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Friday, May 24, 2019 

Ortiz, Virgil – Sun and Mountain Canteen

This is a new smaller canteen by Virgil Ortiz.  The piece is coil built and painted with native clay slips and wild spinach (a plant) for the black.   The design on the piece is a geometric rain pattern combined with sun (circles) and mountain (triangles) designs.  Virgil paints his designs so that they match the surface shape of his pieces.  Can you see the “spirit line” in the design? It is at the rim of the canteen.  The spirit line is a break in the painting and used on traditional Cochiti pottery.  Virgil has also incorporated his signature “x”, which is the turkey track into the designs.   The piece is signed on the back.   The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

$ 650.00

Ortiz, Inez – Double Headed Monos Figure

Inez Ortiz was the sister of Virgil Ortiz and the mother of Lisa Holt.  She was well known for her whimsical figures and her animal storytellers.  This is one of her few “monos” figures. The monos figures are ones which originated in Cochiti in the 1880s.  Double-headed figures, such as this one, were representations of Siamese Twins from traveling circuses in the area.  This figure is very intricate in the painting.  Each of the “heads” is wearing a necklace.  They each have a different type of mustache or beards!  The cloud designs on the clothes are classics for Cochiti.  The figure is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 850.00

Swentzell, Roxanne – Sitting Girl Bronze (Artist Proof 2)

This is bronze by Roxanne Swentzell.  It is one of her classic female figures sitting with her hand extended. It was created to sit on a shelf but can also sit on a lucite block (as pictured).  The piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed “Rox” and numbered “APII”, which means Artist Proof Number 2.  It is a sold out edition.  Definitely a wonderful classic of her bronze work!

$ 1,200.00

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Thursday, May 23, 2019

Garcia, Gloria “Golden Rod” – Large Bowl Corn Dancers

This is a striking larger bowl by Gloria Garcia.  The bowl is fully polished and fired red.  It is etched in a band around the shoulder of the piece.  There are Corn and Deer Dancers.  Separating each of the dancers are corn plants, but also sun faces. The sun faces represent the various phases of the sun. They are wonderfully intricate in design and varied in each grouping!  Gloria’s combination of polishing and etched designs is always striking.  This piece is signed on the bottom with her Tewa name “GoldenRod”.

$ 775.00

Garcia, Gloria “Golden Rod” – Large Bowl with Buffalo, Deer, Antelope & Ram Dancers

This is an exceptional larger bowl by Gloria Garcia.  The bowl is fully polished and fired black.  It is etched in a band around the shoulder of the piece.  There are buffalo, antelope, deer and ram dancers encircling the piece.  Amazingly, there are 10 figures on this bowl!  They are intricately etched with designs on the clothes.  There is an additional red clay slip which was added to the piece after the firing.   Gloria’s combination of polishing and etched designs is always striking.  This piece is signed on the bottom with her Tewa name “GoldenRod”.f the bowl.   Gloria’s combination of polishing and etched designs is always striking.  This piece is signed on the bottom with her Tewa name “GoldenRod”.

$ 975.00

Gutierrez, Lois  – Water Jar with Tumbling Eagles and Carved Avanyu

Lois Gutierrez is one of the few potters who continue to create traditional polychrome (more than 3 colors of clay) pottery at Santa Clara Pueblo.  This is a traditional style water jar with the low shoulder and a short neck.  The jar is from 2010.  Around the neck of the jar it is painted with eagles using four different colors of clay.  Around the shoulder of the jar is it carved with a water serpent.  This is one of the few pieces which Lois has carved during her career.  The water serpent is then stone polished. The jar has been traditionally fired outdoor and overall is a striking coloration.  It is signed on the indented bottom of the jar.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00

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Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Begay, Jr., Harrison – Old Style Dragonfly Jar

This is a classic jar by Harrison Begay, Jr..  He has won numerous awards over the years for his deep carved pottery.  This jar has old style dragonflies carved into the clay.  They are surrounded by cloud, wind and water designs.  The dragonflies are polished while the other designs are both matte and polished. The variation in surfaces creates a more striking appearance.  Harrison has a distinctive style of carving, which has a beveled appearance to the angle of the cuts into the clay. Note as well the polishing on this jar, which has a glassy appearance!  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Harrison ’19”.

$ 1,500.00

Namingha, Les – “Pueblo Series” Jar with Zia Birds

This jar is part of a new series of pieces by Les Namingha.  This, “Pueblo Series” is focused on universal design similarities among various Pueblo pottery. As Les is both Zuni and Hopi-Tewa, he has a lot of cultural imagery to pull from for this body of work.  Les says of this piece:

“This jar is part of my “Pueblo Jar series” that I started recently. This series interprets or incorporates elements from other Pueblos outside of my Zuni and Tewa-Hopi influenced work.  My focus is on finding similarities in design elements across all Pueblo communities.  Here there are two Zia style birds.  There are similar styles of birds seen at Zuni, Acoma, Laguna and in ancient pottery.”

The jar has a round body and a short neck.  The jar has striking colorations and there are birds painted on each side in medallions.  They are additionally designed with different imagery on for the bodies.  One the sides and encircling the jar are large yellow ellipses.  These bold geometrics accentuate the detailed designs on the remainder of the jar.  It is signed on the bottom.  The last photo is one of this jar next to a piece by Elizabeth Medina. It seemed interesting to show the style of birds from Zia in comparison to this jar.

$ 2,200.00

Toya, Maxine – Pueblo Singer

Maxine Toya is well known for her figurative pottery.  This is one of her Pueblo singer figures.  It is made from clay her cloak is sculpted and then polished and painted.  There are two different layers to the cloak!  The face is also sculpted and painted.  The cloak is also painted with rain designs.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maxine Toya”.

$ 600.00

Naranjo, Madeline – Clouds and Corn Jar

Madeline Naranjo creates beautifully carved and polished pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This jar has tall sides and carved in four sections. The design is clouds (matte) over the corn (polished).  The carving is deep and the remainder of the piece is fully polished.  The contrast of the matte and polished surfaces works perfectly. Madeline’s matte areas are sanded and perfectly smooth so that there are no indentations or areas where the matte might make a shadow.  Her designs are always innovative and beautifully executed.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

Click Here to See More Work by Madeline Naranjo

$ 340.00

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Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Tafoya, Shirley – Wide Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1990’s)

Shirley Tafoya was the youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her miniature pottery.  This bowl is from the 1990’s.  It is very deeply carved with a water serpent encircling the piece.   The entire surface is fully polished and the top rim of the bowl is matte.  Shirley etched the eye and the mouth of the avanyu.  The water serpent is a classic Santa Clara design telling the story of how the avanyu saved the village from a flood.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya”. A classic of Tafoya Family pottery!

$ 1,200.00

Youngblood, Mela  – Bowl with Clouds and Avanyu (1980’s)

This is a striking larger bowl by Mela Youngblood.  She was a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and began making pottery in the late 1960’s and quickly achieved a distinctive style for her work.  Each piece of her work very highly polished and very deeply carved.  This bowl is carved with a water serpent encircling the piece.  Above the avanyu (water serpent) is a rounded cloud pattern.  Note the depth of the carving on the bowl!  It is fully polished and fired a deep black.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mela Youngblood”.  It is beautifully polished and striking in design.

$ 2,000.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Polychrome Jar with Deer, Bear and Mountain Lion

This is a stunning new jar by Russell Sanchez.  He continues to be one of the true innovators in Pueblo pottery.  Each piece is perfectly coil built, stone polished and etched.  This jar is a rounded shape with a short neck.  The jar has three medallions, each is polished with a white clay slip.  The animals are a bear, mountain lion, and deer.  They are each inset with a piece of Lone Mountain Turquoise.  The medallions are surrounded by a band of checkerboard polished red and matte designs.  The area surrounding the full medallions is a polished black clay slip.  There are old style bird wing patterns separating each of the medallions around the shoulder.  As if that isn’t enough, the inside of the neck is carved with ribs to create a “waterfall rim”!  It is then fully polished red all the way to the inside base of the neck of the jar!  The piece is traditionally fired.  The hematite hei-shi beads are inset after the firing.  The coloration of the white, black and red are all reminiscent of San Ildefonso pottery from the early 1900’s.  Russell has created his own variation using polished surfaces instead of matte.  As Russell continues to innovate from historic designs, he says, “Tradition means moving forward and adding to it. You keep moving forward.  If we stayed stagnant we would no longer exist.”  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is exciting to see how this imagery is not new but Russell’s reinterpretation of it both modernizes and revives.

Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 7,200.00

Antonio, Frederica – Four Seasons Jar with Lightning Designs

Frederica Antonio is renown for her intricately painted pottery. Each piece is coil built and then finely painted. Her designs are a series of fine vertical and horizontal lines which are then filled in to create larger images in the squares.  This jar is a classic olla shape with a high shoulder and a short neck.  Frederica has painted the Four Seasons in the black-and-white sections of the jar.  Each section is very intricate in design and extends from the neck spiraling to the base.  Separating them are three bands of color, representing lightning.  The base of the jar is concave, reminiscent of historic Acoma jars which were carried on the head.  This combination of thin walls, classic shape, and tightly painted design create a piece which is visually stunning!  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,800.00

Yazzie, Angie – Large Micaceous Clay Cloud Bowl

Angie Yazzie is renown for her thin-walled Taos pottery. Each piece is coil built and made from micaceous clay from near Taos Pueblo.  Angie focuses on traditional shapes along with making each piece nearly paper thin!  It almost feels like there is nothing there when you hold one! This bowl is carved on the rim in a step pattern.  It is often referred to as a cloud bowl or a “prayer bowl”.  The piece is made from micaceous clay so when it is fired it has a sparkling/metallic appearance.  Angie fires her pieces using wood and on this piece, the dark coloration is from the heat of the firing.  The fire-clouds on this outside of this large bowl are stunning! They range from black to almost red in areas.  It is signed on the bottom, “Angie Yazzie”.  She has won numerous awards for her work, including “Best of Pottery” at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2017.

$ 2,600.00

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Monday, May 20, 2019

Lucas, Steve – Jar with Bird Wing Designs

This is a striking new larger jar by Steve Lucas.  He is one of the leading Hopi-Tewa potters working today.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished, painted with native clay slips and bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired.  Steve has won “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market and his work remains some of the most refined and creative.  This jar is made by mixing together two of the Hopi clays created swirling colors in the clay (which can best be seen on the bottom). The jar has a wide shoulder and a slight neck.  The design above the shoulder is a bird wing pattern which connects in four sections. The polished areas are a deep red and a brown clay slip.  Note the complexity in the design and the coloration. It takes more time to polish the slips after they are painted, but the result is also more dynamic as they reflect the light.  Below the shoulder is a star pattern created out of diamond-shaped patterns.  Steve said of these designs:

“I think about the ancients. I used to hike out to Sikyatki a lot when I stayed out at my mom’s place and look at the pottery sherds. You could pick up a sherd, wipe it off, and the design would still be brilliant. I would be amazed at how well the painting had held up to all the weather over all those centuries. I would find some interesting designs, and I would put them on my pieces. Those ancients were good artists and are an inspiration to me.”  Steve Lucas, Spoken Through Clay

The jar was traditionally fired which created the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “S. Lucas” and a mudhead (koyemsi) and an ear of corn (corn clan).  It’s great to see such strong new work from him both in design and form!

$ 2,600.00

Namingha, Les – Tall Jar with Hopi Bird Medallions

This is an exceptional large jar by Les Namingha.  It is the use of shape, texture, and design which are so strong on his piece.  The jar is tall and near the top, it is indented, with the clay pushed inwards.  In these areas, Les has painted a series of small medallions, each with different Hopi-Tewa designs.  Birds, bird wings, cloud, and lighting are all visible in the designs.  Each medallion is a different color and they either contrasting or complementary to the ones nearby. While the medallions are smooth, the rest of the jar is wonderfully textured with a rough surface and a touch of added mica!  Near the base, there is a water design which is tightly painted encircling the entire jar.  It is as if the birds are all flying in the sky above the water.  The jar gives voice to Hopi-Tewa designs of the past but filtered through the modern lense of Les’s creativity.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 4,600.00

Tahbo, Mark  – Large Open Plainware Bowl (1990’s)

Mark Tahbo was known not just for his painted pottery, but especially for the blushes on his pottery from the firing.  This bowl is from the 1990’s.  It is one of his larger plainware pieces and it is fully polished on the inside and the outside.  Mark polished it in a horizontal manner.  I remember that he had a similar piece but taller which he always kept in his kitchen.  This bowl was outdoor fired to create the coloration.  Mark was masterful at firing and always wanted to achieve dramatic blushes on the surface of his pottery.  When they turned out with variations like on this jar, from white to deep orange, he was the most pleased.   Mark told me about his plainware work:

“My first plainware pieces were done years ago. I was sure that these would be well received and gallery owner Charles King took a chance with them. They were an immediate hit!  I don’t do very much plainware for it has to be flawless.  The surface has to be free of all dips or air holes and the shape has to be elegant on its own, as there is no design to distract the eye.  The colors achieved on the pots are truly amazing.  Each piece is fired outdoors using sheep dung and coals.  I love it!”

The jar is signed on the bottom “Mark Tahbo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic of his pottery!

$ 2,200.00

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Sunday, May 19, 2019

Pourier, Kevin – Buffalo Horn “Double Dragonfly” Sculpture

Kevin and Valerie Pourier are Oglala Lakota. Their home and studio are located on the Pine Ridge Reservation – Medicine Root District, just on the northern edge of the Badlands area of the reservation. The inspirational and material source of the Pourierʼs work is rightly ascribed to what also happens to be the Lakota Peopleʼs first name, Pte Oyate kin, the Buffalo People.  As partners, they are pleased to cultivate the idea that their work not only comes out of the lifeways of the People but is, moreover, a new cultural artform.  Each piece is hand cut from buffalo horn, which is then carved and inlaid with stones.  This is one of Kevin’s iconic “cup”.  It is based on a historic Crazy Horse buffalo horn cup, which was inset with earth pigment colors.  Kevin has modified this concept to create his inlaid versions using part of the buffalo horn.  There are two dragonflies cut into the horn. They are then inlaid with mother-of-pearl shell, which is then polished to give it a shine and smooth surface. It’s striking how the coloration of the horn itself is visible in the black area of the piece.  Kevin’s jewelry and sculpture can be found in museums throughout the US.  He has won numerous awards for his work, including “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2019.  We are pleased to represent his work at our galleries in Santa Fe and Scottsdale.

Click Here to See More Work by Kevin Pourier

$ 3,600.00

Pourier, Kevin – Buffalo Horn Dragonfly Pendant

Kevin and Valerie Pourier are Oglala Lakota. Their home and studio are located on the Pine Ridge Reservation – Medicine Root District, just on the northern edge of the Badlands area of the reservation. The inspirational and material source of the Pourierʼs work is rightly ascribed to what also happens to be the Lakota Peopleʼs first name, Pte Oyate kin, the Buffalo People.  As partners, they are pleased to cultivate the idea that their work not only comes out of the lifeways of the People but is, moreover, a new cultural artform.  Each piece is hand cut from buffalo horn, which is then carved and inlaid with stones.  This pendant is carved in the shape of a dragonfly from buffalo horn.  It is inlaid with golden lip shell.  The coloration of the shell and its iridescence is mindful of the wings of the dragonfly.  Kevin’s jewelry and sculpture can be found in museums throughout the US.  He has won numerous awards for his work, including “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2019.  We are pleased to represent his work at our galleries in Santa Fe and Scottsdale.

Click Here to See More Work by Kevin Pourier

$ 425.00

Pourier, Kevin – Buffalo Horn Monarch Butterfly Wing Pendant

Kevin and Valerie Pourier are Oglala Lakota. Their home and studio are located on the Pine Ridge Reservation – Medicine Root District, just on the northern edge of the Badlands area of the reservation. The inspirational and material source of the Pourierʼs work is rightly ascribed to what also happens to be the Lakota Peopleʼs first name, Pte Oyate kin, the Buffalo People.  As partners, they are pleased to cultivate the idea that their work not only comes out of the lifeways of the People but is, moreover, a new cultural artform.  Each piece is hand cut from buffalo horn, which is then carved and inlaid with stones.  This is a monarch butterfly pendant which is carved and then inlaid with lapis and turquoise to create the coloration.   So why the monarch butterfly design?  Kevin says:

“There is a picture of Sitting Bull which is probably the thing that inspires me most of all. This is a very famous photo.  There is a monarch wing in his hat band.  Lots of people never even noticed the wing until I point it out.  That photo alone shows me that he knew of the power and the beauty of the butterfly.  Looking at the time that the photo was taken, a time when we were having everything taken from us our way of life, our land, our buffalo, spirituality and our people were being killed, one has to understand what kind of turmoil a leader would be going through, but yet he had the awareness and understanding of all things even the little things like butterflies.”

Kevin’s jewelry and sculpture can be found in museums throughout the US.  He has won numerous awards for his work, including “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2019.  We are pleased to represent his work at our galleries in Santa Fe and Scottsdale.

Click Here to See More Work by Kevin Pourier

$ 225.00

Panana, Ruby  – Large Jar with Birds

Ruby Panana began making pottery in 1983.  She is a granddaughter of Joe and Ascenicona Galvan Pino and a daughter of Seferina Bell.  Her sisters Eleanor Griego and Reyes Pino are also potters.  This classic Zia shaped jar with high shoulders and a short neck.  The jar has birds encircling the piece. Separating them are cloud and rain designs.  The jar is signed on the bottom.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00

Herrera, Irene – Wedding Vase with Birds and Cloud Handle

Irene Herrera (b. 1942) is part Zia and Jemez.  She learned to make pottery from her mother Andrea Tsosie when she was eight years old.  This wedding vase is painted with birds on both sides.  Over the birds is a rainbow design and there are feathers and rain separating each of the birds.  The top of the handle is carved is a cloud pattern.  It is signed on the side, “Irene Herrera”.

