers which become oceans.  The oceans are fed by everything around the world.  It binds us. That is why when we go to the water and throw in cornmeal and pray.  The water and water serpent connect us to the entire world.”

The impressed rainbows are another design seen in early carved/impressed Santa Clara pottery.  The last two photos show both the rainbow and avanyu designs on early Santa Clara pieces.  There is also a photo of this jar before it was polished and fired.  It’s always interesting to see a piece in process!  The jar has an exceptional amount of carving and the polishing is Nathan’s “glass-like” surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay with his name and deer tracks, which represent his name in Tewa, which means “Deer Path”.   Simply stunning!

“The Space Between”: Santa Clara Carved Pottery 1920-Present

$ 8,800.00

Youngblood, Nathan – “Mesa Rain” Red Jar

This is a deeply carved and highly polished red jar by Nathan Youngblood.  He is well known for his carved pottery and use of both traditional Santa Clara and other designs. This jar has a round body and a short sloping neck.  The entire jar is fully polished.  Around the center, it is fully carved with design.  Nathan says of the design,

“The jar has a mesa pattern in the center.  Going to the left, the wind is blowing off the mesa with swirling clouds.  The round medallion opposite the mesa steps is the sun in the clouds at sunset.  Then the clouds and rain come back to the mesa completing the cycle of the day.

The jar is very fully carved and each of the sections of design change, flow and interlock as the jar is turned.  The red clay slip is deep and rich in coloration and the jar was traditionally fired. The shape shows off the imagery and the angle of the short neck beautifully reflects the light.  While the shape, carving, and designing might seem like enough, Nathan also takes his pottery one step further. After it is fired, he uses small screwdrivers and scrapes the sides of the carved designs and the recessed areas, to create a visually striking contrast.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay with his name and deer tracks, which represent his name in Tewa.  Simply stunning!

$ 5,200.00

de la Cruz, Juan and Lois Gutierrez  – “Blue Corn Sisters” Plate

Juan Cruz creates complex painted polychrome pottery.  He is a son of noted potter Lois Gutierrez.  Lois made the jar and Juan, who is noted for his illustrations, painted the design using natural clay slips.  This plate is dynamic in the use of the designs all in one scene.  Juan wrote of the scene he painted as follows:

“After their arduous journey, the Blue Corn sisters spoke with Grandmother Spider and entreated her for help.  She provided weapons to the sisters and taught them this song:  Formerly we were Blue Corn Women, now we are Morning Star.  With this song and other aid provided by Grandmother Spider, they were prepared for the forthcoming battle.”

The plate is truly polychrome (more than three colors of clay).  Note the intricacy of the figure and the designs on their shield, dress and even the feathers!  The Morning Star can be seen in the design at the top of the plate.  The description is written on the back of a hand-painted graphic of the four directions.  What a phenomenal addition to this piece and the painting helps to better understand how exceptional Juan is with his art.   While Juan is new to the pottery world, he recently won “Best of Pottery” at Gallup Ceremonials in 2017 and has been featured in articles in Cowboys & Indians Magazine and Native Art Magazine in 2018.

$ 2,200.00

Garcia, Tammy – Large Jar with Fish and Flowers (2018)

Elegant! This new jar by Tammy Garcia is a delicate shape with correspondingly delicate imagery.  The designs encompass the surface of this piece and the shape of the water jar is striking with the sharp shoulder and the raindrop rim.  The jar has 27 fl0wers, each deeply carved with a raised central section.  There are very delicately carved thin lines which separate each petal of each flower.   There are three elaborate medallions, each carved with a trout in the center.  The trout are amazing, as not only are they highly polished, but each has different marking painted onto the clay.  As for the designs around the medallions,  Tammy says she has been creating “frames” for her designs.  Here, each medallion is framed with bear paws and floral designs.  There are additional bear paws across the surface of the jar. The bear paws are symbolic for good luck.  Note the variety of colors on the jar!  There are deep red and tan areas on the surface.  The various colors are from different clay slips. She has also texturized sections of her work and even rounded out surfaces, like the area above each fish!  The entire jar has numerous levels of carving from the raised flowers to the interiors of the bear paws.  Note as well the matte areas of the jar.  This is technically one of the most difficult parts of this piece, as they have to be sanded perfectly smooth so that no raised areas cast shadows.  It’s very time-consuming.  Tammy has won numerous awards for her pottery and been the recipient of the New Mexico Governor’s award.  It’s not surprising that with the intricate nature of her pottery she makes only about ten pieces of pottery a year.  Yes. Ten!  Yet each piece is unique and expands on her distinctive style and voice in the clay.

