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King Galleries is pleased to represent the artwork of several selected painters and photographers. It is exciting to have these exceptional artists as part of our gallery.

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Namingha, Les – “Polychrome II (Dextra Series)” Acrylic on Canvas

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Polychrome II (Dextra Series)”.  It is one of a series of acrylic paintings on canvas he made which explore both his pottery and that of his aunt, Dextra Quotskuyva.  I asked Les if he had any other paintings around and he brought in two pieces he had from the Dextra Series.  The painting is highly detailed with a top view of a piece of pottery, painted with classic design called “Prayer for Rain”.  The various colors depict both his work and Dextra’s.  Interestingly, in the center is a map of where he did his first show with Dextra, at Marti Struever’s gallery in Chicago!  What a great piece of history on so many levels!  It is signed on the front.

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 2,000.00
Namingha, Les – “Polychrome III (Dextra Series)” Acrylic on Canvas

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Polychrome III (Dextra Series)”.  It is one of a series of acrylic paintings on canvas he made which explore both his pottery and that of his aunt, Dextra Quotskuyva.  I asked Les if he had any other paintings around and he brought in two pieces he had from the Dextra Series.  The painting is highly detailed with a top view of a piece of pottery, painted with classic Hopi-Tewa designs.  The imagery blends the work of Les and Dextra as the pointilism dots seems to show the path of Les’s work navigating through the historic.  It is signed on the front.

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 2,000.00
Namingha, Les – “Polyphonic Starburst” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Polyphonic Starburst”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series. The painting is on board and it is framed.  The painting is a dynamic overlay of various textures. The various layers and the depth of the painting gives the piece subtle shadows.  The linear patterns can be seen in the background while there is the migration pattern blue line and then the Hopi birds layered on top of one another.  The various colors add to the impact, as they become more vibrant as one moves to the surface.  It captures the strength of Les’s designs and the layering techniques. I included a close up view of one section to show the texture of the piece.  Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 2,800.00
Da, Jarrod – “Nambe Butterfly” Original Pastel

Jarrod Da has created a distinctive style of painting using pastels for his work. Each piece is hand painted and it is amazing how much detail he is able to achieve in each piece!  His new work is a blend of contemporary themes with San Ildefonso and Pueblo imagery.  This piece is entitled, “Nambe Butterfly”.  Jarrod says of this painting:

“This piece was made after a trip to Nambe falls in northern New Mexico. The design work is influenced from San Ildefonso Pueblo Pottery design along with influences from Deco design. You can see this Deco influence within design elements like the rainbow in the center of the piece with its gradating small circle pattern varying in many colors. The various colors of the circles represents spray coming from the falls and shows that water is not clear but has a whole spectrum of color when light hits it. Traditional Pueblo design is represented through the staircase and kiva designs along with the flower motif in each of the butterfly’s wing is indicative of pottery design.   The butterfly represents the fragility of our eco system and its mission to recreate time and time again.”

The painting is subtle in color but complex in design.  It comes in a black frame and matted. It is signed, “DA 17”.  The photo shows the painting unframed and matted. The second photo is the painting framed on the wall for scale.

$ 1,200.00
Da, Jarrod – “Blue Pueblo Bird” Original Pastel

Jarrod Da has created a distinctive style of painting using pastels for his work. Each piece is hand painted and it is amazing how much detail he is able to achieve in each piece!  His new work is a blend of contemporary themes with San Ildefonso and Pueblo imagery.  This piece is entitled, “Blue Pueblo Bird”.  Jarrod says of this painting:

“These bird pieces celebrate San Ildefonso plate design. These bird designs are rediscovered with more contemporary lines and shapes along with nontraditional colors. These nontraditional colors were used to investigate what new color pallets could be used on flat two dimensional designs.”

The painting is subtle in color but complex in design.  It comes in a black frame and matted. It is signed, “DA 17”.  The photo shows the painting unframed and matted. The second photo is the painting framed on the wall for scale.

