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King Galleries is pleased to represent the artwork of several selected painters and photographers. It is exciting to have these exceptional artists as part of our gallery.

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Vigil, Phillip – “Blue River” Original Acrylic on Canvas

Phillip Vigil is one of the exciting, young native painters working today.  His modernist designs are a play on his life, culture and personal experiences.  Phillip has primarily been working on paper, but the transition to canvas has been an exciting change in his art. In a 2011 “Rethinking Contemporary Native American Art” article in “THE” magazine, they included Vigil saying,  “Phillip Vigil seeks his identity as a contemporary creative type who is also an indigenous person.  He is self-taught, inspired to paint by his love of the comic strip Calvin & Hobbes”.

This painting, “Blue River”, is a large-scale piece painted on canvas.  Phillip said of this piece:

“I think of this painting as a metaphor for life.  Just as no river ever really flows in a straight line, neither do our lives.  The big blue streak of color is representational of the, ‘curving river’ and the way things always unexpectedly ‘pop-up’ in life to challenge us and change our direction.

The other elements of the painting, the splashes, marks, lines and drips, each of these speaks to the unexpected.  They are metaphors for our lives which rarely follow an imposed path no matter how hard we try to control events, people or the world around us.  Each day is like the paint, it will drip and splash around us and choose its own path.”

We are pleased to represent his paintings in our Scottsdale gallery and look for more from this amazing artist!

$ 3,500.00
Allison, Marla – “Shawls and Pottery” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a member of Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. Marla lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

Marla began her expression through art in her youth and gained formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.

She was the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

Marla says of her painting:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Shawls and Pottery (Going to see Charles)“.  Ok, how you can you not LOVE the tile!  The painting utilizes what we love about her work:  a vibrant color scheme and Pueblo graphics.  It is a subtle but striking piece and a reflection of why she has become such an important name in contemporary Native painting!

$ 3,400.00
Vigil, Phillip – “Untitled No. 1″ Original Acrylic on Canvas – 61″ X 54”

Phillip Vigil is one of the exciting, young native painters working today.  His modernist designs are a play on his life, culture and personal experiences.  Phillip has primarily been working on paper, but the transition to canvas has been an exciting change in his art. In a 2011 “Rethinking Contemporary Native American Art” article in “THE” magazine, they included Vigil saying,  “Phillip Vigil seeks his identity as a contemporary creative type who is also an indigenous person.  He is self-taught, inspired to paint by his love of the comic strip Calvin & Hobbes”.

This painting, “Untitled, No. 1”, is a large scale piece painted on canvas.  This painting shows his first step in returning to canvas and doing it in a BIG way!  Phillip said of this piece:

“This painting represents my return to painting on canvas.  It is the largest of my first four recent canvas works. While I’m primarily known for works on paper, returning to the canvas has been a seamless process.  The larger expanse of space available to paint has ushered in a new perspective for me.  I no longer feel contained by the limits of the paper size and it is quite freeing.

“This painting is about life and my life, in particular.  These are internal landscapes I have created, which stretch back to my childhood and beyond.  The hand coming down from the left corner is picking up the marbles or gum ball drops.  The rest of the painting is in motion.  This is a metaphor for how life flows around us all at the same time.”

We are pleased to represent his paintings in our Scottsdale gallery and look for more from this amazing artist!

$ 4,800.00
Vigil, Phillip – “Sunset” Original Acrylic on Canvas – 54″ X 28″

Phillip Vigil is one of the exciting, young native painters working today.  His modernist designs are a play on his life, culture and personal experiences.  Phillip has primarily been working on paper, but the transition to canvas has been an exciting change in his art.  In a 2011 “Rethinking Contemporary Native American Art” article in “THE” magazine, they included Vigil saying,  “Phillip Vigil seeks his identity as a contemporary creative type who is also an indigenous person.  He is self-taught, inspired to paint by his love of the comic strip Calvin & Hobbes”.

This painting, “Sunset”, is a visually stunning use of color and design to reveal his experiences.  Phillip said of this piece:

“This painting, “Sunset” is a representation of the spectacular and visually varied event which is each sunset here in the high desert.  The light, the shape of the clouds and the quickly changing colors are stunning.  They amaze and inspire me.  Where I live in Jemez Pueblo, just south of the main village, the light pollution is limited and just as the sun sets, the first stars come out.  For most people this remarkable visual experience is something taken for granted.  For me, when I look up and see the sunset and then the first light of the stars in the darkening sky, I can’t help but think, ‘what more inspiration does one need’”.

