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King Galleries is pleased to have a variety of Pueblo and Tribal pottery from the 1920's to the present. We have created this "Signed Historic Pottery"  to identify work by those potters who were early innovators in the 1920's and began to sign their work. It also is used for any artists who have passed away, making their art part of the historical record. The history of Pueblo pottery during this period is one of an exciting change as it has evolved from utilitarian ware to folk art to the fine art of today. We hope you enjoy these amazing pieces!

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Haungooah, Art Cody – Turtle with Hemis Mana Katsina (1974)

Art Cody Haungooah began making pottery in  1972.  He brought his Kiowa heritage and culture to the pottery of Santa Clara Pueblo.  This clay turtle is from 1974.  It is fully polished and the back is etched with a Hemis Mana katsina.  Note the more deeply incised and rounded lines around the katsina figure.  It is signed on the bottom on the neck, “Haungooah 2-74”. It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

Art Cody Haungooh: A “Reflected Light” in Pueblo Pottery

 

$ 375.00
Shupla, Helen – Wedding Vase with Mesa and Cloud Designs

Helen Shupla is famous for her carved pottery as well as her exceptional melon jars.  This large wedding vase is coil built and it is carved around the body of the piece.  The style of carving is interesting as most of the work is carved into the negative space as opposed to caring it in a line around the vase.  There is a mesa design along with a cloud, mountain, and bird pattern.  The wedding vase is signed, “Helen Shupla” on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,400.00
Naranjo, Teresita  – Wedding Vase with Water Serpent (1970’s)

Teresita Naranjo is famous for her deeply carved pottery.  Each piece was coil built, carved, stone polished and traditionally fired outdoors.  She was a daughter of noted potter Christina Naranjo and a sister of Mary Cain.  This wedding vase by Teresita is from the 1970’s.  It is one of her classic shapes with the long necks and rounded spouts.  The body of the vase is deeply carved with a waters serpent (avanyu), which encircles the piece.  As the vase is turned there are additional cloud and rain designs.  The entire piece is beautifully polished and a classic for her work!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita Naranjo” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,250.00
Gonzales, Rayita – Carved Open Bowl with Avanyu (1930’s)

Rayita Gonzales was a sister of Louis  “Wo-Peen” Gonzales and Raymoncita Gonzales.  She did not make much pottery but it was mostly during the 1930’s.  This is the 4th piece of her work that we have come across for the gallery!  It is an open bowl and carved on the inside with a water serpent.  The style of her carving is very distinctive and especially the “horn” on the water serpent.  The back of the bowl is also fully polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rayita”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

For more information on the Early San Ildefonso Innovators, Click Here.

$ 400.00
Lewis, Lucy – Bowl with Rain and Lightning Design (1980’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the past century. This bowl is coil built and painted using bee-weed, a plant.  The design consists of a triangular mountain, rain and lightning design. The pattern is repeated around the shoulder of the bowl.  This bowl is thin walled and delicately painted.  It was traditionally fired so the white has much more of a pearlescent coloration, which creates added depth.  In the 1980’s the surfaces of her pieces were more highly polished, giving them a smoother feel.  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00
Martinez, Maria – Bowl with Mesa & Prayer Feather Design “Marie + Julian” (1920’s)

This bowl by Maria Martinez is a classic of her early pottery from the late 1920’s.  It was made and polished by Maria and then painted by her husband, Julian Martinez (1897-1943).  The bowl is Maria’s classic rounded shoulder shape and the entire piece is fully stone polished, including the base.  The design around the sides is painted with a mesa and a prayer feather pattern. The prayer feathers are held in the hands of Pueblo dancers and are often depicted as a series of triangles one on top of the other.  The bowl is very highly polished and was fired to a gunmetal appearance. This metallic or “gunmetal” was achieved by the heat of the firing and note how the coloration changes as the bowl is turned!  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay,  “Marie + Julian”.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one small rub below the shoulder but very little wear on the polished bottom, which is unusual, as one might expect more wear just from moving the bowl around over the past 100 years!

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 2,200.00
Martinez, Maria – Large Wide Plainware Bowl “Maria Poveka”, 1950’s

In the 1950’s Maria Martinez created a series of pieces which were simply stone polished with no design.  As she primarily made the pottery and polished it this was fitting with the other pieces of her career.  This wide bowl is very highly polished and it is fired a dark black but with areas that are gunmetal.  This shape is one which she made, often saying it was made so that it would fit when being held by two hands.   The bowl is signed in the clay, “Maria Poveka”.  This is a combination of her Anglo and Tewa names.  Her name, “Poveka” means “Water Lilly”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Maria Martinez Signatures

$ 2,200.00
Sanchez, Desideria – Bowl with Cloud & Wind Designs (1920’s)

Desideria Montoya Sanchez was a sister of noted potter Maria Martinez.  She was known for her traditional pottery and use of both classic and innovative designs. This bowl is a round shape and painted with a series of bold line cloud and wind patterns. The thick lines and the style of the imagery give the bowl a very modern appearance and are certainly unusual in the imagery of San Ildefonso.  The firing of the bowl has given it a somewhat gunmetal appearance in areas.  The gunmetal coloration is due to the heat of the firing and note how areas are more black and others are more metallic.   The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Desideria”.

$ 975.00
Martinez, Maria – Bowl with Feather Pattern (Maria Popovi 665)

This is a rounded neck bowl by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the bowl while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The bowl is highly polished and has the traditional eagle feather pattern painted in matte around the shoulder.  Typical of the work of Popovi Da, the feathers are perfectly painted with each feather nearly the same width as the one next to it. It is remarkable as Popovi painted them free-hand and each feather would be painted over several times. The shape of this bowl is one of Maria’s classics, as the round shoulder accentuated the shape of the feathers.  The firing is a very highly polished black with a mirror-like shine.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi 665“. The signature indicates that it was made around in June 1965.  The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 4,400.00
Martinez, Maria – Jar with Plant Design “Marie + Julian” (1930’s)

This jar by Maria Martinez is a classic of her early pottery from the late 1930’s.  It was made and polished by Maria and then painted by her husband, Julian Martinez (1897-1943).  The jar has a distinctive form with a sharp shoulder and a sloping neck.  The design is a plant pattern which extends up from the shoulder to the neck.  The bowl is highly polished and fired a deep black.  It is signed, “Marie + Julian” on the bottom.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is one small rub below the shoulder and a small pre-firing indention on the shoulder (last photo).

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 1,800.00
Martinez, Maria  –  Jar with Rain and Plant Designs “Marie + Santana”, 1940’s

This jar by Maria Martinez is one of her classic pieces.  It was made and polished by Maria Martinez and painted by her daughter-in-law Santana. It has a very highly polished surface. The design around the shoulder is a rain and plant pattern.  It is tightly painted while allowing the polished surface of the bowl to remain exposed.  The firing has given the bowl a nearly gunmetal appearance.   The rounded shoulder and sloping neck are an excellent example of Maria’s pottery from this time.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Marie + Santana”.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic!  

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 2,000.00
Martinez, Maria – Jar with Avanyu (Maria Popovi 1069)

This is a short neck jar by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da.  Maria made and polished the jar while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The jar is highly polished and has the classic water serpent (avanyu) painted around the shoulder. This particular shape, with the round body and the short neck, is one which is easily one of Maria’s most famous forms.  The firing is nearly gunmetal in coloration with a very high shine.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Maria Popovi 1069“. The signature indicates that it was made around in October 1969.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 4,400.00
Medina, Sofia & Lois Medina – Four Color Stoarge Jar with Birds & Rainbows

Sofia Medina and her daughter Lois Medina were known for a traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece was coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This is jar is striking in design and a very classic Zia shape with the high shoulder and slight neck.  The jar has two large sections with birds and very complex double rainbow band.  Separating each of the rainbow bands are small cloud designs.  The bird is surrounded by complex rain and flower designs.  The opposite sides have large birds with a single rainbow band and flower patterns.  Note how the rainbow bands are stone polished areas!  There are equally complex variations of fine-line and hatchtwork patterns.  Did you know that Zia potters use volcanic basalt as their temper for the clay, which gives these pieces their stability but also weight.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the side, “Sofia & Lois Medina”.