$ 500.00
Da, Jarrod – “Pueblo Bees” Original Pastel

Jarrod Da has created a distinctive style of painting using pastels for his work. Each piece is hand painted and it is amazing how much detail he is able to achieve in each piece!  His new work is a blend of contemporary themes with San Ildefonso and Pueblo imagery.  This piece is entitled, “Pueblo Bees”.  The painting has two bees painted in blue and yellow with Pueblo designs on the wings . They are flying near pueblo painted flowers and with interspersed geometric shapes.  Jarrod wrote of this piece:

“Pueblo Bees was created pondering the modern effect we have on honeybees. This one of three of a series of mixed media pieces. The design work is influenced through a mix of traditional San Ildefonso Pueblo design and modern art deco influences. The fine detail work is done in India ink. This piece is my ode to saving the honeybee and realizing the crucial role they play in this giant organism we call earth.”

The painting is subtle in color but complex in design.  It comes in a black frame and matted. It is signed, “DA 17”.  The photo shows the painting unframed (to capture the detail) and then framed on the wall with other paintings by Jarrod, for scale.

$ 500.00
Namingha, Les – “Segment with Line Break” Acrylic Painting on Board

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Segment with Line Break”.  It is a painting on board using a acrylic. The piece has a texture in the “line break”.  First about the “line break”.  This might be seen as a “spirit line” used in pottery, which is a space in the painted line around the the neck of a jar.  In the pottery of Nampeyo of Hano, using a “line break” is often considered a hallmark of her pottery.  Interestingly on this piece, the line is impressed into the painting, so that it has a recessed feel!  The “segment” part of the painting are the four shapes (two triangles, one half circle and a trapezoid).  They are all shapes seen in the designs on Hopi-Tewa pottery.  Les has both minimalized them and used primary colors for them.  Much as they are the “primary” shapes, they are represented here in the primary colors.  It’s fascinating that such a small painting can have such a depth of context! It is signed on the front and also on the back.

$ 600.00
Namingha, Les – “Spiral” Acrylic Painting on Board

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Spiral”.  It is a painting on board using a acrylic. The piece has a textured background with linear impressed “grid”.  On top is an impressed spiral, which circles out from the center.  It’s a classic Hopi-Tewa design seen in everything from jewelry to pottery.   Les brought in this small painting, which certainly captures his creativity in even the most simplistic of styles.

$ 400.00
Namingha, Les – “Hopi Bowl Design” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Hopi Bowl Design”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series. The painting is on board and it is framed.  The painting has a crackled back layer with a large Hopi bird painted on the surface.  The body of the bird is highlighted with various Hopi-Tewa designs.  The area around the bird is painted with pointilism dots and lines.  The background is striped.  Take a closer look at the second photo and you can see the crackling. It gives a feeling of pottery and clay with the acrylic.  Exceptional! Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 1,600.00
Namingha, Les – “Patterns” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Patterns, Black on Bronze”. The painting is acrylic and metallic pigments on canvas.  I think in the photos don’t quite capture the texture of the background.  However, the painting is a series of very delicately painted bird wings which ebb and flow across the canvas.  Stepping back and various new shapes appear.  It is a striking use of a very classic Hopi design in a repetitive style to create a larger and more dynamic painting. I attached a few additional photos of the piece installed in the gallery.

 

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 4,000.00
Namingha, Les – “Window in Time” Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Window in Time”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series.  The paining is graphite, ink pencil and wax crayon on paper.  It is a very dramatic painting.  The black lines form the window which presents the viewer looking out into the past.  Hopi-Tewa designs are painted boldly in clay colors while the other designs are simply outlines.  The further back one looks, the more (or maybe less) one sees.  Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 1,200.00
Namingha, Les – “Raven & Crow” Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Raven & Crow”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series.  The paining is graphite, ink pencil and wax crayon on paper.  It is a very powerful and very dramatic painting.  The raven and crow are the top layer of design in black.  Look a bit further and there is so much painted behind them with other Hopi imagery and coloration.  Stunning!  Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 1,200.00
Namingha, Les – “Existence” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Existence”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series. The painting is on board and it is framed.  The painting is a powerful painting with various Hopi birds, shapes and designs.  Look at the top left and there is even one of his tiles!  The bold bird in yellow on top and the layers underneath require an in depth viewing of this piece.  Simply exceptional! Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 1,800.00
Namingha, Les – “Polychrome Abstraction” Acrylic Painting

