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Virgil Oritz

Virgil Ortiz

Virgil Ortiz is one of the most innovative potters working today. He is a son of noted potter Seferina Ortiz and grandson of Laurencita Herrera. His sisters Janice, Inez, and Joyce are also potters along with his niece, Lisa Holt. He encourages his nieces and nephews also to continue making traditional pottery. His work has been featured in numerous museum exhibits nationwide, and he is also known for his fashion designs. He has won multiple awards at Santa Fe Indian Market, the Heard Museum Indian Market, and other events. His pottery can be found in museums worldwide. “The thought has never crossed my mind to be anything other than an artist and fashion designer. Art is in my blood”, says Virgil Ortiz, a Cochiti Pueblo Native. Sought by celebrities, royalty, and collectors, American Indian artist Virgil Ortiz artworks move into a new era combining art, décor, fashion, video, and film. Hailing from a family of celebrated Pueblo potters.  From the National Museum of the American Indian in New York, and Denver Art Museum, to the Hertogenbosch Museum in The Netherlands, and Foundation, and Cartier’s Paris, France.  Virgil Ortiz’s exquisite clay works are exhibited worldwide. Born in 1969, the youngest of six children, Ortiz grew up in a creative environment.  Storytelling, collecting clay, gathering wild plants, and producing figurative pottery was part of everyday life. His grandmother Laurencita Herrera and his mother, Seferina Ortiz, were both renowned Pueblo potters.  “I didn’t even know it was art that was being produced while I was growing up,” he remembers. Virgil Ortiz, who works and lives in Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico, has worked very hard and has had a few lucky breaks.  His efforts have propelled him to a preeminent place among contemporary Native artists. After a highly successful collaboration with fashion mogul Donna Karan, in which he developed boldly patterned textiles based on his graphic decorative painting.  Ortiz launched his fashion line. His designs are captivating, provocative, and edgy thus creating the high demand. His sharp laser-cut leather jackets, swinging taffeta skirts, cashmere sweaters, and silk scarves echo the voluminous contours and sinuous motifs of Pueblo pottery. He showcases the richness of indigenous high fashion and compelling storytelling of Pueblo culture and history. Virgil Ortiz debut Colorblind, his all-new T-shirt collection blending art, vibrant colors and graphic images.  Each of which portrays his interpretation of the historic Pueblo Revolt of 1680 – the First American Revolution. “I want to pay tribute to our great leader Po’pay and ancestors that lived and walked on our lands, and respect that their spirit will live on through me.” Creating a global awareness of Pueblo culture is reflected in the design components that reach past a traditional Ortiz sculpture.  His art form delves into an untapped age of décor elements that honor a prosperous civilization with skill and vision.  Ortiz also designed 'Indigenous Imprints'®, a carpet collection designed exclusively for Aqua Hospitality Carpets. This collection consists of twenty unique patterns.  His design concepts are a fascinating balance between contemporary and the traditional for guest rooms, corridors and public spaces in some of the most exclusive hotels and resorts worldwide. 'Indigenous Imprint's® is a natural progression toward leading-edge furnishings and adornment that capture the elegance and spirit of Ortiz’s inspiration. Beyond the notoriety of his artistic talent, Ortiz’s professional agenda centers on a lifelong dream to create opportunities for children in his tribal community that reflects the legacy of his ancestors. “It’s important to recognize that Pueblo communities are very much alive.  They have a level of vitality that speaks to generations of strength, persistence, brilliance, and thriving energy. I have something vital to do before I go. I want to preserve my culture and inspire our youth to accomplish whatever it is they dream to be.” – Virgil Ortiz

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Ortiz, Virgil – Sun and Mountain Canteen

This is a new smaller canteen by Virgil Ortiz.  The piece is coil built and painted with native clay slips and wild spinach (a plant) for the black.   The design on the piece is a geometric rain pattern combined with sun (circles) and mountain (triangles) designs.  Virgil paints his designs so that they match the surface shape of his pieces.  Can you see the “spirit line” in the design? It is at the rim of the canteen.  The spirit line is a break in the painting and used on traditional Cochiti pottery.  Virgil has also incorporated his signature “x”, which is the turkey track into the designs.   The piece is signed on the back.   The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

$ 650.00
Ortiz, Virgil – Badger and Butterfly Jar (2019)

