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Works in clay by four generations of the Tafoya Family. July 24-28, 2018 at King Galleries Santa Fe. New pottery will be posted online each day.

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Tafoya, Shirley – Wide Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1990’s)

Shirley Tafoya was the youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her miniature pottery.  This bowl is from the 1990’s.  It is very deeply carved with a water serpent encircling the piece.   The entire surface is fully polished and the top rim of the bowl is matte.  Shirley etched the eye and the mouth of the avanyu.  The water serpent is a classic Santa Clara design telling the story of how the avanyu saved the village from a flood.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya”. A classic of Tafoya Family pottery!

$ 1,200.00
Tafoya, LuAnn – Mini Red 12 Rib Melon Jar

known for her large, highly polished pottery.  This jar is carved with twelve vertical melon ribs.  The entire piece is fully polished and fired a deep red coloration.  LuAnn said of her melon bowls:

“I’ve made just a few melon bowls. I would make a bowl and carve the melon ribs on there. They are difficult to make but pretty.”  LuAnn Tafoya, Spoken Through Clay

The coloration is beautiful and the shape of his piece is a great example of her skill, creativity, and commitment to traditional Santa Clara pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 475.00
Tafoya, LuAnn – Mini Red Jar with Avanyu

This is another classic miniature from LuAnn Tafoya.  She is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her large, highly polished pottery.  This jar is a classic shape for Santa Clara pottery with the sloping sides.  It is deeply carved with a water serpent encircling the piece.  The water serpent (avanyu) is part of a story where it saves the village from a flood.  That is why as the jar is turned the body of the avanyu consists of cloud and rain pattern.  However, that also gives the jar a distinctive appearance as it is turned beyond just the one design.  The jar is very highly polished and traditionally fired.  The color is a striking deep red.  The recessed area surrounding the carving is filled in using a white or cream-colored clay.  This creates a striking visual contrast between the tan and red areas.  The coloration is beautiful and the shape of his piece is a great example of her skill, creativity, and commitment to traditional Santa Clara pottery.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 625.00
Tafoya, Margaret, Toni Roller & Charles Lewis – Bowl with Rain and Mountain Designs

This is one of the few triple signature pieces by Margaret Tafoya.  The bowl was made by Margaret Tafoya, designed and carved by her great-grandson Charles Roller Lewis and polished by her daughter Toni Roller.  It was made in the 1990’s.  The bowl is one of Margaret’s classic shapes.  The designs are a mountain, cloud and rain pattern which are deeply carved into the bowl.  It is highly polished and traditionally fired black.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya, Toni Roller, Charles Lewis”.  It is definitely a fascinating piece of history!

$ 2,200.00
Tafoya, Shirley – Jar with Melon Swirl Neck

Shirley Tafoya was the youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her miniature pottery.  This jar is from the late 1990’s.  It is a classic Santa Clara water jar shape. The rim is fluted and the neck is carved with an old-style melon swirl design.  Shirley would often use historic pieces as inspiration for her pottery.  The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya”. A classic of Tafoya Family pottery!

$ 800.00
Youngblood, Christopher – Square Box with Four Melon Rib Designs

Christopher Youngblood creates intricately carved vessels which reflect a perfect balance of matte and polished surfaces with intricately carved designs.   This box is square in shape. Creating boxes is always technically difficult as the flat sides can easily crack during drying or firing.  This piece is fully carved on the outside and the inside of the box has a micaceous clay slip. The side of the box has four different styles of melon ribs.  Each goes a different direction or has a variation in the swirl but they each flow seamlessly into the next side!  Carving and the polishing to create this seamless flow is difficult but the results are striking.  The lid has additional melon ribs extending down on both sides.  The piece was traditionally fired (see the last two photos) inside a metal box to keep out smoke and create a more consistent coloration. The result, however, is a striking coloration to the red and the contrasting matte surface.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  I’m pleased that I have been working with Chris since 2010 when I wrote the first article on him for Native People’s magazine.  It is exciting to see how his work has progressed over the years and the awards for his pottery, including the 2104 “Best of Pottery” at Santa Fe Indian Market.  He was featured in the book, Spoken Through Clay, and continues to be one of the leading young potters working today.