This painting by Les Namingha is entitled, “Polychrome Abstraction”.  It is part of his “Urban Polychrome series. The painting is on board and it is framed.  The painting is a dynamic overlay of various Hopi birds and designs.  Look closer and the initial layer of bird wings in turquoise color.  While not a huge painting it captures the strength of Les’s designs and the layering techniques. Les says of the Urban Polychrome series:

“The concept of layering is inherent in our mortal journey. As time moves forward, our memories become layered. Some memories remain vibrant, others faint or hazy. Yet others, obscure or even hidden. Likewise, our experiences, words, works, emotions, prayers and songs build up in layers creating our existence. In turn, our societal interactions become exercises in layering. We see this in evidence with street art or graffiti writing where layers of thought and a desire to express a “proof of existence” create tapestries of color and marks. Blending, covering, harmonizing, dissonance, disappearing. This concept of layering is the idea behind Urban Polychrome and other works in the Urban Series.”

$ 2,000.00
Arthur Lopez – “Saint Inez del Campo” Santos Wood Carving

Arthur Lopez is one of the leading santos carvers in New Mexico.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and watercolor pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.   These are the time involved and historic foundations for his work.  This piece is entitled,  Santa Inez del Campo”  Arthur says of this piece:

“Saint Agnes is also known as Agnes of Rome, Ines, Inez del Campo, and Ynez.  The name “Agnes” is similar to the Latin word agnus, which means “lamb”.  For this reason depictions of Saint Agnes often include a lamb.  The name actually comes from a Greek word which means “chaste, pure, sacred”.  Agnes is one of the “virgin martyrs” of the church of Rome.  She is one of seven women, in addition to the Blessed Virgin Mary, who are mentioned in the Roman Canon of the Mass (Eucharistic Prayer I). Saints Felicity, Perpetua, Agatha,  Lucy, Cecilia, and Anastasia  are the other six.  Agnes is a patron saint of chastity, gardeners, girls, Girl Scouts, engaged couples and victims of rape.”

Arthur’s work is found in numerous museum and public collections, including Albuquerque Museum of Art & History,  Denver Art Museum,  Freedom Museum (911 Memorial at Ground Zero), Harwood Museum of Art, Museum of International Folk Art,  Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, and the State of New Mexico Permanent Art Collection.

 

$ 4,800.00
Arthur Lopez – “Maria-Posa” Wood Carving

Arthur Lopez is one of the leading santos carvers in New Mexico.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and watercolor pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.   These are the time involved and historic foundations for his work.  This piece is entitled, “Maria-Posa”.   It is a fun play on  the Spanish words for Mary and Butterfly.  Arthur says of this piece:

“It is a piece is about hope that links several old and recognized symbols of the Mexican people. The monarch butterfly leaves Mexico in the spring, migrates to North America and returns to Mexico in the winter, in a near-miraculous cycle that each year spans the lives of several generations of monarchs that normally live less than two months. Guadalupe, the sacred mother Mary who appeared to San Juan Diego in 1531, is the patron saint of the Americas. The piece represents the potential for transformation in all of us and serves as a symbol of our past, our faith and the hope for rebirth in a better future.”

Arthur’s work is found in numerous museum and public collections, including Albuquerque Museum of Art & History,  Denver Art Museum,  Freedom Museum (911 Memorial at Ground Zero), Harwood Museum of Art, Museum of International Folk Art,  Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, and the State of New Mexico Permanent Art Collection.

