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Joel McHorse and Christine McHorse, 2014

Joel McHorse and Christine McHorse, 2014

Joel McHorse is a son of noted potter Christine McHorse. He learned to make pottery from his mother and began making pottery in the 1990's. His early work was a combination of traditional Navajo shapes and incised designs along with his own distinctive silver work that he used as finials on the lids. He took nearly a decade away from the clay to become an architect. Joel said of his early work, "The successes of form and composition that I see in my pottery I try to utilized in my architecture." The opposite could be said today as the success of his architectural career has created a new direction in his work in the clay and especially in silver. Joel's pottery can be found in museums such as the IAIA Museum, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts/Peabody Essex and the Heard Museum. His work is unique and timely and definitely a potter to watch!

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McHorse, Joel — “Hindsight” Bowl with Lid

This bowl is made of micaceous clay and reduction fired.  The lid fits perfectly and it is surmounted by silver finial which Joel has made.  Amazingly, he is as much a jeweler as a potter and an architect!  This bowl is called, “Hindsight” and the shape of the silver piece captures the name perfectly!  The silver piece is made from the lost wax method in which he carves out the shape in wax and then casts it in silver.  It is attached using padded screws so that it will not damage the clay.  The shape and motion of the silver work creates a very organic appearance in combination with the simplicity and sparkle of the black fired micaceous clay.  Joel’s pottery can be found in museums such as the IAIA Museum, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts/Peabody Essex and the Heard Museum.  His work is unique and timely and definitely a potter to watch!

$ 3,200.00
McHorse, Joel — “Symphony” Mica Bowl w/ Silver Lid

This bowl is made of micaceous clay and reduction fired.  The lid fits perfectly and it is surmounted by silver finial which Joel has made.  Amazingly, he is as much a jeweler as a potter and an architect!  This bowl is called, “Symphony” and the finial for the lid is silver and made from the lost wax method.  The silver is attached to the lid using padded screws so that it will not damage the clay.  The shape and motion of the silver work creates a dynamic sense of motion especially in combination with the simplicity and sparkle of the black fired micaceous clay.  Joel’s pottery can be found in museums such as the IAIA Museum, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts/Peabody Essex and the Heard Museum.  His work is unique and timely and definitely a potter to watch!

$ 8,800.00
McHorse, Joel — “Deconstruction” Mica Bowl w/ Silver Lid

This bowl by Joel McHorse is made of micaceous clay and reduction fired.  The lid fits perfectly and it is surmounted by silver finial which Joel has made.  Amazingly, he is as much a jeweler as a potter and an architect!  This bowl is called, “Deconstruction” and the finial for the lid is silver and made from the lost wax method.  The silver is attached to the lid using padded screws so that it will not damage the clay.  The lid on this piece is oxidized sterling silver with a textured feel.  The shape brings to mind traditional handles on lidded clay pots.  Joel’s pottery can be found in museums such as the IAIA Museum, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts/Peabody Essex and the Heard Museum.  His work is unique and timely and definitely a potter to watch!

$ 3,800.00
McHorse, Joel — “Silver Flower” Lidded Jar

Joel learned to make pottery from his mother, Christine McHorse.  His early work was a combination of traditional Navajo shapes and incised designs along this his own distinctive silver work that he used an finials on the lids. This is a classic jar with a perfectly fit lid made from micaceous clay and reduction fired.  The silver pieces for the lid are created using the lost wax method of casting. There are three vertical infinity symbols which are soldered together to create the flower design.  It is a brilliant use of various designs to create a new form!  The petal/flower motif as well works in balance with the shape of the jar  and the coloration from the firing.  There is an architectural appearance to them and a somewhat art-deco feel in their connection to the vessel itself.  Not surprisingly Joel is as much an architect as a potter.  He took nearly a decade away from the clay to become an architect.  Joel said of his early work, “The successes of form and composition that I see in my pottery I try to utilized in my architecture.”  The opposite could be said today as the success of his architectural career have created a new direction in his work in the clay and especially in silver.

$ 3,600.00
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