$ 24,000.00

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Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Hubbell, Patrick Dean – “Almost a Portrait No. 55” Oil on Canvas

Patrick Dean Hubbell is a dynamic painter who often incorporates earth pigments and oil to create his paintings.  This painting, entitled, “Almost a Portrait No. 55”, and it is oil on canvas.    Here the focus is on the Navajo blanket and age of the elder in the painting.  Patrick says of his “Almost a Portrait” series:

The series, “Almost a Portrait”, reminiscent of using historic black and white photos of Native Americans.  In my thinking it was to create the “next great American Indian portrait”, but not quite, since not a full portrait.  It abstracts the figure so you focus on the color and jewelry, not just the person.  It allows the abstract personality to come out. “

Patrick says of his work in his artist statement:

“My work is an investigation of identity. I am drawn to the subtle questioning of this examination. I find inspiration in everything and I use various themes rooted in the correlation and the conflict of both my Native American and Contemporary mindset. I am equally interested in the abstract qualities of expression as well as representational imagery. Using nature, stories, philosophies, and abstract representations, I am able to depict this existence of identity. My work includes the use of bold and vibrant colors, combined with the integration of various elements of design, and a multitude of line quality and expressive mark making that often mimics what nature provides. These elements allow me to create my own aesthetic value in which reflect a personal experience of memory, physical, mental, and spiritual instances from life. The expressive personality of my work allows the viewer a momentary visual experience.”

$ 3,200.00

Hubbell, Patrick Dean – “I See Your Love in the Distant Horizon” Oil & Earth Pigments

Patrick Dean Hubbell is a dynamic painter who incorporates earth pigments and oil to create his paintings.  This painting, entitled, “I See Your Love in the Distant Horizon”, combines oil and natural earth pigments on a wood panel.  The earth pigments are all gathered by Patrick from the Navajo reservation.  This painting has a horizon line of pigments across the bottom and it is painted on board.  It is framed in a gold frame. I added an additional photo of the piece in the gallery.  Patrick says of his earth pigment series:

“The earth pigment and the oil was a project I had in mind to gather pigments from across the Navajo nation.  I would be incorporating Navajo traditional sandpainting with my background of painting.  I was also interested in the tradtiional European paintings where they used earth pigments combined with oil paint.  I put all three ideas together and this allowed for further exploration of the pigment itself.  The pigments provided both texture and transperancy in the art.”

Patrick says of his work in his artist statement:

“My work is an investigation of identity. I am drawn to the subtle questioning of this examination. I find inspiration in everything and I use various themes rooted in the correlation and the conflict of both my Native American and Contemporary mindset. I am equally interested in the abstract qualities of expression as well as representational imagery. Using nature, stories, philosophies, and abstract representations, I am able to depict this existence of identity. My work includes the use of bold and vibrant colors, combined with the integration of various elements of design, and a multitude of line quality and expressive mark making that often mimics what nature provides. These elements allow me to create my own aesthetic value in which reflect a personal experience of memory, physical, mental, and spiritual instances from life. The expressive personality of my work allows the viewer a momentary visual experience.”