$ 2,800.00
White, Elizabeth – Large Red Jar with Bean Dance Figures (1970’s)

Elizabeth White created distinctive pottery using the various colors of Hopi clay. She originated the use of the ear of corn as a design in repousse (pushed out from the inside) on her pottery. Her pottery is all signed in the clay with her Hopi name Polingaysi, which means, “butterfly sitting among the flowers in the breeze”.  This jar is one of her classic narrow jars with two ears of corn.  The coloration of the clay is the traditional red clay (well, reddish-orange), which is used in Hopi pottery.  The coloration is striking on this larger jar.   The entire piece is stone polished in a vertical manner and the figures are matte.  There are two figures, which are taken from an Awatovi mural design.  They are part of the winter “Bean Ceremony” when they grow bean sprouts in the kivas. The figures are pushed out from the inside of the jar, not applique on top of the surface.  The jar is in good condition and a few rough area in the matte.  Interestingly, Polingaysi was a school teacher and taught at Hopi and  Navajo schools for almost 40 years.  On retirement from teaching, she became an artist, a poet, and a philosopher.  Her career as a potter was begun late in life, after her retirement, so there is very little of her work available.  This is certainly one of the largest pieces we have had of her work in the gallery.  The last photo is one of Elizabeth White working on this piece! Definitely check out the work of her nephew, Al Qoyawayma for comparison and the evolution of this style!

$ 5,500.00
Cain, Mary – Bowl with Cloud and Lightning Design (1990’s)

Mary Cain was a daughter of Christina Naranjo and a granddaughter of SaraFina Tafoya.  She was known for her classic style Santa Clara pottery.  This bowl is carved with a cloud, lightning and wind pattern which encircles the piece.  There is always a fluidity to her designs as they ebb and flow around the piece.  The bowl is fired a dark black.  It is signed on the bottom, “Mary Cain”.    It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00
Naha, Helen “Feather Woman” – Awatovi Star Design Bowl (1978)

This smaller bowl by Helen Naha, also known as “Feather Woman”, has her iconic Awatovi Star design.  Helen created distinctive pottery using the white clay slip throughout her career.  The designs were all painted using bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law, Paqua Naha yet had her own style in form, imagery, and composition.  Helen is known for her revival of the pre-historic Awatovi pottery.   Awatovi is one of the ruins near Hopi where a white slipped style of pottery was made.  It is a fascinating place as it was where Coronado made contact with the Hopi in 1540.  During the excavations in the 1930’s the whiteware pottery was rediscovered.  It was the imagery from his work which inspired much of Helen’s early pottery, as opposed the more classic Sikyatki inspired pottery of Nampeyo.  This bowl has the “Awatovi Star” pattern painted on the top and the bottom.  The bowl has a larger opening and the entire interior is also fully polished!  Around the shoulder is an eternity band.  The bowl was traditionally fired and there is some variation to the color with the fired cloud, which certainly adds to the beauty of the piece.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom with her hallmark feather.  It was originally purchased in 1978.

$ 1,000.00
Gonzales, Rose – Red Carved Long Neck Jar

This carved jar is a classic vessel by San Ildefono potter Rose Gonzales.  She is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career, she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This jar is carved on the sides with lightning and rain patterns.  Rose was famous for her “cameo” style of carving with the use of negative space and rounded edges.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rose”.

$ 600.00
Aguilar, Rosalie & Joe – Carved Red Jar with Rain Designs (1930’s)

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional pottery throughout their time working together.  In the 1930’s they began to make carved pottery.  This jar has a carve rain and lightning pattern separated by a negative space mountain design.  The jar is polished red and the background area is a matte red clay slip.  The style of the carving is known as “cameo carving”, which was typical at San Ildefonso in the 1930’s. The jar is in is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Rosalie + Joe” on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 600.00
Roybal, Tonita – Bowl with Geometric Rain Designs (1920’s)

Tonita Roybal remains one of the great innovative names in San Ildefonso pottery.  This smaller jar has her classic sharp shoulder and sloping neck.  The neck has a geometric rain and cloud pattern.  Note the small design with the three rows of rain. This particular design is one which she often used on her pottery.  Sometimes it was attached to the other designs, sometimes simply floating on the polished surface.  The bowl is highly polished and fired to a great gunmetal coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tonita”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

$ 625.00
White, Elizabeth – Red Clay Jar with Double Corn (1981)

Elizabeth White created distinctive pottery using the various colors of Hopi clay. She originated the use of the ear of corn as a design in repousse (pushed out from the inside) on her pottery. Her pottery is all signed in the clay with her Hopi name Polingaysi, which means, “butterfly sitting among the flowers in the breeze”.  This jar is one of her classic narrow jars with two ears of corn.  The coloration of the clay is the traditional red clay (well, reddish-orange), which is used in Hopi pottery.  The coloration is striking on this larger jar.   The entire piece is stone polished to a high shine except for the two ears of corn which are unpolished matte.  The narrow shape is very much like the jars that her nephew Al Qoyawayma makes which he calls “wish pots”.  He tells the story that the name comes from Elizabeth as she said people would look at the pieces and say, “I wish I could have one”.  This jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Interestingly, Polingaysi was a school teacher and taught at Hopi and  Navajo schools for almost 40 years.  On retirement from teaching, she became an artist, a poet, and a philosopher.  Her career as a potter was begun late in life, after her retirement, so there is very little of her work available.  This jar was originally purchased in 1981.  It is a classic of her work and an important addition to any collection!

$ 1,800.00
Da, Tony – Red Bowl with Avanyu (1971)

This is a classic smaller red bowl by Tony Da.  He had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike. This bowl was originally purchased in 1971.  It is fully polished a deep red and etched with the classic avanyu (water serpent).  Tony would etch the designs into the clay before the piece was fired so that there was a sharpness to the designs.  Note the precision of the horn and the clouds on this piece!   The avanyu is symbolic of the village being saved from a flood by the water serpent.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had, and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

$ 5,000.00
Martinez, Maria –  Bowl with Cloud and Lightning Designs (1920’s), “Marie”

This is a classic bowl by Maria Martinez from 1920-25.  It was made and polished by Maria Martinez and painted by her husband, Julian.  These early pieces are signed, “Marie”, although Julian was painting the designs.  It was not until around 1925 that they began to sign both names to the pottery.   This bowl has a slightly rounded shoulder and the design is painted in the area between the shoulder and the neck.  The pattern is a cloud and lightning design.  The bowl was highly fired to create a near gunmetal (metallic) appearance.  The gunmetal color achieved on these early pieces was from the heat of the firing.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Marie”.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 1,800.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Seedpot with Realistic Deer (1995)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is very intricately designed.  It would seem that it most likely was made, polished and the designs were begun by Camilio and then the designs were finished by his son, Joseph Lonewolf.  While it is signed by Camilio, it would suggest that the piece was already polished.  However, there are indicators that it was finished by Joseph, as he finished several of the pieces which Camilio had in process before he passed.  The deer are all very intricately etched and designed than on any of the piece finished by Camilio from 1990-5.  There is is a large buck with antlers extending over the top of the seedpot. On the opposite side there is another deer with smaller antlers and two does.  The deer are very intricately designed and they are much closer in style to those of Joseph.  As well, there is the number on the bottom, which is precision-etched, and the last letters are JL, which are probably Joseph’s initials as the end of the numbering system. The numbering system used by Camilio was typically much shorter and a bit more stylistic in design.  Overall, the piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Bowl with Grasshopper Medallions (1973)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This bowl is very thin walled and has an indented bottom.  It is fully polished red and etched with a single medallion. There is a Mimbres style grasshopper or cricket as the design.  Not the depth and precision of the matte area behind the insect!  There are rectangular green polished areas surrounding it, which represent the grass.  The use of the green clay slip in 1973 was quite new and a extraordinary addition to native clay colorations at the time.   The remainder of the bowl is fully polished red.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,800.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Feathered Water Serpent Seedpot (1990’s)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This seedpot is from the 1990’s.  It has the yearly symbol of a heart with a cross in it on the back.  On the front is the classic Feathered Water Serpent which was used by Joseph Lonewolf and his family.  Note the intricate detail in the head and the feathers.  There is an additional butterfly etched into the back of the piece.   The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,250.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Mini Seedpot with Flute Players (1986)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This is a very small seedpot and yet it is very fully designed!  The seedpot has two Mimbres style flute players as the design.  They are surrounded by plant and rain designs. There is a butterfly on the opposite side.  The heart medallion is the yearly symbol for 1986.  There is an additional green clay slip used to highlight the designs.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Baca, Angela – Large Melon Bowl with 32 Ribs