$ 3,600.00
Arthur Lopez – “Alma Del Maria” Wood Santos Carving

Arthur Lopez is one of the leading santos carvers in New Mexico.  After the piece is carved, is covered in gesso (a glue made from rabbit hide) which is allowed to dry and then sanded.  It is painted with both natural and watercolor pigment.  Natural colored pigments, such as the brown, are derived from black walnut hulls.   These are the time involved and historic foundations for his work.  This piece is entitled, “Alma de Maria”.   Arthur says of this piece:

“Alma de Maria”  is an allegorical variant of the Immaculate Conception, it represents the descent of the Holy Spirit (Dove) upon Mary and the Announcement of the Incarnation. She wears a crown of roses to symbolize her purity and exemption from the sins of the world. The baby birds in a nest made in the form of a crown of thorns represent innocence at birth and Jesus death for our sins. “If you come across a bird’s nest in any tree or on the ground, with young ones or eggs and the mother sitting on the young or on the eggs, you shall not take the mother with the young. You shall let the mother go, but the young you may take for yourself, that it may go well with you, and that you may live long. – Deuteronomy 22:6-7″

Arthur’s work is found in numerous museum and public collections, including Albuquerque Museum of Art & History,  Denver Art Museum,  Freedom Museum (911 Memorial at Ground Zero), Harwood Museum of Art, Museum of International Folk Art,  Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, and the State of New Mexico Permanent Art Collection.

 

$ 4,800.00
Allison, Marla – “Of the Earth” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Of the Earth“.  The imagery is inspired by pottery designs with a very earth oriented coloration, much like the clay.  The designs range from pottery designs to an avanyu.  All of Marla’s paintings have a “gallery wrap” so the painting continues onto the side.

Marla says of her painting in general:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained a formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.  She was also the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 1,550.00
Allison, Marla – “Hopi Girls” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Hopi Girls“.  The imagery is her take on the classic Curtis photograph.  The piece is painted in her cubist style with a black/gray coloration and just a hint of reds.

Marla says of this painting:

This piece is inspired by photograph by Edward Curtis.  It reminds me of my youth, well, youth in general, and the timid way of becoming an adult.  I didn’t gain my voice until my mid 20’s, when I could really talk to people.  Maybe it’s a Pueblo things where the young girls hide behind others who are more bold.

As for her painting in general, she says:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained a formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.

Ms. Allison was the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 4,400.00
Allison, Marla – “Preparation of Clay: Nampeyo of Hano” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Preparation of Clay: Nampeyo of Hano“.  The imagery is inspired by the photography of Edward Curtis (see the last photo in the series).  This painting is large scale with a dramatic use of color and imagery.

Marla says of this painting:

This painting, ‘Preparation of Clay” comes from a photo of Nampeyo of Hano by Edward Curtis.  I wanted to depict the idea of age becoming perfection, where the hands are the storyteller in the piece.  She makes the clay, taken from the earth, and then hand molds it into a vessel.  I put emphasis on the shape of her hands with a fractal cubism style.  I wanted there to be an additional emphasis on the bowl holding the clay.  Inside the bowl are some very subtle pottery designs.”

Marla says of her painting:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained a formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.  She was also the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 6,650.00
Da, Tony – Original Pen & Ink Painting of Maria Martinez

Tony Da is a name synonymous with innovative pottery and paintings.  However, before he became famous for his pottery he began drawing in the 1960’s.  He was the son of noted potter Popovi Da and the grandson of Maria Martinez.  This is one of about five pen and ink drawings that he did early in his career.  Virtually all the other are in public collections.  This piece is one of his grandmother, Maria Martinez.  The other known pen & ink drawings of Maria are in the permanent collection of the Millicent Rogers Museum in Taos.  This piece has an interesting provenance.  It was made in 1966 for the “Three Generations” exhibition in Washington DC.  The exhibition was partially arranged through some collectors in Texas, with whom Maria, Popovi and Tony stayed on their way to DC.  At the end of the exhibition, this drawing of Maria, along with several other pieces, were acquired by their benefactors in Texas.  The painting is signed, “D’a 66”.   It is in excellent condition. What a great piece of history and this piece is certainly an important addition  to any collection of work by Tony Da or San Ildefonso art.

