Loading the content... Loading depends on your connection speed!

Scottsdale 480.481.0187 | Santa Fe 480.440.3912
kgs@kinggalleries.com
Shopping Cart - $ 0.00

No products in the cart.

Sylvia Naha

Sylvia Naha Sylvia Naha was a daughter of noted potter Helen Naha, (Featherwoman) and the granddaughter of Paqua Naha. Paqua was the first (Frog Woman.)  Sylvia's sisters are noted Pueblo potters Rainy Naha and Burell Naha. Sylvia created pieces with the white clay polished surface painted with bee-weed (black) and native clay slips. Her work is all traditionally hand coiled and fired.  Throughout the 1980's, Sylvia was considered among the most innovative of the Hopi potters. Her pieces were classic in form and amazingly intricate in design. Her pottery is signed on the bottom with a feather and an "S" for Sylvia. Sylvia had won numerous awards for her work at Santa Fe Indian Markets, the Heard Indian Markets, among other events.  We are always pleased to come upon one of her works at King Galleries and to work closely with the talented Naha family.   Please check our new additions regularly if you are interested in acquiring a piece.  You can always telephone to see what collections we have upcoming.

Showing all 2 results

grid
list
Naha, Sylvia – Seedpot with Corn, Lizard and Awatovi Star Design

Sylvia Naha created pieces with the white clay polished surface painted with bee-weed (black) and native clay slips.  Throughout the 1980’s, Sylvia was considered among the most innovative of the Hopi potters.  Her pieces were classic in form and amazingly intricate in design.  This seedpot has two of her classic designs on the top:  A lizard and a corn plant.  The lizard is painted with a series of triangular geometrics.  Opposite the lizard is a corn plant.  Corn has a strong symbolism for prosperity and abundance.  The bottom half is fully painted with the black-on-white Awatovi Star.  Awatovi is one of the ruins near Hopi where a white slipped style of pottery was made.  It is a fascinating place as it was where Coronado made contact with the Hopi in 1540.  During the excavations in the 1930s, the whiteware pottery was rediscovered.  It was the imagery from his work which inspired much of Helen Naha’s (Sylvia’s mother) early pottery, as opposed to the more classic Sikyatki inspired pottery of Nampeyo of Hano.  The bottom of the seedpot is signed with a feather and an “S”.  The piece is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 300.00
Naha, Sylvia – Seedpot with Star and Flower Design

This miniature seedpot is an exceptionally intricate piece by Sylvia Naha.  She was a daughter of Helen “Featherwoman” Naha and a sister of Rainy and Burell Naha.  She was known for her distinctive pieces painted with intricate designs on a white polished clay surface.  Throughout the 1980s, Sylvia was considered among the most innovative of the Hopi potters.  Her pieces were classic in form and amazingly intricate in design.  This seedpot has a star pattern on the top and bottom of the piece.  On the sides are four flower patterns.  The center of each flower is very detailed with a fine-line hatchwork pattern.  There is an additional tan clay slip which is painted on the stars.  The black on the painting is from Bee-Weed (a plant) and the other colors are natural clay slips.  The seedpot is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The jar is signed on the bottom with a feather and an “S”. 

$ 300.00
Mobile version: Enabled