This is one of the largest pieces we have had by Angela Baca.  She was famous throughout her career for her melon ribbed pottery.  The form is derived from the melon and squash grown in the area and so there is always an organic style to the shape.  This piece is round and has 32 ribs carved into the clay. The entire surface of the bowl is fully polished, including the space between each of the ribs!.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Angela Baca” and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,375.00
Torivio, Dorothy – Wide Jar with Yucca Leaf Design

This is a classically shaped jar by Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took traditional Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  The shape of the jar has a wide, sharp shoulder and a very tiny neck.  The design is a yucca leaf which extends from the neck to the shoulder and then to the base.  The open space of the white and the contrasting black give the jar a very modern appearance.  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Dorothy Torivio” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,000.00
Medicine Flower, Grace & Camillio Tafoya – Red & Black Jar with Figures & Avanyu (1970’s)

This an unusual collaborative piece by Grace Medicine Flower and her father, Camilio Tafoya.  It is from the early 1970’s and it was fired “black-and-red”.  It is a distinctive firing technique where the piece is covered before the manure is put on to turn it black.  The jar was made by Camilio and polished by Grace. She would then etch the designs into the clay before it was fired.  This piece has a lightly etched avanyu on two sides.  Separating them are two red medallions.  One has a Mudhead Clown figure and the other a Rain Dancer.  There is a striking coloration of the red against the black.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Grace Medicne Flower and Camilio Tafoya”.   The jar is in excellent with no chips,cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 775.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Jar with Feather Pattern and Band Design

This polychrome jar by Blue Corn combines her polished and mica clay slips.  The jar is fully polished tan and then painted with a black clay, a red clay and a micaceous clay band below the shoulder.  The jar was traditionally fired and maybe a bit overfired, as the black areas are lighter in areas and a smoke area can be seen below the shoulder.  The feather pattern is tightly painted and the jar is still striking in appearance and reflect the traditional firing techniques.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.

$ 800.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Jar with Feather Pattern

This is striking polychrome jar by Blue Corn.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This water jar is fully polished tan and then it is painted.  The black is a black clay and the is an additional clay slip.  The jar  has a feather pattern painted along the neck.  Blue Corn used a green clay slip at the tips of the feathers and in the cloud design above.  Interestingly, the body of the jar is all one coloration but as it was traditionally fired outside, the area above the shoulder appears to be a lighter coloration than the base, adding one more visually striking dimension to this piece.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There is one small area of black slip loss and a small air bubble along one feather.  Both can be seen in the same photo.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.

$ 1,200.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Jar with Feather Pattern (1976)

This is a classic polychrome jar by Blue Corn.  It was originally purchased in 1976.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This water jar is fully polished tan and then it is painted.  The black is a black clay and there is an additional red or peach colored clay slip.  The jar has a feather pattern painted along the shoulder and neck.  Around the rim of the jar is a checkerboard pattern.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There are some small areas where the black is lighter.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Blue Corn”.

$ 950.00
Gachupin, Candelaria – Jar with Birds (1976)

Candelaria Gachupin was a granddaughter of noted potter Rosalea Toribio and the daughter of Maria Bridgett. She taught both her daughter Dora Tse-Pe and son-in-law Ralph Aragon to make pottery.  This jar was originally purchased in 1976.   Candelaria was known for her stylized birds, which have long legs and are a visual “signature” to her pottery.  This jar has three sections of birds with plants, separated by a polished red lightning band.  Around the neck is a could pattern.  We do not often see a lot of her pottery but there is certainly a striking appearance to her designs. This jar is signed on the side, “Candelaria Gachupin, Zia Pueblo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the side, “Sofia & Lois Medina”.

$ 450.00
Aguilar, Rosalie -Bowl with  Cloud and Rain Designs

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional plates during their brief career working together.  This is one of their carved pieces. It has the “cameo” style of carving which was typical at San Ildefonso in the 1930’s.  The design is carved around the neck of the piece.  It is a cloud and rain design.  The remainder of the bowl is fully polished.  It was fired a dark black but with additional small gunmetal colored areas from the firing..  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Rosalie + Joe” on the bottom in the clay.

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 475.00
Naha, Helen “Feather Woman – Wide Jar with Bat Wing Design (1970’s)

Helen Naha created distinctive pottery using the white kaolin clay slip throughout her career.  The designs were all painted using bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law, Paqua Naha yet had her own style in form, imagery, and composition. This jar has a wide shoulder and a slight neck.  It is a shape which Helen frequently used on her pottery. The sides are painted with a batwing design which extends down below the shoulder.  Helen would often make the mouth of the vessel large enough so she could get her hand in to polished the inside. The interior of this jar is fully polished.  The bottom has her hallmark “feather”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 975.00
Naha, Helen “Feather Woman – Bowl with Cloud Designs (1978)

Helen Naha created distinctive pottery using the white kaolin clay slip throughout her career.  The designs were all painted using bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law, Paqua Naha yet had her own style in form, imagery, and composition. This bowl was originally purchased in 1978.  It is painted with a cloud pattern around the body of the piece.  Above the clouds and rain is a red clay slip and below are additional colors.  There is a separate band of “stippled” black, which adds another “color” to the bowl.  As with much of Helen’s pottery, the inside is fully polished.  She would try to make the mouth of the vessel large enough so she could get her hand inside to polished the inside.  The bottom has her hallmark “feather”.   It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Juan, Mary – Jar with Wind Designs (1960’s)

Mary Juan was a cousin of noted potter Ida Redbird. She was one of the original members of the 1938 Maricopa Pottery Cooperative. She was part of the early Revival Period artists from 1937-41. She continued to create pottery until the 1960’s. Mary Juan was known for the finely polished deep red slip, graceful shapes, and finely painted designs.  This jar has a wind motif painted around the sides.  There is her signature “wave” pattern around the neck and the jar has a slightly turned out neck. This piece is traditionally handcrafted from native clay with the paddle and anvil method, iron oxide red slip is decorated with black mesquite sap paint and pit fired.  This jar is signed on the bottom, “Mary Juan”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 250.00
Redbird, Ida – Bowl with Indented Sides (1960’s)

Ida Redbird is one of the best known of the potters involved in the revival of Maricopa pottery from 1937-40. She was featured in Arizona Highways in 1948. Her pottery is made using a paddle-and-anvil technique and they are twice fired.  The black designs are derived from a mixture of mesquite sap and cactus spines.  This bowl has indented sides to create an undulating appearance.  There is a sun and cloud design on each of the four sides.    It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Ida Redbird” on the bottom.

$ 350.00
Gutierrez, Helen – Red Bowl with Feather Design (1986)

Helen Gutierrez (1935-1993) was a daughter of Isabel Atencio, a sister of Gilbert Atencio and the mother of Geraldine, Carol, and Rose Gutierrez. She was known for her traditional San Ildefonso pottery.  This bowl is highly polished red.  It is painted with a buff colored clay to create the feather pattern which encircles the piece.  The bowl was traditionally fired red.  The design and style are classic for San Ildefonso.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 425.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Large Carved Bowl Feather Design (1960’s)

This is is a large and classic bowl by Camilio “Sunflower” Tafoya.  He was the father of Grace Medicine Flower and Joseph Lonewolf and the brother of Margaret Tafoya.  While he is known for his miniatures this one of his larger carved bowls from the 1960’s.  The bowl is fully polished and carved with a feather pattern.  The spectacular part of this bowl is the coloration from the firing. It ranges from dark black to areas with brown and even a section that is almost silver in appearance. That coloration is very reminiscent of the firings by his mother, Sara Fina Tafoya.  The brown seems to make it’s own designs as it flows with the black and it certainly creates a much stronger and more fascinating bowl.  It is not often we see his larger carved vessels and rarely with such a great polish and surface.  The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are some light surface scratches.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 1,000.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Mimbres Cricket” Seedpot (1997)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1997.  The piece is entitled, “Mimbres Cricket”.  It includes a signed version of the card which Joseph made for each of his miniatures.  This piece was actually made for our show at the gallery with Joseph and Grace Medicine Flower in 1998.   Joseph wrote partially of this piece:

“Portrayed from a side view is a cricket representative of the Mimbres Period – 10th to 14th centuries.  The cricket – an insect related to the locust and grasshopper, but usually having long antennae – appears to be leaping in mid-air.  Beneath the Mimbres cricket is highly polished red slipwork (Mother Earth) which encompasses the extreme front, partial sides, back side and a portion of the top.”