$ 16,000.00
Allison, Marla – “Blue Birds in Cedar Brush” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Blue Birds in Cedar Brush“.  The imagery is bound in the designs of Laguna pottery.  The pottery patterns flow across the surface with interspersed bluebirds against the color of the cedar brush.

Marla says of this painting:

This painting is one that came to me after driving home after a Deer dance in Mesita.  All these bluebirds were flying around. I was thinking..there’s a pretty blue bird…and another..and another.  It was a moment of peacefulness away from my studio and it showed what nature can inspire.  I saw inspiration simply fluttering around me.

As for her painting in general, she says:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.  She was also the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 3,100.00
Allison, Marla – “Laguna Strong” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. She lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Laguna Strong“.  The imagery is inspired by historic photos of the women of Laguna pueblo. The colors from the pottery and they are combined in Marla’s unique painting style

Marla says of this painting:

The painting is exactly what is in the tile.  There are some very strong women in the pueblo not only now, but especially in the past.  There was the strength to be gained in the old days and this painting is a away for me to pay homage to those who came before us.  If you look closely, you can see that she has a slight smirk, there is an underlying happiness within her strength.

As for her painting in general, she says:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

Allison began her expression through art in her youth and gained formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.  She was also the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

$ 2,300.00
Vigil, Phillip – “Blue River” Original Acrylic on Canvas

Phillip Vigil is one of the exciting, young native painters working today.  His modernist designs are a play on his life, culture and personal experiences.  Phillip has primarily been working on paper, but the transition to canvas has been an exciting change in his art. In a 2011 “Rethinking Contemporary Native American Art” article in “THE” magazine, they included Vigil saying,  “Phillip Vigil seeks his identity as a contemporary creative type who is also an indigenous person.  He is self-taught, inspired to paint by his love of the comic strip Calvin & Hobbes”.

This painting, “Blue River”, is a large-scale piece painted on canvas.  Phillip said of this piece:

“I think of this painting as a metaphor for life.  Just as no river ever really flows in a straight line, neither do our lives.  The big blue streak of color is representational of the, ‘curving river’ and the way things always unexpectedly ‘pop-up’ in life to challenge us and change our direction.

The other elements of the painting, the splashes, marks, lines and drips, each of these speaks to the unexpected.  They are metaphors for our lives which rarely follow an imposed path no matter how hard we try to control events, people or the world around us.  Each day is like the paint, it will drip and splash around us and choose its own path.”

We are pleased to represent his paintings in our Scottsdale gallery and look for more from this amazing artist!

$ 3,500.00
Allison, Marla – “Shawls and Pottery” Original Acrylic

Marla Allison is a member of Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. Marla lives and makes art from her home studio where she finds comfort and inspiration by connecting with family, tradition, and being close to her community. Marla is a contemporary Native artist whose primary medium is painting.

Marla began her expression through art in her youth and gained formal education at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, NM where she obtained an Associates Degree in three-dimensional art. Since graduating from IAIA, Marla has exhibited artwork at the Heard Museum Indian Fair and Market, the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the Smithsonian Native Art Market in New York. Permanent collections with Marla’s work are found in, The Heard Museum Permanent Collection (Phoenix, AZ), The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (Santa Fe, NM), The Red Cloud Indian School Collections (Pine Ridge, SD) and various private collections around the country and also Rome, Italy.

She was the 2010 recipient of the Eric and Barbara Dobkin Native Woman’s Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM.