This is striking new jar by Virgil Ortiz.  The jar is coil built and painted with wild spinach (a plant) for the black.  The imagery is created using strong, bold lines.  One one side there is a butterfly and the other side is a bagder.  The butterfly has triangular lines on the edges of the wings to create a sense of motion.  The badger, on the opposite side, is Virgil’s clan and a design has used for his pottery and fashion. Both the butterfly and badger are painted at an angle which make them less linear on the surface and gives the jar more motion. Can you see the “spirit line” in the design? It is at the top of the first tile on the left! The spirit line is a break in the painting and used on traditional Cochiti pottery.  Virgil has also incorporated his signature “x”, which is the turkey track into the designs.  The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

$ 4,000.00
Ortiz, Virgil – “Hate is a Drag” Clay Figure

The pieces Virgil Ortiz has created an exceptional new series of pieces for “Taboo II:  Fearless.  Unshaken. Inspiring”. Virgil has focuses on various new topics of social commentary.  Each piece is coil built, painted with wild spinach (black) and clay slips.  This piece is entitled, “Hate is a Drag”.  Virgil says of this piece:

“Sometimes we stand alone.  Sometimes as a group. Gender roles and society often challenge how we see ourselves and are perceived. I wanted to depict a man getting dressed for drag along with the three fierce drag queens.  To me it’s never about race, sex or gender but I just see people as people. Yeah, Hate is a Drag.”  Virgil Ortiz

Technically, Virgil’s figurative work on this figure is extraordinary.  He said he started the base in a triangle and then worked up from there. The entire piece is coil built. The various figures easily tell his story in a fun and yet thoughtful manner.  As with man of his pieces for Taboo, the topics remain both timely and timeless.

TABOO II: Fearless. Unshaken. Inspiring

$ 8,000.00
Ortiz, Virgil – “Spirit World Army” Clay Figure

The pieces Virgil Ortiz has created an exceptional new series of pieces for “Taboo II:  Fearless.  Unshaken. Inspiring”. Virgil has focuses on various new topics of social commentary.  Each piece is coil built, painted with wild spinach (black) and clay slips.  This piece is entitled, “Spirit World Army”.  Virgil says of this piece:

This piece speaks to the internal conflicts of those living with PTSD.  For this sculpture, I honed in on my recent experience of using art to encourage Veterans with PTSD to share their stories and establish a new sense of self through healing.  PTSD is not limited to those who have been deployed but can impact anyone as the result of a traumatic experience or encounter.  The dramatic converging faces depict the internal battle of those who have PTSD.  Their daily experience can be a duality of a suppressed painful past and the attempt to find normality in daily life. The three-pointed star and the three circles represent the infinite quest for stability and balance in their thoughts and lives. On the back, I painted Rorschach inspired silhouetted images of Vets to bring balance and overall symmetry to the form and design.  The silhouettes speak to the proudest moments of Vets serving our county yet experiencing depression being away from their loved ones.”  Virgil Ortiz

Technically, Virgil’s figurative work excels on this figure.  The convergence of the two faces is both dramatic and visually stunning.  There is a tightness to the way the faces flow into one another.  The painted designs not only tell the story but emphasize the shape of the figure.  While it may feel modern it certainly harkens to the early Monos figures and their often quite unusual use of human forms (real and imaginary).  A piece which is both thought-provoking and timeless in concept and design.

TABOO II: Fearless. Unshaken. Inspiring

$ 9,500.00
Ortiz, Virgil – “MMIWG : MIIICH” Clay Sculpture

The pieces Virgil Ortiz has created an exceptional new series of pieces for “Taboo II:  Fearless.  Unshaken. Inspiring”. Virgil has focuses on various new topics of social commentary.  Each piece is coil built, painted with wild spinach (black) and clay slips.  This piece is entitled, “MMIWG : MIIICH”.  Virgil says of this piece:

“MMIWG are the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.  There is an innate difficulty to grapple with the extent and impact of these missing and murdered American Indian and Alaska Native women and girls.  At a rate of 15 missing each day, they are rarely accounted for in federal statistics. The impact ranges from reservations to urban communities. This piece was created to bring awareness to this epidemic. The spirits of these missing women and girls need guidance to the next life – many of them have not been given a proper burial and send-off.  The hummingbirds, or “Miiich” in the Keres language, serve as guides and protectors for these lost mothers, sisters, daughters, aunts and loved ones so that they are able to return home.” -Virgil Ortiz

The piece is a large scale sculpture which is dramatic in form, design, and concept  Technically, note the shape of the piece which is overall a bird form. The shape is also technically difficult to make with various angular edges and swooping lines.  Many of the hummingbirds are also raised in relief, a first for Virgil in his work.  The hummingbirds are symbolic of his mother, Seferina Ortiz.  Note as well on the edge opposite the woman wearing the tablita that there is a single black hummingbird, which is meant to be the spirit messenger for those women and girls who are missing.  It is an extraordinarily powerful piece in clay and speaks to Virgil’s unique ability to use the clay to visually tell both a story and help to educate people about the missing indigenous women and girls.

