Loading the content... Loading depends on your connection speed!

Scottsdale 480.481.0187 | Santa Fe 480.440.3912
kgs@kinggalleries.com
Shopping Cart - $ 0.00

No products in the cart.

Qoyawayma, Al – Large Mesa Verde Jar with Seven Kivas

Qoyawayma, Al – Large Mesa Verde Jar with Seven Kivas

16.75"w x 11"h
$ 19,750.00
Availability: In stock

This is a spectacular large piece from Al Qoyawayma.  It is one of his architectural pieces from his “Mesa Verde” series.  The oval area is pushed into the clay and then the building is pushed back out from the inside of the bowl.  This piece is one of his more complex works.  There are towers in the background and in the front are seven kivas.  Each is highlighted with vigas and windows. There is even a building to the front left and a stairway down to the front of the bowl!  It is quite extraordinary in complexity and size.  Note how Al etches and then paints all the “bricks” that make up the buildings!  This is one of the largest and most complex architectural pieces we have had from Al in several years.  Al’s architectural pieces are among his most iconic works.  The bowl is signed on the bottom in the clay.  It is from the late 1990’s and it is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, restoration or repair.


In stock


Artist

Artist

Qoyawayma, Al (b. 1938)

al qoyawaymaAl QoyawaymaAl Qoyawayma

Al Qoyawayma's Hopi pottery is created in two distinct styles. The first style embodies figurative sculpted reliefs using the repousse' technique, combined with traditional coil construction and tactile stone polished surfaces. The resulting contemporary Hopi pottery calls forth images of the Southwest with its subtle mix of desert hues creating an interplay of light and shadow, so reminiscent of the land of the Hopi. This land and the essence of his ancient relatives nurtures and inspires the artist. Al writes of himself, “I am of the second generation of Hopi beyond the broken pattern, a pattern, a way of life utterly foreign to the western world. With the full influence of western civilization, I am the products of two worlds. Out of our family clan, the Coyote Clan, it was said that we would be the generation to meet the new world and make a change that was our ancient role as the Coyote Clan….to be those who go before. It is only natural that one of our basic survival skills, as exhibited at our ancient home of Sikyatki, should be adapted to today’s world of art. Through the patient hand and guidance of a beautiful teacher, my aunt Polingaysi, I learned the basic techniques and philosophy I now use in my pottery creations. My clay creations reflect the aesthetic influences of the southwest environment and values passed down through our family. Form, textures, contrasts, shadow, the softness of desert color hues are foremost in my work. Oral history and research provide me with themes, continually emerging, which identifies who we were and are; a profound pursuit. At the same time, my repoussé technique provides a “contemporary” style of ceramics. I am not restricted by a particular tradition; rather I’m free to innovate. I find myself trying to “reach” in my creative pursuit, as I strive to bring into focus those things, human and spiritual, just beyond my reach. Creativity will always be my challenge." Most recently, Al won "Best of Pottery" at the 2016 Santa Fe Indian Market and "Best of Pottery" at the 2017 Heard Indian Market.
Mobile version: Enabled