$ 325.00

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Saturday, May 18, 2019

Naranjo, Madeline – Square Neck Jar with Double Avanyu

Madeline Naranjo creates beautifully carved and polished pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This jar has a tall shape with a squared neck.  The piece is carved with two avanyu on the sides.  Each avanyu is polished and the tongues are matte.  The remainder of the jar is fully polished.  The contrast of the matte and polished surfaces works perfectly. Madeline’s matte areas are sanded and perfectly smooth so that there are no indentations or areas where the matte might make a shadow.  Her designs are always innovative and beautifully executed.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

Click Here to See More Work by Madeline Naranjo

$ 280.00

Naranjo, Madeline – Red Jar with Carved Hummingbirds & Flowers

Madeline Naranjo creates beautifully carved and polished pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This jar has flat sides and it is fully carved. The designs are hummingbirds and flowers.  However, note how the designs continue to flow across the surface of the jar as it is turned.  The is always more difficult than simply making designs in a series of four panels. The hummingbirds are matte while the flowers and other designs are polished.  The contrast of the matte and polished surfaces works perfectly. Madeline’s matte areas are sanded and perfectly smooth so that there are no indentations or areas where the matte might make a shadow.  Her designs are always innovative and beautifully executed.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

Click Here to See More Work by Madeline Naranjo

$ 375.00

Naranjo, Madeline – Water Jar with Butterflies

Madeline Naranjo creates beautifully carved and polished pottery.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This jar has a classic water jar shape with the wide shoulder and elongated neck.  There are deeply carved butterflies as the design encircling the piece.  The alternate between matte and polished surfaces.  The remainder of the jar is fully polished.  The contrast of the matte and polished surfaces works perfectly. Madeline’s matte areas are sanded and perfectly smooth so that there are no indentations or areas where the matte might make a shadow.  Her designs are always innovative and beautifully executed.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

Click Here to See More Work by Madeline Naranjo

$ 325.00

Tafoya, Madeline & Laura Tafoya – Red Carved Wedding Vase

Madeline Tafoya (1912-2002) was known for her carved and polished pottery.  This piece was made by Madeline and carved and polished by her daughter, Laura Tafoya (b. 1946) learned to make pottery from her mother Madeline Tafoya, as well as her aunt, Madeline Naranjo.   This piece is a classic shape and carved with rain and lightning designs.  It is highly polished and fired a deep red coloration. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Madeline T. & Laura T.”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00

Naranjo, Frances – Wedding Vase with Avanyu

Frances Naranjo is a daughter of noted potter Madeline Naranjo.  This piece is deeply carved with a water serpent as the design.  It is highly polished on the handle and the spouts.  It is fired a dark black in coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Frances Naranjo”.

$ 225.00

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Friday, May 17, 2019

Chavarria, Harvey & Debra Trujillo – Sun Face Seedpot with Turquoise (1980’s)

This is an intricate seedpot by Debra Trujillo (Duwyenie) and Harvey Chavarria.   The seedpot is fully polished and etched in a medallion which encompasses about a third of the piece.  The center of the medallion is a Sun Face design.  Surrounding it is a feather pattern and a water serpent (avanyu).  At the edge of the design is a mountain pattern. Debra would etch the designs into the clay before they were fired.  The lighter red areas are where the polished surface has been etched away but not as deep as the tan areas.  There is a single inset piece of turquoise as part of the sunface design.   The piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Debra + Harvey”.

$ 250.00

Chavarria, Harvey & Debra Trujillo – Flat Seedpot with Turtle and Sunface (1980’s)

This is an intricate seedpot by Debra Trujillo (Duwyenie) and Harvey Chavarria.   The seedpot is fully polished and etched with a turtle in the center.  The back of the turtle is a Sun Face.  Surrounding the turtle are feathers and a mountain design.  Debra would etch the designs into the clay before they were fired.  The lighter red areas are where the polished surface has been etched away but not as deep as the tan areas.  This flat, round shape of seepot is one that was stylized by Debra & Harvey for their work.   The piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Debra + Harvey”.

$ 200.00

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Thursday, May 16, 2019

Panana, Ruby  – Jar with Birds and Butterflies

Ruby Panana began making pottery in 1983.  She is a granddaughter of Joe and Ascenicona Galvan Pino and a daughter of Seferina Bell.  Her sisters Eleanor Griego and Reyes Pino are also potters.  This tall jar has classic Zia imagery.  On each side there is a bird, over which there is a rainbow.  The rainbow is polished red.  The neck has flowers and butterflies as the design.  The jar is signed on the bottom.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00

Williams, Rose – Large Drum Jar with Mountain Design Rim

Rose Williams (1915-2015) wass one of the great matriarchs of Navajo pottery.  Shew as from the Shonto/Cow Springs area of the Navajo Reservation.  Rose was an adult when she learned to make pottery, but continued doing so for over three decades.  Her children, Alice Cling, Sue Ann Williams, and Susie Williams Crank, and her daughter-in-law, Lorraine Williams, are all recognized potters.  This is one of her classic pieces.  It is “drum jar” with a low shoulder and elongated neck.  The rim of the jar is sculpted with a mountain design.  The remainder of the jar is fully polished.  The jar was traditionally fired and afterward covered in pine pitch.  This was a traditional method historically to make the pottery water-proof. Today, potters continue this process as a testament to the past. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay , “RW”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00

Williams, Rose – Jar with Handles

Rose Williams (1915-2015) wass one of the great matriarchs of Navajo pottery.  Shew as from the Shonto/Cow Springs area of the Navajo Reservation.  Rose was an adult when she learned to make pottery, but continued doing so for over three decades.  Her children, Alice Cling, Sue Ann Williams, and Susie Williams Crank, and her daughter-in-law, Lorraine Williams, are all recognized potters.  This jar has a sharp shoulder and a short neck.  There are handles on each side.  Separating the handles is a raised area which is then incised with lines representing rain.  The jar was traditionally fired and afterward covered in pine pitch.  This was a traditional method historically to make the pottery water-proof. Today, potters continue this process as a testament to the past. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay , “RW”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00

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Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Naranjo, Kevin & Maria Rose – Mini Jar with Deer and Avanyu (1995)

Kevin Naranjo and Maria Rose Naranjo worked together on pottery in the late 1980s and early 1990s.  Marian made and polished the pottery while Kevin etched the designs.  The shapes of their pottery are wonderful with the wide shoulder and sloping side.  This jar is highly polished and etched with a medallion of a realistic deer.   The deer is very detailed and extends down to the base.  Around the back of the jar, along the rim, is an etched water serpent (avanyu).  Below the water serpent are cloud and rain designs.  The rim of the bowl, along with the deer, has been two-toned so that it is black-and sienna. This piece is from 1995 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Kevin Naranjo and Maria Rose”.

$ 300.00

Gonzales, John – Red Bowl with Avanyu (1999)

This bowl by John Gonzales is from 1999.  The rim and base are a red clay slip.  There is a central band which is tan colored and etched with an avanyu (water serpent) as the design.  The avanyu encircles the bowl and the background area of the design is slipped with mica.  Above and below the avanyu are inset shel hei-shi beads.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “John Gonzales”.

$ 300.00

Naranjo, Kevin & Maria Rose – Bowl with Deer and Pueblo Scene (1994)

Kevin Naranjo and Maria Rose Naranjo worked together on pottery in the late 1980s and early 1990s.  Marian made and polished the pottery while Kevin etched the designs.  The shapes of their pottery are wonderful with thin walls and a very highly burnished surface.  This is a larger piece of their work.  It has a male and female deer realistically etched into the clay.  Behind them is a pueblo scene along with mountains and trees.  The detail is always exceptional in Kevin’s designs.  After it was fired and designed, it was then two-toned so that it is black-and sienna.  Highlighting various areas on the bowl makes them stand out.  This piece is from 1994 and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Kevin Naranjo and Maria Rose”.  It has a Second Place Ribbon from the 1994 Santa Fe Indian Market.  The judges were R. Pardington and Dextra Quotskuyva.  Their collaborative work can also be found at museums, such as the Denver Art Museum.

$ 1,100.00

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Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Jim, Harrison – Jar with Mudhead Carved in Relief (1985)

Harrison Jim learned to make pottery from his mother-in-law Joy “Frogwoman” Navasie. He often collaborated with Marianne Navasie on his pottery.  This jar is a collaborative piece made by Marianne Navasie (1951-2007) and then carved and designed by Harrison.  The piece has a mudhead katina (one of the clowns) in front of a kiva with the kiva ladder behind him.  The figure is very detailed and carved in relief.  The remainder of the jar is painted with Hopi-Tewa birds.  The jar is signed on the bottom with a frog hallmark and “H. Jim”.  The piece won a third place ribbon at the 1985 Gallup Intertribal Ceremonials.  The ribbon is made out in the names of both Marianne and Harrison.  It is signed by Clara Lee Tanner.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 550.00

Jim, Harrison – Seedpot with Morning Singer Katsina in Relief

Harrison Jim learned to make pottery from his mother-in-law Joy “Frogwoman” Navasie. He often collaborated with Marianne Navasie on his pottery.  This jar is a collaborative piece made by Marianne Navasie (1951-2007) and then carved and designed by Harrison.  The piece has two Morning Singer Katsinas carved in relief on the top half.  They are deeply carved and highlighted with clay slips. The bottom half is painted with cloud and rain designs.  They are painted with bee-weed (black) and red clay slips.  The piece is signed on the bottom with a frog hallmark and tadpole (the hallmark for Marianne Navasie)  and “H. Jim”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 275.00

Howato, Ted Tahbo – Large Jar with Eagle Tail Designs

Ted Tahbo Howato is the youngest son of Diana Tahbo and great-great-grandson of Grace Chapella.  This large jar is coil built and painted with bee-weed and red clay slips.  The jar is painted with eagle trial and bird wing patterns which extend downward from the rim.  It was traditionally fired which created the blushes on the surface.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Ted T Howato” and a pipe, as he is “Tobacco Clan”.