The butterfly is symbolic of beauty and the the interlocking rings medallion represents the attachment between friends and was the yearly symbol for 1997.  Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  The piece is signed on the bottom and includes the signed artist card.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Anasazi Potter & Butterflies” Seedpot

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from around 2000.  The piece is one of his few black fired pieces.  It is fully eteched with a potter working on painting a piece of pottery.  They are surrounded by several other pieces of finished pottery.  Above the figure are butterflies.  Each butterfly is detailed and has various clay-colored slips.  There is a small butterfly etched into the black along with the yearly symbol.  It is a more complex design, both in the figure and as well as the colors.  It is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,800.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Mini Seedpot Eagle Feather Pattern (1975)

This miniature seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is from 1975. It is etched with a feather pattern around the neck. The area below the design is fully polished red.  It is signed on the bottom “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 175.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Seedpot with Trout, Otter & Skunk (1995)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya is from 1995. It is the last series of pieces he made.  It was fully polished and etched with an otter, trout, and skunk.  There is a simplicity and playfulness to the designs.  The various colors are derived from natural clay slips.  It is signed on the bottom “Camilio Sunflower Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00
Da, Tony – Bowl with Feather Design and Turquoise (1972-3)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike. This bowl is from 1972-3.  It is fully polished red and the design is etched into the clay after firing.  This bowl has two series of eagle feathers etched into the clay.  It was Tony’s modernistic interpretation of the classic feather pattern seen on Maria’s pottery.  Connecting the two sections of the feather there is a triangular design and a single inset piece of turquoise on each side.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

$ 8,000.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Jar with Avanyu (1971)

Joseph Lonewolf began making pottery in 1970-1.  This is a very early piece of his pottery.  It is a more classic shape with a wide shoulder which slopes upward.  The bottom half of the piece is fully polished. The top is etched with a water serpent (avanyu) with a feather pattern, which is the style used by him and his family.  The matte background area is deeply etched swirls up from the shoulder and over the rim.  It must have been exciting in 1971 to see work that was so new and unique at the time!  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,200.00
Torivio, Dorothy – Tall Jar with Butterfly Designs

This is a distinctive shape jar by Acoma potter Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  This shape creates a large surface area for the butterfly designs.  The neck is painted the traditional red coloration, while the remainder is black on white.  The jar captures her “op-art” style with increasing and diminishing sizes of butterfly designs.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom.

$ 2,500.00
Romero, Teresita – Jar with Lightning and Cloud Designs (1960’s)

Teresita Romero is one of the great names in the revival of Cochiti pottery in the 1950-60 era.  She was the grandmother or noted potter Diego Romero and painter Mateo Romero.  Throughout her career she was known for her large vessels and use of traditional iconography in her work.  This jar is a complex piece of her pottery.  The jar has a round body and a slightly turned out neck.  The jar is painted with two bands of designs.  The top band is a cloud motif and the bottom is a lightning and water design.   The black areas are painted with wild spinach and the red with clay slips.  The red clay she used was distinctive for her pottery and had an orangish-red coloration.  The jar is signed on the bottom “Teresita Romero”.   The jar is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 700.00
Naranjo, Christina – 13″ Tall Jar with Carved Avanyu (1970’s)

Christina Naranjo was a daughter of SaraFina Tafoya and a sister of Margaret Tafoya and Camilio Tafoya.  She was known for her classic style carved Santa Clara pottery.  This is definitely the largest piece of her pottery we have had in the gallery.  It is a tall water jar with a long neck.  Around the body of the piece, it is fully carved with a water serpent (avanyu), as the design.  The avanyu encircles the jar in a band of design but note the exceptional complexity of the imagery.  The area clouds and rain and lightning in the pattern and they utilize the normal band but also the negative space.  The long neck is also fully polished.  The style of her carving is certainly significantly different than that of her sister, Margaret Tafoya.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Christina Naranjo”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Christina has a wonderful legacy in the work of her daughters Mary Cain and Teresita Naranjo, as well as her great-granddaughters Tammy Garcia and Autumn Borts.

$ 2,800.00
Shupla, Helen – Sienna Melon Jar with 15 Ribs (1980’s)

Helen Shupla is certainly most famous for her exceptional melon jars.  Her melon jars are the very traditional form with the ribs pushed out in the clay.  This melon jar is one of her classic shapes with the round body and the slight neck.  The neck was a later development in her pottery forms.  Each of the 15 ribs are pushed out into the clay.  She would do this by placing her fingers inside the bowl and pushing against the clay from both the inside and outside!  Can you see the slight angle to each section?  This is how she would turn her hand as she was pushing against the clay to create the separate ribs!  The entire piece is fully polished and fired black and then fired a second time to make it sienna!  This is one of the most difficult techniques to create, but also one of the most striking. The desired coloration is nearly a carmel color and this jar has that amazing coloration.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 3,800.00
Da, Tony – Turtle with Bear Lid (1975-6), Life and Art of Tony Da p. 82

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.   While Tony made turtle shapes for his figurative pottery, he only made only a few turtles with lids.  This turtle is one of his with a fully polished bear lid.  The body of the turtle is fully polished and etched with a water serpent.  For the inside of the turtle when the lid is removed, there is a silver inset.  This was meant to encompass the open space created when he made the round body.  This turtle is signed on the foot in the clay, “DA”.   It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The piece is featured in the book, The Art and Life of Tony Da on page 82.

Tony made several types of turtles. His first ones were simple and did not have a lid.  His first lidded turtle was a black one made in 1971.  It is now in a museum collection.  He made 3 or 4 red turtles with bear lids and silver insets between 1972-4.  He made two other major lidded turtles during his career.  One had a turtle lid and the other a lizard lid.  The turtle with the lizard lid was probably his last turtle figure, as it has the most sculptural appearance and detail of any of his other lids.  At this time, we do not know of any other black lidded turtles beyond the one made in 1971.

This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had, and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

Da, Tony – Red Clay Bear with Turquoise (1970-1)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  Tony began making bears as early as his first show in 1967 at Gallup Ceremonials.  As they evolved they became more sculptural in form.  This bear is an earlier one from around 1970-71.  The bear is fully polished and fired red.   The heartline and the inside of the legs is matte. There are two pieces of turquoise on the back and two for the eyes.  The bear has an incised heartline which is symbolic of the strength of the bear.  The bear is signed on the back foot in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

Tse-Pe & Dora – Black & Sienna Jar with Avanyu (1975)

Tse-Pe Gonzales and his wife, Dora, began working together around 1971.  Dora would make the pottery and Tse-Pe would etch the designs. This jar is an exceptional piece of their pottery.  The jar has a round shoulder which comes to a sharp edge and then up to an elongated neck.  The rim is two-tone black and sienna.  The jar itself is fired to striking gunmetal coloration. The avanyu is etched into the clay around the shoulder and there is a single inset of turquoise for the eye.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay “Tse-Pe and Dora”.    It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Tse-Pe and Dora worked individually from the 1980-2000, but their early collaborative work remains innovative, creative and of the highest quality even compared to many of today’s potters.