$ 6,800.00
Youngblood, Christopher – Elongated Box with Avanyu & Avanyu Lid

Christopher Youngblood creates intricately carved vessels which reflect a perfect balance of matte and polished surfaces with intricately carved designs.   This box is rectangular in shape. Creating boxes is always technically difficult as the flat sides can easily crack during drying or firing.  This piece is fully carved on the outside and the inside of the box has a micaceous clay slip. The side of the box has two avanyu encircling the piece.  The body of each avanyu consists of rain and lightning designs. The Avanyu, or water serpent, is a design often seen in Santa Clara Pueblo pottery and is part of a story where the avanyu saves the village from a flood.  The lid is as exceptional as the box, as it is flat and fully carved.  The sides of the finial each have a water serpent as the design.  The flat part of the lid has swirling water designs.  Note the smooth matte areas in contrast to the highly polished relief areas.  The last photos are of the bowl being traditionally fired black. It is signed on the bottom in the clay.  I’m pleased that I have been working with Chris since 2010 when I wrote the first article on him for Native People’s magazine.  It is exciting to see how his work has progressed over the years and the awards for his pottery, including the 2104 “Best of Pottery” at Santa Fe Indian Market.  He was featured in the book, Spoken Through Clay, and continues to be one of the leading young potters working today.

$ 6,500.00
Tafoya, LuAnn – Storage Jar with Bear Paws

LuAnn Tafoya is known for her highly polished traditional Santa Clara pottery.  This is a stunning large black storage jar.  A storage jar is a particular shape in Santa Clara Pueblo pottery which usually has a round shape and a short neck.  This piece is a classic shape with a very round form and just a slight indention before the neck.  There are four bear paws on the piece.  They are impressed into the clay and then the entire piece is fully polished.  Did  you know that the whole piece has to be polished at one time?  Otherwise, the clay slip will dry and it won’t be as shiny in appearance.  LuAnn said of her water jars:

“Sometimes the shape depends on how the clay is drying. Sometimes you have to bring it in right away. It is OK you can make it wider and then come in. I think for the first storage jar I used the puki given to my mom from my grandmother. It was narrow at the bottom. They made the base so the puki was just thin. We had to wire it to keep it attached. Later I made a new one with that form so I could have it for the future. It’s a nice shape going up from the bottom.”  LuAnn Tafoya, Spoken Through Clay

The storage jar is highly polished and fired a striking glassy black coloration.  LuAnn is one of the few potters making piece of such quality and historic continuity.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “LuAnn Tafoya”.   It is an exceptional example of her skill, creativity, and commitment to traditional Santa Clara pottery.

$ 7,800.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Bowl with 20 Carved Feathers (1977)

This is an early carved bowl by Nancy Youngblood.  The bowl is from 1977 when Nancy was just 22 years old!  The shape is a classic bowl and the feathers are carved into the clay.  Note the depth of the carving!  Each feather is symmetric and precise.  The entire piece is very highly polished and fired a deep black.  It is easy to see looking at this bowl the level of talent evident in her early work and how that same precision in carving and polishing is still part of her work today.  In the area below the shoulder, there is also a carved bear paw.  It is a charming addition to the overall design.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Nancy Yellow Aspen Youngblood, Dec. 1977”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It comes to us from the collection of Georgia Loloma, the wife of noted jeweler Charles Loloma.

$ 2,000.00
Roller, Toni – Melon Bowl with 16 Ribs (1985)

Toni Roller is known for her classic shapes and exquisite stone polished pottery.  She is a daughter of Margaret Tafoya and has developed her own distinctive style yet adhering to the traditional methods and techniques of her mother.  This bowl is from 1985 and it is a carved melon bowl with 16 ribs. Each rib is evenly spaced and carved into the clay.  The entire surface is fully polished to a high shine. It was traditionally fired and it is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Toni Roller”.