$ 800.00

Naha, Sylvia – Seedpot with Corn, Lizard and Awatovi Star Design

Sylvia Naha created pieces with the white clay polished surface painted with bee-weed (black) and native clay slips.  Throughout the 1980’s, Sylvia was considered among the most innovative of the Hopi potters.  Her pieces were classic in form and amazingly intricate in design.  This seedpot has two of her classic designs on the top:  A lizard and a corn plant.  The lizard is painted with a series of triangular geometrics.  Opposite the lizard is a corn plant.  Corn has a strong symbolism for prosperity and abundance.  The bottom half is fully painted with the black-on-white Awatovi Star.  Awatovi is one of the ruins near Hopi where a white slipped style of pottery was made.  It is a fascinating place as it was where Coronado made contact with the Hopi in 1540.  During the excavations in the 1930s, the whiteware pottery was rediscovered.  It was the imagery from his work which inspired much of Helen Naha’s (Sylvia’s mother) early pottery, as opposed to the more classic Sikyatki inspired pottery of Nampeyo of Hano.  The bottom of the seedpot is signed with a feather and an “S”.  The piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00

Patricio, Robert – Large Jar with Birds and Geometric Designs

Robert Patricio is known for his classic forms and use of both traditional and pre-historic imagery.  This is a large jar which is from early in ihs career.  There are birds painted around the shoulder and wind designs near the base.  It is signed, “P. M. Patricio”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00

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Monday, May 13, 2019

Ortiz, Virgil – Badger and Butterfly Jar (2019)

This is striking new jar by Virgil Ortiz.  The jar is coil built and painted with wild spinach (a plant) for the black.  The imagery is created using strong, bold lines.  One one side there is a butterfly and the other side is a bagder.  The butterfly has triangular lines on the edges of the wings to create a sense of motion.  The badger, on the opposite side, is Virgil’s clan and a design has used for his pottery and fashion. Both the butterfly and badger are painted at an angle which make them less linear on the surface and gives the jar more motion. Can you see the “spirit line” in the design? It is at the top of the first tile on the left! The spirit line is a break in the painting and used on traditional Cochiti pottery.  Virgil has also incorporated his signature “x”, which is the turkey track into the designs.  The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

$ 4,000.00

Tafoya, Jennifer – Green Jar with Salmon

Jennifer Moquino is known for her clay vessels along with her amazing animal figures!  This jar is fully polished green.  The designs of the salmon and fish are etched out of the top surface of the clay.  Additional designs are then etched into the body of the fish and highlighted with clay slips.  The neck of the jar has water and cloud designs.   All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Jennifer continues to be one of the leading innovative potters working today!  This is an earlier piece of her pottery and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 575.00

Martinez, Maria   – Jar with Mountain Designs “Maria Popovi” (1956-9)

This jar is a classic piece by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the bowl and it was fired by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). Popovi focused on both the painted surfaces of the pottery as well as the firings.  This bowl is one of Maria’s classic shapes with her low shoulder and sloping sides. The design is an open pattern which uses the negative space to create the imagery.  There is a mountain and lightning design encircling the piece.  The jar is fired to a near gunmetal coloration and you can see stronger areas of gunmetal in the photos. The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria / Popovi”.  This dates it from 1956-9. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Great gunmetal fired pieces by Maria and Popovi with such high polished surface are always stunning and a great addition to any collection!

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 2,200.00

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Sunday, May 12, 2019

Garcia, Effie – Bowl with Plant Design

Effie Garcia is known for her deeply carved Santa Clara pottery. Each piece is coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired.  This bowl has her classic shape with a narrow base and wide shoulder.  Around the sides are four flowers carved deeply into the clay.  Each of the flowers has additional leaf patterns and the overall carved areas are outlined in clay, giving it a matte appearance.  The bowl is highly polished and signed on the bottom.

$ 450.00

Curran, Alvin – Red Clay Bear with Heartline (1990’s)

Alvin Curran was possibly the most refined and sophisticated San Juan style potter of his generation. He was married to Dolores Curran and his daughter is Ursula Curran, both of whom continue to make pottery.  Alvin took the traditional style of incised San Juan polychrome pottery and refined his carving and painted designs.  This is one of the few clay bears he made.  It is hollow and highly polished a deep red.  There is an incised heartline on each side.  The “heartline” is symbolic of the breath as the life force of the animal.  This bear was traditionally fired red.  It is signed on the bottom, “Alvin Curran”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 650.00

Manymules, Samuel  – Small Jar with Nine Sharp Swirl Melon Ribs

This small jar by Samuel Manymules has a short neck and sharp melon ribs.  The ribs are pushed out in the clay to a sharp point and there is a deep groove separating each rib.  The symmetry of each of the 9 ribs adds to the overall appearance of the jar.  The jar is traditionally fired and the coloration is striking!  The variation from black to brown gives the piece a sense of motion on the surface.  The browner areas are where it was fired to a higher temperature.  After the firing, the jar is then covered with pine pitch in the traditional way expected of Navajo pottery.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.   It is extraordinary vessels like this which keep Samuel among the top Navajo potters working today.

$ 850.00

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Saturday, May 11, 2019

Lewis, Lucy – Bowl with Quail and Butterfly (1970’s)

This is a charming smaller bowl by Lucy Lewis.  She is one of the great Matriarch potters of the past century. This bowl is coil built and painted with bee-weed (a plant) for the black.  The bowl has a butterfly and two quail as the design.  The quail are on the opposite side of the bowl, as if they are looking for the butterfly which has flown off!  This piece is from the 1970s.   It has been native fired and has a beautiful coloration to the white clay slip.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a few small areas of spalling seen in the photos.

$ 425.00

Lewis, Lucy – Seedpot with Bird Wing Designs (1970’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the past century. This seedpot is coil built and painted using bee-weed, a plant.  The design on the top of the piece is a bird wing pattern along with a rain design.  The design is around the top while the remainder of the bowl is white.  It was traditionally fired so the white has much more of a pearlescent coloration, which creates added depth.  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 925.00

Sarracino, Myron – Large Jar with Rain and Cloud Designs

Myron Sarracino is one of the few Laguna potters working today.  He learned to make pottery from Gladys Paquin and creates pieces which are thin-walled and tightly painted. This jar has a high shoulder and a more classic storage jar shape.  It is painted black-on-white. Around the neck are cloud patterns.  Extending up from the base are mountains. The center of the jar is painted with a fine-line wind design.  It is a striking and complex pattern.  Note on the rim that there is a  painted “spirit line”, which is where the “spirit” of the painter is able to leave the piece and it is also a tribute to the potters who came before.  It is seen on much older Acoma and Laguna pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom.

$ 475.00

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Friday, May 10, 2019

Whitegeese, Daryl  – Black Water Jar with Rainbow Design

Daryl Whitegeese is known for his use of classic Santa Clara forms and his amazing polished surfaces.  This jar is a classic shape with a low round body and a slightly turned out neck.  The jar is fully carved with a rainbow pattern with rain extending downward and two corn plants in each section.  The jar is very deeply carved and the edges almost feel sharp to the touch! The jar is very highly polished and fired a glossy black.  Note as well the rim of the jar, which almost seems to have a sharp edge, which is difficult to achieve with stone polishing the surface.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 2,800.00

Duwyenie, Debra – Tall Jar with 28 Hummingbirds

This tall jar was made by Preston Duwyenie and polished and incised by Debra Duwyenie.  The design on the front is fully polished and full of imagery. The design is a flowering plant which extends up from the base.  Each of the flowers are etched into the clay and the center of each is matte, which is just where the polished slip has been etched away.  For nearly each flower is a hummingbird, each of which are also etched into the clay and with matte bellies.  There are 28 hummingbirds on the jar!  The remainder of the jar is slipped with a micaceous clay.  It is fired red in coloration.  Interestingly, Debra etches her designs into the clay before the piece is fired.  If you look closely you can see how the background area is also vertically etched to create an additional layer to the piece.  The jar is signed with Debra’s name and Preston’s hallmark.