TABOO II: Fearless. Unshaken. Inspiring

 

 

$ 11,000.00
Ortiz, Virgil – “Puppy Power” Clay Sculpture

The pieces Virgil Ortiz has created an exceptional new series of pieces for “Taboo II:  Fearless.  Unshaken. Inspiring”. Virgil has focuses on various new topics of social commentary.  Each piece is coil built, painted with wild spinach (black) and clay slips.  This piece is entitled, “Puppy Power”.  Virgil says of this piece:

“Dogs.  We dress them up, we take them out on parade, we lavish them with gifts.  For many, that’s not enough and they want to enter the world of dogs themselves.  Sure, Puppy Play looks like a kink, with the leather and hoods and tails.  But it’s a world scene created by men and women and it’s one that is not about control but about love and affection. It seeks to show a way to navigate our lives away from the ordinary into the unknown.  It may seem silly to wear a tail and ears, but is it any sillier to dress up our dogs in a dress and shoes?” – Virgil Ortiz

Interestingly, Virgil’s first major exhibit at the Wheelwright, entitled, “Clay People” focused primarily on S&M figures.  That is a topic which, nearly two decades later, remains “taboo” but which Virgil seems to utilize with ease.  It may be the feeling of discomfort but there is also humor within the context of his work.  Virgil looks at both sides of “puppy power” and creates incredible clay work of technical complexity.

TABOO II: Fearless. Unshaken. Inspiring

$ 9,800.00
Ortiz, Virgil – “FALLD” Clay Sculpture

The pieces Virgil Ortiz has created an exceptional new series of pieces for “Taboo II:  Fearless.  Unshaken. Inspiring”. Virgil has focuses on various new topics of social commentary.  Each piece is coil built, painted with wild spinach (black) and clay slips.  This piece is entitled, “FALLD”.  Virgil says of this piece:

“Growing up and living with ADD, dyslexia, Aspergers, or autism is an unimaginable personal and social challenge.  During my time at Colorado College, I had the opportunity to learn from 15-year-old Foster what it’s like to live with these disorders.  As a kid, he thought he was a failure.  He showed me one of his own drawings which expressed how he felt about his failures. He saw himself as an extended figure, surrounded by the words, “falld”, meaning “failed”.  This was an intense expression of his personal feelings and perception.  He felt he had to pull himself up every day, so I put him at the top of the mountain, the apex of this piece.  He loves to mountain climb, so that seemed appropriate.  The other figures are carrying the weight of the world on their shoulders and at the same time, getting ready to toss Foster’s “drawing” away as he overcomes his feelings of failure to achieve personal success.  I see him standing tall, beginning to enter a place of non-duality where the understanding of his neurodiversity can have its own meaning outside and separate of how and what it means to others.” Virgil Ortiz

The shape and the clay work become the “canvas” for this powerful story.  The single figure on the lower edge is painted all black (wild spinach).  The drawing he used by Foster is actually in relief in areas, as is much of the rest of the piece.  It is not just flat surfaces, but angles and edges, some of which are so lightly raised they have to be felt, which give the piece added dimension.  Just as the story of Foster finding his way forward, Virgil has painted this piece to draw your eye around and upward.  It seems that in the end, it is uplifting both conceptually and visually.  A piece which is both thought-provoking and timeless in concept and design.