$ 2,500.00

Allison, Marla – “Gifts to Remember” Original Acrylic, Gold Leaf, Silver Leaf

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This painting incorporate gold and silver leaf along with the acrylic.  The piece is entitled, “Gifts to Remember“.  Marla says of this painting:

“We all have that special keepsake whether ephemeral or permanent to hold forever.  The moment of knowing such a gift is given is what you want to breathe in, to hold on to, see in blinding light so it burns it’s memory in your brain to never forget that perfect moment.  I wanted this painting to be my feeling of happiness and symbolized with a bluebird for beauty and a white flower for purity.  This is a feeling I have felt before and what I wanted to last forever if at least on canvas.”

All of Marla’s paintings have a “gallery wrap” so the painting continues onto the side so that framing is not necessary.

Marla says of her painting:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.  She was also the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 4,600.00

Allison, Marla – “Dragonfly and Moonlight” Original Acrylic, Gold Leaf, Silver Leaf

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This new painting incorporates gold and silver leaf along with the acrylic.  The piece is entitled, “Dragonfly and Moonlight“.  Marla says of this painting:

“Dragonflies are so soft to the touch you might not even know they have even landed on you until you feel the wind tugging at it’s wings and the small feet tightening on to your skin.  This painting is that feeling of special contact and warming you throughout making you hold your breath so not to loose the moment and hope time stands still for the moment to last.”

All of Marla’s paintings have a “gallery wrap” so the painting continues onto the side so that framing is not necessary.

Marla says of her painting:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.  She was also the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 2,300.00

Allison, Marla – “Clouds and Flowers” Original Acrylic, Gold Leaf, Silver Leaf

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This new painting incorporates gold and silver leaf along with the acrylic.  The piece is entitled, “Clouds and Flowers“.  Marla says of this painting:

“As the morning sun lights the day with golden rays, movement of awakening starts to twitch each resting life anew, so is the need for each other.  As the flowers need the sun and the clouds start to lift in new light, a breath of another grateful morning starts again.  This is the moment of gratitude for another day.”

All of Marla’s paintings have a “gallery wrap” so the painting continues onto the side so that framing is not necessary.

Marla says of her painting:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.  She was also the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 1,250.00

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Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Medina, Elizabeth – Lidded Jar with Nine Zia Birds

Elizabeth Medina is known for a traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece is coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This jar is painted around the neck with four different styles of birds.  Separating each of them is a flower design.  Below these birds is a cloud and rain motif.  Around the shoulder of the jar, there are four additional birds, and each is different in style.  Note that the red and tan areas are stone polished while the black and cream are matte.  The lid has a bear design with a bird on top, making a total of nine birds on this jar!  The jar is signed on the side “Elizabeth Medina, Zia”.

$ 400.00

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Monday, February 25, 2019

Youngblood, Nancy – Asymmetric Swirl and Shell Jar with Lid (2018)

This is an extraordinary tall jar by Nancy Youngblood. The shape is one which has become iconic for her pottery and especially the melon ribs.  The straight sides show off all the various designs.  On two of the sections there are shells.  Why shells?  They are often used in Pueblo dances and ceremonies as part of necklaces.  The interesting aspect to them on Nancy’s pottery is that each of the sections is rounded out and polished just like her melon ribs!  The two other sections have various melon swirl designs carved into they clay. They are more “free form” and ebb and flow to create unique shapes.  There are deep ridges and rounded sections.  It is a beautiful flow of design on the jar!  The background area is perfectly sanded and smooth to contrast with the highly polished sections. This is always difficult as the matte areas can cast shadows if they are note smooth.  The lid is also carved with swirls of ribbed designs.  Throughout the entire piece the angles of her carving create a strong surface for the reflection of light.  Nancy said of this style of her work:

“I’ve had problems that if I carve it too thin, it will break. I’ve had that happen so many times. I get to the end and I’m carving the single ribs and it has an air pocket in it. You wet it with slip and then when you touch it, with the first stroke of the stone, the clay falls off. There’s nothing you can do. It’s a loss.”  Nancy Youngblood, Spoken Through Clay

Nancy has won numerous awards, from “Best of Pottery” to “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market for her melon bowls.  This new jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  This is undoubtedly a contemporary classic of her style!