 

 

$ 2,800.00

Sanchez, Russell  – Gunmetal Jar with Cloud Designs and Lid

This is a very intricately designed bowl by Russell Sanchez.  The rim is polished with mica to create a very high sheen.  The sides are etched with a classic triangular cloud design.  The “op-art” appearance of the row and angles of the design on a round surface are striking.  As well, the highly polished surface add to the impact of the light reflecting off the sides of the bowl.  There are two medallions, each highly polished.  They are each incised (before firing!) with two very intricately designed San Ildefonso birds. Note the use of the same triangular design in both of the birds!  The medallions are surrounded by two bands of hematite hei-shi beads.  They are nearly silver in coloration and complement the metallic appearance of the bowl after the firing.  It has a gunmetal metallic shine.  This is one of those pieces that is not only visually impressive, but there is a tactile aspect.  Where one might expect the mica to have texture, it is so highly burnished it is perfectly smooth!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Russell”.

Click here to read: Russell Sanchez: Contemporizing the Pueblo Pottery Past

$ 5,800.00

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Thursday, May 9, 2019

Tse-Pe, Dora – Red Wedding Vase with Avanyu (1990)

This is one of the few wedding vases made by Dora Tse-Pe.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law Rose Gonzales and continued her work in a similar style of cameo carving. This vase has a water serpent (avanyu) carved around the shoulder of the piece.  There is a single inset piece of turquoise for the eye.  It is fully polished, as is the lower half of the wedding vase. The two spouts are slipped with a micaceous clay.  The contrast of the matte and polished surfaces work perfectly on this jar.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Dora of San Ildefonso, 1990”.

$ 1,800.00

Medicine Flower, Grace & Camillio Tafoya – Large Red & Black Wedding Vase (1970-1)

This an unusual collaborative piece by Grace Medicine Flower and her father, Camilio Tafoya.  It is from the early 1970’s and it was fired “black-and-red”.  It is a distinctive firing technique where the piece is covered before the manure is put on to turn it black.  The bowl was made by Camilio and polished by Grace. She would then etch the designs into the clay before it was fired.  This piece has Koshari clowns dancers on either side.   They are in the center of the red “two-tone” medallion. The sides of the lip on the spouts are also two-tone red.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicne Flower and Camilio Tafoya”.   The wedding vase is in good condition with no chips,cracks, restoration or repair and a few light surface scratches.

$ 1,500.00

Shupla, Helen – Wedding Vase with 21 Melon Ribs (1970’s)

Helen Shupla is famous for her carved pottery as well as her exceptional melon jars.  This piece combines her melon shaped vessels with the wedding vase form. The top of the piece is the wedding vase with a twisted handle and two spouts.  The body of the piece has 21 melon ribs, which are pushed out from the inside to create the undulating form.  The entire piece is fully polished and fired a deep black coloration.   The wedding vase is signed, “Helen Shupla” on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,800.00

Cain, Linda – Wedding Vase

This is a very modernist wedding vase by Linda Cain.  Linda is a daughter of Mary Cain and the mother of Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.  This piece has a very wide shoulder and very tiny spouts.  The body of the jar is carved in relief and then fully polished.  The carved designs are cloud patterns which spiral around the piece on both sides!  The result is a subtle appearance with small shadows cast by the rounded designs.  The spouts are very small and connected by a handle.  The jar is fired a deeper red coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 800.00

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Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Huma, Rondina – Red Bowl with Geometric Designs (1980’s)

Rondina Huma has certainly been one of the most influential Hopi potters working today.  Since her two-time “Best of Show” award at Santa Fe Indian Market, her tight style and intricately painted pottery has changed the face of contemporary Hopi pottery.   Each piece is coil built, fully stone polished and painted with native clays and bee-weed (black), and native fired.  This is one of her early pieces from the 1980s.  The bowl is made from red Hopi clay and then painted with bee-weed. The bowl is fully polished on the inside and outside.  The imagery is her classic use of smaller square designs.  On this piece, there are additional fine-line linear patterns which create some of the separations of the smaller squares.  The rim of the bowl is fully painted with a water design.  It is always interesting to see her early work and how it certainly evolved over time.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,400.00

Nampeyo, Nellie Douma – Jar with Bird Wing Designs (1960’s)

Nellie Nampeyo Douma was the second daughter of Nampeyo of Hano and a sister of Fannie Nampeyo and Annie Nampeyo.  This jar is coil built and painted with bee-weed for the black.  The design is a bird wing and bird tail pattern, stylized from the classic migration pattern.  The bird wing and tail are around the center of the jar. The top triangular pattern is a cloud motif and it is slipped with a red clay.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Nellie Nampeyo”.  It is in very good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 375.00

Nampeyo, Fannie – Large Migration Pattern Jar (1972)

This is a classic jar by Fannie Nampeyo. She was the youngest daughter of noted potter Nampeyo of Hano and also the mother of noted potters Iris Nampeyo, Leah Nampeyo, and Thomas Polacca.  She was undoubtedly among the most skilled of her generation for painting designs pottery.  While her mother revived the “migration” or bird wing design, Fannie made is a signature design of her pottery and the Nampeyo family.  This jar is wide in shape with a round shoulder, and a short neck with a turned out rim.  However, it is the migration pattern which dominates the surface of this piece.  The migration pattern, or bird wings, extend around the entire jar in 9 sections.  The jar was traditionally fired so that it has some visually striking blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom, “Fannie Nampeyo”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The piece was originally purchased in 1972.   Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo said of  the migration pattern:

“This is the one design that was really stressed for us to use, the migration pattern. Nothing but lines, representing the migration of all the people to all the places, including down below and up above. It has seven points at the top and bottom. All the x’s represent life from the bottom and top, telling you the universe is one. The thin lines, I just wanted to paint them real fast and real close to try and include everyone.”  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo, Spoken Through Clay.

$ 3,200.00

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Tuesday, May 7, 2019

Tafoya-Sanchez, Linda – Large Jar with Turtles

This new large by Linda Tafoya-Sanchez is stunning in design and polish.  The jar is a large piece with a lot of surface area for carving.  The top and bottom sections are fully carved and then stone polished.  They are carved with water and cloud motifs and note the thin lines of the carving!   Linda says that this style of her carving is inspired by the time she lived in Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo and their classic incised pottery.   The central band is carved with turtles of various sizes.  They are each polished and surrounded by a micaceous clay slip.  The added texture of the mica and the smooth surface of the turtles gives the jar a striking visual appearance.  Linda says of the use of turtles in her pottery:

“The turtles are the prayer and hope to bring some rain.  There is a Turtle Dance they do in San Juan (Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo). You will see the turtle shells on the backs of their legs. Sometimes they don’t stay in the same direction and they start twisting, just like I’ve placed them in various directions on the pot. The San Juan linear designs here resemble the lightning and the strikes you see in the sky.” Linda Tafoya-Sanchez, Spoken Through Clay

The piece was traditionally fired a deep red coloration.  It is signed on the bottom, “Linda Tafoya-Sanchez”.

$ 3,200.00

Naranjo, Johnathan – Large Water jar with Dancers, Koshari and a Dog

This is an exceptional large jar by Johnathan Naranjo.  It is fully designed with four figures (or five, as Johnathan points out, if you include the dog!). As the jar is turned, it captures several different Pueblo dancers.  There is a young girl with a tablita on her head and a basket.  Next is another young woman in her manta holding pieces of pottery in her hand and on her head.  The next is a young male dancer with evergreens around his neck and in his hands.  Finally, there is a Koshari clown holding a dog.  Each of the figures is exceptional in their design.  Johnathan has a talent for depicting figures on his pottery.  They are simply incised into the clay and the various depth of the blade determines the coloration from tan to light red!  The skill and precision required to make the small cuts and create detail and shading is amazing.  A few areas of note are is the detail in the jar on the girl’s head, the shading on her manta, the detail in the tablita, and, of course, the dog!  The piece speaks to the continuity of Pueblo ceremonial dances and also the humor in the clowns.  The coloration of the jar is derived from the firing technique.  Johnathan has won numerous awards for his pottery.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.

Click Here to See more Work by Johnathan Naranjo

$ 2,600.00

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Monday, May 6, 2019

Lucas, Steve – Jar with Sikyatki Birds

This is a complex new jar by Steve Lucas.  He is one of the leading Hopi-Tewa potters working today.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished, painted with native clay slips and bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired.  Steve has won “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market and his work remains some of the most refined and creative.  This jar is painted with a series of interlocking birds which are inspired in style by the work of his ancestor, Nampeyo of Hano.  Each bird is painted with, red and brown clay slips, each of which is polished!  It takes more time to polish the slips after they are painted, but the result is also more dynamic as they reflect the light.  The area below the shoulder is also fully painted with a star pattern. The base of the bowl is polished a deep red.  It is this deep red clay slip with just a bit of mica, for which Steve is famous.  He said of the red:

“When I first learned to make pottery, the red slip painted in the designs was difficult to work with. It wouldn’t take heat very well and would scorch and turn black. The red was also difficult to polish. My aunt Dextra had a deep red color clay slip, and I decided to experiment with it. I took some of our base clay and added the red to it and it polished very well. I then decided to put some mica in there to get that sparkle. That’s where the new red came from, and Dextra liked how it turned out. I introduced them to that. It was nice that for my teacher, Dextra, I was able to share and teach her something.”  Steve Lucas, Spoken Through Clay

The numerous colors and the precision of the painting is striking.  The jar was traditionally fired which created the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “S. Lucas” and a mudhead (koyemsi) and an ear of corn (corn clan).  Spectacular!