$ 750.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Wide Jar with Mesa & Rain Designs (1970’s)

This is a striking wide shoulder jar by Margaret Tafoya. It is from the 1970’s.  It is an unusual shape for Margaret’s pottery with a wide shoulder and a short neck.  The jar is carved around the shoulder with a mesa and rain pattern. The design is repeated four times around the jar.  The piece is very highly polished and deeply carved.  It was fired a deep black.  Interestingly, Margaet was at the peak of her career in the 1970’s.  It was 1978-9 when she won consecutive “Best of Show” awards at Santa Fe Indian Market for two storage jar.  There is certainly a wonderful precision in the carving, shape, and polish of this jar.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 6,800.00
Archuleta,  Mary Ester – Red Canteen with Bear Paws (1970’s)

Mary Ester Archuleta is the second youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  She has never prolific and most her pottery was made in the 1970’s and 1980’s.  This canteen is a striking piece and fully polished a deep red. There are bear paws on both sides.  The entire piece is fully polished. The bear paws represent a story of how the Pueblo people were led to water during a drought by a bear.  This particular style of canteen is one which is very reminiscent of the work of her mother, Margaret Tafoya.  The stopper is hand carved and there are leather straps.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mary E. Archuleta”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 1,200.00
Archuleta,  Mary Ester – Red Bowl with Bear Paws

Mary Ester Archuleta is the second youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  She has never made a lot of pottery, and most of it was in the 1970’s and 1980’s. A majority of her pottery was inspired by the incised San Juan style of pottery as she married into San Juan and lived there.  This bowl is a classic round shape with bear paws as the design.  It is perfectly polished and a stunning deep red color.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mary Archuleta.”  It is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 950.00
Tafoya, Shirley – Bowl with Carved Avanyu (1980)

Shirley Tafoya was the youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya and known for her miniature pottery.  This bowl is from 1980.  It is very deeply carved with a water serpent encircling the piece.  The entire surface is fully polished.  Shirley etched the eye and the mouth of the avanyu.  The water serpent is a classic Santa Clara design telling the story of how the avanyu saved the village from a flood.  The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya”. A classic of Tafoya Family pottery!

$ 1,000.00
Trammel, Jennie –  Tall Jar with Sun and Cloud Design (1980’s)

Stunning!  This is an exceptional jar by Jennie Trammel.   She was a daughter of Margaret Tafoya.  Over the years Jennie did not make a lot of pottery as she lived a very private life and was virtually never involved in markets or gallery shows.  However, she created striking pottery with classic shapes and designs which were distinctive to her work.  Each piece was coil built and it was the carving, with the rounded edges, which was a visual key to her work.  This tall jar has a low shoulder, which gives it lots of space for design.  The central areas is fully carved with three rising sun designs.  They are separated by three cloud motifs descending downward.  Jennie continues to fascinate with her designs, as they are images that few other Santa Clara potters use in their work.  As well, as on this piece, her choice to use three designs instead of four, is more difficult and unusual.  The carving is very deep and the piece is a very deep red.  The background area is matte and the traditional creame colored clay slip. The jar is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are a couple of areas of slip loss on the edge of some of the carving, which might have happened at the time of firing and are not unusual in her larger pottery.  The jar is signed, “Jennie Trammel” in the clay on bottom.   Definitely one of her classics!

$ 4,000.00
Tafoya, Margaret & Shirley Tafoya – Bowl with Kiva Step Design (BOF . 113)

Shirley Tafoya was the youngest daughter of Margaret Tafoya. They each created distinctive styles of carved pottery.  This is one of the only pieces Margaret made with her daughter, Shirley.  Shirley told me when I was writing “Born of Fire” that Margaret had made the bowl and she asked Shirley to carve a kiva step design into the clay.  Shirley then polished the bowl.  The bowl is highly polished and traditionally fired.  The kiva steps were a significant choice:

“The kiva step pattern is a classic design see on much of Margaret Tafoya’s pottery. That particular design has three steps, representing the kiva where religious ceremonies take place on the Pueblo. From the kitchen window of Margaret’s house, their clan kiva could also be seen while they worked.  Again, the tradition of form and design, of passing on knowledge to the next generation, were all a daily presence in Margaret’s pottery and life”.  Born of Fire, p. 100

This bowl is from the 1980’s and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya, Margaret Tafoya”.  It is an amazing piece of history, culture and Pueblo tradition!  The last photos are one from the book, Born of Fire along with a photo of Margaret and Shirley Tafoya.