$ 1,500.00
Blue Corn – Polychrome Plate with Cloud Designs

This small plate is intricately designed by Blue Corn.  Blue Corn began by making black-on-black pottery but it is her polychrome potter for which she is the most famous.  This plate has a cloud and lightning design painted with a green slip and a prayer feather and rain pattern in brown clay.  It is on a white stone polished surface.  While the plate is small, the design is complex.  It is signed on the back in the clay, “Blue Corn”.  The bowl is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Da, Tony – Gunmetal Jar with Avanyu & Lid (1969)

While the pottery of Tony Da has been well documented, it is still exciting to have a piece with such an exceptional provenance.  This gunmetal fired jar is an early piece of his pottery from 1969, just two years after he began making pottery!   The jar is first featured in the book, “Maria” by Richard Spivey as a full plate (the correct caption is figure 6.25).  It captures the elegance of the shape and the lid.  The second time it is published is in the book, “The Art and Life of Tony Da”.  The shape of the jar reflects Tony having  learned to make pottery from Maria.  It has a round should and an elongated neck.  It is around the shoulder that the water serpent (avanyu) is etched into the clay before the firing. The lid has a long handle and it is formed on the inside so that it fits perfectly on the jar.  The jar was fired by Popovi Da (who fired most of Tony’s gunmetal pottery) and it has a stunning gunmetal appearance.  It is only near the base of the piece that there is more of a black coloration.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Over the course of a career that spanned from 1967-82, Tony helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike.  While he started out as a painter, he made his first pottery in 1967 and it’s first public showing was at Gallup Ceremonials of that year.

Martinez, Maria – Water Jar with Gourd Indentions (1920’s)

This is certainly one of the most unique jars we have had by Maria Martinez.  The jar is from the 1920’s and it was made by Maria Martinez and her husband, Julian.  It is the actual form, with the indented sections around the shoulder, which is so unusual!  Maria is known for her traditional shapes and highly polished surfaces.  In the 1920’s, this long neck style of jar was one of her most classic forms.  The last image in this post shows her working on a jar with indented sides!  It is not a style which she made after the 1920’s and this is one of the first I have seen in person.  However, each indention is fully polished, as is the entire jar. The neck was painted by Julian and there is a cloud pattern and a turned out neck.  The jar was traditionally fired and has a nearly gunmetal appearance.  It is a creative piece of her pottery and an extraordinary part of the history of her pottery.  The jar is signed, “Marie” in the bottom.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are few small surface scratches, but nothing unexpected with the age of the jar.  It is not just exciting but an honor to have such a historically important jar come back into the gallery!

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 4,200.00
Martinez, Maxamiliana “Anna” – Jar with Avanyu (1920’s)

This is one of the more complex painted jar we have had by Maximiliana “Anna” Martinez, who was a sister of Maria Martinez.   It is fully polished and painted with a water seprent (avanyu), encircling the jar. It is the complexity of the avanyu which makes the piece so distinctive.  Note the fine lines and the clouds above the avanyu.  The jar was fired black and has near-gunmetal appearance.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Anna”.   Why is the work of Anna Martinez important? Interestingly, Maria would often say she was the best painter in the family.  She was married to Cresencio Martinez, who was known for his paintings and was also a brother to Tonita Roybal.  One can begin to see how her talent was easily fostered by those around her making a jar like this simply a classic!

Early San Ildefonso Pottery Innovators -1920-1940

$ 1,800.00
Tafoya, Shirley – Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1980)

Shirley Tafoya was the youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her miniature pottery.  This bowl is from 1980.  It is very deeply carved with a water serpent encircling the piece.  The entire surface is fully polished.  Shirley etched the eye and the mouth of the avanyu.  The water serpent is a classic Santa Clara design telling the story of how the avanyu saved the village from a flood.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya”. A classic of Tafoya Family pottery!

$ 1,000.00
Trammel, Jennie –  Tall Jar with Sun and Cloud Design (1980’s)

Stunning!  This is an exceptional jar by Jennie Trammel.   She was a daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  Over the years Jennie did not make a lot of pottery as she lived a very private life and was virtually never involved in markets or gallery shows.  However, she created striking pottery with classic shapes and designs which were distinctive to her work.  Each piece was coil built and it was the carving, with the rounded edges, which was a visual key to her work.  This tall jar has a low shoulder, which gives it lots of space for design.  The central areas is fully carved with three rising sun designs.  They are separated by three cloud motifs descending downward.  Jennie continues to fascinate with her designs, as they are images that few other Santa Clara potters use in their work.  As well, as on this piece, her choice to use three designs instead of four, is more difficult and unusual.  The carving is very deep and the piece is a very deep red.  The background area is matte and the traditional creame colored clay slip. The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a couple of areas of slip loss on the edge of some of the carving, which might have happened at the time of firing and are not unusual in her larger pottery.  The jar is signed, “Jennie Trammel” in the clay on bottom.   Definitely one of her classics!

$ 4,000.00
Tafoya, Margaret & Shirley Tafoya – Bowl with Kiva Step Design (BOF . 113)

Shirley Tafoya was the youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya. They each created distinctive styles of carved pottery.  This is one of the only pieces Margaret made with her daughter, Shirley.  Shirley told me when I was writing “Born of Fire” that Margaret had made the bowl and she asked Shirley to carve a kiva step design into the clay.  Shirley then polished the bowl.  The bowl is highly polished and traditionally fired.  The kiva steps were a significant choice:

“The kiva step pattern is a classic design see on much of Margaret Tafoya’s pottery. That particular design has three steps, representing the kiva where religious ceremonies take place on the Pueblo. From the kitchen window of Margaret’s house, their clan kiva could also be seen while they worked.  Again, the tradition of form and design, of passing on knowledge to the next generation, were all a daily presence in Margaret’s pottery and life”.  Born of Fire, p. 100

This bowl is from the 1980’s and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya, Margaret Tafoya”.  It is an amazing piece of history, culture and Pueblo tradition!  The last photos are one from the book, Born of Fire along with a photo of Margaret and Shirley Tafoya.

$ 3,400.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Wide Jar with Cloud and Step Designs (1970’s) (BOF p. 107)

his is a striking wide shoulder jar by Margaret Tafoya. It is from the 1970’s.  It is an unusual shape for Margaret’s pottery with a wide shoulder and a short neck.  The jar is carved around the shoulder with cloud and step designs.  The carving on this jar is very complex with variation as the jar is turned.  In the book, Born of Fire, it says of this jar:

“This jar from the 1970’s shows the perfect balance of form and design typcial of this period.  The intricate and flowing cloud and step pattern was most likely designed and carved by Alcario [Tafoya]”.  Born of Fire, p. 107

Alcario Tafoya, the husband of Margaret Tafoya, was known for his intricately carved designs. The use of negative space with imagery flowing up from the base lower section and down from the top of the band are indicative of his design style.  Toni Roller said of her father:

“Alcario did help with some of the designs. My dad’s designs are very outstanding. You can tell the difference between my mother’s and my dad’s designs. He did a lot of designs on my mother’s pots. Sorry to say he was never given very much credit for it.” —Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

The jar is highly polished and traditionally fired.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is featured in the book Born of Fire, on p. 107.

$ 8,800.00
Naranjo, Christina & Teresita Naranjo – Jar with Carved Avanyu (1960’s))

This is a striking but unusual collaborative piece by Christina Naranjo and her daughter, Teresita Naranjo.  The jar was made by Christina and is one of her classic round shapes with the slight neck.  It was carved by Teresita with a very deep style of carving.  The jar has a water serpent (avanyu) encircling the piece. Note that there is Teresita’s signature style of negative space carving with the clouds descending from the rim.  The carving on the horn of the avanyu is especially deep, crips and very thin!  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. There are some minor scratches on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Teresita + Christina”.  It is interesting that in over 20 years, I have had several pieces which were signed by both Christina and Mary Cain (another daughter) but this is the first one I have had by Christina and Teresita.  It’s nice to see in a collaborative piece that their individuality in shape (Christina) and carving (Terestia) are so distinctive.  Christina Naranjo was a sister of Margaret Tafoya and Camilio Tafoya, as well as the matriarch of the family of potters including Teresita Naranjo and Tammy Garcia.