$ 12,000.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Carved Swirl Neck Jar with Bird Tail Design

This is a complex long neck jar by Russell Sanchez.  The shape of the jar is inspired by the work of his great-aunt, Rose Gonzales. The long, straight neck is one which she made famous and which Russell has modified in his current work. Here the neck has 16 carve swirling ribs.  The rim of the jar is polished, as is the interior of the neck.  The body of the jar is an exceptional shape which comes up from the base and then extends nearly flat to the neck!  That is always a difficult transition in coil-built pottery. The body of the jar is fully polished and it is etched with three stylized bird tail designs.  The style of the design is reminiscent of the work of early San Ildefonso innovators such as Tonita Roybal, Rosalie Aguilar, and Juan Cruz.  The transition to the long neck has a single band of mica and there are two bands of hematite hei-shi beads along with inset smaller round beads.  So, why hematite?  Russell has begun to use it on his recent pieces for several reasons. There is a traditional aspect in that women wear hematite bracelets when they do certain traditional dances at the Pueblo.  There is also hematite content in the clay slips use on the pottery.  Russell also notes that when he is able to fire his pieces to a gunmetal appearance, the hematite captures the shine and also gives them a contemporary appearance.  As Russell has said:

“I’m a traditionalist all the way through.  Innovation is part of our tradition. You use the same materials and tools that you have, and the same design elements, and the Clay Mother will come through you for what she wants you to do,” he explains. “Instead of doing the same cloud pattern or serpent pattern, you take that and make it your own. So, in fact, everything I’m doing is old, but new.”  Russell Sanchez, Southwest Art Magazine

The jar is highly fired with a near gunmetal appearance to the surface.  The contrasts of polished, mica and polished mica give the jar a dynamic appearance.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 8,900.00

Clashin, Debbie – Large Jar with Awatovi Birds & Bird Tails

Debbie Clashin has become one of the exciting leaders in Hopi-Tewa pottery over the past several years.  She is known for her large-sized traditional fired vessels.  This large jar is a wide shape and a slightly turned out neck.  The entire piece is stone polished and then it is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  The design has two large birds, bird tails and and panels with sun and mesa designs. The painting on the jar is delicate and flowing with the additional areas which are mottled.  The jar is traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar and a few little darker areas.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 2,400.00

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Sunday, February 24, 2019

Gutierrez, Lois  – Jar with Bears & Avanyu

This is a complex jar by Lois Gutierrez.  She is one of the few potters who continues to create polychrome pottery at Santa Clara.  Polychrome, or more than three different colors of clay slips, are all painted onto the surface of the vessel before it is fired. This is a water jar shape with a wide shoulder and an elongated neck. The jar is painted with three panels of design, each with a bear and an avanyu.   The story of the bear and the Pueblo people is that the bear leads the people to water during a drought.  Here, the bear and water serpent are connected in their designs.  They are each every intricately designed with different clay slips.  Above the avanyu are bear paws and below the shoulder is an additional bear paw design.  All the colors are derived from natural clay slips.   This jar has over five different natural clay colors utilized.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Lois”.   This is an intricate piece of Lois’s pottery which combines a cultural legacy in design with one in clay.

 

$ 1,200.00

Lewis, Eric – Jar with Parrot and Swirling Clouds

This jar by Eric Lewis has a graphically painted parrot as the design.  The remainder of the jar has stylised swirling clouds.  The shape works perfectly for the bold design and the area opposite the parrot flows perfectly on the piece.  The jar is round with a slight neck.  Eric uses his designs to follow the shape of the jar and accentuate its form.  Eric has taken classic Acoma linear designs and made them both bolder and more graphic. The result is a striking jar with tightly painted imagery.  Eric remains one of the young Pueblo potters to watch!