$ 2,000.00

Lucas, Steve – Jar with Hopi Eagle Tail Designs

This is a striking new large jar by Steve Lucas.  He is one of the leading Hopi-Tewa potters working today.  Each piece is coil built, stone polished, painted with native clay slips and bee-weed (black) and traditionally fired.  Steve has won “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market and his work remains some of the most refined and creative.  This jar is painted above the shoulder with four eagle tail designs.  They extend down from the neck to the shoulder.  Separating them are the bird heads.  There are additional polished red and brown clay slips used without the jar.  It takes more time to polish the slips after they are painted, but the result is also more dynamic as they reflect the light.  Steve said of these designs:

“I think about the ancients. I used to hike out to Sikyatki a lot when I stayed out at my mom’s place and look at the pottery sherds. You could pick up a sherd, wipe it off, and the design would still be brilliant. I would be amazed at how well the painting had held up to all the weather over all those centuries. I would find some interesting designs, and I would put them on my pieces. Those ancients were good artists and are an inspiration to me.”  Steve Lucas, Spoken Through Clay

Below the shoulder, Steve has painted a series of polychrome rain and cloud patterns. Again, they are highlighted with the polished clay sections in red and brown.  Near the base, the entire piece is fully polished a deep red.  This definitely adds to the overall dynamic appearance of this piece.    The numerous colors and the precision of the painting is a bit breathtaking on this piece.  The jar was traditionally fired which created the blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “S. Lucas” and a mudhead (koyemsi) and an ear of corn (corn clan).  Spectacular!

$ 3,400.00

Namingha, Les – Tile with Hopi Birds

This large tile by Les Namingha uses a variety of his recent design elements.  In the background, the tile is painted with a variety of geometric patterns.  The various shapes are then layered on with two Hopi bird designs. The birds are flowing in shape and then intricately painted with Hopi-Tewa designs.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Les Namingha”.

$ 1,000.00

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Sunday, May 5, 2019

Lowden, Anita – Seedpot with Ants (1960s)

Anita Lowden was a daughter of Jesse Garcia and sister of Stella Shutiva. She was one of the earlier Acoma Pueblo potters to use Mimbres designs.   This seedpot has two ants as the design on the top of the piece.  It is fully polished and then painted and traditionally fired.  The design of the ants is inspired by the Mimbres pottery designs of the 1100’s.  The piece is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Anita Lowden”.

$ 550.00

Leno, Juana – Clay Female Figure (1970’s)

Juana Leno is one of the four revivalist matriarchs of contemporary Acoma pottery (including Marie Z. Chino, Lucy Lewis, and Jessie Garcia). She was a daughter of Lupita and Jose Vallo and learned to make pottery from her grandmother Eulilia Vallo. This is an exceptional figurative piece of her pottery. There is a history of Acoma figurative work in this style, especially with the painted cheeks.  This figure is coil built and the arms are painted onto the body. The “skirt” is a classic lighting and rain design.  The face and hair are also painted with bee-weed.  The figure was traditionally fired, which gives it the coloration on the surface.  After the firing, she added the turquoise earrings.  The piece is signed on the bottom, “J. Leno”. It is in very good condition and a creative piece of pottery by this important Acoma Pueblo potter!

$ 775.00

Shutiva, Stella – Fineline Canteen with Turtle (1970’s)

Stella Shutiva was renown for her corrugated pottery.  Her style was inspired by pre-historic style corrugated vessels.  However, before the corrugated pottery, she created exceptional painted vessels. This canteen is painted with a rain and water design.  In the center is a small turtle in relief. The back is painted with a red clay slip and the signature, “S. Shutiva” in on the base.  The canteen was traditionally fired which created the color variations on the surface.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. 

$ 875.00

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Saturday, May 4, 2019

Tafoya, LuAnn – Mini Red 12 Rib Melon Jar

known for her large, highly polished pottery.  This jar is carved with twelve vertical melon ribs.  The entire piece is fully polished and fired a deep red coloration.  LuAnn said of her melon bowls:

“I’ve made just a few melon bowls. I would make a bowl and carve the melon ribs on there. They are difficult to make but pretty.”  LuAnn Tafoya, Spoken Through Clay

The coloration is beautiful and the shape of his piece is a great example of her skill, creativity, and commitment to traditional Santa Clara pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 475.00

Tafoya, LuAnn – Mini Red Jar with Avanyu

This is another classic miniature from LuAnn Tafoya.  She is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her large, highly polished pottery.  This jar is a classic shape for Santa Clara pottery with the sloping sides.  It is deeply carved with a water serpent encircling the piece.  The water serpent (avanyu) is part of a story where it saves the village from a flood.  That is why as the jar is turned the body of the avanyu consists of cloud and rain pattern.  However, that also gives the jar a distinctive appearance as it is turned beyond just the one design.  The jar is very highly polished and traditionally fired.  The color is a striking deep red.  The recessed area surrounding the carving is filled in using a white or cream-colored clay.  This creates a striking visual contrast between the tan and red areas.  The coloration is beautiful and the shape of his piece is a great example of her skill, creativity, and commitment to traditional Santa Clara pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 625.00

Whitegeese, Daryl – Red and Tan Jar with Rising and Setting Sun Design

This is one of the first red and tan jar we have had by Daryl Whitegeese.  He is known for his use of traditional Santa Clara shapes and designs.  This jar is a wide shape and fully polished a deep red on the top and the bottom.  The central area is carved with a mesa design and rising and setting sun designs. The central area is polished tan, which is always difficult to create. The tan areas are where water (not clay slip) is applied to the surface of the piece and then stone polished.  Push to hard and it is streaky but not hard enough and it won’t have a shine.  This jar has an amazing coloration for both the red and tan areas. There is the traditional cream colored clay which he has used in the recessed areas which have been carved out.  Typically for his work, the edges are very sharp and create a strong contrast to the matte slipped background.  Daryl has won numerous awards for his pottery including “Best of Pottery” at the 2015 and 2019 Heard Indian Markets.   The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

 

$ 3,400.00

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Friday, May 3, 2019

Roybal, Tonita – Bowl with Feather Design (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This bowl reflects the exceptional nature of her pottery designs, shapes, and firing.  The piece is one of her classic shapes with the sharp shoulder and sloping sides. The design is a feather pattern which is open at the top and extends down to the shoulder.  It is highly polished and fired to a near gunmetal appearance.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Tonita” in the clay on the bottom.

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

 

$ 600.00

Aguilar, Rosalie & Joe – Bowl with Rain and Plant Designs (1920’s)

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional pottery during their brief career working together.  This is a smaller piece of their pottery.  The bowl has rain and plant designs painted around the shoulder.  It is fired a deep black.   It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rosalie + Joe”.

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 300.00

Aguilar, Rosalie & Joe – Large Carved Jar with Lightning and Mesa Designs (1930’s)

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional carved pottery during their brief career working together.  They initially began making black-on-black pottery and then in the 1930’s, they began to carve designs into their pottery. This larger jar is carved with cloud, rain, lightning, and mesa designs.  The carving is done using the negative space of the jar as part of the design elements.  The piece is fully polished and fired to a gunmetal metallic coloration.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Rosalie + Joe” on the bottom in the clay.

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 1,000.00

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Thursday, May 2, 2019

Blue Corn –  Jar with Feather Pattern (1980s)

While Blue Corn is one of the innovative San Ildefonso potters of the late 1900s.  She is often best known for her polychrome pottery but began her career making black pottery.  This jar is from the 1980s.  The shape is one for which she was well known, with the low shoulder and sloping sides.  It is very highly polished and painted with a feather pattern.  The design encircles the entire bowl.  It is fired a deep black.  It is signed in the clay, “Blue Corn”.   The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00

Medicine Flower, Grace & Camillio Tafoya – Red & Black Jar with Figures & Avanyu (1970’s)

This an unusual collaborative piece by Grace Medicine Flower and her father, Camilio Tafoya.  It is from the early 1970’s and it was fired “black-and-red”.  It is a distinctive firing technique where the piece is covered before the manure is put on to turn it black.  The jar was made by Camilio and polished by Grace. She would then etch the designs into the clay before it was fired.  This piece has a lightly etched avanyu on two sides.  Separating them are two red medallions.  One has a Mudhead Clown figure and the other a Rain Dancer.  There is a striking coloration of the red against the black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicne Flower and Camilio Tafoya”.   The jar is in excellent with no chips,cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 775.00

Folwell, Jody – Black and Red Jar with Asymmetric Rim

Jody Folwell is known for her creative pottery shapes and designs.  This jar is one of her classic shapes with a wide shoulder and an asymmetric rim.  Jody created this style where the jar is stone polished just past the neck, and the remainder is matte. The piece is traditionally fired.  The manure creates the dark coloration on the rim and the speckling on the side.  It is signed on the bottom, “Jody”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00

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Wednesday, May 1, 2019

Youngblood, Nancy – Jar with 32 Feathers and Carved Avanyu (1986)

This is a spectacular jar by Nancy Youngblood is from 1986.  While it is small, it is very deeply carved into the clay.  The jar has 32 very, very thinly carved feathers encircling the neck of the piece. It’s amazing how she could even carve into the clay with such small lines!  Below the feathers is a very deeply carved avanyu encircling the jar.  The body of the avanyu swirls around the piece with cloud and rain designs.  The piece is very is highly polished to a stunning shine. It is in perfect condition, with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nancy Youngblood Cutler”.