TABOO II: Fearless. Unshaken. Inspiring

 

$ 8,500.00
Ortiz, Virgil – “Venutian Soldiers, Pueblo Revolt: 2180” Water Jar

This water jar includes some of the most iconic images in the work of Virgil Ortiz.  The design is taken from his Revolt 1680/2180 series. Thre are four figures representing the Pueblo Warriors from the Venutian Soldier series of his work.  It is a powerful story of the connection between man and the environment.  The figures are each intricately painted and inspired by photography work he did in 2012.  The last photos are some of his photography for the Venutian Soldier series.  While the figures are intricately painted, the space between them is left nearly blank. However, there is a turkey track which looks like an “x”, next to each of the figures, signifying their travels.  The neck of the jar has a plant and cloud design. The jar shape itself is elegant with the high shoulder and short neck.  The jar is made from native clay, native clay slips and wild spinach (the black).  The piece is signed on the bottom. The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

In the book, “Revolt”, I wrote about these as follows:

In the summer of 2012 Ortiz premiered his “Venutian Soldiers’.   The story of the Pueblo Revolt was becoming more evolved and Ortiz was able to have fun developing more background for his characters and the events before the Revolt 2180. “I have created Native Superheroes in the form of clay, photography, video and film, which allows me the freedom to express my personal interpretation of the REVOLT – The First American Revolution.  The Venutian Soldiers are futurist, herculean superheroes, over eight feet tall, who fight mainly at nighttime and possess extraordinary strength and magical powers”.  Here the Venutian Soldiers reflect the destruction of pueblos by the Spanish during their original conquest. In their future version, it is the Castilians who have destroyed their ‘world’ and the Venutian Soldiers are the embodiment of this devastation. Their environment has been destroyed through nuclear weapons causing the Venutian Soldiers to use oxygen tanks and gas masks to survive. This story is a thoughtful embodiment of a world overrun and the natural order destroyed yet survivable by the sense of “Pueblo community”.  The Venutians are lead by Tahu and Kootz to find a hospitable land and “rebuild their traditions and ways of life on ancestral sacred lands”.

$ 3,400.00
Ortiz, Virgil – “South Directional Figure” 1995

This clay figure by Virgil Ortiz is from 1995.  It is coil built and painted with a white clay slip and additional red clay.  The black is wild spinach, which is a plant.  The figure is what he called his “Directional Figures” representing the North, South, East, and West.  Each figure was a different color and this one represents the South, as the body is mostly painted red.  Virgil did not want to re-create ceremonial figures in his work and so he created this style to tell a Pueblo story of the four directions, but with his own style.  The figure was traditionally fired and the small clay tabs were added after the firing. The piece is signed on the bottom in the clay, “Virgil Ortiz”.  It is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.

$ 2,500.00
Ortiz, Virgil – “Tahu The Blind Archer 2180” Jar (2019)

This is striking new jar by Virgil Ortiz.  The jar features a futuristic version of Tahu, the Blind Archer, in a 2180 style.  The story for the imagery on this piece comes from Virgil’s work focusing on the Pueblo Revolt 1680 and his futuristic 2180.  He has continued to create pieces in this series since 2007.

“In 2007 Ortiz began to identify and give form to characters who would populate his fictionalized version of the Pueblo Revolt: Tahu, a girl blinded by the Spanish conquistadors; Mopez, the leader of the Pueblo Runners; and the Castilians to represent the Spanish invaders. The characters who make up the Pueblo Revolt series are inspired by names and words in Keres (the indigenous language of Cochiti Pueblo) and other Puebloan languages. “Tahu” is a word used as a sign of respect for older Pueblo women. “Mopez” means “cardinal” and was the Keres name of Ortiz’s brother. “I wanted to use native language words and names to identify the characters. Part of the Revolt story had to be the actual events, but I also wanted it to tie into our language. If I could get the kids interested in history I might also be able to get them interested in our language and keep it alive.” “Virgil Oritz: Revolt 1680/2180”, Charles S. King

On this jar, Tahu has a stylized and sleek appearance.  As the jar is turned you can see the feathers on her helmet and back.  The reverse side of the jar has a stylized snake.  For Virgil, the snake is a symbol of transformation.  The body of the snake is made up of sun and wildflower designs.  Can you see the “spirit line” in the design? It is at the top of the first tile on the left! The spirit line is a break in the painting and used on traditional Cochiti pottery.  Virgil has also incorporated his signature “x”, which is the turkey track into the designs.  The tiles are painted with native clay slips and wild spinach (a plant) for the black.  The piece is signed on the back.  The use of traditional and contemporary imagery has become a standard for Virgil’s pottery as he pushes the boundaries of contemporary Native clay.