 

We are pleased to represent his paintings in our Scottsdale gallery and look for more from this amazing artist!

$ 2,500.00
Vigil, Phillip – “Rain” Original Acrylic on Canvas – 46″ X 55″

Phillip Vigil is one of the exciting, young native painters working today.  His modernist designs are a play on his life, culture and personal experiences.  Phillip has primarily been working on paper, but the transition to canvas has been an exciting change in his art.  In a 2011 “Rethinking Contemporary Native American Art” article in “THE” magazine, they included Vigil saying,  “Phillip Vigil seeks his identity as a contemporary creative type who is also an indigenous person.  He is self-taught, inspired to paint by his love of the comic strip Calvin & Hobbes”.

This painting, “Rain”, is a large scale piece painted on canvas.  Phillip said of this piece:

“’Rain’ is about the rains which come during the monsoons throughout our southwestern summers.  The big thunder clouds build up in the distance and the you can see the rain flowing downward from them.  I currently live in Jemez Pueblo and here, rain is our everything.  It sustains our people or grows the chili or corn which are part of my daily life.

The recent droughts have put a strain on Pueblo life and has caused me to reflect on the importance of water to me, the pueblo and our culture.  The cleansing, sustaining rains which come each summer remind me that Water is Life.”

We are pleased to represent his paintings in our Scottsdale gallery and look for more from this amazing artist!

$ 3,500.00
Da, Jarrod – “Yellow Quail” Original Pastel

Jarrod Da has created a distinctive style of painting using pastels for his work. Each piece is hand painted and it is amazing how much detail he is able to achieve in each piece!  His new work is a blend of contemporary themes with San Ildefonso and Pueblo imagery.  This piece is entitled, “Yellow Quail”.  The painting has a large Pueblo style bird, typical of those painted on San Ildefonso pottery. The bird combines various designs, from clouds to rain patterns, to create the imagery. The background has geometric forms, which complement and shadow the bird. Jarrod says of this piece:

These bird pieces celebrate San Ildefonso plate design. These bird designs are rediscovered with more contemporary lines and shapes along with nontraditional colors. These nontraditional colors were used to investigate what new color pallets could be used on flat two dimensional designs.”

The painting is subtle in color but complex in design.  It comes in a black frame and matted. It is signed, “DA 17”.

$ 400.00
Da, Jarrod – “Red Hybird Bee III” Original Pastel

Jarrod Da has created a distinctive style of painting using pastels for his work. Each piece is hand painted and it is amazing how much detail he is able to achieve in each piece!  His new work is a blend of contemporary themes with San Ildefonso and Pueblo imagery.  This piece is entitled, “Red Hybrid Bee III”.  The painting has two bees painted in red and black with Pueblo designs on the wings . They are flying near pueblo painted flowers and with interspersed geometric shapes.  Jarrod wrote of this piece:

Red Hybrid Bee III was created pondering the modern effect we have on honeybees. This is three of a series of mixed media pieces. The design work is influenced through a mix of traditional San Ildefonso Pueblo design and modern deco influences. The fine detail work is done in India ink. This piece is my ode to saving the honeybee and realizing the crucial role they play in this giant organism we call earth.”

The painting is subtle in color but complex in design.  It comes in a black frame and matted. It is signed, “DA 17”.

$ 500.00
Browning, Ashley – “NDN-opoly” Digital Photograph

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment or life in contemporary Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called “NDN-opoly”.  Ashley writes of this piece, “It is a hand drawn illustration of a Native American Monopoly. It represents Pueblos (the Man on the top and the Pueblo homes), Navajos (the man in the middle holding the sheep and fry bread), and Plains Indian (the tee pees). I think this is such a cool idea they should make an actual game!”.  The first in this series won a Second Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2015. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “NDN iPhone” Digital Photograph

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment or life in contemporary Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called, “NDN iPhone”.  The hand model is Shaandiin Tome.  Ashley says of this piece, “It has hand drawn icons that are a Native version of iPhone apps, it is placed that are set on top of Montana Tee Pees.  So cool, it should be made into an actual apps.”  Take a closer look a few of the apps, as they certain capture the life of many Native artists.  Ashley certainly has an extraordinary sense of cultural critique in her artwork.  The first in this series won a Second Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2015. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “Generation Hands” Digital Photograph