$ 3,300.00

Garcia, Tammy – Polychrome Jar with Birds and Rainbows

This is an early piece by Tammy Garcia from around 1992. It is an exceptional piece of her carved pottery.  The design has a stylized bird on each side.  They are polished red while the plants below them are polished tan.  The clouds above are polished white!  There is a polished tan rainbow extending out from the clouds.  Surrounding the birds are very intricately carved rain and wind designs.  The number of very small carved sections along with the various clay slips which are all polished give this jar a very unique appearance.  In addition, look behind the carving and there is a white clay slip which Tammy applied before the piece was fired.  As you can imagine, with all the small angles and edges, it was very time-consuming.  She said she only made a few with the white clay in the background and then she began to just use water to smooth out the background.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tammy Garcia”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This jar is certainly an important part of Tammy’s amazing story of working with the clay to create her distinctive art.

$ 9,800.00

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Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Gutierrez, Denny – 26 Swirls Faceted Melon Jar (1997)

Denny Gutierrez was known for his faceted melon bowls.  As opposed to carving them, he would flatten out each rib out to create a “faceted” appearance.  The result was a reflective surface and a very striking piece of pottery.  This jar is narrow in shape, which shows off the faceted swirling ribs.  It is from 1997.  The jar has 26 faceted ribs swirling down from the rim to the base.   The narrowness of each rib adds to the amazing reflectiveness of this piece.  The jar is very highly polished and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 200.00

Holt, Lisa & Harlan Reano – Standing Owl with Pueblo Designs

Lisa Holt and Harlan Reano make an amazing team, working to create innovative pottery using traditional techniques.  Lisa makes the pottery and it is painted by Harlan.  This standing owl is an exceptional piece of their work.  The owl has a rather intense connotation in Native stories reflecting wisdom, foresight, and the keeper of sacred knowledge.  This standing owl utilizes numerous traditional Cochiti and Kewa designs to make up the entire piece.  The eyes are encircled by the wild spinach plant design, which is what is used to paint the black on the figures.  The wings also have the wild spinach design in the center and plant designs on either side.  The main body has triangular feather patterns with a surrounding lightning design.  However, it’s the use of the clay as the feathers on the head and wings that is exceptional!  Harlan as well said to note how they sculpted the feet, which together with the wings, give a sense of flight. The materials are all traditional as the red and cream are both native clays while the black is wild spinach (a plant). This figure was also traditionally fired outdoors.

$ 3,000.00

Velarde, Carol – Clay Bear with Carved Heartline

Carol Velarde is known for her deeply carved pottery. This is one of her figurative bears.  The bear is made from clay and carved with a heartline. The heartline is symbolic of the heart being the spiritual center of the bear.  Note how deeply she carves into the clay and after it is carved and polished she then uses clay to outline the design.  Visually, this makes the imagery more dramatic.  The bear is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 125.00

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Monday, April 29, 2019

Trancosa, Kevin – Large Jar with Geometrics and Lid (1997)

Kevin Trancosa was one of the few potters working at San Felipe Pueblo.  I was lucky to work with him from 1996-7 in Scottsdale.  Each piece was coil built and made from San Felipe clay.  In 1997 he began working with white micaceous clay.  The result was a striking appearance with black painted designs and a micaceous surface.  This jar is painted with a mountain design which extends from the base to the neck.  Note how small the design is when it reaches the neck!  The lid is also mica slipped and has a face and tablita.  Kevin only made a few of these that I remember.  This particular piece was purchased from the gallery.   The piece is from 1997 and it is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While he had a brief career, his work remains important among San Felipe potters.ote how small the design is when it reaches the neck!  The lid is also mica slipped and has a face and tablita.  Kevin only made a few of these that I remember, and typically they were for one of the art shows in which exhibited.  The piece is from 1997 and it is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While he had a brief career, his work remains important among San Felipe potters.

$ 2,200.00

Youngblood, Nathan – Black and Tan Box with Avanyu and Double Lid

This is an extraordinary piece by Nathan Youngblood.  It is one of his few boxes and this is one of the only ones with a double lid!  The box itself is round and fully carved with a water serpent. The avanyu (water serpent) encircles the entire piece.  The lid is fully carved and polished tan.  Tan is one of the most difficult colors to achieve in Pueblo pottery.  Why?  It is water instead of a clay slip that is used to polish the piece.  Polish too hard and it is streaky, and not hard enough and it is dull.  When a piece is traditionally fired it also takes in more smoke which changes the color.  Finally, the second “lid” is carved and slipped with mica.  The story on the piece reflects both the color and designs.

“The circular box is carved with an avanyu.  It encircles the entire piece and the body is made up of various water designs  The lid is fully carved and looking down on it, it represents the land around above and surrounding the waterways of the avanyu.  I used the tan to represent the color of the earth.  There is a single hole in the lid, which represents the connection between the land and the water below. I made a “lid” which sits in the hole and it is a carved to represent a tree. It is bringing the water up from below to grow.  This is the connection of water, land and life.”  Nathan Youngblood

All three pieces were traditionally fired. The box and “tree lid” are fired black.  It has a wonderful coloration which is “water like” in appearance.  The lid is tan, which is always difficult to polish and fire.  This piece has perfect firing and the result is a caramel coloration, which is always so rich and distinctive for the tan fired vessels.   The pieces are signed with Nathan’s name and his signature of three deer tracks.  They represent his name in Tewa, which means “Deer Path”.

$ 4,500.00

Namingha, Les – Tall Jar with Minimalist Hopi Birds

This tall jar by Les Namingha uses an elongated form as a foundation for his minimalist Hopi-Tewa birds.  The top of the jar has a very painterly style, which is then overpainted with concentric lines.  The side of the jar has four panels, each with a different Hopi-Tewa style of bird.  The birds have been minimalized into more geometric shapes and then layered using color variations.  Each panel is separated by a checkerboard pattern.  The lower section of the jar has black and white geometrics and the very base of the jar is textured.  He has used mica with the paint on the lower sections, so there is just a bit of “sparkle” in the piece.    It is a complex and striking jar.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 4,200.00

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Sunday, April 28, 2019

Youvella, Nolan – Jar with Flute Player

Nolan Youvella is a son of noted potters Iris Nampeyo and Wallace Youvella.  He is known for his relief carved pottery.  This taller jar is fully polished.  It is etched on one side with a flute player and geometric cloud, wind and rain designs.  The jar was traditionally fired so there are light blushes on the surface.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nolan Youvella Nampeyo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00

Vigil, Minnie – Polychrome Jar with Feather Pattern (1980’s)

Minnie Vigil is renown for her polychrome and highly polished pottery.  This jar is fully polished red below the shoulder.  Along the neck of the jar it is painted with red, white and black clay slips which are all matte. The design is a feather pattern and a cloud design below the shoulder.   The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Minnie”.  She is a sister to potters Gloria Garcia (Goldenrod), Lois Guiterrez and Thelma Talachy and an aunt to Jason Garcia.

$ 125.00

Garcia, Virginia – Jar with Bear Paws (1994)

This water jar by Virginia Garcia is a classic shape for Santa Clara pottery.  The jar has a shape inspired by the storage jar with a round body but there is a sharp shoulder before it extends up to the neck.  There are three bear paws as the design, which are impressed into the clay.  The entire jar is fully polished and fired a black coloration.   Virginia is a sister of noted potters Tina Garcia and Greg Garcia.   While Virginia is no longer making pottery, this is certainly an outstanding example of her skill.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, ‘Virginia Garcia”.

$ 600.00

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Saturday, April 27, 2019

Ortiz, Virgil – “MMIWG : MIIICH” Clay Sculpture

The pieces Virgil Ortiz has created an exceptional new series of pieces for “Taboo II:  Fearless.  Unshaken. Inspiring”. Virgil has focuses on various new topics of social commentary.  Each piece is coil built, painted with wild spinach (black) and clay slips.  This piece is entitled, “MMIWG : MIIICH”.  Virgil says of this piece:

“MMIWG are the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.  There is an innate difficulty to grapple with the extent and impact of these missing and murdered American Indian and Alaska Native women and girls.  At a rate of 15 missing each day, they are rarely accounted for in federal statistics. The impact ranges from reservations to urban communities. This piece was created to bring awareness to this epidemic. The spirits of these missing women and girls need guidance to the next life – many of them have not been given a proper burial and send-off.  The hummingbirds, or “Miiich” in the Keres language, serve as guides and protectors for these lost mothers, sisters, daughters, aunts and loved ones so that they are able to return home.” -Virgil Ortiz

The piece is a large scale sculpture which is dramatic in form, design, and concept  Technically, note the shape of the piece which is overall a bird form. The shape is also technically difficult to make with various angular edges and swooping lines.  Many of the hummingbirds are also raised in relief, a first for Virgil in his work.  The hummingbirds are symbolic of his mother, Seferina Ortiz.  Note as well on the edge opposite the woman wearing the tablita that there is a single black hummingbird, which is meant to be the spirit messenger for those women and girls who are missing.  It is an extraordinarily powerful piece in clay and speaks to Virgil’s unique ability to use the clay to visually tell both a story and help to educate people about the missing indigenous women and girls.