$ 3,400.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Wide Jar with Cloud and Step Designs (1970’s) (BOF p. 107)

his is a striking wide shoulder jar by Margaret Tafoya. It is from the 1970’s.  It is an unusual shape for Margaret’s pottery with a wide shoulder and a short neck.  The jar is carved around the shoulder with cloud and step designs.  The carving on this jar is very complex with variation as the jar is turned.  In the book, Born of Fire, it says of this jar:

“This jar from the 1970’s shows the perfect balance of form and design typcial of this period.  The intricate and flowing cloud and step pattern was most likely designed and carved by Alcario [Tafoya]”.  Born of Fire, p. 107

Alcario Tafoya, the husband of Margaret Tafoya, was known for his intricately carved designs. The use of negative space with imagery flowing up from the base lower section and down from the top of the band are indicative of his design style.  Toni Roller said of her father:

“Alcario did help with some of the designs. My dad’s designs are very outstanding. You can tell the difference between my mother’s and my dad’s designs. He did a lot of designs on my mother’s pots. Sorry to say he was never given very much credit for it.” —Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

The jar is highly polished and traditionally fired.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is featured in the book Born of Fire, on p. 107.

$ 8,800.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Large Rainbow Ridge Water Jar with Bear Paws (1960’s), BOF p. 78

This is a striking large water jar by Margaret Tafoya.   This red water jar is featured on p. 78 of the book, “Born of Fire”. The water jar is from the 1960’s and certainly from a period when Margaret was at the peak of her career.  In 1978 and 1979 she won “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market.  She is one of the only artists to ever win twice and then to win in two consecutive years.  This water jar is distinctive and important because of the color (she made fewer red pieces than black), the very classic shape and the bottom.   The shape is a double shoulder water jar with a rainbow ridge.  This is the ridge above the shoulder which is actually pushed out in the clay.  The rim of the jar is slightly turned out and there are four bear paws impressed into the clay before it was polished.  As for the bottom, this comes from a time period when she used one of her mother’s (SaraFina Tafoya) pukis to create the indented base.  Nearly of the pieces with this style of base are classic style water jars, almost as if they are made as an homage to her mother and her legacy.  The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”. It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  This is definitely a historically important and exceptional jar by this important Santa Clara potter and great to have it published in one of the definitive books on her career.  Toni Roller said of the bear paw design.

“The story behind the bear paw, according to my grandmother, she said that our ancestors came from Puye, from the cliffs. One time when the people were living up there, there was a drought so bad they couldn’t grow anything. They were so worried. They wondered why the bear was well fed and not thin like they are. So they tracked the bear, and the bear led them to the Rio Grande. The reason we put the bear paw on the pots is to honor the bear that saved the people, the ancestors that came to Santa Clara from Puye. That’s why now most of the Indian people live along the Rio Grande. The bear saved all our ancestors.”  Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

$ 24,000.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Tall Jar with Shells & Shell Lid

Nancy Youngblood creates stunning vessels which combine both matte and polished surfaces. This is an elegant vase with deeply carved sections where she has two different types of shells as the design.   The use of shells in her pottery is reminiscent of the shells worn by the Pueblo Dancers during various ceremonies.  Historically, there are lots of shells found in the Southwest, as they were highly valued and used for trade.  Note how the shells are rounded out like the ribs in her melon bowls!  The surrounding area is matte, which contrast perfectly with the high shine of her stone polished surfaces.  Note how even the matte areas are, as if they are not flat and even they create shadows.  The symmetry of the jar is perfection, with a narrow base and a wide shoulder.  The lid has carved and polished shells on each side and they are fully polished and each section is rounded out.  The lid also fits perfectly into the jar with a line to show exactly where to position it on the vessel.  The jar is from 2006 and it is in perfect condition.