$ 7,000.00
Ortiz, Virgil – Old Style “Monos” Figure

Virgil Ortiz is known for his innovative style of Cochiti pottery, inspired by the Monos figures made at the pueblo in the 1880’s. As I wrote in the book, “Virgil Ortiz: Pueblo Revolt 1680/2180,

“This use of the figures for social commentary is where they derived their name, monos. The word is a colloquial blend of Spanish and Keres, with inexact definitions that range from “mimic,” “mocking,” or “cute” to “monkey.” While “monkey” might have suggested the elongated bodies and arms or the simplified open-mouthed faces of the figures, it was also a subtle racial pejorative aimed at their Cochiti makers.”

This is one of Virgil’s traditional clay figures made from native clay and painted with native clays and wild spinach (black).  The figure has been traditionally fired.  As noted the Monos figures were originally created as objects of social criticism and reflection and Virgil continues on this same path in his contemporary work.  This figure is made in the “old style” and as a reference check out the final image by Ben Wittick from the 1880’s. These figures were made with hollow arms and “open” hands.  The mouths and eyes were also open.  Here Virgil has revived those older technical forms. The designs on the figure a spinach leaf patterns on the vest and pants. The little pocket on the vest and the goatee on the figure are very reminiscent of the early Monos figures, as those were personal identifiers which were incorporated into the design.  Note how deeply the black fired on this piece!  The earrings are also traditional red clay and added after the firing. It is signed on the bottom and is from 2018.

$ 5,900.00
Sale!
King, Charles S., “Spoken Through Clay”

Spoken Through Clay

A NEW  RELEASE SPECIAL:  $95.00, including shipping (US)! Check out the new review in the Denver Post!

 Just a few things which make this book unique!
*   The size!  The book is 11.75″ x 14.25″ and weights over 8 pounds!
*  The photography of the pottery is stunning, emphasizing the individual pieces.
*  Each caption is the artist discussing the individual piece on the page.
*  The artist “biographies” are from interviews with the artists and they discuss their art, culture, lives and history.
*  Organization: The book is not organized by pueblo or family, but entails new ways to think about the future of Native pottery.
*  Printing in Italy gives the book very high quality color and paper.
* The photos of the living artists were taken by Will Wilson using a tin-type process. He was a recipient of the 2107 New Mexico Governor’s Award for the Arts in photography!
*  The book features work by more than 30 contemporary potters and more than a dozen important historic potters.
*  There are essays by myself, Peter Held and Eric Dobkin.  They add to the overall understanding of the project a historic perspective.

_____________________________________________

August 18, Pasatiempo Review

“Charles S. King’s new book, Spoken Through Clay: Native Pottery in the Southwest, The Eric S. Dobkin Collection, is spectacularly heavy —which is a problem from a practical standpoint, because once you open it, you won’t want to put it down. With dreamy tintype artist portraits by Diné photographer Will Wilson, dazzlingly crisp images from Addison Doty, and intimate first-person essays written by dozens of artists, the book is a visually delicious, intellectually consuming foray into historic and contemporary Southwestern pottery. In short, prepare to swoon.

If you’re thinking of this as a coffee-table book, you’ll need to imagine a decently sized coffee table. The book is more than a foot tall and, when opened, two feet wide, but its outsize appearance belies the often delicate beauty of its contents: hundreds of individual pieces of pottery from Eric S. Dobkin’s exquisitely curated collection — arguably the largest and most important of its kind. Gallery owner, author, and Pueblo pottery expert King designed Spoken Through Clay to be approachable for those unfamiliar with Native American pottery. “In the age of social media, I wanted to make the book both visually striking and personal,” King said. The book opens with essays by King, Dobkin, and curator Peter Held, who calls clay “the most archival of materials … seductive, sensuous, responsive, geologic, and malleable.”

“I wanted the end result of the book to be that the reader would connect with the artists in a personal way, beyond just the art, and understand the time it takes to become an artist, to achieve success,” King said. Sprawling yet intimate, Spoken Through Clay introduces its readers not just to the beauty of Southwestern pottery but also to the fascinating stories of the people who make it.Iris McLister, Pasatiempo

____________________________________

“It’s one of the things that makes us who we are. It’s what holds our family together. We are a family of potters. It’s our identity. People don’t realize how much work goes into it just processing the clay and making it. You have to do it with your heart.”—Linda Tafoya-Sanchez

 