$ 1,200.00
Garcia, Sarah – Bowl with Lightning Designs (1970’s)

Sarah Garcia (1928-2015) was born at Laguna Pueblo to Maria Trujillo.  However, she spent her adult life at Acoma Pueblo.  She, along with Jessie Garcia, Lucy M. Lewis, and Marie Z. Chino, were largely responsible for the revival of Anasazi and Tularosa designs on contemporary Acoma vessels.  Her daughter Goldie Hayah continues making pottery.  This is a classic style Acoma jar with very tightly painted designs.  There are lightning and rain patterns encompassing the surface of the bowl. The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Sarah Garcia”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Aguilar, Rosalie & Joe – Plate with Avanyu Designs (1920’s)

Rosalie and Joe Aguilar created some exceptional pottery during brief career working together.  It is often their plates which are the most visually striking and complex of their work.  This plate is a complicated and fascinating design. There are two avanyu heads on either side where the circle is the eye and each has an elongated tongue. They are connected with a water design and the step pattern is the mountain. The “x” design in the center is the turkey track.  The fineline checkerboard areas area exceptionally well painted.  The piece has a very modern appearance with the placement of the imagery yet it is one from the 1920’s.  This plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or  repair.  There are a few light surface scratches.  It is signed on the back, “Rosalie + Joe”.

Click here to read more about the “Early San Ildefonso Innovators”

$ 1,400.00
Lewis, Lucy – Bowl with Heartline Deer (1980’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the past century. This bowl is coil built and painted using bee-weed, a plant.  The design consists of three heartline deer.  This imagery is a classic to both Acoma and Zuni pottery, with the heartline signifying the center or “heart” of the animal.  This bowl is thin walled and delicately painted.  It was traditionally fired so the white has much more of a pearlescent coloration, which creates added depth.  In the 1980’s the surfaces of her pieces were more highly polished, giving them a smoother feel.  The bowl is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,500.00
Tapia, Tom – Bowl with Katsina and Sun Medallions

This is a larger bowl by Tom Tapia.  It is highly polished and designed with four medallions.  One is a Sun, while the others are different katsina figures.  Separating the medallions are kivas with ladders.  Around the base is another katsina figure which encircles the piece and has feather and rain designs.  The bowl was fired black and then the reddish clay coloration is added after the firing.  It is this color combination for which Tom achieved recognition.  The bowl is signed, “Tom Tapia”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Large Rainbow Ridge Water Jar with Bear Paws (1960’s), BOF p. 78

This is a striking large water jar by Margaret Tafoya.   This red water jar is featured on p. 78 of the book, “Born of Fire”. The water jar is from the 1960’s and certainly from a period when Margaret was at the peak of her career.  In 1978 and 1979 she won “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is one of the only artists to ever win twice and then to win in two consecutive years.  This water jar is distinctive and important because of the color (she made fewer red pieces than black), the very classic shape and the bottom.   The shape is a double shoulder water jar with a rainbow ridge.  This is the ridge above the shoulder which is actually pushed out in the clay.  The rim of the jar is slightly turned out and there are four bear paws impressed into the clay before it was polished.  As for the bottom, this comes from a time period when she used one of her mother’s (SaraFina Tafoya) pukis to create the indented base.  Nearly of the pieces with this style of base are classic style water jars, almost as if they are made as an homage to her mother and her legacy.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is definitely a historically important and exceptional jar by this important Santa Clara potter and great to have it published in one of the definitive books on her career.  Toni Roller said of the bear paw design.

“The story behind the bear paw, according to my grandmother, she said that our ancestors came from Puye, from the cliffs. One time when the people were living up there, there was a drought so bad they couldn’t grow anything. They were so worried. They wondered why the bear was well fed and not thin like they are. So they tracked the bear, and the bear led them to the Rio Grande. The reason we put the bear paw on the pots is to honor the bear that saved the people, the ancestors that came to Santa Clara from Puye. That’s why now most of the Indian people live along the Rio Grande. The bear saved all our ancestors.”  Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

$ 24,000.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Large Wedding Vase with Avanyu (1950’s)

This is a large wedding vase by Margaret Tafoya.  It is from the 1950’s.  The design is a water serpent and it is very deeply carved into the clay.  There is an unusual cloud pattern above the head of the water serpent, and another cloud pattern on the reverse of the bowl.  It is this style of carving which is more usually seen on the work of the late 1950’s.  The shape of the vase is rounder with the extended spouts.  The entire surface of the wedding vase is fully polished.  The style and complexity of the carving, also suggest that it was probably designed by Margaret’s husband, Alcario Tafoya.  Toni Roller said of her father’s designs:

“Alcario did help with some of the designs. His are bold designs. My dad’s designs are very outstanding. You can tell the difference between my mother’s and my dad’s designs. He did a lot of designs on my mother’s pots. Sorry to say he was never given very much credit for it.” —Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

The wedding vase is signed, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are surface scratches which are expected on pieces from this period, but no structural issues.

$ 14,500.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Bowl with Antelope Medallions (1973)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This bowl is very thin walled and has an indented bottom.  It is fully polished red and there are three medallions.  Each medallion has an antelope as the design.  The antelope are etched into the clay before firing.  The border of each medallion is polished green.  Joseph was one of the first potters to begin using clays that were not red and this is a very early example of his green clay slip.  The remainder of the bowl is fully polished red.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 2,200.00
Da, Tony – Red Jar with Avanyu (1972-3)

Tony Da had a short career which spanned from 1967-82.  He helped change the world of Pueblo pottery.   He was among the first to begin etching into the surface of the pottery (sgraffito), adding stones, hei-shi and then began creating all matte carved vessels.  His pottery today is considered to be among the most sought after by collectors and museum alike. This jar with a slightly elongated neck is from 1972-3.  It is a period when the red clay slip was a bit deeper red in coloration.  This bowl is fully polished and has a water serpent (avanyu) as the design. The avanyu is etched into the clay and note the sharpness of the horn. The avanyu is symbolic of the village being saved from a flood by the water serpent.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “DA”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is certainly a classic style of Tony’s pottery and even an early piece like this bowl reflects the impact he had, and continues to have, on Pueblo pottery.  The pottery of Tony Da remains an important addition to any collection!

$ 9,800.00
Youngblood, Mela  – Tall Water Jar with Carved Avanyu (1972) with Ribbon

This is one of the largest pieces we have seen by Mela Youngblood.  She began making pottery in the late 1960’s and quickly achieved a distinctive style for her work.  Each piece of her work very highly polished and when carved the edges are distinctly rounded.  This jar has a carved avanyu encircling the piece. Mela’s carving is distinctive with rounded edges to her carving.  The avanyu here is deeply carved and the entire jar is fully polished.  It is a stunning piece not just for the size, but also for the polishing and carving.  The jar won a blue ribbon at the 1972 Gallup Intertribal Ceremonials.  Mela’s name is on the ribbon and it is on the last two photos.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mela Youngblood”.  It is certainly a rarity with great provenance and an important piece of Tafoya family history!

$ 5,500.00
Tafoya, Margaret & Mela Youngblood – Weddding Vase (1976)

Margaret Tafoya and her daughter, Mela Youngblood, made some pottery together in the 1970’s.  Typically, Margaret would make the piece and then it would be carved by either Mela or Alcario Tafoya (Margaret’s husband).  Some of the collaborative pieces I have seen were signed by all three.  This wedding vase is just signed by Mela and Margaret. The wedding vase is definitely Margaret’s shape. The carving has a mesa and lightning on one side and a mountain pattern on the other.  The carving design was done by Mela on this piece, as was the polishing.  It’s a striking piece and an interesting piece of history!  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya, Mela Youngblood”

$ 2,400.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Tall Double Shoulder Water Jar (1960’s)

This is a striking fully polished water jar by Margaret Tafoya. It is from the 1960’s.  It is an elegant shape with a long neck and a “double shoulder”.  The double shoulder was also called a “rainbow ridge” by Margaret and her mother, Sarafina Tafoya. It adds to the difficulty of a piece as the second ridge requires the potters to create a rise from the shoulder to a second shoulder to the neck.  The jar is stone polished all at one time and then fired to a deep black.  It is from the 1960’s and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  This shape and size is definitely a classic of her work!