Marla says of her painting:

“I am from Laguna Pueblo so I paint Laguna Pueblo. I paint and create for Laguna history to be great and remembered. I paint because I was passed down a gift from my grandfathers; I paint to continue what they started. I began with simple works of loose brush strokes, slight symbols of pottery design, and shapes taught to me in my youth. I researched the artists that I found powerful and connected what they did with what I do. From study and admiration, I found that I had something all my own.  Most of my influence is from pottery design of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi Pueblo. I have also found much influence by the cubism of Pablo Picasso and squares of Paul Klee. I don’t stick with one certain style but it is all my own, that’s what makes it mine. With the use of pottery design, I have painted landscapes that have design on them symbolizing where the clay that holds these designs comes from. I have painted mosaic paintings that are broken up squares and by taking these paintings apart with the image, the viewer is forced to visually put them back together as a way of putting themselves and their past into it in the process.  I paint so I remember where I came from. I paint so others can remember where I come from. I paint to be remembered.”

This painting by Marla is entitled, “Shawls and Pottery (Going to see Charles)“.  Ok, how you can you not LOVE the tile!  The painting utilizes what we love about her work:  a vibrant color scheme and Pueblo graphics.  It is a subtle but striking piece and a reflection of why she has become such an important name in contemporary Native painting!

$ 3,400.00
Vigil, Phillip – “Untitled No. 1″ Original Acrylic on Canvas – 61″ X 54”

Phillip Vigil is one of the exciting, young native painters working today.  His modernist designs are a play on his life, culture and personal experiences.  Phillip has primarily been working on paper, but the transition to canvas has been an exciting change in his art. In a 2011 “Rethinking Contemporary Native American Art” article in “THE” magazine, they included Vigil saying,  “Phillip Vigil seeks his identity as a contemporary creative type who is also an indigenous person.  He is self-taught, inspired to paint by his love of the comic strip Calvin & Hobbes”.

This painting, “Untitled, No. 1”, is a large scale piece painted on canvas.  This painting shows his first step in returning to canvas and doing it in a BIG way!  Phillip said of this piece:

“This painting represents my return to painting on canvas.  It is the largest of my first four recent canvas works. While I’m primarily known for works on paper, returning to the canvas has been a seamless process.  The larger expanse of space available to paint has ushered in a new perspective for me.  I no longer feel contained by the limits of the paper size and it is quite freeing.

“This painting is about life and my life, in particular.  These are internal landscapes I have created, which stretch back to my childhood and beyond.  The hand coming down from the left corner is picking up the marbles or gum ball drops.  The rest of the painting is in motion.  This is a metaphor for how life flows around us all at the same time.”

We are pleased to represent his paintings in our Scottsdale gallery and look for more from this amazing artist!

$ 4,800.00
Vigil, Phillip – “Sunset” Original Acrylic on Canvas – 54″ X 28″

Phillip Vigil is one of the exciting, young native painters working today.  His modernist designs are a play on his life, culture and personal experiences.  Phillip has primarily been working on paper, but the transition to canvas has been an exciting change in his art.  In a 2011 “Rethinking Contemporary Native American Art” article in “THE” magazine, they included Vigil saying,  “Phillip Vigil seeks his identity as a contemporary creative type who is also an indigenous person.  He is self-taught, inspired to paint by his love of the comic strip Calvin & Hobbes”.

This painting, “Sunset”, is a visually stunning use of color and design to reveal his experiences.  Phillip said of this piece:

“This painting, “Sunset” is a representation of the spectacular and visually varied event which is each sunset here in the high desert.  The light, the shape of the clouds and the quickly changing colors are stunning.  They amaze and inspire me.  Where I live in Jemez Pueblo, just south of the main village, the light pollution is limited and just as the sun sets, the first stars come out.  For most people this remarkable visual experience is something taken for granted.  For me, when I look up and see the sunset and then the first light of the stars in the darkening sky, I can’t help but think, ‘what more inspiration does one need’”.

 

We are pleased to represent his paintings in our Scottsdale gallery and look for more from this amazing artist!

