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Picuris Pottery of the Picuris Pueblo, of North Central New Mexico, alongside the Rio Grande River  Valley, was named, 'Pikuria,' meaning - "those who paint," by Spanish colonizer Juan de Oñate.  Picuris is located approximately twenty-five miles southeast of Taos, New Mexico, in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Picuris was once the largest in population of the New Mexico's Eight Northern Pueblos, but today is one of the smallest Tewa speaking Pueblos, with approximately two-thousand inhabitants. Like Taos, Picuris Pueblo was influenced by Plains Indian culture, particularly the Apaches. Picuris pottery is often made in the form of functional micaceous clay vessels, and are recognized by their beautiful, almost metallic shimmer in appearance. This type of pottery is utilitarian by design, and usually is not decorated or painted on the outside of the vessel, but beautiful shapes, micaceous clay, and fire-cloud reflect the beauty of an ancient art form that has been carefully preserved.

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Honyumptewa, Kimberly Riley – Picuris Micaceous Jar

Kimberly Riley Honyumptewa is from Laguna/Picuris Pueblo and married to Aaron Honyumptewa who is Hopi/Picuris. She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law in the traditional Picuris style and using native clay from the area. Each piece is coil built and traditionally fired.  Kimberly has a strong sense of form as the jar has a sharp shoulder and a elongated neck. The piece is traditionally fired so there are beautiful blushes across the surface. Will be exciting to see how her work evolves in creating more Picuris pottery!

$ 125.00
Honyumptewa, Kimberly Riley – Large Picuris Micaeceous Jar

Kimberly Riley Honyumptewa is from Laguna/Picuris Pueblo and married to Aaron Honyumptewa who is Hopi/Picuris. She learned to make pottery from her mother-in-law in the traditional Picuris style and using native clay from the area. Each piece is coil built and traditionally fired. This is one of her first larger jars and Kimberly says she was inspired by both the utilitarian nature of the clay but also the classic Picuris shapes.  This jar has a high shoulder and a slight neck. She said she polished the bottom as that is how they would be made to be used for cooking!  The jar is traditionally fired and has beautiful blushes on the copper colored clay.  Will be exciting to see how her work evolves in creating more Picuris pottery!

$ 300.00
Honyumptewa, Aaron – Picuris Micaceous Double Handle Canteen

Aaron Honyumptewa is both Hopi and Picuris. He is known for his very intricately carved katinsa dolls.  He recently moved back to Picuris Pueblo in New Mexico, the home of his mother and family and has begun to learn to make pottery from his mother.  The pottery is traditional style of Picuris pueblo and Aaron says he is hoping to help revive the art form!  This small canteen has a classic shape with the rounded shoulder and the double handles.  The clay itself is a beautiful coloration with the classic gold clay color.  It was traditionally fired to create the blushes on the surface.  If Aaron works  with the clay with the same creativity in which he carved katsinas, he has a bright future!

$ 80.00
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