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment or life in contemporary Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called, “Generation Hands”.  It is certainly one of the most powerful of her digital photos.  Ashley says, “The models are  (Top to bottom) Samantha Whitegeese, Mindy Little Yellow Bird, Tina Whitegeese, Michele Tapia Browning and Lu Ann Tafoya.  It is a portrait of four generations of strong women, a Student, a disabled woodworker, a corporate person, an artist and a potter. On their arms is the tewa words that represents their relations to me. So it goes from top to bottom: younger relation (no real tewa word for cousin), relation (no real tewa word for sister), aunt, mother and grandma.”  The original photo was taken and then overlayed with the words in Tewa.   The first in this series won a FirstSecond Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2014. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “Paper Doll” Digital Photo

Ashley Browning uses her photographic and innovative graphic skills to create her unique digital photo compositions. This piece is entitled, “Paper Doll” and utilized Leslie Browning Tafoya as the model.  Ashley says of this piece, “After playing with paper dolls as a child, I always wanted to play with a pueblo paper doll, especially a paper doll from my pueblo of Santa Clara. I inspired it from the summer side, where there is a mix of different style and colors.”  The piece is creative with the various traditional clothes from Santa Clara. She ended up dressing the model three different times for the clothing ‘options’.  Native People’s Magazine wrote about Ashely and this piece,

 “I like to make people feel, to remember something—experience something meaningful,” says Ashley Browning, 21, of Pojoaque and Santa Clara pueblos in New Mexico. In 2013 she won first prize at Indian Market for best computer-generated graphics with her “real-life” paper doll, which featured a digitally altered photo of her model with interchangeable traditional and contemporary attire. With it, Browning used the digital present to evoke memories of the previous generation’s analog world.”

The first piece in this series won first place ribbon at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2013.  It is an edition of 10 and framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “Juxtaposition” Digital Photo

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment in Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called, “Juxaposition”.  The model is Samatha Whitegeese (a daughter of Daryl Whitegeese).  Ashley says of this piece, “This photo is about young woman who is balancing her contemporary lifestyle and her traditional pueblo life. It is an everyday challenge that almost every young person deals with while going to school and participating in traditions.”  She took multiple photos of Samantha and combined them together to create this image.  The first in this series won a First Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2013. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Sense, Sarah – “Weaving Water 25” Woven Photographs

Sarah Sense is one of the phenomenal innovators in American Indian art.  This piece is entitled, “Weaving Water 25″ and it combines archival woven photographs and bamboo paper.  The photography of the setting sun combined with water is beautiful.  However, it is the open part of the basketry weaving which makes it so visually dynamic!  Somehow the movement of the water, the sky and the basketry all seems harmonious.  Sara uses her own photography as the basis for her “woven” paintings.  The designs in the weaving are all inspired by the basketry of her Chitimacha Tribal background.  In her desire to use the basketry imagery in her work she contacted tribal leaders, concerned about them being used in a flat “painting” as opposed to a three-dimensional basket.  With their permission she has created a dynamic art career.

$ 1,800.00
Sense, Sarah – “Weaving Water 23” Woven Photographs

Sarah Sense is one of the phenomenal innovators in American Indian art. In short she uses her own photography as the basis for her “woven” paintings.  The designs in the weaving are all inspired by the basketry of her Chitimacha Tribal background.  In her desire to use the basketry imagery in her work she contacted tribal leaders, concerned about them being used in a flat “painting” as opposed to a three-dimensional basket.  With their permission she has created a dynamic art career.  This piece combines archival woven photographs and bamboo paper.  It is part of her series entitled, “Weaving Water” and this one is “Weaving Water 23“.  Each piece is original and this one has a dynamic sense of the setting sun, the water and basketry designs, each blended in a harmonious appearance.  Certainly an exceptional new direction in her work!

$ 1,800.00
Sense, Sarah – “Weaving Water 13” Woven Photographs

Sarah Sense is one of the phenomenal innovators in American Indian art. In short she uses her own photography as the basis for her “woven” paintings.  The designs in the weaving are all inspired by the basketry of her Chitimacha Tribal background.  In her desire to use the basketry imagery in her work she contacted tribal leaders, concerned about them being used in a flat “painting” as opposed to a three-dimensional basket.  With their permission she has created a dynamic art career.  This piece combines archival woven photographs and bamboo paper.  It is part of her series entitled, “Weaving Water” and this one is “Weaving Water 13”.  Each piece is original and this one has a dynamic sense of the sky, water and basketry designs, each blended in a harmonious appearance.  Certainly an exceptional new direction in her work!

$ 1,800.00
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