$ 2,500.00
Vigil, Phillip – “Rain” Original Acrylic on Canvas – 46″ X 55″

Phillip Vigil is one of the exciting, young native painters working today.  His modernist designs are a play on his life, culture and personal experiences.  Phillip has primarily been working on paper, but the transition to canvas has been an exciting change in his art.  In a 2011 “Rethinking Contemporary Native American Art” article in “THE” magazine, they included Vigil saying,  “Phillip Vigil seeks his identity as a contemporary creative type who is also an indigenous person.  He is self-taught, inspired to paint by his love of the comic strip Calvin & Hobbes”.

This painting, “Rain”, is a large scale piece painted on canvas.  Phillip said of this piece:

“’Rain’ is about the rains which come during the monsoons throughout our southwestern summers.  The big thunder clouds build up in the distance and the you can see the rain flowing downward from them.  I currently live in Jemez Pueblo and here, rain is our everything.  It sustains our people or grows the chili or corn which are part of my daily life.

The recent droughts have put a strain on Pueblo life and has caused me to reflect on the importance of water to me, the pueblo and our culture.  The cleansing, sustaining rains which come each summer remind me that Water is Life.”

We are pleased to represent his paintings in our Scottsdale gallery and look for more from this amazing artist!

$ 3,500.00
Da, Jarrod – “Red Hybird Bee III” Original Pastel

Jarrod Da has created a distinctive style of painting using pastels for his work. Each piece is hand painted and it is amazing how much detail he is able to achieve in each piece!  His new work is a blend of contemporary themes with San Ildefonso and Pueblo imagery.  This piece is entitled, “Red Hybrid Bee III”.  The painting has two bees painted in red and black with Pueblo designs on the wings . They are flying near pueblo painted flowers and with interspersed geometric shapes.  Jarrod wrote of this piece:

Red Hybrid Bee III was created pondering the modern effect we have on honeybees. This is three of a series of mixed media pieces. The design work is influenced through a mix of traditional San Ildefonso Pueblo design and modern deco influences. The fine detail work is done in India ink. This piece is my ode to saving the honeybee and realizing the crucial role they play in this giant organism we call earth.”

The painting is subtle in color but complex in design.  It comes in a black frame and matted. It is signed, “DA 17”.

$ 500.00
Browning, Ashley – “NDN-opoly” Digital Photograph

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment or life in contemporary Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called “NDN-opoly”.  Ashley writes of this piece, “It is a hand drawn illustration of a Native American Monopoly. It represents Pueblos (the Man on the top and the Pueblo homes), Navajos (the man in the middle holding the sheep and fry bread), and Plains Indian (the tee pees). I think this is such a cool idea they should make an actual game!”.  The first in this series won a Second Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2015. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “NDN iPhone” Digital Photograph

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment or life in contemporary Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called, “NDN iPhone”.  The hand model is Shaandiin Tome.  Ashley says of this piece, “It has hand drawn icons that are a Native version of iPhone apps, it is placed that are set on top of Montana Tee Pees.  So cool, it should be made into an actual apps.”  Take a closer look a few of the apps, as they certain capture the life of many Native artists.  Ashley certainly has an extraordinary sense of cultural critique in her artwork.  The first in this series won a Second Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2015. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “Generation Hands” Digital Photograph

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment or life in contemporary Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called, “Generation Hands”.  It is certainly one of the most powerful of her digital photos.  Ashley says, “The models are  (Top to bottom) Samantha Whitegeese, Mindy Little Yellow Bird, Tina Whitegeese, Michele Tapia Browning and Lu Ann Tafoya.  It is a portrait of four generations of strong women, a Student, a disabled woodworker, a corporate person, an artist and a potter. On their arms is the tewa words that represents their relations to me. So it goes from top to bottom: younger relation (no real tewa word for cousin), relation (no real tewa word for sister), aunt, mother and grandma.”  The original photo was taken and then overlayed with the words in Tewa.   The first in this series won a FirstSecond Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2014. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “Paper Doll” Digital Photo

