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santa clara potterySanta Clara Pottery

Traditional Name: Kha'p'oo Owinge (Valley of the Wild Roses.) The Pueblo is a member of the Eight Northern Pueblos, and the people are from the Tewa ethnic group of Native Americans who speak the Tewa language.  The Pueblo is on the Rio Grande, between Ohkay Owingeh (formerly San Juan Pueblo) to the north and San Ildefonso Pueblo to the south.  Santa Clara Pottery and its Pueblo are famous for producing hand-crafted pottery, specifically blackware and redware with deep engravings. Thanks to cultural pride and a strong sense of identity, the Santa Clara people have retained many of their ancient traditions while integrating with the best of what the majority culture has to offer. The Pueblo has a high regard for education, both the tribal heritage and modern education.  Santa Clara Pueblo people find employment on the reservation as well as in nearby cities. Some dances and community festivals are open to the public.  In June, St. Anthony’s Feast Day features Comanche Dances.  In August, Harvest Dances and Corn Dances are performed in honor of the patron saint, St. Clare. Regarded as one of the great masters of Pueblo ceramics Margaret Tafoya (1904-2001), a matriarch of Santa Clara Pueblo, is known for her trademark large black polished ceramics.  Margaret decorated with traditional imagery of rain clouds, water serpents, bear paws, and other family symbols.  An award-winning artist, she was the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts and a National Heritage Fellowship.  She had twelve children, eight of whom became potters; Virginia Ebelacker, Lee Tafoya, Toni Roller, LuAnn Tafoya, Mela Youngblood, Jennie Trammel, Mary Ester Archuleta and Shirley Tafoya.  Her grandchildren and today great-grandchildren carry on the traditions of making pottery.  Margaret was a guardian of traditional pottery making methods and techniques.  She created large storage vessels with stone polished surfaces.  Her carving was done before the piece was polished.  She created her amazing work from the 1920's through the 1980's.

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Tafoya, Pasqualita – Carved Bowl with Avanyu (1940’s)

Pasqualita Tafoya was the sister of noted potter SaraFina Tafoya and the matriarch of a family of renowned potters.  Her early pottery are primarily carved vessels with some unusual styles of carved patterns.  This is a larger bowl of her pottery with a carved avanyu encircling the piece.  The avanyu (water serpent) is deeply carved into the clay and the surface is fully polished.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Pascualita”.  Interestingly, there are numerous variations on the spelling of her name depending on the time period when they were made.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is nice to see a larger piece of her pottery with such a classic design.

$ 800.00
Browning, Ashley – “NDN-opoly” Digital Photograph

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment or life in contemporary Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called “NDN-opoly”.  Ashley writes of this piece, “It is a hand drawn illustration of a Native American Monopoly. It represents Pueblos (the Man on the top and the Pueblo homes), Navajos (the man in the middle holding the sheep and fry bread), and Plains Indian (the tee pees). I think this is such a cool idea they should make an actual game!”.  The first in this series won a Second Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2015. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “NDN iPhone” Digital Photograph

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment or life in contemporary Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called, “NDN iPhone”.  The hand model is Shaandiin Tome.  Ashley says of this piece, “It has hand drawn icons that are a Native version of iPhone apps, it is placed that are set on top of Montana Tee Pees.  So cool, it should be made into an actual apps.”  Take a closer look a few of the apps, as they certain capture the life of many Native artists.  Ashley certainly has an extraordinary sense of cultural critique in her artwork.  The first in this series won a Second Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2015. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “Generation Hands” Digital Photograph

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment or life in contemporary Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called, “Generation Hands”.  It is certainly one of the most powerful of her digital photos.  Ashley says, “The models are  (Top to bottom) Samantha Whitegeese, Mindy Little Yellow Bird, Tina Whitegeese, Michele Tapia Browning and Lu Ann Tafoya.  It is a portrait of four generations of strong women, a Student, a disabled woodworker, a corporate person, an artist and a potter. On their arms is the tewa words that represents their relations to me. So it goes from top to bottom: younger relation (no real tewa word for cousin), relation (no real tewa word for sister), aunt, mother and grandma.”  The original photo was taken and then overlayed with the words in Tewa.   The first in this series won a FirstSecond Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2014. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “Paper Doll” Digital Photo

Ashley Browning uses her photographic and innovative graphic skills to create her unique digital photo compositions. This piece is entitled, “Paper Doll” and utilized Leslie Browning Tafoya as the model.  Ashley says of this piece, “After playing with paper dolls as a child, I always wanted to play with a pueblo paper doll, especially a paper doll from my pueblo of Santa Clara. I inspired it from the summer side, where there is a mix of different style and colors.”  The piece is creative with the various traditional clothes from Santa Clara. She ended up dressing the model three different times for the clothing ‘options’.  Native People’s Magazine wrote about Ashely and this piece,

 “I like to make people feel, to remember something—experience something meaningful,” says Ashley Browning, 21, of Pojoaque and Santa Clara pueblos in New Mexico. In 2013 she won first prize at Indian Market for best computer-generated graphics with her “real-life” paper doll, which featured a digitally altered photo of her model with interchangeable traditional and contemporary attire. With it, Browning used the digital present to evoke memories of the previous generation’s analog world.”

The first piece in this series won first place ribbon at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2013.  It is an edition of 10 and framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “Juxtaposition” Digital Photo

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment in Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called, “Juxaposition”.  The model is Samatha Whitegeese (a daughter of Daryl Whitegeese).  Ashley says of this piece, “This photo is about young woman who is balancing her contemporary lifestyle and her traditional pueblo life. It is an everyday challenge that almost every young person deals with while going to school and participating in traditions.”  She took multiple photos of Samantha and combined them together to create this image.  The first in this series won a First Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2013. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Tafoya, Ray  – Seedpot with Buffalo (1991)

This miniature seedpot by Ray Tafoya is fully polished and round in shape.  It has a Mimbres style buffalo on the top.  It is surrounded by arrowhead and wind designs.  All the different colors are derived from natural clay slips.  The eye of the buffalo is also the hole for the seedpot!  Note how many of the designs surrounding the bear are similar to ones used today by his daughter, Jennifer Moquino.  The seedpot is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 375.00
Tafoya, Ray – Seedpot with Bear (1986)

This miniature seedpot  by Ray Tafoya is from 1986.  It is fully polished and it is an oval shape.  It has a Mimbres style bear on one side. The other side has a stylized bear paw.  All the different colors are derived from natural clay slips.  Note how many of the designs surrounding the bear are similar to ones used today by his daughter, Jennifer Moquino.  The seedpot is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00
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