$ 250.00

Clashin, Debbie – Jar with Two Large Birds

This water jar by Debbie Clashin is painted with a stylized bird design.  She is a cousin of noted potter Mark Tahbo and a descendant of Grace Chapella.  Debbie has quickly become well known for her large-sized traditional Hopi-Tewa pottery. The jar has a sloping shoulder and a slightly turned out rim from the neck.  The jar is painted with two large stylized birds on each half of the jar.  The heads of the birds gracefully turn in while the tail feathers extends backward.  The jar is painted with bee-weed and natural clay slips.  It was traditionally fired with blushes across the surface of the jar.   It is signed on the bottom with her name and a pipe for his “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 800.00

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Saturday, February 23, 2019

Youngblood, Christopher – Square Box with Four Melon Rib Designs

Christopher Youngblood creates intricately carved vessels which reflect a perfect balance of matte and polished surfaces with intricately carved designs.   This box is square in shape. Creating boxes is always technically difficult as the flat sides can easily crack during drying or firing.  This piece is fully carved on the outside and the inside of the box has a micaceous clay slip. The side of the box has four different styles of melon ribs.  Each goes a different direction or has a variation in the swirl but they each flow seamlessly into the next side!  Carving and the polishing to create this seamless flow is difficult but the results are striking.  The lid has additional melon ribs extending down on both sides.  The piece was traditionally fired (see the last two photos) inside a metal box to keep out smoke and create a more consistent coloration. The result, however, is a striking coloration to the red and the contrasting matte surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  I’m pleased that I have been working with Chris since 2010 when I wrote the first article on him for Native People’s magazine.  It is exciting to see how his work has progressed over the years and the awards for his pottery, including the 2104 “Best of Pottery” at Santa Fe Indian Market.  He was featured in the book, Spoken Through Clay, and continues to be one of the leading young potters working today.

$ 6,800.00

Tafoya, Jennifer (Moquino) – Wide Jar with Bees and Blossoms

This is a striking jar by Jennifer Tafoya.  She is known for her clay vessels and also her amazing animal figures!  This jar is an elegant shape with a wide shoulder and a short neck. The entire piece is very highly polished.  The top is very intricately designed.  There are cherry blossoms and note the intricacy of the flowers, the buds, and the branches!  There are four bees as part of the design.  They are very intricately designed and note that two of them even have pollen on their back legs!  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!

$ 3,500.00

Youngblood, Christopher – 16 Rib Swirl Melon Bowl with Kiva Step Lid

Christopher Youngblood creates intricately carved vessels which reflect a perfect balance of matte and polished surfaces with intricately carved designs.   This is a classic swirl melon bowl.  It has 16 ribs, each carved into the clay and each stone polished. The ribs are very highly polished with an amazing shine and flow from the rim to the base.  The lid has a kiva step design, which is polished on both sides.  Take a closer look at the photos and note the precision and glassy appearance from the polishing.  The remainder of the lid is matte in contrast to the polished surfaces.  The last two photos are of the box being fired outside in the flames along with the manure being poured over the piece to turn it black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  I’m pleased that I have been working with Chris since 2010 when I wrote the first article on him for Native People’s magazine.  It is exciting to see how his work has progressed over the years and the awards for his pottery, including the 2104 “Best of Pottery” at Santa Fe Indian Market.  He was featured in the book, Spoken Through Clay, and continues to be one of the leading young potters working today.

$ 4,000.00

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Friday, February 22, 2019

Garcia, Tammy – “Fish & Game” Bronze 23/25

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is stylized like her intricately carved pottery. The piece is entitled, “Fish & Game”. One side has a fish, while the other side has birds.  She has captured a beautiful balance between the realism of the animals and the traditional designs and surrounding Pueblo imagery. The unique oval shape also works perfectly for this piece!  It is signed and numbered.