Ashley Browning uses her photographic and innovative graphic skills to create her unique digital photo compositions. This piece is entitled, “Paper Doll” and utilized Leslie Browning Tafoya as the model.  Ashley says of this piece, “After playing with paper dolls as a child, I always wanted to play with a pueblo paper doll, especially a paper doll from my pueblo of Santa Clara. I inspired it from the summer side, where there is a mix of different style and colors.”  The piece is creative with the various traditional clothes from Santa Clara. She ended up dressing the model three different times for the clothing ‘options’.  Native People’s Magazine wrote about Ashely and this piece,

 “I like to make people feel, to remember something—experience something meaningful,” says Ashley Browning, 21, of Pojoaque and Santa Clara pueblos in New Mexico. In 2013 she won first prize at Indian Market for best computer-generated graphics with her “real-life” paper doll, which featured a digitally altered photo of her model with interchangeable traditional and contemporary attire. With it, Browning used the digital present to evoke memories of the previous generation’s analog world.”

The first piece in this series won first place ribbon at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2013.  It is an edition of 10 and framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Browning, Ashley – “Juxtaposition” Digital Photo

Ashley Browning creatively uses her photographic and graphic skills to create imagery that captures a moment in Pueblo culture.  This digital photo is called, “Juxaposition”.  The model is Samatha Whitegeese (a daughter of Daryl Whitegeese).  Ashley says of this piece, “This photo is about young woman who is balancing her contemporary lifestyle and her traditional pueblo life. It is an everyday challenge that almost every young person deals with while going to school and participating in traditions.”  She took multiple photos of Samantha and combined them together to create this image.  The first in this series won a First Place at Santa Fe Indian Market in 2013. There are 10 pieces in the edition and it is framed in a black frame.

$ 325.00
Sense, Sarah – “Weaving Water 25” Woven Photographs

Sarah Sense is one of the phenomenal innovators in American Indian art.  This piece is entitled, “Weaving Water 25″ and it combines archival woven photographs and bamboo paper.  The photography of the setting sun combined with water is beautiful.  However, it is the open part of the basketry weaving which makes it so visually dynamic!  Somehow the movement of the water, the sky and the basketry all seems harmonious.  Sara uses her own photography as the basis for her “woven” paintings.  The designs in the weaving are all inspired by the basketry of her Chitimacha Tribal background.  In her desire to use the basketry imagery in her work she contacted tribal leaders, concerned about them being used in a flat “painting” as opposed to a three-dimensional basket.  With their permission she has created a dynamic art career.

$ 1,800.00
Sense, Sarah – “Weaving Water 23” Woven Photographs

Sarah Sense is one of the phenomenal innovators in American Indian art. In short she uses her own photography as the basis for her “woven” paintings.  The designs in the weaving are all inspired by the basketry of her Chitimacha Tribal background.  In her desire to use the basketry imagery in her work she contacted tribal leaders, concerned about them being used in a flat “painting” as opposed to a three-dimensional basket.  With their permission she has created a dynamic art career.  This piece combines archival woven photographs and bamboo paper.  It is part of her series entitled, “Weaving Water” and this one is “Weaving Water 23“.  Each piece is original and this one has a dynamic sense of the setting sun, the water and basketry designs, each blended in a harmonious appearance.  Certainly an exceptional new direction in her work!

$ 1,800.00
Sense, Sarah – “Weaving Water 13” Woven Photographs

Sarah Sense is one of the phenomenal innovators in American Indian art. In short she uses her own photography as the basis for her “woven” paintings.  The designs in the weaving are all inspired by the basketry of her Chitimacha Tribal background.  In her desire to use the basketry imagery in her work she contacted tribal leaders, concerned about them being used in a flat “painting” as opposed to a three-dimensional basket.  With their permission she has created a dynamic art career.  This piece combines archival woven photographs and bamboo paper.  It is part of her series entitled, “Weaving Water” and this one is “Weaving Water 13”.  Each piece is original and this one has a dynamic sense of the sky, water and basketry designs, each blended in a harmonious appearance.  Certainly an exceptional new direction in her work!

$ 1,800.00
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