 

$ 17,000.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Large Wedding Vase with Avanyu (1950’s)

This is a large wedding vase by Margaret Tafoya.  It is from the 1950’s.  The design is a water serpent and it is very deeply carved into the clay.  There is an unusual cloud pattern above the head of the water serpent, and another cloud pattern on the reverse of the bowl.  It is this style of carving which is more usually seen on the work of the late 1950’s.  The shape of the vase is rounder with the extended spouts.  The entire surface of the wedding vase is fully polished.  The style and complexity of the carving, also suggest that it was probably designed by Margaret’s husband, Alcario Tafoya.  Toni Roller said of her father’s designs:

“Alcario did help with some of the designs. His are bold designs. My dad’s designs are very outstanding. You can tell the difference between my mother’s and my dad’s designs. He did a lot of designs on my mother’s pots. Sorry to say he was never given very much credit for it.” —Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

The wedding vase is signed, “Margaret Tafoya”.  It is in very good condition with chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  There are surface scratches which are expected on pieces from this period, but no structural issues.

$ 14,500.00
Youngblood, Nancy – Large Box with Shell Designs with Shell & Avanyu Lid

This is an exceptional large box by Nancy Youngblood.  It is not often that she makes boxes and this particular piece combines many different techniques used in her pottery.  The box is an elegant shape with a length, width and height proportionality that works for the size. The sides of the box have shells on them, and not how each ridge of the shell is rounded out like her straight melon ribs! The ends of the box have circular shells. The use of shells reflects the shells used on traditional dancers at the Pueblo and that they have been used culturally for centuries.  The top of the box has a carved and polished avanyu encircling the handle, which is a double sided shell.  One visually dynamic aspect of the box is the how she has sanded the matte areas so that they are so smooth. It is a critical part of pieces as any uneven surface is revealed in the light as a small shadow!  The polished surfaces just glow with the reflection of the light.   Consider that each shell edge or swirling shell has two “sides”to be polished and the surface area of the piece is about double its size!  This box is from 2008 and came originally from Nancy to the gallery and now it has come back to us.  It is in perfect condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.   Nancy has won numerous awards for her melon bowls and this is undoubtedly a classic and important piece of her pottery.

$ 28,000.00
Youngblood, Mela  – Tall Water Jar with Carved Avanyu (1972) with Ribbon

This is one of the largest pieces we have seen by Mela Youngblood.  She began making pottery in the late 1960’s and quickly achieved a distinctive style for her work.  Each piece of her work very highly polished and when carved the edges are distinctly rounded.  This jar has a carved avanyu encircling the piece. Mela’s carving is distinctive with rounded edges to her carving.  The avanyu here is deeply carved and the entire jar is fully polished.  It is a stunning piece not just for the size, but also for the polishing and carving.  The jar won a blue ribbon at the 1972 Gallup Intertribal Ceremonials.  Mela’s name is on the ribbon and it is on the last two photos.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Mela Youngblood”.  It is certainly a rarity with great provenance and an important piece of Tafoya family history!

$ 5,500.00
Tafoya, Margaret & Mela Youngblood – Weddding Vase (1976)

Margaret Tafoya and her daughter, Mela Youngblood, made some pottery together in the 1970’s.  Typically, Margaret would make the piece and then it would be carved by either Mela or Alcario Tafoya (Margaret’s husband).  Some of the collaborative pieces I have seen were signed by all three.  This wedding vase is just signed by Mela and Margaret. The wedding vase is definitely Margaret’s shape. The carving has a mesa and lightning on one side and a mountain pattern on the other.  The carving design was done by Mela on this piece, as was the polishing.  It’s a striking piece and an interesting piece of history!  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya, Mela Youngblood”