TABOO II: Fearless. Unshaken. Inspiring

 

 

$ 11,000.00

Ortiz, Virgil – “Spirit World Army” Clay Figure

The pieces Virgil Ortiz has created an exceptional new series of pieces for “Taboo II:  Fearless.  Unshaken. Inspiring”. Virgil has focuses on various new topics of social commentary.  Each piece is coil built, painted with wild spinach (black) and clay slips.  This piece is entitled, “Spirit World Army”.  Virgil says of this piece:

This piece speaks to the internal conflicts of those living with PTSD.  For this sculpture, I honed in on my recent experience of using art to encourage Veterans with PTSD to share their stories and establish a new sense of self through healing.  PTSD is not limited to those who have been deployed but can impact anyone as the result of a traumatic experience or encounter.  The dramatic converging faces depict the internal battle of those who have PTSD.  Their daily experience can be a duality of a suppressed painful past and the attempt to find normality in daily life. The three-pointed star and the three circles represent the infinite quest for stability and balance in their thoughts and lives. On the back, I painted Rorschach inspired silhouetted images of Vets to bring balance and overall symmetry to the form and design.  The silhouettes speak to the proudest moments of Vets serving our county yet experiencing depression being away from their loved ones.”  Virgil Ortiz

Technically, Virgil’s figurative work excels on this figure.  The convergence of the two faces is both dramatic and visually stunning.  There is a tightness to the way the faces flow into one another.  The painted designs not only tell the story but emphasize the shape of the figure.  While it may feel modern it certainly harkens to the early Monos figures and their often quite unusual use of human forms (real and imaginary).  A piece which is both thought-provoking and timeless in concept and design.

TABOO II: Fearless. Unshaken. Inspiring

$ 9,500.00

Ortiz, Virgil – “FALLD” Clay Sculpture

The pieces Virgil Ortiz has created an exceptional new series of pieces for “Taboo II:  Fearless.  Unshaken. Inspiring”. Virgil has focuses on various new topics of social commentary.  Each piece is coil built, painted with wild spinach (black) and clay slips.  This piece is entitled, “FALLD”.  Virgil says of this piece:

“Growing up and living with ADD, dyslexia, Aspergers, or autism is an unimaginable personal and social challenge.  During my time at Colorado College, I had the opportunity to learn from 15-year-old Foster what it’s like to live with these disorders.  As a kid, he thought he was a failure.  He showed me one of his own drawings which expressed how he felt about his failures. He saw himself as an extended figure, surrounded by the words, “falld”, meaning “failed”.  This was an intense expression of his personal feelings and perception.  He felt he had to pull himself up every day, so I put him at the top of the mountain, the apex of this piece.  He loves to mountain climb, so that seemed appropriate.  The other figures are carrying the weight of the world on their shoulders and at the same time, getting ready to toss Foster’s “drawing” away as he overcomes his feelings of failure to achieve personal success.  I see him standing tall, beginning to enter a place of non-duality where the understanding of his neurodiversity can have its own meaning outside and separate of how and what it means to others.” Virgil Ortiz

The shape and the clay work become the “canvas” for this powerful story.  The single figure on the lower edge is painted all black (wild spinach).  The drawing he used by Foster is actually in relief in areas, as is much of the rest of the piece.  It is not just flat surfaces, but angles and edges, some of which are so lightly raised they have to be felt, which give the piece added dimension.  Just as the story of Foster finding his way forward, Virgil has painted this piece to draw your eye around and upward.  It seems that in the end, it is uplifting both conceptually and visually.  A piece which is both thought-provoking and timeless in concept and design.

TABOO II: Fearless. Unshaken. Inspiring

 

$ 8,500.00

Ortiz, Virgil – “Puppy Power” Clay Sculpture

The pieces Virgil Ortiz has created an exceptional new series of pieces for “Taboo II:  Fearless.  Unshaken. Inspiring”. Virgil has focuses on various new topics of social commentary.  Each piece is coil built, painted with wild spinach (black) and clay slips.  This piece is entitled, “Puppy Power”.  Virgil says of this piece:

“Dogs.  We dress them up, we take them out on parade, we lavish them with gifts.  For many, that’s not enough and they want to enter the world of dogs themselves.  Sure, Puppy Play looks like a kink, with the leather and hoods and tails.  But it’s a world scene created by men and women and it’s one that is not about control but about love and affection. It seeks to show a way to navigate our lives away from the ordinary into the unknown.  It may seem silly to wear a tail and ears, but is it any sillier to dress up our dogs in a dress and shoes?” – Virgil Ortiz

Interestingly, Virgil’s first major exhibit at the Wheelwright, entitled, “Clay People” focused primarily on S&M figures.  That is a topic which, nearly two decades later, remains “taboo” but which Virgil seems to utilize with ease.  It may be the feeling of discomfort but there is also humor within the context of his work.  Virgil looks at both sides of “puppy power” and creates incredible clay work of technical complexity.

TABOO II: Fearless. Unshaken. Inspiring

$ 9,800.00

Ortiz, Virgil – “Hate is a Drag” Clay Figure

The pieces Virgil Ortiz has created an exceptional new series of pieces for “Taboo II:  Fearless.  Unshaken. Inspiring”. Virgil has focuses on various new topics of social commentary.  Each piece is coil built, painted with wild spinach (black) and clay slips.  This piece is entitled, “Hate is a Drag”.  Virgil says of this piece:

“Sometimes we stand alone.  Sometimes as a group. Gender roles and society often challenge how we see ourselves and are perceived. I wanted to depict a man getting dressed for drag along with the three fierce drag queens.  To me it’s never about race, sex or gender but I just see people as people. Yeah, Hate is a Drag.”  Virgil Ortiz

Technically, Virgil’s figurative work on this figure is extraordinary.  He said he started the base in a triangle and then worked up from there. The entire piece is coil built. The various figures easily tell his story in a fun and yet thoughtful manner.  As with man of his pieces for Taboo, the topics remain both timely and timeless.

TABOO II: Fearless. Unshaken. Inspiring

$ 8,000.00

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Friday, April 26, 2019

Martinez, Maria – Polychrome Bowl with Cloud Designs, “Marie” (1920’s)

This is an exceptional smaller bowl by Maria Martinez and her husband, Julian.  The bowl is coil built and thin walled.  It is painted with a cloud and bird wing design.  Typical of their work in the early 1920s, the bowl is painted with very tight lines.  The early signed polychrome work by Maria is a rarity.   While she began her career making polychrome pottery, the “new” black-on-black pottery in 1920-1 changed everyone’s interest as it became more popular.  Potters quickly transitioned to the new blackware and the polychrome pieces were then made with less frequency.  Interestingly, the provenance on this bowl is that the owner’s grandmother purchased it from her in the 1920s.  Definitely a fascinating and important piece of San Ildefonso and Maria pottery history!  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie”.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 7,000.00

Martinez, Maria – Gunmetal Jar with Avanyu (Maria Popovi 463)

This is a wide shoulder jar by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the jar while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The jar is highly polished and has the classic water serpent (avanyu) painted around the shoulder. This particular shape, with the round body and the sloping sides, is easily one of Maria’s most famous forms.  The firing is quite stunning with a nearly full gunmetal in coloration and a very high shine.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi 463“. The signature indicates that it was made around in April 1963.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 4,400.00

Martinez, Maria – Black-and-Sienna Gunmetal Jar “Maria Poveka”, 1964-5

This is an exceptional gunmetal jar by Maria Martinez from around 1964-5.  The jar was made and polished by Maria.  It is one of her classic shapes with the very round shoulder and a short neck. The jar was fired by her son Popovi Da and it has a spectacular gunmetal surface.  Popovi was known for his firing techniques and his gunmetal pieces remain some of the best.  The neck of the jar has been “two-toned” with a sienna neck to contrast with the gunmetal surface.  There is his classic “halo” band, which is the dark black band separating the gunmetal from the sienna surface.  The piece is most likely from around 1964-5 or possible a few years later.  It was only in 1964 that Popovi Da created the black-and-sienna coloration.  As well, by 1965 Maria was signing “Maria Poveka” less frequently on her pottery and most pieces were signed “Maria Popovi”.  This jar is signed, “Maria Poveka” in the clay on the bottom.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is certainly a unique style of Maria’s pottery and an important addition to any collection.

$ 7,500.00

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All Contemporary   All Signed Historic

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