“She [Margaret Tafoya] made water jars sitting outside the adobe house, and they would never crack on her.  There’s a rainbow band on the shoulder. She would sit on the floor with her legs straight out and make the pots that way. Today we stand up and make our pots.”  LuAnn Tafoya and Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

$ 14,500.00
Youngblood, Mela  – Kiva Bowl (1970’s)

Mela Youngblood began making pottery in the late 1960’s and quickly achieved a distinctive style for her work.  Each piece of her work very highly polished and when carved the edges are distinctly rounded.  This bowl is a very classic style of Kiva Bowl.  This bowl is fully polished on the inside and outside. The bowl has the “kiva” three-step form on the sides.  The holes in the kiva step areas were traditionally included so that eagle feathers could be placed in them. Mela made few of these during her career. The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The highly stone polished surface is striking!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,500.00
Ebelacker, Virginia – Jar with Carved Mountain Designs (1970’s)

Virginia Ebelacker was the first daughter of noted potter Margaret Tafoya.  She was known for large sized pottery as well as her deeply carved designs.  This jar is a very classic shape with a carved band around the center. The designs are mountain and lightning patterns. The jar is deeply carved and highly polished. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Her sons Richard and James were both known for their distinctive large pottery and today her grandson, Jason, is also creating exceptional pottery.

$ 1,500.00
Lewis, Lucy – Jar with Double Star Pattern (1970’s)

Lucy Lewis is one of the great Matriarch potters of the 1900’s.  She was an important revivalist of Acoma pottery throughout her career. This jar is coil built and painted with a fine-line star pattern. There are two different star patterns on the bowl, one with four points and one with eight points.  Lucy would paint her pieces with bee-weed for the black and each piece was traditionally fired outdoors.  This bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lucy M. Lewis”.

$ 775.00
Naha, Helen “Feather Woman” – Large Awatovi Star Design Jar

This is a classic wide shoulder jar by Helen Naha, also known as “Feather Woman”.  She created distinctive pottery using the white clay slip throughout her career.  The designs were all painted using bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law, Paqua Naha yet had her own style in form, imagery, and composition.  Helen is known for her revival of the pre-historic Awatovi pottery.   Awatovi is one of the ruins near Hopi where a white slipped style of pottery was made.  It is a fascinating place as it was where Coronado made contact with the Hopi in 1540.  During the excavations in the 1930’s the whiteware pottery was rediscovered.  It was the imagery from his work which inspired much of Helen’s early pottery, as opposed the more classic Sikyatki inspired pottery of Nampeyo.  This jar has the “Awatovi Star” pattern painted on the top and the bottom.  The shape of the jar has a more open mouth, which reveals more of the painted imagery when viewing from the side.  Just above the shoulder is her “eternity band” design.  The inside of the bowl is also polished, which Helen tried to do on most of her pottery when she could reach her hand inside.  The jar has been traditionally fired and there is some variation to the color with the fired cloud, which certainly adds to the beauty of the piece.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom with her hallmark feather.

$ 2,800.00
Medina, Sofia & Lois Medina – Four Color Jar with Deer & Birds

Sofia Medina and her daughter Lois Medina were known for traditional style of Zia pottery.  Each piece was coil built, painted with native clays and native fired.  This is jar is exception in the form and the painting.  The jar is painted on two sections with a rainbow design and below the rainbow is a deer. The rainbow and the deer are polished with two different colored clays.  Note the leaves over the back of the deer and there are two different colors of clay in each leaf!  The area around the deer has thinly painted lines.  Separating the deer are two sections of large birds.  Each bird is surrounded by plant designs along with cloud patterns. Did you know that Zia potters use basalt as their temper for the clay, which gives these pieces their stability but also weight.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the side, “Sofia & Lois Medina”.  Not just a classic piece of their pottery, but outstanding in size, design and color as well!

$ 2,200.00
Adams, Sadie – Jar with Cloud and Rain Designs

This is a small jar by Sadie Adams. It is fully polished on the inside and outside. The design is a classic Sikyatki inspired rain and cloud pattern.  It is painted with bee-weed  (black) and two sections of polished red.  The jar is signed on the bottom with her hallmark flower.  It is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There is some fugitive black areas.

$ 200.00
Torivio, Dorothy -Long Neck Jar with Butterfly Design

This is a classic long neck shaped jar by Dorothy Torivio.  She was among the first to utilize and then refine the “op-art” style in her Acoma pottery. She took classic Acoma patterns and then repeated them on a vessel, ranging the size from small to large and then small again, in accordance with the shape of the vessel.  The shape of the jar is one which Dorothy created to emphasize her painted designs.  The long neck has a butterfly pattern which is repeated in smaller and then larger sizes.  The precision and tight painting on the neck is exceptional!  The jar is signed on the bottom, “Dorothy Torivio” and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,650.00
Gutierrez, Lela & Luther – Polychrome Thunderbird Open Bowl (1956-66)

Lela Gutierrez began making pottery in the 1930’s with her husband, Van Gutierrez.  After Van passed away in 1956 she continued to make pottery with her son, Luther Gutierrez.  She would make the pieces and Luther would paint the designs.  They worked together for only 10 years from 1956 to 1966.  This open bowl is fully painted on the inside.  There is a thunderbird in the center and a star pattern.  On the inside rim of the bowl are alternating sun and lizard designs.  All the various colors are derived from natural clay slips and painted onto the piece before it was fired.  It is signed on the bottom, “Lela/Luther”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Gonzales, Rose – Red Canteen with Ribbon (1965)

This canteen is a classic piece by San Ildefono potter Rose Gonzales.  She is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This canteen is her classic shape for this form.  It is fully polished red with no design.  It still has the original leather strap and wood stopper!  The canteen won a second place at the 1965 Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonials.  The piece is signed on the back in the clay, “Rose”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,100.00
Gonzales, Rose – Wide Bowl with Rain and Cloud Designs

Rose Gonzales is often considered the first at San Ildefonso Pueblo to make carved pottery. However, over the course of her career she created a variety of styles including plainware, painted and carved pottery.  This wide bowl is deeply carved with her classic style of rounded edge carving.  The design is a series of cloud and rain patterns which flow through the negative space of the shoulder of the bowl.  The bowl is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed, “Rose” on the bottom in the clay.

$ 800.00
Nampeyo, Priscilla Namingha – Migration Design Jar (1970’s)

This is an exceptional jar by Priscialla Namingha Nampeyo.  She was a great-granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano and granddaughter of Annie Healing,  She was also a sister of Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo. Priscilla was the matriarch of a family of renown potters, including Rachel, Bonnie, Nyla and Jean Sahmie.  Priscilla began making pottery when she was only seven years old, under the guidance of Nampeyo of Hano. This jar is thin walled and painted with the classic migration pattern.  It is one of those pieces that captures the essence of her pottery skill with very thin lines and a design which matches the shape.  Priscilla was known for her traditional work and this jar is simply one of her best.  It was traditionally fired and so it has blushes across the surface.  It is signed on the bottom “Priscilla Namingha Nampeyo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 950.00
Tafoya, Camilio – “Wild Turkeys” Seedpot (1989)

This seedpot by Camilio Tafoya reflects the interesting connection of the wild turkey and Pueblo culture. There are turkey clans and most importantly, the turkey feathers are used in numerous Pueblo dances.  They are a critical part of the cultural and spiritual activities in most pueblos.  Interestingly, they have been important for quite a while in Pueblo life.

“The ancient Pueblo people shifted from making blankets of rabbit fur to using turkey feathers. One blanket could require 12,000 feathers, which could be taken as the birds molted.  The blankets helped ward off the high-altitude chill of Mesa Verde, but the turkeys also “must have had some symbolic importance,” said Lipe. “That continues all the way through to the present. Turkey feathers are still ritually quite important among Pueblo people.”   Eric Sorensen

You might also check out the “Turkey Girl” story as presented by Juan de la Cruz on the Camilio Tafoya bronze listing.  This seedpot has a male and female turkey on either side of the seedpot. They are etched into the clay and highlighted with colored clays.  The top of the seedpot has a cloud pattern and a rain pattern. The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Camilio”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 500.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – “Standing Fawn & Butterflies” Seedpot (1989)

This seedpot by Joseph Lonewolf is from 1989.  The piece is coil built and stone polished. The design is etched into the clay.  There is a single standing fawn on one side surrounded by a blue clay slip.  Surrounding the fawn are 20 small butterflies also highlighted in blue. On the back is a doe and her fawn lightly etched into the clay. They are surrounded by more very tiny etched butterflies! Near the base is the 1989 yearly symbol, an ankh, an ancient Egyptian symbol of life.  Each year Joseph would create a new “yearly symbol” and use it to “date” his pieces for that year.  Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  The piece is signed on the bottom.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 4,200.00
Tafoya, Agapita – Jar with Carved Cloud and Feather Designs (1950’s)

Agapita Tafoya was the wife of noted potter Camilio Tafoya and the mother of Grace Medicine Flower and Joseph Lonewolf. Agapita created most of her pottery from the 1930’s to the early 1950’s. This jar is from the 1950’s and it is deeply carved and stone polished. The design is a cloud pattern extending down from the neck and a prayer feather pattern extending up from the base.  The piece is fully polished and fired red.  The recessed area has a cream colored slip which was used for contrast with the red clay slip.  The jar is in good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Agapita Tafoya”.