FEATURED ARTISTS Grace Medicine Flower • Dextra Quotskuyva • Autumn Borts-Medlock • Jody Naranjo • Harrison Begay Jr. • Jordan Roller • Sara Fina Tafoya • Lonnie Vigil • Margaret Tafoya • Steve Lucas • LuAnn Tafoya • Loren Ami • Toni Roller • Popovi Da • Linda Tafoya-Sanchez • Mark Tahbo • James Ebelacker• Yvonne Lucas • Jeff Roller • Lisa Holt • Harlan Reano • Nampeyo • Jacquie Stevens • Nathan Youngblood • Jacob Koopee Jr. • Jennifer Moquino • Christopher Youngblood • Maria Martinez • Tony Da • Tammy Garcia • Virgil Ortiz • Joseph Lonewolf • Johnathan Naranjo • Nancy Youngblood • Les Namingha • Russell Sanchez • Christine McHorse • Richard Zane Smith • Rondina Huma • Susan Folwell • Dominique Toya • Jody Folwell

Spoken Through Clay features the pottery of iconic Native American artists from historic potters Nampeyo and Maria Martinez, to contemporary potters Tammy Garcia, Virgil Ortiz, and many others, are featured in a new book published by the Museum of New Mexico Press. Spoken Through Clay: Native Pottery of the Southwest showcases nearly three hundred pottery vessels from the acclaimed Eric S. Dobkin Collection, covering a wide range of mostly Pueblo artists from the Southwest.

“The physical scale of the vessels combined with the depth of the contemporary collection [is] breathtaking,” says author Charles S. King. The book is part of a “transitional process of looking to the clay, the vessel, and the potter’s voice and allowing the pieces to stand on the merit of their artistic integrity.”

The book includes portraits and voices of renowned potters speaking about their artistry and technique, families, culture, and traditions. Many of the artists are connected by Pueblos, generations, or family members. Dynamic color photography captures the depth and dimension of the pieces, while the artists provide an illuminating perspective through narrative captions. Artists, academics, collectors, family members, and gallerists add additional insight about the lives, historical context, and importance of these potters and their work.

SPOKEN THROUGH CLAY Native Pottery of the Southwest The Eric S. Dobkin Collection
By Charles S. King Essay by Peter Held

Artist portraits by Will Wilson
ISBN: 978-0-89013-624-9

352 pages, 320 color plates, 40 artist portraits

Publication Date: August 01, 2017
ABOUT THE AUTHOR Charles S. King is the author of Born of Fire: The Life and Pottery of Margaret Tafoya, The Life and Art of Tony Da, Virgil Ortiz: Revolt 1680/2180, and numerous articles on Pueblo pottery. He has served on boards of art associations, judged pottery at prestigious events, and lectures about the art form. His business King Galleries represents many of today’s leading Native potters and important historic works in clay. Charles lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

$ 125.00 $ 95.00
King, Charles S. – “Virgil Ortiz: Revolt 1680/2180”

Over the past decade, Charles King has worked closely with Virgil Ortiz at King Galleries.  Virgil has premiered nearly all his new series at the gallery during that time.  In preparation for this book of Virgil’s work surrounding the Pueblo Revolt 1680/2180, King interviewed and worked with Virgil to help give new insight into this amazing accomplishment.  The result is the first comprehensive analysis and presentation of how Virgil conceived and then brought to life his various series dealing with the Pueblo Revolt.

Virgil Ortiz is an internationally renowned ceramicist, fashion designer, and graphic artist from Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico. He uses contemporary art to blend historic events with futuristic elements. Set against Ortiz’s graphic murals, the exhibition “Revolt 1680/2180: Virgil Ortiz” features 31 clay figures and invites visitors to immerse themselves in a storyline that Ortiz created that begins with the Pueblo revolt of 1680. 

In addition to King’s essay, there is a spectacular forward by Herman Agoyo, who helped bring the statue of Po’Pay to the US Capitol.  Peter Held, renown curator of the Ceramics Research Center, rounds out the essays with insights into how Virgil’s work fits into the modern world of ceramics.

If you have always wanted to understand Virgil’s take on the Pueblo Revolt and how he has re-imagined it in the future, this is certainly the only book to give such insight.  Take a moment and delve into his art and check out the amazing ceramic pieces also featured in the book!  It is stunning!


Revolt 1680/2180: Virgil Ortiz
by Charles King, Foreword by Herman Agoyo
Denver Art Museum, 2015
ISBN: 978-0-914738-98-5
Hardcover, 7 ¾ x 9 in.
80 pages, 58 illustrations

$ 35.00
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