$ 2,400.00
Roller, Toni -15″ Tall Jar with Avanyu and Cloud Designs

Toni Roller is known for her classic shapes and exquisite stone polished pottery.  A daughter of Margaret Tafoya, Toni has developed her own distinctive style yet adhering to the traditional methods and techniques of her mother.  This may be one of the tallest pieces of her potter we have seen! The jar is 15″ tall and carved with two bands of design.  There is a central band with a carved avanyu.  Above the avanyu is a carved band with cloud, bird and lightning designs.  It is a very intricately designed piece. As well, the entire surface is fully polished!  It is traditionally fired a deep black.  The jar is from 2006 and signed on the bottom, “Toni Roller”.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair. Definitely a significant piece by one of Margaret Tafoya’s daughters.

$ 5,000.00
Tafoya, Margaret – Tall Double Shoulder Water Jar (1960’s)

This is a striking fully polished water jar by Margaret Tafoya. It is from the 1960’s.  It is an elegant shape with a long neck and a “double shoulder”.  The double shoulder was also called a “rainbow ridge” by Margaret and her mother, Sarafina Tafoya. It adds to the difficulty of a piece as the second ridge requires the potters to create a rise from the shoulder to a second shoulder to the neck.  The jar is stone polished all at one time and then fired to a deep black.  It is from the 1960’s and it is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Margaret Tafoya”.  This shape and size is definitely a classic of her work!

“She [Margaret Tafoya] made water jars sitting outside the adobe house, and they would never crack on her.  There’s a rainbow band on the shoulder. She would sit on the floor with her legs straight out and make the pots that way. Today we stand up and make our pots.”  LuAnn Tafoya and Toni Roller, Spoken Through Clay

$ 14,500.00
Youngblood, Mela  – Kiva Bowl (1970’s)

Mela Youngblood began making pottery in the late 1960’s and quickly achieved a distinctive style for her work.  Each piece of her work very highly polished and when carved the edges are distinctly rounded.  This bowl is a very classic style of Kiva Bowl.  This bowl is fully polished on the inside and outside. The bowl has the “kiva” three-step form on the sides.  The holes in the kiva step areas were traditionally included so that eagle feathers could be placed in them. Mela made few of these during her career. The bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  The highly stone polished surface is striking!  It is signed on the bottom in the clay.

$ 1,500.00
Ebelacker, Virginia – Jar with Carved Mountain Designs (1970’s)

Virginia Ebelacker was the first daughter of noted potter Margaret Tafoya.  She was known for large sized pottery as well as her deeply carved designs.  This jar is a very classic shape with a carved band around the center. The designs are mountain and lightning patterns. The jar is deeply carved and highly polished. The jar is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is in very good condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  Her sons Richard and James were both known for their distinctive large pottery and today her grandson, Jason, is also creating exceptional pottery.

$ 1,500.00
Roller, Cliff – Bowl with Bear Paws (1995)

Cliff Roller is a son of noted potter Toni Roller. Each piece is coil built and stone polished.  This bowl is carved four bear paws as the designs. The bear paws are symbolic of a Pueblo story where the bear leads the people to water during a drought.  Here the bear paws are each deeply carved into the clay and polished. The remainder of the bowl is fully polished to a very high shine.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Cliff Roller”.  This bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While these days Cliff makes very little pottery, his work remains a statement to his skill as a potter!

$ 400.00
Roller, Cliff – Jar with Square Neck (2002)

Cliff Roller is a son of noted potter Toni Roller. Each piece is coil built and stone polished.  This jar has a round body and an elongated square neck. The designs are carved into the negative space of the jar.  Around the neck are a tablita and wind pattern.  Around the sides are rain and kiva bowl patterns.  The jar is deeply carved and highly polished.  It is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Cliff Roller”.  This bowl is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.  While these days Cliff makes very little pottery, his work remains a statement to his skill as a potter!

$ 975.00
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