$ 350.00
Dunlap, Carmelita – Wide Shoulder Jar with Rain Patterns (1979)

Carmelita Dunlap is one of the San Ildefono potters best known for her large vessels.  This jar is smaller for her work, but highly polished and tightly painted. The design is a series of rain and prayer feathers patterns.  The feather patterns vary as the jar is turned.  The jar itself is highly polished and fired a brown-black coloration.  It is this distinctive coloration for which she was best known. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Carmelita Dunlap”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a smaller classic of her work!

$ 800.00
Lonewolf, Joseph – Grizzly Cubs & Butterflies Seedpot (1984)

Beginning in the early 1970’s, Joseph Lonewolf revolutionized the world of Santa Clara pottery by incorporating his sgraffito (lightly etching the surface of the clay) and incised (more deeply cut into the clay) designs.  This seedpot is from 1984.  It has two grizzly bear cubs, each etched into the clay in great detail.  Each of the cubs is entranced with the butterflies.  What is so exceptional on this piece is not just the bears and the interaction with the butterflies, but the filigree style etching work surrounding them.  The plants and the feather patterns flow around the piece in a delicate stylistic manner.  It’s always difficult with his work to imagine that Joseph etched the designs into the clay!  There is an additional white clay slip used along with a red clay slip.   The back of the piece has a medallion with a rainbow, which is the yearly symbol for 1984.  The precision of the designs and the shine of the polished surface create a perfect balance.  This piece is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,800.00
Naha, Helen “Feather Woman – Water Jar with Bat Wing Design (1970’s)

Helen Naha created distinctive pottery using the white kaolin clay slip throughout her career.  The designs were all painted using bee-weed (black) and natural clay slips.  She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law, Paqua Naha yet had her own style in form, imagery, and composition. This jar has a wonderful shape with a low shoulder and slightly turned out rim.  The design is the classic batwing pattern which extends down below the shoulder.  The bottom has her hallmark “feather”.  It is really wonderful to note her attention to the little details and that even the entire inside of the jar is fully polished! Note the wonderful bold lines of Helen’s painting!  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,800.00
Tahbo, Dianna – Jar with Bird Tail Designs (2001)

Diana Tahbo was known for her tightly painted pottery and especially her beautiful miniatures.  This tall jar is vertically polished and then painted.  The design has bird tails in two sections and bird wings in two others.  The jar was traditionally fired, which created the blushes on the surface.  The interesting thing about when she vertically polished her pottery (as well as when Mark did the same thing) is that the lines of the polishing are visible after the firing.  It adds one more layer of depth to the piece.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 575.00
Martinez, Santana & Adam – Plate with Seed Designs (1970’s)

This is a classic designed plate by Santana and Adam Martinez.  Adam was the youngest son of Maria Martinez, and Santana painted Maria’s pottery in the 1940-50’s. The plate is stone polished and it is painted with a mountain and seed design.  It was fired a deep black coloration.  The plate is signed on the back in the clay, “Santana + Adam”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Definitely a classic piece!

$ 500.00
Chino, Rose – Jar with Birds (1980’s)

Rose Chino was a daughter of noted potter Marie Z. Chino. This jar is a more classic style of shape with the high shoulder.  It is painted with four birds (maybe quail) encircling the piece.  They are painted with bee-weed and the jar was traditionally fired.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Rose Chino”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00
Nampeyo, Nellie – Wide Bowl with Eagle Tail Designs

Nellie Nampeyo Douma was the second daughter of Nampeyo of Hano and a sister of Fannie Nampeyo and Annie Nampeyo.  This small bowl is coil built and painted with bee-weed for the black.  The design is an eagle tail design which has a very tightly painted appearance.  The design is repeated four times around the bowl.  It is traditionally fired with some blushes on the surface.  It is signed on the bottom, “Nellie Nampeyo”.  It is in good condition with no cracks, restoration or repair. There is a small inclusion on the side, which appears to be pre-firing.

$ 400.00
Garcia, Tina – Kiva Bowl

Tina Garcia was well known for her use of traditional shapes in her pottery.  This is a very traditional shaped bowl with the sharp shoulder and the kiva step design carved on the rim.  The steps represent the steps into the kiva ceremonial space.  The bowl is fully polished and fired a deep black. It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Tina Garcia”  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 900.00
Shupla, Helen – Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1970’s)

Helen Shupla was famous for her carved pottery as well as her exceptional melon jars.  This bowl is carved with a water serpent (avanyu) as the design.  Helen’s husband Kenneth Shupla, would often help her with the carving on the pottery.  Note the complexity of her designs and how the tail extends up over the head of the avanyu!  The bowl is highly polished and it is signed on the bottom, “Helen Shupla”  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 400.00
Martinez, Maria – Small “Fish” Plate (Maria + Popovi,1956-9)

This is a classic black plate by Maria Martinez and her son, Popovi Da. Maria made and polished the plate while it was painted by her son, Popovi Da  (1923-1971). The plate is highly polished and is one of his few pieces which has an animal motif.  This plate has a fish as the central design.  Fish were among the most common animal designs used by Popovi on his plates.  Popovi Da was an accomplished painter in the San Ildefonso two-dimensional style and this plate captures that style of his art.  The fish is beautifully painted to capture a sense of motion and fill the entire space.  It was only from 1956-9  that Popovi painted these pieces, which are among the most sought after and best of his career!   It is  signed on the back in the clay, “Maria Popovi“. The signature indicates that it was made around 1956-9.   The plate is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

To learn more about Maria’s signatures, click here.

$ 5,800.00
Tafoya, Camilio – Seedpot with Fish & Bird (1982)

The is among the most refined incised pieces we have seen by Camilio Tafoya. The seedpot is incised on one side with a fish and the other a bird. They are separated by a leaf pattern.  The entire piece is very highly polished and the additional colored clay slips create a striking visual complement to the shine.  The seedpot is from 1982 and it is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 600.00
Nampeyo, Priscilla Namingha – Large Eagle Tail Bowl (1990’s)

Priscilla Namingha Nampeyo was a great-granddaughter of Nampeyo of Hano and granddaughter of Annie Healing,  She was also a sister of  Dextra Quotskuyva Nampeyo. Priscilla was the matriarch of a family of renown potters, including Rachel, Bonnie, Nyla and Jean Sahmie.  Priscilla began making pottery when she was only seven years old, under the guidance of Nampeyo of Hano. This large bowl is a classic of her style.  It is thin walled and painted with the classic “eagle tail” pattern, which was made famous by Nampeyo.  The top section is slipped with red clay while the design itself is painted with bee-weed (a plant) for the black. Each of the four eagle tails extends down over the shoulder and are surrounded by the bird wings.  The bowl was traditionally fired, so there are striking blushes on the surface.  Priscilla was known for her traditional designs along with the tightly painted designs.  The bowl is signed on the bottom “Priscilla Namingha Nampeyo”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is nice to see such a large and classic designed piece of her work in the gallery!

$ 3,200.00
Coriz, Arthur & Hilda  – Large Bowl with Plant Designs (1980’s)

This is very large bowl by Arthur and Hilda Coriz.  Hilda would coil build each piece and then they would be painted by Arthur. The painting was done with natural clay slips (white and red) and then wild spinach (black).  This striking large jar is painted with a classic Kewa (Santo Domingo) plant design encircling the piece.  Arthur alternated the direction the plants, giving the jar a more dramatic appearance.  The lower section is polished red and note on the base that the initial coils seem visible.  There is a “spirit line” or break in the painted design on the rim, which then extends down through the entire design!  This goes back to historic Kewa pottery when the artist would use the spirit line to release their spirit or connection from the vessel.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay. The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is not often that we see their pottery and especially with the use of such classic designs!

 

$ 1,850.00
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