$ 4,600.00

Garcia, Tammy – “Inclusions”, Bronze 8/35

This bronze by Tammy Garcia captures the multi-dimensionality of her clay work. The bronze is in the shape of one of her classic jars.  It has carved feathers around the neck and bears around the body of the piece.  The jar is an edition of 35.  The patina she selected for this is a green copper coloration, which gives it a striking appearance.  It is signed on the bottom, “Tammy Garcia”.  Tammy has been innovative with her exploration of various medium using her amazing artistic style.  This piece is number 8/35.

$ 3,400.00

Garcia, Tammy – “Of Traditions”, Bronze 10/50

This is one of Tammy Garcia’s new bronzes. The piece is in the shape of one of her water jars but in miniature form.  It has carved feathers and an avanyu (water serpent) as the design.  The jar is made in an edition of 50.  The patina she selected for this piece has a bronze and copper coloration.  It is signed on the bottom, “TG” for Tammy Garcia and the number is 10/50.  Tammy has been innovative with her exploration of various medium using her amazing artistic style.

$ 1,200.00

Garcia, Tammy – “Seeded Woman I” Bronze.  Ed. 7/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is taken from a series of clay pieces which she made which were inspired by the paintings of Picasso.  The imagery is a Picasso-esqe woman sitting in a chair.  The piece has multiple layers and textures.  When asked about the name and the imagery, Tammy said:

“I thought about a definition of the word, “seed” which I had read.  It was, ‘A seed is the small, hard part of a plant from which a new plant grows’.  It made me think of women who came to the Southwest when the trains arrived in the 1880’s, or with the Fred Harvey Tours in the 1920’s.  They brought with them their past but became enamored with the Southwest or Native Culture. So on the bronze, the woman is sitting on a chair and the back of the chair is incised with Pueblo designs.  The side has areas which were inlaid hei-shi beads.  These women became the seeds of new interest in the area and culture. They spread this love of the Southwest just like a seed.  I called this, “Seeded Woman I”.  It is the first in this series to pay tribute to those how become aware of Native culture, respect it and spread their love of the art and artists to the world.”.

The piece has striking patinas to differentiate the various textures and depths of carving.  Much like her clay work, the piece is distinctive in style and yet very sharply defined.  This piece is 7/35 and it is signed and numbered on the bottom by Tammy Garcia. Simply a striking piece by one of today’s great potters with a lot of thought behind it!

$ 1,200.00

Garcia, Tammy – “Seeded Woman II” Bronze.  3/35

Tammy Garcia is known for her amazing pottery, as well as the creativity of her bronzes. This bronze is taken from a series of clay pieces which she made which were inspired by the paintings of Picasso.  The imagery is a Picasso-esqe woman sitting in a chair.  The piece has multiple layers and textures.  When asked about the name and the imagery, Tammy said:

“I thought about a definition of the word, “seed” which I had read.  It was, ‘A seed is the small, hard part of a plant from which a new plant grows’.  It made me think of women who came to the Southwest when the trains arrived in the 1880’s, or with the Fred Harvey Tours in the 1920’s.  They brought with them their past but became enamored with the Southwest or Native Culture. So on the bronze, the woman is sitting on a chair and the back of the chair is incised with Pueblo designs.  The chair itself is has a turquoise colored patina to represent the areas. The woman on one side has a hei-shi necklace and the other a turquoise colored necklace.  These are representative of how those who journeyed and continue to visit here have the culture become an integral part of their lives.  They have become seeds who spread their affection for the Southwest and Native art around the world.  I called this, “Seeded Woman II”.  It is the second in this series to pay tribute to those how become aware of Native culture, respect it and spread their love of the art and artists to the world.”.

The piece has striking patinas to differentiate the various textures and depths of carving.  Much like her clay work, the piece is distinctive in style and yet very sharply defined.  This piece is 3/35 and it is signed and numbered on the bottom by Tammy Garcia. Simply a striking piece by one of today’s great potters with a lot of thought behind it!

$ 1,200.00

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All Contemporary   All Signed Historic

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